Transferring our 2 1/2 year old to a gluten and dairy free diet

Heather - posted on 03/04/2014 ( 5 moms have responded )

4

0

0

Our daughter has had many dairy issues since we switched her over to whole milk at one year of age. (I nursed her for her first year and she had no problems). We've had chronic constipation issues with her as well as when she tries to poop she tries so hard she throws up. She currently takes Miralax (as that seems to be the only thing that works for her). She has been on Lactaid milk as well as soymilk, now we are on the Rice Dream Vanilla Milk. We are currently working with a specialist who recommended that we get her into GFDF diet. Prior to going into gluten free, we did try dairy free with her for a month and noticed a big difference. Adding gluten free into it is making it a bit more tricky. I'm looking for tips/tricks to get her to eat, as she is a picky eater. I'd love to get her off the Miralax permanently and not have her have any problems with pooping, as we are also trying potty training, but that isn't going well!! Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

5 Comments

View replies by

Livia - posted on 03/08/2014

96

0

41

I'm going to send u some recipes for some good stuff to make as well just give me a day or too :)

Heather - posted on 03/07/2014

4

0

0

No problem, but thanks for the info on the gluten free stuff-I appreciate it : )

Livia - posted on 03/04/2014

96

0

41

Busy toddlers burn lots of calories. A child that is not gaining weight steadily can be in danger of not meeting their nutritional needs. This is the reason for your physician's concern.

Getting your little one to eat more is likely to be very difficult. Therefore, making each mouthful have the greatest caloric impact is the most likely to add those needed ounces.

Here are some strategies for adding calories.

Add 1 or 2 tablespoons of nonfat dry milk powder to casseroles, muffins, cooked cereal, pancakes, puddings, mashed potatoes scrambled eggs, meatloaf, whole milk, milkshakes, yogurt, and even her formula.

Add a powdered breakfast drink (such as Instant Breakfast®) to:milk, milkshakes, smoothies, or ice cream.

Add extra margarine or butter to: cooked cereal, rice, pasta dishes, sandwiches, potatoes, and vegetables.

Add cheese to: casseroles, meatloaf, crackers, sandwiches, hamburgers, soups, mashed potatoes, and vegetables.

Spread cream cheese or peanut butter (watch for allergies) on: crackers, muffins, fruit slices, pancakes, graham crackers, and pretzels.

Include supplements, such as:Boost® Pediasure®, Carnation Instant Sport shakes® & Breakfast®, and Yo-J®.

For extra protein, offer more of these foods: eggs, milk, cheese, peanut butter, cottage cheese, puddings, legumes, ricotta cheese, meats, & yogurt.

These strategies are recommended by dieticians. You may even want to ask your physician for a referral for a dietary consult with a dietician that can help you with a very specific plan for your child.

Livia - posted on 03/04/2014

96

0

41

Grocery stores now have full aisles of gluten free products which is great and all of the product manufacturers are realizing that the gluten free diet is here to stay so they are making a lot of there foods gluten free now. There is a site delish.com that has some good recipes and kraftfoods.com has some also pintrest of all places has A LOT and they are awesome! Take a look at the ones on pintrest and let me know what you think. ellen0115@aol.com good luck!!!!

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms