Translations from English to English, please any U.K. moms help us U.S. moms!

Christy - posted on 12/21/2010 ( 23 moms have responded )

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I know most of what the England version of English(terms like nappy and mum) means but can any of you UK moms clarify some more words for us U.S moms (or other moms) if you know the proper translation? Words used frequently on Circle of Moms. Thanks! :)

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Sarah - posted on 12/22/2010

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Our schools are primary (which is infant and juniors) and secondary. Infants are usually from around ages 5-7, depending on which county you are in. Some will start children as young as three. Juniors is usually aged 7-11, and secondary is 11-16 or 18 depending on the state. College is usually for 16-18 year old, and then university for degrees.

Sarah

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Renae, Like you I'm Australian, but I don't see the need to use the US terms when posting on CoM, and I'm a bit puzzled as to why you do. I'm sure they can work it out, and if they don't, they'll ask, like Christy has done.
This is an international community, so I'll keep using the Aussie versions. Not having a go at anyone!

Sarah - posted on 12/23/2010

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Hi Jackie. Yes colleges are for students wanting to learn anything from car mechanics, to brick laying, to A levels (which are the exams you need to go on to university) to child care, hairdressing, beauty therapy. They are basically to help you learn your trade, or continue your education. A lot of schools have a 'sixth from', which is for 16-18 year olds, but they really just teach A levels. Is there such a thing in the US? What would children who do not want to get a degree do at 16?

Jodi - posted on 12/23/2010

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In Canberra, they call it college for Year 11 & 12 (at least, they do at the public schools, but not the private). Go figure. I've lived here for 11 years, and I STILL can't get used to calling it college. In the public system, they go to a different school for 11 &12, so that's why they don't call it High School.

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SHARIFAH NORJANNAH - posted on 12/29/2010

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As a Singaporean, I understand what you meant completely! although the standard of spoken English here is good, but amongst us Singaporean, we do have our own version of English which is known as Singlish, for example we just don't simply say 'no', we say 'no lah'! unique is'nt it?!

SHARIFAH NORJANNAH - posted on 12/29/2010

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hee...hee....that's funny! but frankly speaking I am more worried about understanding the abbreviations/acronyms used by teenagers these days! I have two teenage sons and sometime they use these terms when communicating with their friends on line. OMG! I just don't get it!

Renae - posted on 12/28/2010

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Just thought of another: "fanny"

I remembered a thread I got highly confused reading because they kept saying fanny and it didn't make sense, until I remembered it means something different to you! lol

Renae - posted on 12/28/2010

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Kathy - because I got tired of explaining what a "nappy" or a "dummy" was! I figured it was just easier to jump on the band wagon and save myself an additional explanatory post. LOL. Plus every time I see someone use the word "dummy", it is followed by 5 posts asking what it is. I also tend to use whatever language the OP used, so that they can understand, so if an Aussie started the convo I would talk normally. :)

Lissa - posted on 12/28/2010

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I live in Scotland, every 50 miles people speak completely differently and use different words for things. Dialects are fantastic, they are your heritage and culture. Whether it's bairn (child) Dreich (overcast and drizzly skies), blethering (talking), Piece (sandwich), Rammy (a fight) and my favourite Booroch ( I actually don't know how to spell it but it means great big mess)
I would never write these words but I do use them in everyday language.

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I like learning about the dialects! And of course, we all know the Yanks can't spell! (just joking guys!)

SHARIFAH NORJANNAH - posted on 12/27/2010

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100% agreed, Kathy! I think it is just the 'dialect' thing...and this is interesting!

SHARIFAH NORJANNAH - posted on 12/23/2010

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My suggestion is always have an American dictionary and a British version at home for reference, just like me!

Jackie - posted on 12/23/2010

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Usually high school goes up to age 17-18ish. (grades 9-12). If you are not interested in getting a degree in college, you can go to a trade school for mechanics, childcare, ect... but you can also take a class for your trade while still in high school as an elective. We have schools specifically for trades.

So yes, Renae, what we would consider college, you refer to as Uni, I guess.

Gina - posted on 12/23/2010

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In Canada our children start school at age 5yrs. We have Elementary school which is grades K -- 5 (K >Kindergarten), Middle school grades 6 --8 and High school grades 9 -- 12. Then off to College for a trade or University for a degree depending on what the student wants to go into. We use both UK and US terms in our everyday language.

Renae - posted on 12/23/2010

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Yeah, I always thought US College was equivalent to our University, as in, I thought you got a degree at College. Huh interesting.

I just came across another one. We say shopping "trolley", they say "cart".

Jackie - posted on 12/22/2010

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Really Sarah? So College for you would be like 11-12 grade here (US) aka Junior and Senior year in High School. Hmmm, interesting. I would have never known that

Renae - posted on 12/21/2010

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I'm in Australia and we use the same terms as England - but when I'm posting on CoM I say "diaper", "paci", "crib", "mom".

I think the biggest one for me to get used to was "spank". To me "spank" means to smack repeatedly "you'll get a spanking" means you will be put over my knee and have your bottom slapped half a dozen times. But often posters on CoM from US say "spank" when all they mean a single tap on the hand.

Jodi - posted on 12/21/2010

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I'm not British, I'm an Aussie, but we do the nappy and mum thing too.
Dummy - pacifier.
Pram -stroller.
Cot - crib
Smack - spank
That's all I can think of off the top of my head.

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