WHAT ADVICE CAN HELP ME

Aly - posted on 12/29/2010 ( 23 moms have responded )

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I breast fed the first 2 weeks then my son stopped latching after 5 lactation appointments, so we began using formula as a supplement. Then became solely upon formula from enfamil premium, gentlease, to soy. My son is 4 months and I am still producing small amounts of milk when I squeeze my nipples, not enough to nourish my baby fully. I was wondering if I would buy a pump and pump continuously if I would build up enough to fully feed him, or would I be wasting money and time?

Thank you and God Bless

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Sherri - posted on 12/30/2010

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Noel you just have to be very careful with you wording because although you were trying to help the OP, you came across very judgmental and offensive to those who formula feed.

Michelle - posted on 12/30/2010

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Hmmm I guess that means all of us moms out there whos baby was allergic to breast milk are going to have asthmatic cancer filled children.....I am so glad that because my child cant tolerate my breastmilk, I have failed to make a commitment and be super mom.

Trina - posted on 12/29/2010

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Milk is created on a supply and demand basis. If you contiune to pump on a regular basis your milk will produce.

[deleted account]

Aly, have you offered your breast to your baby? He might be interest in sucking from you, and that would help build up your supply too. I would suggest trying to feed him from the breast BEFORE he's had his formula, before his appetite has gone.
If you've had problems with a corect latch, this video might help:

I don't think it would be a waste of money to buy a pump. With a combination of breastfeeding and pumping you should certainly be able to increase your supply. It might take some time, so I wouldn't be ditching the formula yet.

Good luck.

Momma - posted on 12/29/2010

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That works for some women. I honestly didn't try it so I don't know. For me stopping was because I was producing bloody milk. My daughter was in the NICU so I was able to see it. So anyway, I had to quit all together and go to formula. In my opinion, nothing is wasting money if it means doing something good and/or necessary for your baby. I say go for it. Plus, some places will even let you return a pump. Kinda sick I know but I think you have a year to return. Also, some hospitals rent them kinda cheaply, mine did.

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Danielle - posted on 12/30/2010

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If you cant build your milk yourself, there is a tea my midwife had me get when i had my daughter called mothers milk tea, and a supplement called More Milk Plus by mother love. I got them at whole foods. They worked well, and we've been going strong for 6 months! hope this helps!!

Callie - posted on 12/30/2010

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Aly like some of the other pp have said nursing your baby would increase your supply faster than pumping. A baby is much more efficient than any pump. But a good quality pump can help as well. I used a medela handpump at the beginning but I eventually got a mechanical medela pump. And I have to say I wish I would have had it all along. Some may not like this but I bought my pump from craigslist. I bought all new tubes and shields for it so it would be sterile (was told this was ok). The only thing I used was the motor. Also to increase your supply you could try taking fenugreek. You should be able to find it in a health store. Good Luck.

Noel - posted on 12/30/2010

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Certainly not meaning to judge anyone else's choices, and the fact of the matter remains that pregnancy, motherhood, and all things encompassed become a very diverse experience for all involved. We all have to do what is best for us, and the choices, no matter what they are, never amount to being simple or easy. Mothers are the only ones that understand what all of this means, and we are all passionate about the choices we make, which I'm sure leads to many similar discussions. :)

Michelle - posted on 12/30/2010

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Sorry, just couldn't help myself. I will try:)

As far as the OP, the only problem I see with what you are wanting to do is the Soy formula your LO is already on. Is there a reason for the soy? If there is a milk allergy then it may be that in order for you to start BFing again you have to remove all milk products from your diet, until you are done BFing. Something to keep in mind and speak to your pedi. about at your next appointment. By all means I would try to BF again. I agree with another poster though, if you can rent a breast pump, that may be a better solution to see if you can start producing more milk. Breast pumps are not cheap and I would hate to say "go buy one" only for it to not work and then you wasted that money.

Sara - posted on 12/30/2010

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**MOD REMINDER**

This isn't a breast versus bottle debate ladies, so let's stay on topic and address the OP's question.

Sara B.
WTCOM Moderator

Noel - posted on 12/30/2010

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If your child is allergic to breast milk, then it really doesn't have anything to do with your ability to be this "supermom" does it? It was beyond your control, right? All of the sarcasm seems uneccesary here. I'm not trying to make something ugly about this subject, but the truth is the truth, and we all just have to do the best we can, right?

Sara - posted on 12/30/2010

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Sometimes you can rent pumps from the hospital. And they're good, high grade medical pumps. Maybe you could give that a try? It's not as much of an investment.

Carina - posted on 12/30/2010

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Hi ya Aly,
Everyone is unique... If you use a pump you will eventually get enough milk for your child... May not be enough for a regular drink - You could use it as a supplement... Give it a go - What have you got to loose?? it might be just what the doctor ordered... But do what you feel comfortable doing.... Merry Christmas & have a safe new year

Noel - posted on 12/30/2010

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The bottom line is that the milk that our bodies are designed to give our babies is far superior to anything that is artificicially manufactured by us, for reasons even far beyond simple nutrition and infant growth. It is important that people know that when trying to make a decision as to whether they should go to the trouble of one final attempt at building a milk supply back up. Breastfeeding is a difficult commitment. I have exclusively breastfed two children whild holding a full time job and a part time one as well. It was worth the trouble for me because of the myriad health benefits that exist. However, I am not judging anyone who is not able or willing to make a huge commitment like that. There are plenty of formula fed babies that are doing just fine, and no one should feel guilty for making that particular choice. I am only trying to bring to light the immense blessing this woman will be giving her baby if she is able to continue with breastfeeing. If is doesn't work out, she can rest in the knowledge that she did everything within her power to give her child a good start in life.

Noel - posted on 12/30/2010

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The health statistics in relation to breast fed babies vs non-breastfed are actually quite significant in regards to cancer, diabetes, asthma, general illness, and a whole host of other disorders. Anyone who just says, "oh yeah, formula is just as good" is mistaken. I think it's great that you are considering giving it one more good try!

September - posted on 12/30/2010

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Although you're not producing enough milk to nourish your child it's best to nurse rather than pump to increase your supply. So still offer the formula but nurse as often as possible as well. You could pump in addition. Good luck!



Edit to add: I'm not saying that pumping does not work, I pumped too however I noticed my supply increased tremendously by letting our son nurse as opposed to exclusively pumping.

Mary Renee - posted on 12/30/2010

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I would also encourage you to let the baby latch. There have been cases where mothers of adopted newborns have been able to breastfeed by letting the baby's sucking stimulate milk production even though they aren't the biological mother so I think it's entirely possible for you to build up enough milk. I would let the baby suckle while supplementing whatever he gets with formula until your breast are stimulated enough to produce enough milk.

Blessing - posted on 12/30/2010

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def not a waste of money. my little girl breastfeeds and i also pump. my advice if you do pump get a handpump not electric they are more effective in helping stimulate the breast

Johnsonfoye - posted on 12/30/2010

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I will appreciate if you mind the use of words and secondly, try to verify facts before making comments. It was her choice to make and not to force or prove to be the best. I would rather appreciate a healthy discussion that will provide the best solution or option for her to decide on. Thanks

[deleted account]

Johnsonfoye Foye - thats a load of rubbish! if it doesn't work out and she wants to formula feed her baby is at no greater cancer risk then a breast fed one

Johnsonfoye - posted on 12/30/2010

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Personally, i will encourage that you continue to give him your personally milk as long as possible. I was at a seminar recently and was told that research has shown that children who are not breast feed well at infant stand the risk for having cancer when they grow old, so i will advice you continue no matter the stress. It will worth the effort. Thanks

Amanda - posted on 12/29/2010

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I would def do it. I ended up pumping with my youngest because she only latched on for about 3 weeks and than refused and would take her bottle. So I bought a cheap little pump and pumped milk for her and would put it in her bottles. I did that for about 6mnths and than weaned her onto formula. I would say go for it! YOu have nothing to lose!

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