What are things I can do to help my son's speech develop?

Heather - posted on 05/23/2012 ( 53 moms have responded )

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He is two and not talking more then 15 words. I'm learning that I need to talk more and build a routine. What else can I do to help my son's speech develop?

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Jenn - posted on 05/23/2012

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Get him started with Early Intervention. My four year old was the same way. They set him up with speech therapy and then when he was three got him into a preschool that had a speech therapist come in.

Melissa - posted on 05/24/2012

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So much great advice. Like Rebecca Martinadale said, talk to you child about everything. "Look sweetie, Mommy is getting your cereal. Do you like cereal? Mommy likes cereal. Here's a spoon for your cereal. I'm going to pour milk in your cereal. Yum, I love cereal and milk." Okay, so that may be a bit exaggerated, but talk, talk, talk, talk talk. I know it may feel silly to just talk. People would look at me funny in the grocery store if dd would be on my back in a baby carrier and I'm telling her all about everything I was buying, "Mommy's buying grapes. You love green grapes so I'm going to buy green grapes." I may have looked like an idiot in the store, but she has a great vocabulary now (she's almost 3) and I know it's not just from reading, it's also from how much I talk to her and describe everything to her.

At our 18 month appt, if DD didn't have a vocabulary of 30 or more words, they would have referred us to early intervention, and like someone else mentioned, she had to have over 50 words and the ability to string words together by 2 or they would have referred her to early intervention.

Katie used the term "language explosion" for her 2 girls, and you may find your son will do the same thing, my dd has done that numerous times where suddenly out of the blue she seemed to have an increased vocabulary overnight, sort of like a growth spurt.

Christina - posted on 05/24/2012

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Hi Heather....I'm a speech-language pathologist with a background in early intervention. Like some others have said, I would recommend referring your child to your state's early intervention program. If you're not sure how to do it, ask your pediatrician or Google "early intervention" plus the state you live in. By age 2, your son should have at least 50 words and be stringing two words together. If he qualifies for early intervention, you can have an SLP come to your home (for little to no cost) and teach you ways to stimulate his language. It's also possible that he might be evaluated and found not to be eligible for services. In that case, you can ask for suggestions on how to work with him on your own, as well as local services that are available, such as playgroups, preschool programs, etc. You have nothing to lose! Good luck!

Dawn - posted on 05/24/2012

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When i took custody of my grandson at the age of 2 he didn't speak a word. I just spoke to him like an adult and like Elfrieda said made him tell me what he wanted instead of just giving it to him. He will be 3 in June and he now has a very large vocabulary and speaks very well.

Ellsje - posted on 05/23/2012

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Contact your local Early Intervention and have your child evaluated. It's possible he needs special help, and that's nothing to be ashamed of. This is a free resource in most states.

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Carlitta - posted on 09/17/2013

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What an inspiration to hear. My 22 month old son does not talk! I know that he understands what people are saying to him and around him but we can't get him to use not one word! I am obsessing on this. I have him enrolled in early intervention and he receives developmental and speech therapy. Both therapists comment on how well he does and how great his attention is. So I am baffled that he won't talk! I enjoyed reading your posts and I have hope for the future!

Tali - posted on 06/11/2012

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Hi, I have to agree with Abby.
I really believe in the Signing Time program and saw how it encouraged my own kids to speak and develop their communication.
I've written a bit about my experience with signing time on my blog
http://mygoinggreenblog.blogspot.co.il/2...
and also link to the signing time website.
Good luck and don't be discouraged, he's still young - plenty of time to catch up.

Alexandra - posted on 06/05/2012

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I have two toddlers ages 2yrs 11mths and a 1 yr 10mths (in other words they are 13 mths apart). They both have a speech delay and are currently receiving speech therapy. I started my son with the Regional Center at 16 months because he was not speaking at all. I have noticed a huge difference in his speech and language although he still has a speech delay it's not as severe as it was a yr ago and he is babbling more and trying to speak. One thing I have done with my son is to work on body parts with him and my daughter (since she too is in speech therapy). That has helped with his speech and I ask him questions even though he sometimes doesn't respond I respond for him and ask him to repeat what I say and say it slower and try to uncinate words. My daughter is more severe than my son was so I try harder with her although it seems as though she's lazier than my son was at her age. She rarely says mama or dada but does so when she's hurt or crying. She started therapy not too long ago and she's "opening up" so it's helping her too but I try to sty consistent on emphasizing words and actions so she can correlate the action and the sound. I wish you the best of luck. It'll get better.

Sangeeta Vasu - posted on 06/02/2012

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my daughter is 27 months old and she is not talking like other kids.. she says few words but she understands very well.. her attention to details is really good.i am worried abt this as people are keeping asking that why is she not talking yet. we read and sing and do everything normal parents do. what can i do ? :(

Katrina - posted on 05/31/2012

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If you have a tunnel put the child in the tunnel with the tunnel standing up then you put the stuff animal to your mouth then say the name of the animal dont worry if the child doesnt repeat then you put the stuff animal in the tube. If you have a excerise ball you can but your child on the ball put toys in front then roll the child forward when they grab something say the name of it.
Don't stress yourself or the child out make the games fun but if they lose interest dont worry.
A few minutes a day is enough of focus word play but you can also do it with out them notice like show on upload words like elmo jump, he is running, same thing goes for daily things just say them.
Hope this helps im doing all this with my two boys who are in speech therapy.

Danielle - posted on 05/29/2012

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First, try not to worry! My now 8 yr old son was like that. He said a few more words by then, but we'd hear him say something once, then never again. He's my 3rd & my 2 older daughters would speak for him. He was also aware of his speech problem, and wouldn't talk to many people, so even when he started speech therapy, we didn't see the difference as quickly as we did with my 2nd child. But my 2nd is a talker & would talk constantly, whether she was understood or not. It took a few months of speech before he would speak more at home. He finally started speaking a lot to everyone around 6, when he was comfortable that he could make himself be understood.

Signing will help him communicate & get his wants known. But be careful that you don't rely to heavily on the signing. A simple thing to do there is to make sure you speak while you sign, even if you know he understands the sign.

Good luck! Speech issues can be frustrating, but speech therapy can do wonders!

Heather - posted on 05/27/2012

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Thank you for all the help. He will start therapy soon, until then we are working on signing. Also I'm trying to remember to talk about everything and not talk for him.

Anna-Marie - posted on 05/26/2012

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When my oldest daughter was young, she too did not speak in words or sentences until age 3. She had a 4 words vocabulary of Mama, Daddy, baby, yes. While I was so worried, her doctor said I gave her everything without her speaking, so she saw no need to. But, when your child is pointing at the faucet and you know it is water she wants, you give it to her without going through a tantrum. When she finally started talking ab out age 3, she told us about all types of things that happened before that age! We had thought she didn't comprehend what was going on around her, but she did indeed. Don't know why she started talking and recalling issues that were several years in the past, but happy she did. We spent a lot of time with her, so it was not neglect. She went on to be an outstanding student and graduated from Univ. . of Michigan with honors and spent 5 summers at Notre Dame in continued studies. All the four children that followed her spoke at normal times and no apparent reluctance. That is the beauty of having more than one child ---- they learn from each other. Try not to worry as it will all come out fine in the end. No one ever asks you today "how old were you when you started talking?!!!!!"

Bridget - posted on 05/26/2012

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Practice making sounds or lip movements. "sssssssss" like in snake; ahhhhh, lips together for quick "p"sounds ppppppppp like in putt putt; take tongue and push against upper teeth like he's trying to push a bug off his teeth ... touch and blow; look in the mirror for him to see his face when he makes faces/sounds. Say "woah" like you're telling a horse to stop ... it's funny the shape the mouth makes when you say wa wa wa. I'm sure you can also look up on the internet speech games and ideas.

Pamela - posted on 05/26/2012

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STOP WORRYING!!!!! Take him to play with other children at parks, play groups. etc. Take him to visit with family, friends, neighbors so that he hears lots of conversation if you are, indeed, not a very talkative person yourself.

READ BOOKS to your child DAILY!!!!!!!!!! There are so many wonderful children's books today. Why are you not reading to him every night before he goes to sleep and during the day as a way of connecting emotionally, Spiritually, etc.? You d have to buy them! Go to the library and check them out. Most libraries allow up to 8 books at a time and usually for a 3 week period of time.

Just don't sit him in front of the TV! LOL!!!! The highest and best to you!

Bridget - posted on 05/26/2012

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Very normal for boys and some don't talk much until 3. In my grandson's case, it turned out that he needed tubes in his ears - he was only hearing in muffled sounds.

Gina - posted on 05/26/2012

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I like a lot of these ideas and thoughts. He might just be observing and gaining the confidence he needs before he tries it on his own. Of my five children, I have one son (now 23) who did just that. He went to a Motessori school where they observed this behavior (with reading) and explained it to me without any concern. He ended up being in the top 4% throughout his schooling and is a very confident person. He is an avid reader and loves to learn! Sometimes we get so set on the "norm" or "traditional" ways of doing things that we forget they are individuals! Good luck!

Julie - posted on 05/26/2012

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My son did not talk very much at age two. At two and a half I put him in tow half days of day care and he really started talking more. Now he has a younger sister and he's teaching her. I don't think I realized how little I was talking around him. He talks constantly to his sister. The only drawback with daycare is the exposure to germs and viruses.

Kathy - posted on 05/26/2012

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I would suggest socializing. mine was two and not talking much, but as soon as he started preschool the words came, slowly, but they came. he has great teachers that were very patient with him and knew he was 6mos. younger than the rest of his class.

I also kept it in perspective. He has only been alive on earth for two years and for maybe 6-10 of those months he wasn't aware he even had a tongue! You know how they slowly discover "oh, this thing is my hand and i'm the one moving it" Same thing with the tongue.

I too had him ask for something before I gave it too him, but if he just didn't feel like it, I didn't torture him over it. You want them to talk, but you don't want them to close you out...they're way too young to start doing that!

Debbie - posted on 05/25/2012

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My son was 18 months and not talking. It was weird because my older daughter was extremely verbal by one year. I complained to the pediatrician that he wasn't talking and always had a runny nose. She referred us to an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor that tested his hearing. He tested fine. We went back in six weeks and tested again. He tested poorly the second time. Due to the mucus and the poor hearing they put tubes in his ears. It was like someone flipped a switch. Immediately, he began repeating everything he heard. The difference was amazing. I felt awful that he had spent so much time not hearing clearly. He is 4 1/2 now and his speech is like his peers. I recommend having your son's hearing checked multiple times by an audiologist.

Amidy - posted on 05/25/2012

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Hello, I don't respond often, usually because someone else has already posted similarly to what I would have shared. The same has happened in this thread but, I wanted to word it the way it was worded so simply for me when my first child was born (I have 3 kids, 13 yr old boy, 12yr old girl, 6 yr old boy).

Narrate your day to him and he will learn to speak well.

It was a nurse in the hospital who gave me this advice. At first I was uncomfortable talking out loud to a day old baby. As time went by her words stuck with me and I stuck with the narrating. Soon it became second nature. That may be because I lived overseas (my husband is air force, we moved to England from the U.S. 4 months pregnant) and most of the time it was just me and the baby so, no one was around to hear.

I did this with all 3 kids. They're all very articulate and have reading and vocabulary scores way above grade level. I didn't do it in a goofy or exaggerated way nor, did I do it in a very adult and proper way. I just talked the way I normally did (I type more properly than I truly speak). Sooner than expected, I had a small person talking back to me.

I'm not saying don't to have him evaluated because I defiantly would but, if all is well, then just talk to him. Enjoy the baby stage, all too soon you'll want him to "Just stop talking and be quiet for two minutes!" ; ^)

All the best to you!

Jennifer - posted on 05/25/2012

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Everybody has made such great suggestions. I think Christina Cook's response is the one that hits home most with me. To give you some background, all 3 of my children have benefitted greatly from the early intervention program in our states (I use plural, because we've lived in 3 different states during this time). My oldest was born very premature (27 weeks, as opposed to 40 for full term-basically missing out on his entire 3rd trimester in-utero). He is now 6, and because of the wonderful early intervention specialists no one can tell, except when he's sick (respiratory issues). He actually reads slightly above grade level and enjoys learning. My 2nd had a great vocabulary, but spoke in a weird way, which made it difficult to understand. None of the speech therapists who evaluated him had ever heard a child speak like that. So, even though he didn't qualify due to his vocabulary, he received therapy through the program because the therapist was able to make a judgement call. My 3rd is just delayed for an unknown reason. My husband has always been concerned about the stigma attached to receiving therapy, but I believe it's better to get the therapy early on to prevent 1) the stigma potential of school-age therapy and 2) being teased later on for issues that could have been fixed before other kids would notice. The best thing about the program is that it's typically free. In all 3 states we never had to pay a dime--even though we have a decent income. Since it's run by the state, benefits vary though. Benefits can even vary by county (which is the situation now, for us). I would also highly recommend one of the other mom's advice to get his hearing checked. I've heard numerous stories of children's hearing blossoming after the parents discover issues with their ears (either needing tubes, or hearing aids). Good luck!

Becky - posted on 05/25/2012

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Have your child evaluated for speech therapy. It will really help. My daughter talks nonstop now and at 20 months, all she was doing was "mmm" for everything. While you are waiting for your 1st appointment, have you child communicate with you if he wants something. For example, if he wants you to open something, have him look at your mouth while you show him the "O" for open and have him try. It won't be the "O" sound, but at least he is trying to tell you what he wants. Don't give in unless he says something, even if it's just an "uh". Also show him some simple sign language, like "More" and "Help". Once he starts talking more, he will probably shy away from them. Good Luck!

Barbara - posted on 05/24/2012

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I used Baby Signs® with both of my boys with great success. I was so impressed with the program and the results that I took the time to learn a lot about it:
Baby Signs is the original sign language program for hearing babies! It's based on scientific research which proved that it actually helps with language development.
It takes a tremendous amount of fine motor skills and coordination for a child to be able to speak. We forget that they can comprehend so much before they're physically developed enough to be able to form words.
Teaching your child some basic signs - even at two years old - can help him communicate his needs, his wants, his thoughts and his feelings. This can help reduce frustration and even strengthen the bond between you!
Good luck to you.

Wendi - posted on 05/24/2012

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My grandson was like that....It ended up being his ears.so maybe you should have them checked also.He got tubes and could hear better and started saying more words.

Katy - posted on 05/24/2012

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I've found with both my girls (the youngest will be 2 in August) that they always had a "language explosion" after spending time in big groups. Whether it was with a playgroup, school, or just hanging out with the extended family. I think that it has really helped as both my girls have great language skills. I try to involve them with as many interactions as possible with kids or adults.

Katie - posted on 05/24/2012

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He might need speech my son had to have talk to your sons doctor about it my sons 10 now and has to have ot

Whitney - posted on 05/24/2012

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My daughter will be 2 in July and says about the same amount of words. She may be attempting to say more but they are unclear. She was also tongue tied until March. I'd talk to your pediatrician. They can can send a recommendations for speech therapy. I know I'm my area there are free programs for speech therapy. I use flash cards with my daughter as well. And reading to her is helping.

Heather - posted on 05/24/2012

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Read, read, read to him, lots, everyday, several times a day. Sing songs with him, the same 5 or 10, everyday. Other than that, TALK to him and with him. You would be surprised that having an actual conversation with him and talking TO him, instead of AT him will help. Because telling him NO all the time, doesn't help him to learn to talk.

Karen - posted on 05/24/2012

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Talking like an adult does not necessarily help. They may not be able to repeat the words that are spoken. You start off talking to them with one word sentences. When they point to something, label it "ball" and repeat the word a few times to them. Also, repeat everything they say back to you. If they want something to drink, don't deny them because they won't say the word, but do repeat what you would like them to say "cup, cup cup" or "more, more, more". You feel like an idiot talking to your child this way but trust me it WORKS. My little guy is 2yrs old and is in speach (early intervention is KEY!!). Already in 4 weeks I have heard him say a few new words and he is starting to repeat me. A lot of people will tell you not to worry, that he's to young, that he will pick it up eventually. Definately try to get early intervention. Don't feel bad about it, that's what it's there for.

Rebecca - posted on 05/24/2012

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My experience is that children will often regress in one area when they are moving forward in another area or making an adjustment to a different situation socially, physically, or emotionally. Reading to a child, talking to her/him are both good things. Most importanly, remember to enjoy your child. Too much worry and pressure will drive both of you crazy! My three are adults now, and each one developed at their own pace and style. Sometimes late talkers are methodical and wait until they can walk or talk almost perfectly before they bloom. As I mentioned earlier, my very late talker is now extremely articulate. When he was little, we had an old school doctor who encouraged me to give him time and have other kids around to play.If you do go the speech therapy route, most kids enjoy it if the therapist is good.

Cherry - posted on 05/24/2012

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Maybe try teaching him how to sign? Speech is one of many methods to communicate. The primary goal should be to encourage a child to start communicating with others around him -- and if speaking is not his first choice, then try signing.

If he starts signing, then you can respond by signing or speaking to him. After awhile maybe he might decide to use more verbal cues?

Dora - posted on 05/24/2012

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Reading is huge. I strongly recommend reading to him a lot. Also when your out and about explain to him what you both are looking at, talk about the weather, etc.... My son only had spoke 2 words until he turned 2yrs old. He didn't have any learning disabilities, its just the way he progressed. Kids learn at their own pace. Is your son's hearing fine? Does he understand you when you ask him something? The words he says, do they sound clear? If you answered yes to all of these questions chances are he is fine and just needs to go at his own pace. I'm not a specialist in any way, it's just what I have seen with my child and other children I know. Good luck :)

Rebecca - posted on 05/24/2012

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Have him evaluated by a neurologist and also get a speech evaluation, and start him in speech therapy. If there is something wrong, early intervention is key. Also, encourage sign language and singing while communicating.

Michelle - posted on 05/24/2012

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Follow the advice to be evaluated by a speech therapist. There is a difference between a delay and a disorder. A therapist can tell you what your child's situation is. If it is a delay then many of the suggestions given here are great and you could choose not to pursue therapy if you want to try some things on your own. However, a disorder is not likely to resolve without intervention.

Diane - posted on 05/24/2012

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Socialize your son. Getting him around other children around his age that are already speaking will help. Elfrieda's suggestion works, I did the same thing with all of my children.

Lianda - posted on 05/24/2012

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dont stress too much I was the same with my son remember hes only 2!! dont worry about it! you'll find he will just start picking things up really quickly when he is READY! read books, talk to him clearly all the time, listen to him, nursery rhymes etc all help. My son was 3 in Jan I was worried he wouldnt be ready for 3 year old kinder because of his talking but now its may he talks fine! of course there are still things I dont understand every now and then because his vocab is still growing! I wouldnt worry until he is closer to 4 (before kindergarten) and they will let you know if theres a problem! also maternal child health nurse would be a good place to go if your really worried apparently its not a hard thing to work on and there are plenty of things they can do to help good luck!

User - posted on 05/23/2012

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you should talk about,it to your sons pediatrist and tell her that you are concern about it and start looking for a speech therapist i have that situation with my son right now he is 3yrs old and he is far behind i was concerned because i couldnt,understended him anything when he was about 16 mo my pediatrician said not to worry now heis 3yrs and just starting sessions with the therapist and i should of done it a year ago because my son should be talkig,by now ....i sugesst to seek for help.

Rebecca - posted on 05/23/2012

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One of my children had only ten words until he was four. He then talked in complete sentences. As an adult, he has given many speeches and is one of the most articulate people I know. Every child is on their own schedule and has their own style of learning, don't get too worried about being on time as long as his or her hearing seems normal and he understands you.Being around other children can be a help.

Cecilia - posted on 05/23/2012

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My siblings call me a descriptive speaker, and I've found that to be true when I consider my son's vocabulary(he's 3). When he was younger and we would sit rolling a ball to each other, I'd say things like "Kriz, roll your blue ball to momma.", or "Go get your red car/truck/boat/plane.". Now he understand words like angry and apologize, though he's more apt to use the terms mad and sorry. Also, flash cards helped a lot. I purchased a set and also had a couple of apps on my Ipod Touch. His aunt was surprised the day she was babysitting and tried to skip over a crescent card. He told her "Titi(auntie), you forgot one, your forgot the crescent!" My niece just turned 2 in April, and my sister was concerned about a similar limit to her vocabulary. So, though she made fun of me for it before, she's trying to train herself into being more descriptive, and making my niece say things like juice please, instead of just pointing(much like another mom mentioned). Storytime is also a great way to introduce new words.These things will definitely help. Your child'll pick up whatever you say most often, something I was reminded of when I heard my son cussing -I'm cleaning up my sailor mouth ;). Best of luck!

Amy - posted on 05/23/2012

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I used simple signs for basic needs that she couldnt form a sound for… juice, milk please thank you more. If see threw a temper tantrum rather then signing or trying to talk I'd stop her and encourage her to properly ask. Don't stress though, every kid learns at their own pace, early intervention is key. My oldest, he is 7 and didn't really speak in full sentences until after 3. He is now caught up. My middle child has other delays and medical problems so she was naturally late. But my youngest is 27 months, she had her older brother and sister to keep up with and she spoke the earliest and can string simple sentences together. Reading to
Them, taking them to the grocery store pointing and saying words over and over, the simple things help them the most. One day when they're ready they'll start! But also let your pediatrican know so you can make sure there are no other concerns and they can let you know if speech therapy is available.

Jane - posted on 05/23/2012

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I used signing time too before I realised it was all not auslan (australian) and it's helped my daughter too she's 2 and has the vocabulary of a 4 year old!

Rebecca - posted on 05/23/2012

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Talk about everything. Even the things you might consider trivial. The first base for language is learning it from watching, hearing and then repeating. Don't just do something such as bathing, changing ect... talk about it. Use your words to describe what you are doing, why, how it makes you feel. Then ask questions about what you are doing, why, and how it makes your child feel. When you go for walks point things out, describe them and then reverse the conversation. Ask your child to find something interesting and tell you about it. I also find the best story books are the ones with elaborate, colorful photos that can be described rather than just reading the words on a page. It invokes thought and encourages language. Also talk to your child with words that are new and unfamiliar, and explain when you get a puzzled look with words your child already knows the meanings of the new words. My now 10yr. old was referred to the speech pathologist because he always took so long to respond. When she did the testing we were told that the reason he took so long was because his vocabulary was so expansive that he was processing to find the exact word to use in the correct context to make his point.

Brooke - posted on 05/23/2012

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What I recommend is setting aside time to read with your son...My youngest daughter was born with a cleft lip and open palate..and has had 2 surgeries..we were so worried her speech would be way worse, I truly believe reading to them helps big time...and while your reading help them sound out words through-out the book...make it fun like a game. :)

Katie - posted on 05/23/2012

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I had a similar issue with my daughter and she was so expressive, even without words, that we always knew what she wanted and answered her like she had spoken, long before she was supposed to talk and we just kept doing it.

In order to get her talking, we did like Elfrieda suggested but we also tried to find things that really interested her, like animals and music, and then asked her questions about it. If she didn't know the word she needed to say, we sounded it out with her, making her say each sound, and then made her say all the sounds together. It took a few attempts before she would pick up the words but it worked out alright.

We also made her ask for things other than just what she wanted. So if she was struggling to do something by herself and was getting frustrated, we would tell her she could say "help please" and we would help her, but only if she used her "big girl words". She usually thought for a second and then decided to talk rather than not do whatever it was she was doing. Or if she was trying to hand me something, I would make her say "hold please". That kind of thing.

Jane - posted on 05/23/2012

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Try baby sign it worked great for me and it really helped my daughters speech and quite. Q and we had alot less tantrums! If you're in America try signing time with Rachel Coleman!! I really really advise it

Meghan - posted on 05/23/2012

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Point to different things and ask what it is. Lots of praise when he gets it right. This helped quite a bit with my son, and now if he doesn't know what it is he'll ask, then repeat after me. Take time every day to talk with him. Sounds simple, and most people already think they do talk to their children, but instead of to, talk with him. Try a mini conversation. Might be hard at first, but as time goes on the speech will improve!

Dee - posted on 05/23/2012

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( he's only 2 i know so lots of time there) but one thing that can be avoided is to not speak for them when others talk to them, and let them answer on thier own. I found that when i was anxious because my daughter was shy, i would anser for her which made her even worse at speaking out because she knew i would do it for her. this made learning to be comfortable sharing her opinions and ideas more difficult for her when she grew up. ( hindsight may be useful after all when sharing ideas :)

User - posted on 05/23/2012

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Take a music class together! Then sing together in the car, at home, while walking, etc. Some kids find singing easier than talking.

Abby - posted on 05/23/2012

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My daughter had this issue. I was able to get a show called Signing Time which teaches sign language to children. She would sign the word and then say it as well. It really got her to start talking and now she won't shut up. LOL. Hope this helps.

Elfrieda - posted on 05/23/2012

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Get him to say what he wants before you give it to him, even if you know exactly what he's thinking. My friend told me that my son needed a little more frustration in his life, and it helped a bit to get him talking. (he has to say, "Cracker, please" instead of just pointing, for example)

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