What kind of dog is best?

Jennifer - posted on 02/24/2009 ( 40 moms have responded )

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My husband isn't too keen on the idea of getting a dog, but I think it would be really fun for my 1 yr old. (and for me ;) Does anyone know what breed of dog would be best for a one year old? And also any dog success stories might be helpful to try and convince my husband.

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Samantha - posted on 02/25/2009

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Does no one read the papers? Are you all so wrapped up in your lives that you cannot understand something that is blazingly simple?



 



CHILDREN AND DOGS DO NOT MIX



 



Dogs (all dogs) are pack animals. They respond to pack psychology. Children are the smallest members of the pack. If you (the adult alpha) disciplines a dog, then he will take his frustration and embarrassment out on the lowest member of the pack....your baby or small child. I am sick to death of hearing about children who have been mauled by dogs because their stupid, short sighted sub-intellegent owners do not understand that animals are not humans and do not behave as humans would. Dogs have no concept of mercy, of 'aww it's only a baby', their only concern is the welfare of the pack and their place within it. Dogs are wonderful companions, loyal friends and have been part of our culture for the past 10,000 years, but only to adults and children who are big enough to dominate them. I have owned dogs throughout my life and I care very much for their welfare. It disgusts me that people with no understanding of dog psychology can just purchase a dog for themselves without any concern for the welfare of the animal. When it all goes wrong and the dog behaves like a dog would, to stimulus that was orchestrated by the human, it is slaughtered for being what it is, an animal.



My advice is to buy a book on dog psychology. My next piece of advice is to shelve your plans for a dog until the child is old enough to understand and defend himself against his pack mate. If you really want to do this now, then more fool you and another dog will be destroyed because of the selfish stupidity of it's owner.

[deleted account]

I love dogs and when my daughter was born our Olde English Bulldogge, Lola (not the same as an English Bulldog) was almost 3 already and was used to being around newborns and younger kids.  We got this breed because we knew we were going to have a baby one day and through many months of research agreed that this was definitely the breed for us.  Our LO is now 17 mths and Lola is just fantastic with her BUT we do have to be careful because she is a powerful breed and easily excited so she has knocked baby a couple of times.  I grew up with dogs and I think it's a wonderful thing to have children grow up with pets....That said, I do believe that your baby is too young right now to have a new dog introduced into the home.  A new older dog can be unpredictable and a puppy can be a LOT of work and puppies tend to nip a lot and need A LOT of time, lots of training and patience.  I desperately urge you to NOT get one right now and to wait until your LO is at least 3, idealy closer to 5.  Dogs are a lot of work and need lots of attention, daily walks, grooming, etc.  If you can't devote your time to caring for a dog, which you probably can't right now, then PLEASE reconsider.  So many animals get tossed because their owners realize how much work and time it is and this is not fair to the animal.



A dog can and is fun BUT, like I said, it needs lots of training (we had a professional), patience, grooming, DAILY walks (just because the breed is small doesn't mean it doesn't need walking), socializing with other people and dogs. Don't forget the vet visits and vaccines AND sometimes the vet bills can pile up as well, as was our case (spent over $5000 for Lola because of some health issues).  You need to look at the big picture and then decide.  If you feel  it's still in the cards then research the breeds properly (dogbreedinfo.com) and make a CAREFUL decision.  Also, I highly suggest that you absolutely don't go to a pet shop as most dogs there come from kennels.  Research a breeder and take it from there.



Any dog deserves a forever home no matter what.



We would love to get another dog, and will eventually, but right now we have too much on our plate with our baby AND Lola.



Hope this helps.

Jessamine - posted on 02/26/2009

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I have been a dog person my whole life, currently we have three dogs in our family. I have had a collie, doberman/german shepard mutt 2x, a rotweiller, doberman pinscher, great dane, and a pitt bull. All of which have always done exceptionally well with children and adults. Yes, especially the bully breeds. Unfortunately the breed, not the owner gets the bad wrap. As long as the owner properly raises the dog, the experience will be life altering; in a good way.



First and foremost you (& family) should seriously weigh out the details to make sure that your ready for the dog, not the breed. Yes, breeds have different quirks but each dog has it's own characteristics and it is best to look at the situation as having another child. I say this because you will need to train the dog as you would have the same responsibility to rear a child, especially if you are recieving the dog as a puppy; and modify any issues with the dog if you recieve them at an older age from someone.



Not only does it become a financial burden; yearly vet visits, food, bedding, leashes, collars, bowls, toys, etc., but it is time consuming as well; training to walk with you vs. walking you, where to go potty, not to bite you/family/friends (biting is apart of the species for various reasons,) grooming (even short hairs need brushing), where to lay (furniture, no, no,) daily walks, etc. etc.



I am not trying to discurage you but 8x times out of 10 people over look these points because they get caught up in how cute or fun it would be and realize that their lifestyle can't raise a dog or that they're not as cute as when they got them as a puppy.



Trust me when I say a dog is a wonderful addition to a family, they will always love you unconditionally, will always help you realize that things are not as bad as we may think they are, appreciate the small things you do, and will contribute to longer life as a result.



So do as much research as possible on a breed but always keep in mind that it is another life you are taking on.

Kate CP - posted on 02/24/2009

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DO NOT GET A DOG FOR A ONE YEAR OLD CHILD. If you want a dog, get it for you NOT the baby. Key word: BABY. Never leave a child unattended with an animal for any length of time for any reason EVER.

I'm a professional obedience instructor and I have never seen this sort of scenario go very well. But, if you are going to get a dog for you (the adult) and you are willing to put in the time and effort, then the best type of dog for you is...the best type of dog for you! I personally love Alaskan (not Siberian [yes, there is a difference]) huskies. But, that's a lot of fur and maintenance for some people. Labs are usually good dogs, but a lot of them continue to act like puppies until they are close to three years old. Standard poodles are actually VERY intelligent animals and were originally used as hunting and retrieving dogs. My advice to you would be to look into adoption of an adult dog who has been "kid tested". Some dogs just do not do well with children and if you can pick the one that has had a good track record...that's a head start! Any dog you acquire should have all their shots on time and always ALWAYS be up to date on flea and tick preventative and wormings as small children are especially prone to infection. Go to training classes! It's tons of fun and it's a great way for you to bond with your new dog/puppy. And a neat tip: if you want a pure bred dog you can still look in the shelters. A lot of "pedigree" animals end up in shelters all around the country. And remember: save a life-spay and neuter your pets!!

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The breed of dog should be chosen more by how active you are as a family, how large the yard will be, how much exercise you are willing to give it EVERY DAY EVEN WHEN THE WEATHER IS INCLEMENT. Most breeds will be okay with children, but, DOGS AND CHILDREN SHOULD ALWAYS BE SUPERVISED BY YOU OR ANOTHER RESPONSIBLE ADULT. As I've posted elsewhere Jeze is a Schipperke, she loves children but I'd never leave her alone with kids. She's 11 and does have the normal aches and pains of aging, children no matter how old don't always understand that their pats, or grabs on an animal may cause pain, hence a growl or with a cat hissing and scratching. Dogs are not babysitters, they cannot speak, so their way of telling the child to stop is to growl, maybe even snap, if the child is causing them pain. Note I said snap not bite, quite often the action is more to tell the person not to do what they're doing; as I've said, dogs cannot speak, so its normal for them to growl etc, one only has to watch dogs or cats together to understand how they relate. To an animal your baby might be viewed as a 'pup' or a 'kitten' and treated accordingly, trouble is a baby's skin is a lot thinner than a baby animal's so the normal means that an animal would use (like picking their young up by the scruff of the neck in their mouths) would cause tearing and bleeding...not necessarily intentionally mauling the baby, but merely treating it as it would a pup or kitten. This is why its imperative to never ever leave an animal and a baby alone together. I know that Jeze becomes agitated when she's near a crying baby (or a child that screams at her), perhaps she's relating it to a pup in distress, and she's trying to help in her own way. I praise her when she comes up to me to help the infant...but I am never far away in any case.
I believe that it is important for a child to have at least one pet, and that the child or children should be taught how to relate to the pet, to understand its needs, and what can and cannot be done. My 3 year old grand daughter loves putting Jeze's lead on and walking her around the house or yard...Jeze likes it to a point, but she is getting old and I have to often tell Summer to slow down, or let Jeze rest a minute. So in short, pick a breed of dog that suits your lifestyle. If you have a large property and are active (meaning that you can adequately exercise your dog), then choose a dog that needs that activity (there is nothing more tragic or potentially destructive or dangerous than a bored, lonely dog). If you're more of a couch potato or have limited yard space perhaps it would be better to adopt a mature dog from a shelter (most determine the temperament of animals prior to putting them up for adoption), or a breed that is less active. Hope that helps.

Kathy - posted on 02/26/2009

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I have a seven year old son and ten month old we have a chihuaha. She is really good with the boys very protective

Betsy - posted on 02/26/2009

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I was'nt to keen on any kind of animal myself. Until my husband got a bull mastif. Best dog in the world, temper is very mellow. Big dog but they are great with children. Also very protective with their love ones. Our dog is a female named Laila. my grandaughter and neighbors kids jump and are very rough with her and she loves it, she has never snapped at them.

Betsy - posted on 02/26/2009

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I was'nt to keen on any kind of animal myself. Until my husband got a bull mastif. Best dog in the world, temper is very mellow. Big dog but they are great with children. Also very protective with their love ones. Our dog is a female named Laila. my grandaughter and neighbors kids jump and are very rough with her and she loves it, she has never snapped at them.

Theresa - posted on 02/26/2009

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I have shih tzu's they are great with kids, they do not shed and have to be groomed, everyone is going to give you a different answer, what I did was went online and checked out different dogs temperments and searched until I found the kind of dog I wanted, I do home daycare so I had to have a dog that was good with children, I now have 4 of them because they were so awesome I just couldn't help myself. I had them before I had my baby, and they do fine with her. I just watch her around them I don't like her to be to close to them because I don't her to pull there hair and hurt them and chance them nipping her which they never have but you never know because dogs are unpredicable. I would say do alot of research before you get one.Good luck!

Maria - posted on 02/25/2009

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I have 2 kids ages 4 and 11 1/2. I also have a bunch of Pitbulls, a Beagle and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. We show and breed also, so we are very involved in the dog community.

When my son was 4 I was looking for a dog. My then boyfriend (now my husband) suggested a Pitbull. I told him he was crazy...I had a kid after all. He laughed and told me to do my research. We were both in college together and were very competitive. I did my research and fell in love with the breed. My family was REALLY unsure. But they love my dogs now too.

When my son was 2 he got his head but open by a Lab/Golden retriever mix. The dog was his father's pet for many years and lived with his parents.

The BEST advice I can give is to figure out what size dog you want, what activity level you think you are going to be able to work with and narrow the list of possible breeds down that way.

In the end, there is no perfect breed. You MUST ABSOLUTELY evaluate each dog/puppy on it's own. Make sure the puppy isn't shy and is willing to come to you when you call it. If it runs away when you grab for it...DON'T pick that one. TEMPERAMENT is KEY!!

I also wouldn't suggest a small breed. They are easily injured. And bite more frequently according to bite statistics.

Once you get your puppy, be honest with yourself when evaluating it's behavior. Many times people make excuses for their pets' bad behaviors. If ignored these problems could become dangerous.

Dogs are pack animals, yes, but they can be a part of your pack.

Make sure you are a responsible owner and you'll be fine :)

I think someone else suggested the shelter as a place to find a dog. I am a breeder, but wholeheartedly agree. You can spend time with the dog and see if you like it's temperament. The dog will be spayed or neutered and up to date on all it's shots. A lot of times, breeders will tell a potential buyer whatever they want to hear to make the sell. It's disgusting and can be hard to know who to trust.

Here are some links for you:

American Temperament Test Society (they test dog's temperaments and report passing rates per breed. Of course these rates assess a small percentage of each breed out here, but the info is helpful) -- http://atts.org/

American Kennel Club -- www.akc.com

Also, there are rescue groups out there that have purebred dogs that need homes. These dogs have been evaluated too.

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me

Maria
mysohni@hotmail.com

Jaymie - posted on 02/25/2009

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We have a 4 1/2 yr old, a sixteen month old and one on the way and we have a yellow lab who is 1 1/2 years old and absolutely amazing with the kids. He gets his ears pulled, painted on, food taken out of his mouth, jumped and wrestled on and he has never, ever displayed anything but a loving nature. You do need to take them for lots of walks and runs outside though or else he will destroy your shoes, toys, basically anything on the floor! Good luck and have fun looking for a dog!

Joanne - posted on 02/25/2009

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hi we have a 4 yr old son who is very active,and has no sense of danger,we wanted a family dog which we knew would not turn on him,we opted for a labrador called toby,who we got when he was 6 mths old,1 yr on and they are best friends and i know toby would never turn on our son only protect him,because its not in a labradors nature to be vicious,but he does bark if theres a knock at the door,or some thing in the garden,letting us know he,s protecting his property and family,this is the best dog we could of chose due to his nature..hope this helps

Malinda - posted on 02/25/2009

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I agree with Kate, and feel that Samantha's post is somewhat ignorant of "dog psychology." Dogs also notice how the "Pack Leader" interacts with other members of the pack and often treat children as higher order members because of the way adults respond to every whim. Of course, this also depends on how well trained your dog is and whether or not you respond to the dog's every whim....



That said, of course it is always important to (and I think this bares repeating - a lot) *NEVER* *EVER* leave *ANY* breed of dog alone with a child. I also fully agree with the sentiment that one should never get a dog *for* a child.



I posted a while back a list of things to consider before getting any dog - including considering whether or not you will be able to properly care for, feed, and train a dog for the animal's entire life. It is also important to fully understand the breed (or breeds) of dog you are bringing into your home and what level/type of exercise and training that animal will need and make sure you're willing to and able to provide that. Also remember that if you want a puppy, it is like having a new baby in your house and they require a great deal of care and attention, which isn't always feasable with children in the house.



Others have recommended that you take quizzes and really research breeds before making a desicion and I agree - this isn't something that a message board should decide for you. I will also encourage you to find your dog, whatever the breed, through a Humane Society or rescue/adoption organization or at the very least a very reputable breeder. Please DO NOT go to a mall pet store or "backyard breeder."



As one breed for you to research and consider, we have two retired racing Greyhounds who do very well with our son. Greyhounds are a good breed with children and are also good for families who do not prefer large amounts of pet hair or drool, but want a larger dog. Contrary to popular belief, they do not tend to be high energy dogs and will not really play a lot of fetch. Their energy runs in spurts - they are sprinters, not marathon runners. So while they need a good walk and a lap or two around the back yard each day, they will spend most of their day (in general) lounging and being "40mph couch potatoes." They do not always train easy (for instance, sitting is a particular challenge for a Greyhound because of their body structure) and you are very unlikely to find a puppy. They are extremely gentle to humans, and those who have raced are very used to being handled and crated. However, some are not good with smaller dogs or cats (ours do fine with our cats, but not all do). There are lots of resources online and at the library that will tell you more about this breed and others.



Good luck, and please take this addition to your home very seriously!

Lesley - posted on 02/25/2009

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We have a Boston Terrier and had two when both our children were born.  I think when kids grow up with animals they learn how to respect them.  Our dogs were wonderful and are protectors.  Especially our female Boston she would go for any dog that went to close to our stroller.  Both dogs were wonderful. Unfortunately we lost our female just over a year ago, but we plan on getting another within the year.  Your kids and animals bond when brought up together.  Our five year old son feeds Duke his breakfast every morning.  It gives them a sense of responsibility. Hope this helps.



 



PS if you do a breeder make sure it is a reputable one, so you don't have a snappy dog.

Jennifer - posted on 02/25/2009

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Thanks for all the advise guys!  I know that I  have a LOT of thinking to do.  I want to make the most educated decision I can.  And yes...don't worry....obviously the dog would be for ME, not for the one year old.  Can you imagine?  "Noah.....go feed spot!" ha ha.  But my thought still stands...I DO think it would "be fun for the one year old" to play with....supervised! ;) 

Kate CP - posted on 02/25/2009

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Quoting Samantha:


... Dogs have no concept of mercy, of 'aww it's only a baby', their only concern is the welfare of the pack and their place within it.





In a way you are correct: dogs have no concept of mercy...they are dogs. However, all baby animals including humans have something in common: they LOOK like infants. That is an infant's only true safe guard against an adult of that species-they just don't know any better yet because they are still infants. Dogs react this way with their own litters all the time. A puppy can get away with something that no adult dog ever could.



 



Dogs and children can and do mix in the proper environment and with supervision. Children should be allowed to interact with animals but, once again, with SUPERVISION.  I should clarify what "supervision" really should mean: not that an adult happens to be in the same room as the child and animal, but is actively watching and guiding the interaction between the two. The adult should know and be away of any body language the dog or child may be giving to signal distress and act on it IMMEDIATELY. 



So, in conclusion, automatically jumping to the end result that no dog and no child should ever interact is not only unrealistic but can actually be detrimental to the development of a dog and/or a child. 

Marianne - posted on 02/25/2009

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We have a Ridgeback mix whom we got a year and a half before our daughter was born and he is wonderful with her, but like all the other advisors say you have to get one that suite you and the time you are willing to put into the relationship, because lets face it you are gaining another "child".

Jacqueline - posted on 02/25/2009

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I actually just bought a puppy for my 3 year old.  You want to go with a small dog for such a small person.  You dont want to go too big because you really dont want the dog to hurt your baby.  You could go to petfinders.com and adopt a small pet that is good with children and is already house trained.  That way you wouldnt have any accidents in the house and it might help your husband second guess the whole dog thing.  Hope that helps some.

[deleted account]

We have two Siberian Huskies and they are great with the baby.  If he cries they will make sure we know and they are very careful not to rough house around him.  But they do need a lot of room to run!  Ours love to find ways to escape, and we spend hours trying to catch them.  They will run and run and not look back!  And they need a lot of brushing if you plan on keeping one in the house because it will constantly shed if it's in a 70 degree house!  So I would advise getting a dog that required less time, especially since your husband already isn't too fond of the idea!

Elaine - posted on 02/25/2009

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I have had dogs my whole life and they are awesome..my girls are grown and they really loved them...With a young child though, I would definately recommend finding a dog that suits your lifestyle..I personally like the dog with less shedding hair because I don't want any other chores, but if you have someone to clean up after them, labs are amazing, the blue collie mixes are great too..very loyal. Good Luck..

Jen - posted on 02/25/2009

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A golden Retriever would be your best bet, imho. We got one when our youngest was 2, "Max" has been the greatest doggie addition to our family. We purchased him from a breeder, picked him out of 7 in the litter. He is the most loving, loyal, trustworthy dog. playful as all get out. He's 2.5 now, look into the breed!! :)

Crystal - posted on 02/25/2009

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Quoting Samantha:



Does no one read the papers? Are you all so wrapped up in your lives that you cannot understand something that is blazingly simple?






 






CHILDREN AND DOGS DO NOT MIX






 






Dogs (all dogs) are pack animals. They respond to pack psychology. Children are the smallest members of the pack. If you (the adult alpha) disciplines a dog, then he will take his frustration and embarrassment out on the lowest member of the pack....your baby or small child. I am sick to death of hearing about children who have been mauled by dogs because their stupid, short sighted sub-intellegent owners do not understand that animals are not humans and do not behave as humans would. Dogs have no concept of mercy, of 'aww it's only a baby', their only concern is the welfare of the pack and their place within it. Dogs are wonderful companions, loyal friends and have been part of our culture for the past 10,000 years, but only to adults and children who are big enough to dominate them. I have owned dogs throughout my life and I care very much for their welfare. It disgusts me that people with no understanding of dog psychology can just purchase a dog for themselves without any concern for the welfare of the animal. When it all goes wrong and the dog behaves like a dog would, to stimulus that was orchestrated by the human, it is slaughtered for being what it is, an animal.






My advice is to buy a book on dog psychology. My next piece of advice is to shelve your plans for a dog until the child is old enough to understand and defend himself against his pack mate. If you really want to do this now, then more fool you and another dog will be destroyed because of the selfish stupidity of it's owner.





wow, I understand having a strong opinion, but can't we do it without being so rude?? This is supposed to be a place for support and advice, not to be attacked over an inquiry!

Rebecca - posted on 02/25/2009

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we just got a puppy and my kids are 9 & 11. they are ALOT of work!!!! We got a nova scotia duck tolling retriever. Similar look to a Golden retriever but much smaller. Energetic and bright - go for a girl...boys pee on everything!

Wendy - posted on 02/25/2009

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Hi I would say a golden retriever.  We got ours when my son was 6 months and the too of them are the best of pals its too funny the dog just turned 1 and my son will be 1 in March.  They love each other and the dog is so good with my son. 



Hope that helps.

User - posted on 02/25/2009

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We used to have a purebred Boston Terrier.. he was awesome with kids and I used to take him to the daycare where I worked to visit the kids... Unfortunately he was killed while I was still pregnant.... we got a new dog - boston terrier crossed with jack russell, he is still good with the baby but pretty excitable.... just make sure that you don't leave the dog and baby alone together until both are a bit older... :)

[deleted account]

All puppies are a lot of work, make sure you plan on putting in the time and effort to train your dog properly. Maybe try contacted the trainer you plan on working with and see if he/she can suggest a dog based on your lifestyle. Also dogs are expensive, make sure you are emotionally, physically and financially ready for a dog.

PS CRATE TRAINING is wonderful and helpful, my dogs an I wouldn't have survived without it.

Dena - posted on 02/25/2009

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We got a dog when our son was 8 months. He was already 2 and very well trained. I have heard getting a puppy and a small child is sometimes not the best idea. Puppies like to chew and jump. Plus they need to be housebroken!  My best advice is to research your dog breeds. Don't get one that likes to run if you're a couch potato!  Golden retreivers and Labrador retrievers are still considered the best family dogs. There are plenty of breeds to choose from. We have a rottweiler/ lab mix. He's 137lbs and gentle as they come. He is great with our 4 year old and curious, but not overly so aboout our 2 month old.  He's a great pet!  We got him from a family looking for a home.  We met him first and it was love at first sight. He's a great addition and I know our boys love him!

Judy - posted on 02/25/2009

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Yes.... i am a nana to five children and run an in-home daycare. Look up the Wheaten Terrier.... They do not shed, are hypoallergenic and wonderful, wonderful, wonderful with children. My Annie, now 3, has never once even growled as the children rode her back. I can't say enough about her. I can be reached at Werb223@aol.com

Rachel - posted on 02/25/2009

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My husband and I just got a 8 week old yellow lab and he is awesome with our 1 year old. Before him we had a female chocolate lab and she was awesome with our daughter when she was really little. I would highly suggest a lab(female if at all possible)...they are a little less hyperactive!

Sarah - posted on 02/25/2009

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by the way, to the poster of this question, i have found that lab mixes are the best because they have the great temperament of a lab and you avoid the issues with inbreeding which is common in pure bred dogs.

Sarah - posted on 02/25/2009

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Quoting Samantha:



Does no one read the papers? Are you all so wrapped up in your lives that you cannot understand something that is blazingly simple?






 






CHILDREN AND DOGS DO NOT MIX






 






Dogs (all dogs) are pack animals. They respond to pack psychology. Children are the smallest members of the pack. If you (the adult alpha) disciplines a dog, then he will take his frustration and embarrassment out on the lowest member of the pack....your baby or small child. I am sick to death of hearing about children who have been mauled by dogs because their stupid, short sighted sub-intellegent owners do not understand that animals are not humans and do not behave as humans would. Dogs have no concept of mercy, of 'aww it's only a baby', their only concern is the welfare of the pack and their place within it. Dogs are wonderful companions, loyal friends and have been part of our culture for the past 10,000 years, but only to adults and children who are big enough to dominate them. I have owned dogs throughout my life and I care very much for their welfare. It disgusts me that people with no understanding of dog psychology can just purchase a dog for themselves without any concern for the welfare of the animal. When it all goes wrong and the dog behaves like a dog would, to stimulus that was orchestrated by the human, it is slaughtered for being what it is, an animal.






My advice is to buy a book on dog psychology. My next piece of advice is to shelve your plans for a dog until the child is old enough to understand and defend himself against his pack mate. If you really want to do this now, then more fool you and another dog will be destroyed because of the selfish stupidity of it's owner.






In reality dogs do show mercy and sympathy.  I have 3 dogs, 1 lab mix that is 90 lbs, another lab mix that is 40 lbs and a 12 lbs miniature pinscher and if my 3 month old is crying or fussing they are sitting right next to me waiting to give her a kiss.  That goes for anyone in my family, they can sense when we are upset even if we aren't crying or yelling and are right in our face trying to kiss us.

Suzanne - posted on 02/25/2009

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A Boxer, they love kids and might seem like a bigger dog but are very gentle, loving and very patient with children.

Nicola - posted on 02/24/2009

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I have a mastiff X, most people frown apon that with having two kids at home but I wouldn't have it any other way. My dog is so protective over me my kids and my husband that she would do what she could to make sure we were ok. Sometimes when my husband is away and some of our friends come over my dog will growl and let them know that dad is away so i'm incharge. It makes me feel safe having a rpotective dog around especially when my hubby is away quite often.

Stefanie - posted on 02/24/2009

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I agree with both Crystal and Pheonex, I have a 9month old son a 3yr old Bosten Terrier who is his best friend and loves him to death, a 7yr old Aussie mix who also does very well with my baby and I have a 7yr old 100lb chocolate lab who is the gentlest of the three. You just have to do your homework and be honest with yourself about what you are looking for. Also I have found that talking to breeders and a vet can also be very helpful. And depending on if you are set on getting a purebred or not the humane socity is a great place to start looking and thay have tons of helpful information.

Alana - posted on 02/24/2009

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hello jennifer, i can only give you my dog success stories as the choice of which breed to get will vary from family to family.

i personally have a 2 1/2 year old chocolate lab coco, and a two year old son brodie. brodie loves coco to death, always giving her cuddles and kisses, even tries to ride her like a horse sometimes. coco loves all this attention and doesnt even mind when he pulls her leg to see what happend, and when she has had enough playing she finds a quiet place to escape to. seeing the two of them playing so nicely together is so cute, but in saying that i would never leave them alone because even the gentlest of family pets can be pushed to their limits and we have no idea what that limit is as they cant tell us. good luck in convincing your husband (the trick there is to plant the seed, let him grow it and then he can think this brilliant idea was all his), and i hope you find the perfect dog to become part of your family.

Danielle - posted on 02/24/2009

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Crystal has some good advice... each breed of dog is different, and has different things to offer your family!! It's not like someone could tell you 'this' or 'that' dog is good for you and your family, because what might be good for them, may be HORRIBLE for you and yours!! I would make a list of what your looking for in a dog, energy levels that are acceptible to you, food intake, trainability, how compatible they are with children, allergies, and breed malformations (ex: we have a Boston terrier, and they have issues with heat because of their shortened palate and little snouts... they also have issues with their anal glands, as most small breeds do...)  It really IS the question of which dog breed fits you and your family!! (Don't forget that potty training takes alot of time and effort, and teaching the dog what is acceptable behavior takes time too... you may want to wait another year or so when your child is older.)  I have 5 children and 2 dogs... it's ALOT of work, but if your up for it, GOOD LUCK!!

Jolie - posted on 02/24/2009

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Hi there! I am speaking from experience. I went to Target to get diapers and came home with a golden retriever. It was suggested to me by our vet that Goldens and labs are two of the best breeds for children. I had a 4 year old, an 2 year old and one on the way when I added yet another mouth to feed to our family.  He is just amazing around them and is very protective in a gentle way.  Hope this helps- good luck!

Pheonex - posted on 02/24/2009

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This is something you really need to do some indepth researching on. There are some breads that are more family oriented than others. It also depends of how much area you have, like if you live in a house with a big yard or an appartment. Big dogs need lots of room. I have heard that shelties and collies are good. Boston Terriers are easy to train and good family dogs. You could try Ceasar Millan's website and see if he has any ideas, because he works with dogs all the time. Some people find labs and golden retrievers good because they are quite durable. You need to ask yourself alot of questions and what you really want out of the dog. A lap dog or one that will run around the yard with your son. We have a Scottish Terrier and she is good with our kids, but she is very good natured, not all of them are like that. You also need to see which puppy is attracted to you and your family. I don't recomend a really hyper breed because they will not be patient with children. I would narrow down what kind you think you would like and then research wich is best with children. Just remember, if you have a puppy it's like having another baby in the house. Alot of training, especially house training. Good luck.

Crystal - posted on 02/24/2009

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The best advice I can offer is look for some quizzes that will suggest breeds that will be good for your family. I would do a few different ones. One I know of for sure is on www.dogbreedinfo.com. I am also possibly looking for a dog, and I am taking several different quizzes (most info sites have their own quiz) and am looking at the ones that are common to all or most of the quizzes I have taken. The ask about things like children, ages of children, how much exercise you can give them, allergies, etc. Good luck. I find information is my best friend when I'm trying to convince my hubby of something. And if the issue is hair, you can get furry, non shedding dogs too.

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