When should a child stop wetting the bed regularly?

User - posted on 08/04/2009 ( 125 moms have responded )

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My 7 year old step son wets the bed almost every night. I have been stopping his drink intake now by 7:30pm, I make sure he goes before bed also. He STILL does it. My husband said it runs in his family, but I don't know if I agree that it's genetic so much as the kid is just being too lazy to get out of bed and go to the bathroom. Shed some light please! Thanks!!

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Jodi - posted on 08/04/2009

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It definitely does run in the family. My step-son is 10 and still wets the bed. My husband wet the bed until he was about 10 or 11. My brother was a bed wetter, and his daughter still wets the bed at age 9.

At his age, the first thing you should do is take him to a doctor to eliminate anything medical that could be causing it. There are also option the doctor may give you. For instance, there is an alarm system available where an alarm is attached to a pad put on the bed and it wakes the child the moment they start wetting so they can get up and go to the toilet. If it works, it can apparently be very effective and toilet train quickly. But it doesn't always work - my step-son slept through it!!

They do out grow it eventually. I'm still waiting. In the meantime, we use pull ups. Because we know we have to be patient, having wet sheets everyday makes very little sense. Pull ups takes the stress out of it all :)

Whatever you do, don't punish him for it. He is not being lazy, he just can't help it. Certainly have him help take responsibility for it, but don't treat it like something he is doing wrong.

Laura - posted on 08/20/2009

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My 5 1/2 year old daughter was wetting the bed very regularly and we tried everthing we could think of. She decided that she wanted to try a bed wetting monitor so I ordered her one. Within 4 nights, she stopped wetting and has only had a few accidents over that last few months. I would recommend this to anyone who is willing to wake to a horrible buzz and assist your child to the bathroom in the middle of the night.

Jodi - posted on 08/09/2009

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Jessica, your comment about bed wetting not being genetic is incorrect.



The great majority of bed-wetting children are primary enuretics. For primary enuretics, the cause is decidedly NOT stress or behavioral concerns. Research has shown that primary nocturnal enuresis is often inherited. If both parents were bed-wetters, 77% of their children will be. If only one parent was, 44% of their offspring will be. If neither parent wet the bed, only about 15% of their children will wet the bed. With primary nocturnal enuresis one almost always finds another relative who was a bed wetter. This corresponds to what is called an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.



Source: http://www.drgreene.com/21_585.html

Tara - posted on 08/04/2009

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Odds are if it runs in your husband's family it may be genetic. Some kids don't develop proper bladder control for a much longer time than others. If you are stopping his liquid intake quite early, he may simply have a small bladder, or have a physical issue that causing his loss of bladder control. Your best bet is to have him evaluated by your pediatrician/doctor to check for physical issues - if that is ruled out then you may need to look at emotional issues - is he afraid, worried, stressed? - those can all affect bladder control in kids. I know my middle sister wet the bed for longer than most (past 5 years old is generally unusual) and it was because she had some physical issues that caused problems with her control.

Tiffany - posted on 07/05/2011

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He may need something to help him through this, there are a lot of different medications, some as simple as a nasal spray that can help with this.

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Christina - posted on 08/26/2013

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My 4 year old step son never wets the bed anymore, but he night before he goes back to his moms place he always wets the bed. When he was visiting family they said he never wet the bed until there was mention of him going back to his moms place. Any ideas of why this could be happening? We are concerned things at home aren't what they should be. :(

Erica - posted on 09/12/2012

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My 6 yr old step son wets the bed almost every night and its NOT because he is a deep sleeper but in fact just doesnt want to get out of bed and is used to wetting in his bed. We have woke him up every 2 hrs and yet still in the morning he will be wet. I stopped all fluid intake after 5pm and he goes to bed at 8, have taken him to bathroom before I go to bed and yet i will wake him up and he would either lay in bed and pee or just have peed before i went in there to wake him up but have done it while he is awake. Pull ups didnt work he would pee in them all night long due to he knew what they were for and that was to pee in. We have made him wash his own pee clothes and bedding and he doesnt mind it. We have been to see doctors and have him in therapy and he tells them i want to pee i dont mind it. Some kids in my opionion can be lazy and some kids can be deep sleepers.

Katie - posted on 07/06/2011

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I have a son who's 18. He wet his bed until he was 11. Pull ups are a wonderful thing! It really isn't laziness. He's probably inherited a deeper sleep pattern than normal and has a slowly developing urinary tract. That's what the doctors told me. It was mostly a matter of peer pressure (staying over at friends) that really made the difference. Do NOT make him feel bad about it. This will complicate it and cause him real emotional issues. He feels icky about it enough on his own. Be supportive of any suggestions he comes up with as attempts to correct it on his own. Maybe see if he wants an alarm to wake him around 2 or 3 for a bathroom check. Some kids just can't help it. I have two other sons that didn't inherit that lovely feature. Be patient. This too shall pass.

Heather - posted on 09/05/2009

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My daughter is 9 and she still wets the bed it's not as often. I've taken her to the doctor and she said that their is nothing wrong and yes it can be genetic. They have a pill that he can take but it may or may not work its a 50/50 shot that it will help. But he will grow out of it. My doctor said that they just get in to a deep sleep and can't wake up! I hope this helps... Oh by the way I get her up a couple times in the night time.

Monique - posted on 09/04/2009

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Quoting Catherine:

When should a child stop wetting the bed regularly?

My 7 year old step son wets the bed almost every night. I have been stopping his drink intake now by 7:30pm, I make sure he goes before bed also. He STILL does it. My husband said it runs in his family, but I don't know if I agree that it's genetic so much as the kid is just being too lazy to get out of bed and go to the bathroom. Shed some light please! Thanks!!


Your Son is'nt to lazy to get out of the bed. Eurethis is what they call bed wetting like your son does, It's a hormone that a child lacks that tells the brain to tell the bladder to hold the wee in. My 7 year old Daughter wets the bed every night, as did i till I was 14. The child cant help it. Yes stop fluid intake about 2 hours before your son goes to sleep. then before you go to bed wake him up and take him to the toilet. Your Husband is totally correct when he says it is genetic. The best advise I can give you is to not make a fuss about, he will get better.

Violet - posted on 08/27/2009

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yes i agree with your husband,some of these problems runs in the family.at 7 years its too early for him to stop,because some of the kids they do stop at the age of 11-15 years.my advise is try to give him a banana an hour before he goes to bed and see if it can help because the banana stops urine.

TeCara - posted on 08/27/2009

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It may be genetic. My brother wet the bed until he was about 12. My son is about to be 4 and he still wets the bed and I stop giving him drink after 7. My friend also had a doctor to tell her the same thing about her daughter who is now 6. So nit is possible that it is genetic.

Stacie - posted on 08/27/2009

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IT CAN ALSO BE A MEDICAL CONDITION SO I HOPE YOU HAVE CONSIDERED TAKING HIM TO SEE A DOCTOR. THIS RUNS THRU MY FAM AS WELL BUT I HAVE A 13 YR OLD NEPHEW THAT WE DEALT WITH THE SAME AS U. MADE SURE HE HAD NO FLUIDS BEFORE BEDTIME AND ETC. @ THE AGE OF 10 HE WAS DX WITH A MEDICAL CONDITION & NEEDED SURGERY. SO I'M NOT SURE WHAT THE CONDITION WAS CALLED @ THIS MOMENT BUT U DON'T WANA LET IT GO UNTREATED FOR TOO LONG :) HAVE A NICE DAY!! & GOOD LUCK!

Kristy - posted on 08/21/2009

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I was in the same situation with a 5 1/2 year old who did not wake up to urinate and was in pull ups - I didn't see an end in site. I purchased the Malem Bedwetting Alarm after reading a ton of reviews and info on the internet - $100 ~ worth every penny. It took a week or two, and we all lost a bit of sleep, but my daughter was out of pull ups and waking up if she had to go potty. At the age your son is, his mind is not trained to wake up when he has to go - it is not a genetic thing most likely, he just has habits set and his brain doesn't realize the sensation to go potty enough to wake up. The alarm trains to brain to realize the sensation when they have to go - it realizes that it doesn't want to hear that alarm and every time the alarm goes off is when they go potty, so they start waking up before they go potty. When I read reviews on the internet, I ran across a lot of people who said they bought a cheaper alarm and ended up buying the more expensive one in the end ~ so I just bit the bullet and got the Malem up front. We started with putting the alarm on dry panties with pull ups over top of it and after she was keeping dry panties for a few nights, we lost the pull up and have never had to go back. You also need a kid that really wants to get out of pullups - so much easier to do this as a team. Try to be understanding and patient - you can do it! A happy household ~ good luck!!!

Kim - posted on 08/20/2009

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But how long does the bed-wetting suppose to last? Or should I say when does it stop?

Julie - posted on 08/17/2009

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I used to have to wake mine up at like 11:00 PM. Sometimes they just sleep too hard. Maybe they had the same problem I did. I used to dream that I was getting up and going to the bathroom. Then I'd wake myself up wetting the bed. I would recommend walking them to the bathroom as your last thing to do before you go to bed. Eventually, they will catch on.

Peggy - posted on 08/16/2009

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I also had the same problem as a kid. I would dream that I had gotten up and awas actually in the bathroom. When one of my children was having the same problem I talked to my dotor and I tried what you were doing as well, He said younger and he said that my child might have a small bladder and that she would have to stretch it a litttle by holding her urine for a short period of time during the day when she felt the urge to go. I was worried that this might lead to a bladder infection, but he said it would not. She eventually stopped the bedwetting. In the meantime get a plastic sheet cover and be patient. I have three and they stopped at different ages.

Robin - posted on 08/15/2009

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We went through a long process with my daughter and her bedwetting. Our doctor did a quick visual exam of her to see if there was a need to check for a deeper physical issue. She concluded not. She also recommended seeing a child pscychologist, which we did, but couldn't identify any underlying anxiety issues. One doctor kindly said that being a deep sleeper is a better quality than making it through the night. That was so nice to hear! I do believe deep sleep was the main reason she wet the bed, but it also became a habit. She admitted that sometimes in the early morning she just didn't want to get up. I don't think she would have even thought of that though, if she wasn't already used to a wet bed. But, that news was frustrating and confusing! We did practice waking our daughter up when we went to bed. After many months, she began being able to get up on her own more consistently. In the meantime, I used pads intended for baby cribs. I placed one under her sheet and one over, since sometimes that one would move when she moved in her sleep. That helped cut down on the amount of changes. For awhile, we had her carry her own sheets to the laundry in the morning (without blame or shame), but I can't say that did much but add to our morning routine. The best positive reinforcement that worked for her was that we told her she could have her first sleepover at our house when she was able to go several nights without wetting. She did feel proud when she got to that point--- though in retrospect I don't know if I'd make that offer again as it could have easily backfired and just put pressure on her for something she couldn't control very well. Our goal was simply to engage her in the process. Best of luck! The good thing is that from all these responses you are definitley not alone, which is a big thing in itself because it can easily feel like your child is the only one with the problem. In the end, it really is just one of those things that eventually works itself out.

Susan - posted on 08/15/2009

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Let him get a mattress cover which is plastic and it will save the mattress.......Go to the Bedwettingstore.com and there you find the cover u need so that might help.

Susan - posted on 08/15/2009

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Sometimes it is laziness....I have a daughter that does the same thing and she is much older then ur son. I had a son that did that too and he stopped when his bladder caught up with his body and that was at 14.....Believe me it was hard.....Its hard for them as well as the parents......You doing the right thing with the intake of liquids at night. There is also a medicine out there for this called DDAVP.....If this is a option for u at all. its a nasal spray......Hope this helps....

[deleted account]

Quoting Catherine:

When should a child stop wetting the bed regularly?

My 7 year old step son wets the bed almost every night. I have been stopping his drink intake now by 7:30pm, I make sure he goes before bed also. He STILL does it. My husband said it runs in his family, but I don't know if I agree that it's genetic so much as the kid is just being too lazy to get out of bed and go to the bathroom. Shed some light please! Thanks!!


my daughter wet the bed till seven also. She wanted sooo badly to go to girl scout camp and when I took her for her physical I asked the doctor at what age is too old. He replied with 5.  When I told him she was 7 he perscribed her a medicine called DDAVP which is like the opposite of a water pill.  She took it for 1 month I never had to get it refilled and since that day she has never wet the bed again.  She is now 8 1/2 and dooing great!!

Eunice - posted on 08/15/2009

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Hi Catherine - that is such a familiar comment. Restrict water, take to toilet before bed (and I even woke my child up before I went to bed to go). I too thought too lazy and switched between concern and anger - which never helped and we both ended up in tears.

My daughter wet the bed too - however, we had medical intervention at the age of 5. Being big for her age, I could not get night time 'pull ups' big enough for her and it became very frustrating. She also had frequent urinary tract infections and concern for kidney damage and inability to have a dry night caused our GP to send her to a specialist. She was diagnosed with what the doctor called 'spasming bladder'. At school waiting in line to ask to go, she was unable to hold it. It is a memory very strong for her. Basically the bladder's trigger to release is too strong to stop in time. She was given a medication (which was restricted and the Dr had to call up for permission to write the 'script) which relaxed the bladder muscle, giving her enough time to get to the toilet. That and no more baths, she was ok in 6 months. I am not sure if boys have similar issues, but it is not uncommon.

I doubt your step son is deliberately doing this, perhaps it is an underlying stress (being upset that he is doing it in the first place)? And if your husband says it is genetice, perhaps it is a 'spasming bladder'? I really wish I knew the correct medical term.

Good Luck

Eunice

Cheryl - posted on 08/14/2009

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My son is eight and still wets the bed every night :o(

I have 7 children and only my two boys with ADHD do this. I dn't know if it's connected or not. The doctor told us to limit his drinking at night and to have him drink a lot duringthe day to stretch his bladder. So far nothing has helped.

You're not alone.

Cheryl - posted on 08/14/2009

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My son is eight and still wets the bed every night :o(

I have 7 children and only my two boys with ADHD do this. I dn't know if it's connected or not. The doctor told us to limit his drinking at night and to have him drink a lot duringthe day to stretch his bladder. So far nothing has helped.

You're not alone.

Chantel - posted on 08/14/2009

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I had the same problem with my son, and my husband was the one having fits and saying he was lazy. The pediatrician said sometimes the part of the brain that sends the message to wake up doesn't fully develop until 12 or 13. He also said that sometimes the body will grow at different rates, and that his bladder might not have caught up. I gave my son a second alarm clock that woke him half way through the night, limited late night liquids, and used waterproof mattress pads. Sure enough, at 12 years old the bed wetting stopped on its own. I didn't ask about wether it was genetic, but his biological father was a bed wetter also. Take your son to the doctor to rule out anything medical, do some research on the internet, and be patient. This too shall pass. Good luck!

Melissa - posted on 08/14/2009

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I had this problem with my daughter. After researching the issue I discovered much of the same information as others who have posted. The latest research shows brain chemicals in some children develop at different rates. Not to worry. It is very much genetic. The post about the dream of using the bathroom meant the child was close to conquering the bed wetting problem. Once this dream begins the brain is chemically ready to wake up before wetting the bed. Children develop this at different rates. No child wants to wet the bed. I can assure you your child is not lazy. That is a common belief among parents of bed-wetters. Continue to allow the child to develop without fear or guilt if bed-wetting occurs. Check-out this website it is very helpful.
http://kidshealth.org/parent/general/sle...
Remember...this too shall pass. :)
Good luck!!!

Cheryl - posted on 08/14/2009

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Actually it is quite common, and there are a number of reasons that could be causing it. He could be a deep sleeper, and not feel the sensation, or there could be genetic issues involved -- small bladder. It is best to take him to a pediatrician to rule out the problem, and find answers on how to deal with it. I had a neighbor boy who wore pull ups til he was 9. It is a very common thing, and they can't help it. My 5 yr old, occationally has accidents, and the pediatrician said not to get mad at him, and have him help be a part of the clean up process. Strip the sheets, clean the mattress, and help put the clothes into the wash. It makes them more aware... Good Luck - (it is probably really embarrassing for him! )

Tracee - posted on 08/14/2009

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It definitely does run in families. With males it is more common, also. You may just need to be patient and wait for him to grow out of it. I have heard of people having success in waking the child up during the night, as well as early in the morning, to urinate. Also you might want to stop the drinks by 7 pm. There are special rubber mattress covers you can get that might help in the mean time.

Somer - posted on 08/14/2009

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My oldest daughter still wet the bed and would leak on herself during the day until she was 6 yr old. Her doctor put her on ditrapan to stretch her bladder and within a month of taking it she completly quit wetting herself. Now I'm having the same problem with her baby sister turning 4 and still wets the bed and wets herself during the day but only at home. Her doctor said it is because she drinks way too much liquids during the day and to cut back.

Jean - posted on 08/14/2009

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My son is going to be 11 in a couple weeks. He has just recent;y stopped wetting the bed within the last few months. I can tell you that it is absolutely not being lazy. It is a genetic thing and there are people who wet the bed into their teens. Every year since he was 5, during his physical I would ask the doctor what we could do because we were told every year that it should stop by the next year, and every year the doctor said there was nothing, that he just had to grow out of it. We have tried the same thing- not letting him drink, waking him up to go to the bathroom a couple times a night and it still happens. The best I have come up with is to make sure he is warm when he goes to sleep and not let him shower at night. I don't know why it happens or what the cold has to do with it, but I do know these things help. I guess I will have to see what happens come winter. But please don't blame your step son, I am sure he doesn't like waking up wet anymore than you like washing the bedding.

Kristin - posted on 08/14/2009

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I have three boys, ages 12, 6, and 3... my oldest was in Overnights/Pull-Ups until almost age 8. And even then, for another couple of years, he would have an accident every once in a while. My suggestion to you, if you haven't done this already and suspect a bit of laziness, is to have him strip his wet sheets and teach him how to do the laundry, and put his sheets back onto the bed afterwards. If he has to do this he may be more apt to use the bathroom one more time before going to sleep! My 6 year-old is having the same issues, and our doctor said that there is an alarm system we can get through the clinic that teaches them to wake up when they need to go. He said our insurance will probably cover it, and I'm planning on getting that.

Brandi - posted on 08/14/2009

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My boyfriends son still wets too and he is 9 1/2. He has been taken to the Dr. by his mom and it isn't a medical condition. He visits every other weekend and a month out of the summer so there is only so much we can do. We stop his drinking after 8 and make him go to the bathroom before bed and he still wets atleast one night out of the weekend. It's very frustrating.

BOSEDE - posted on 08/14/2009

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It sometimes can be genetic, it can also be due to difficulty waking up to use the toilet, sometimes it can be that the bladder is small and irritable. Recent research indicated that reduced production of antidiuretic hormone during sleep can make a child wet the bed. this hormone reduces urine production at night but if it is not available the bladder get full and when the child cannot hold it any longer, he wet the bed. Your son is not the only one but if you are concern request bed wetting alarm from your GP who should refer you to the specialist.

Sherry - posted on 08/14/2009

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my son is 6 and he also wets. I have to wake him at 3 every night and take him to the bathroom. My brother had the same problem until he was 8 and I had a few times when i was little. I think it might be that we share the gene that makes our bladder develop but not as quickly as everyone else. Anyway, we just put plastic sheets on the bed and we have a blue pad, i used at hospital when he was born to put on the bed. Plus he sleeps like a rock. I think this may be a concideration too. Whatever you do, dont get mad at him. It really is something they have to work through too

Stephanie - posted on 08/14/2009

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My 7 year old daughter wets the bed also, my ped said that she has a small bladder and that she should out grow it. I also stop her drink intake and make sure she goes to the bathroom before bed. Butm it also runs in my family too and I honestly think its genetic because my niece is twelve and she still does it and my mom also said I wet the bed until I got older. My ped also said that she should outgrow it. Also, my daughter is very sensitive about this problem and didn't like to go to sleep overs because she was afraid she'd have an accident. But I've explained that she would grow out of it, but she also has to make sure she goes to the bathroom. Good luck!

Susan - posted on 08/14/2009

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My tow older sons had the same problem. You can go talk to a Endocrinologist who specializes in this. They will probably ask you to stop giving liquids after 6pm and especially stop giving caffeine in the evenings. Usually, if there is a history of family bed wetting, chances are the children will have it too and boys are more prone than girls. Although it is EXTREMELY frustrating and tiring, they are not being lazy; they don't like waking up wet. Also, they may not be fully matured yet in their development so this can delay the urge to wake up. There are also bed wetting alarms you clip onto the front of their underwear that will go off to the first drop of urine to wake them up. My children were very heavy sleepers so this didn't help them: they didn't wake up. But, it has been proven to be highly effective on many children. If you get mad or put them down about wetting the bed they may develop low self esteem or depression so unfortunately, you must just encourage them to keep trying. In the meantime, you can buy bed mats so you wash them daily instead of changing sheets daily. Eventually, they should grow out of it, maybe not until they are 10 or 11 but it should become a thing of the past. I've been there so I know what your talking about and all the emotions that go with it. Good Luck!!

Alisa - posted on 08/14/2009

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According to pediatric research, it is quite normal, especially for a male child to wet the bed until he age 13. According to the research, some male children need this time for the development of bladder control. It is also recommended you have the child checked for other ailments that could affect the child's bladder control. There are also bedwetting devices you can purchase to assist with the child's learning to control his bladder. The most effective one I heard of is an alarm placed in the child's underwear. When urine touches it, it vibrates and rings to wake the child so he or she can run to the bathroom. You can purchase these products online, just google bedwetting devices.

Melanie - posted on 08/13/2009

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Hi Catherine

my son turned 7 late last year and was still wetting the bed also. When he started getting embaressed I felt it was time to finally go to the doctor! I was lucky enough to have a very thorough doctor who did a range of tests. The results were that his bed wetting was actually caused by a medical issue, called Spina Bifida Occulta. Although it sounds terrible it's not as bad as it sounds! He has a small part of one of his vertabrae missing which didn't develop properly in the first 14 weeks of gestation. This caused severe constipation, that I had no idea about and either did he. In turn the constipation was causing the bed wetting, which also was just about every night. I would urge all parents to have a comprehensive check up at the doctor if your child is a bed wetter. Once I had done research on this condition i found that about 40% of children have this condition and never know. It is diagnosed through an xray of the childs spine.

Jan - posted on 08/13/2009

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My son wet the bed until he was 10. I was a bedwetter as was my older sister and my younger. My mother never assumed I was lazy and I did not consider that about my son either. When my son was going through it, I told him that the situation did not bother me, but when he got tired of it to let me know and we would go to the Dr. When he was 9 and 1/2 he told me he was ready and we went to the Dr. It was determined that he slept too deeply to wake himself up when he needed to go, so he was put on a medication that put him in a lighter state of sleep. 6 months later he was over it. I don't believe that shame and/or humiliation helps in any way. My son is now 29 and we have discussed this many times. He has thanked his dad and I for not making a big issue of it. I had 2 rules when this was happening. The 1st was that he was required to strip his bed every morning and put the bedclothes on the top of the washer, and the 2nd was that he had to bathe or shower every morning. This method worked well for us, I hope this helps.

Jackie - posted on 08/13/2009

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My seven year old daughter just stop nighttime bed wetting about 2 weeks ago. I kept her in Overnights pull-ups every night so that I would never have to be angry with her for wetting. She was embarrassed about her problem and I never tried to shame her because I know it does not work. It does run in the family. My husband had a problem with it and my sister did. I remember feeling bad for her everytime my mother yelled at her and called her lazy for not wanting to get out of bed to go. But it simply wasn't true. I looked it up on the internet and found that it really is a hereditary condition. The brain has not developed to alert them to wake up and go. They do eventually grow out of it. For the last 6 months or so before she stopped when I would send her to bed she would get out of bed at least a half a dozen times inside of a half hour or so trying to make sure her bladder was empty before she fell asleep. At first it annoyed me but I eventually realized that she needed to do this. Sometimes she would wake up dry. I highly recommend the Overnights and patience as I know he will eventually stop. Good luck :)

[deleted account]

I took my nearly 5 yr old daughter to a eurologist to check her. He said it was still normal and if she continued to do it in another year or so to check back with him. There are other methods as well as a medication that can help if they are older like your son. Ask your pediatrician to refer you, but by all means, don't blame him. Many kids struggle with this issue and feel very embarassed by it, even if they don't let on.

Tara - posted on 08/13/2009

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there has been case history where it is genetic. My brother didnt' stop till he was 15 my one sister when she was 12.. and my daughter was 9.

u are doing the right things. with my daughter because it also affected her self esteem i went to the dr's and got the pills and while she was takin them she stopped wetting the bed. but then they became to expensive so i just started getting her up at night about halfway through. and that slowly (i do mean SLOWLY) taught her body to wake up throughout the night.

There might also be a medical condition that has ur son wetting the bed?? my daughter was born 2 mths premature and so her organs were smaller then they should have been the smallest was her bladder. which when she was 9 caught up to her.



I don't agree that the child is being lazy. No child is lazy when they are sleeping it is that there mind hasn't clicked in to wake the child up when they have to go. it take patience and love. I suggest waking up in the middle of the night(even if u have to set ur alarm to do so) and YOU get up with the child even if they still sleeping and quietly guide them to the washroom while talkin to him quietly sayin things like we are going to the bathroom.. and give instructions.(chances are they are still half asleep)..in time t his gets his body to wakin up and sayin go pee!!. i did this with my daughter.. and eventually she started to wake up on her own at the same time. and was going.



What time does ur child go to bed?? with my daughter ALL fluids where stopped at 6 and her bedtime was at 8. this gave time for all fluids to leave the body that needed to.



gl with this.. it takes patience and even time on ur part to train..

Lisa - posted on 08/13/2009

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My 4, turning 5 yr. old is doing the same thing. My husbad was a bed-wetter until 7. And I know my son sleeps so hard - we've gone into his room at 12 to check on him and he is sound asleep in a pool of urine (with a pull-up on!!). Everything I've read goes along with what the others have said. Some kids just take longer than others. I'm expecting to have a long time with this and just get through it.

Martha - posted on 08/13/2009

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I just recently went through that w/my 7 year old. I did the exact same thing, cutting liquid intake by 8pm and making him go to the bathroom before he went to bed. Nothing seemed to be working. After taking him to the doctor to find out if maybe an infection was the cause of the bed wetting, it turns out that he just has an overactive bladder. The doctor prescribed medication for him to take before bedtime to help relax his bladder so that he does not have the urge to go in the middle of the night. He's been taking the medication for the past month and he has had no more accidents.

Dasola - posted on 08/13/2009

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My 11 yrs old daughter bed wet also. It doesn't run in my own family and i wonder why she does that.I just think they're too lazy to get out of bed. At times they dream as if they're already in the bathroom urinating, my daughter has told me that before. I'm looking forward to what can be done to stop this.

Kim - posted on 08/13/2009

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It's definately probably genetic. He's not lazy. Millions of children and adult suffer from this daily/nightly. Go see your doc who can refer you to a specialist. You can often have your bladder tightened with surgery but you can only have that done once in a lifetime. Lowering the drink intake is definately key and as the parent, especially if your child is a deep sleeper, you should get yourself in the routine to wake him up nightly so that you can help avoid the accident. Deep sleeping can be another cause that medicine could help. See a doc, they can run tests.

Pusheela - posted on 08/13/2009

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I have tried the methodmentioned by Jodi Adams for my son last year when he was 7 years old and it worked. In one month he has stopped wetting his bed. It was just a muscle in his bladder which was not working as it should have been and so the alarm triggers the muscle to contract and so every time he start doing it in his sleep the alarm would ring and he would wake up. After a month he stopped wetting his bed.

MIRIAM - posted on 08/13/2009

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I agree with Tara Hibbert, it may be genetic, and i also agree with almost all the other parents. Children are really different too... anxiety can also cause bed wetting i recall just before i did any exams in primary school i would wet the bed and the following morning i would feel so bad.
I would advise you take him to the doctors and have him checked up.

Hanna - posted on 08/13/2009

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it might have to do with kidneys or bladder (sometimes if a child sits somewhere cold he can get a slight inflammation on either one of those and it may cause bed wetting. i would talk to a doctor and see if he needs to run some tests. if your husband says it runs in the family, then it might be a hereditary physiological condition which needs to be addressed either way before it starts causing problems in his social life (i.e. no sleepovers or kids somehow finding out, etc.)



alternatively, see if you can wake him up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom, but you'll probably need to do it around 1-2am so that there's a more or less even time periods before and after. it'll be rough for a few weeks for you, but then maybe your son will get into the schedule of waking up himself & going :)

Rachael - posted on 08/13/2009

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Have not read all these replies so sorry if already covered. My understanding is that there is a hormone which concentrates the urine when asleep, this hormone is triggered at no definite age, some children can still be waiting for it to be switched on when they are 8,9,10.



Alternatively he could have deep sleep and like someone has already said he could think he has been and gone to the toilet.



How is he at school?



Hope this helps

Lauren - posted on 08/12/2009

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Hi all, I know this is extremely frustrating for the parents. My daughter stopped wetting the bed at age 10. It also used to be every night but as the years went on it became less and less. I did notice the more fuss made or threats made DOES NOT help either, but makes it worse. I tried everything from stopping her drinks from 7pm to getting her up at midnight to go to the toilet, which did'nt make a big difference either. But she is a very deep sleeper, even going to bed early she would wake up with dark rings under eyes. I have read its because they stay in rem sleep much longer than normal and apparantly there is a lost connection between the bladders signal to brain to wake up. When she was older she often would say she was dreaming she was on the toilet and would wake up wet. I think each situation is different, but i would definately rule out laziness. My son now age 7 might wet the bed about once a month. My other son stopped at 4 and never has as accident.

[deleted account]

Hi Catherine, my eldest daughter was also a bet wetter, and I put it down to be lazy to get out of bed. So I used to put those pull ups on her and when she stayed at friends, I used to tell the mother to make sure she wore them. As her friends were not wearing them, she quickly decided to change her habits. It can be genetic, as I recall I also wet my bed up to 6 years of age. Remember a huge change in the childs life can also have an impact, like starting a new school, recently divorced or remarried parents, etc. There are many reasons why they would wet beds. I stopped my daughter a whole hour before her bedtime, so nothing after 7pm and she went to bed at 8pm. Also can be a sign of diabetes, so maybe just take him to get his sugar checked. Hope this helps.

Buzzy - posted on 08/12/2009

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My little sister didnt quit wetting her bed until she was 12yrs old! I believe some children simply sleep to hard to wake themselves up to go to the bathroom. Try waking him up around 12:am & get him used to waking up @ the same time every nite & Good Luck!!

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