Write

Amanda - posted on 01/17/2012 ( 90 moms have responded )

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How to get your daugther to write she is 4 years old. she know how to write a o, H and a A. but she is a left head. What do I need to do?

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Chrystal - posted on 01/17/2012

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If she's holding a pencil and making any letters that you recognize she's doing great! I wouldn't get to worried about it she's little she'll get better with that stuff as her fine motor skills improve with age. Let her play writing in one of those alphabet books she can see how the letters look and maybe try to trace it just make everything fun right now that's what really matter that she develops a love of learning.

Deborah - posted on 02/02/2012

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Same way you write right handed.... hold her hand while she does it and explain it to her, like the letter B is "Line, Bubble, Bubble"..... if she can write O, she can write C, (Don't close the circle!) D is LIne, big Bubble!



You can also get one of those dotted-line alphabet books and hold her left with your right (sitting on her left side) and show her how to trace the letters.

Lisa - posted on 02/02/2012

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In Hong Kong, parents are trying to get their kids to read and write at 2! My son's kindergarten has stacks of homework he has to finish every day, and he's only 4! He has a page of Chinese characters, a page of one or two alphabets in capital letters (they're easier to start with than the lower case), and numbers.

I don't expect him to finish it, but he does. His teacher calls me up if he lags behind but I refuse to push him. I will sit with him and tell him to try as much as he can. Fortunately, he loves it. Probably cuz when he was 2, I bought him a book with dotted lines where you can trace things with marker, then erase it and start over again. He's used that book countless times and can sit there tracing for an hour.

He is not as advanced as some of the other kids, but not behind either. It's best not to compare your child, but also, don't give them limitations about what they can or cannot do. Let them try everything, with some guidance. If they give up, leave it. Try again when they're a bit older. But never push it and always praise them.

Amy - posted on 01/17/2012

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Oh and my son only wrote his name in preschool he didn't learn to write all the other letter till kindergarten.

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Natasha - posted on 11/13/2012

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Good on you the more they know when they go to school the better don't worry about the negitive responses some people have nothing better to do in life than moan and put other peoples efforts down my baby girl is four and even at three was writing letters now at four can write mum and her name and has fun copying things I write my son was left handed and took him two years at school writing things back wards to come right it is harder for them but come right good on you for your efforts

Heather - posted on 11/12/2012

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You are getting sound advice, and it seems that your kiddo is right on track! If you want to encourage her to develop fine motor skills, play plenty of drawing games. One game that my four year old loves is to trace her favorite characters. There are plenty of free coloring sheets online that you can print out at home. Encourage her to turn the paper over (she will be able to see the image faintly on the reverse side) and trace the drawing as well as she can. This is a great exercise for fine motor skills, and I guarantee you she will be pleased with the results. Then, she can color the image on both sides!

Barbara - posted on 11/12/2012

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At four it is ALL about play time because that's how they learn at this age. The more you imitate playtime with her at printing and everything else, the more quickly she will respond to this and the more encouraged she will be to continue to try. Your emotional response to her is what is so critical at her age. If you approach the 'lessons' with anxiety and are impatient with her, she will not be willing to give it her best. Make it a game! Let her know you are happy with what she does regardless of how messy or inaccurate it is. At four, with a left-handed child, I'd just want to play and have fun with her, let her explore her world at her own pace and not put loads of pressure on her to 'perform'. Performance anxiety is the worst later as she starts school in kindergarten and beyond. Don't saddle her with that now, just be encouraging, praise a lot, praise some more, and praise for everything she tries, whether successful or not. She TRIED, that's whats important.

Barbara - posted on 11/12/2012

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Be really patient with her. Lefties have a challenge that right-handers don't, since the school adapts teaching for the majority. Some kids progress a little differently than others and each child has their own timing for acquiring the hand-eye coordination and making the brain connections. Buy her some paper used in school, ask her to just practice any letters she wants to learn how to do. We used a wipe-off board I got at Toys-r-us and she practiced during the commercials while we watched TV at night. The only rule I made was that she had to practice one letter each evening for at least 10 minutes. Start with lower case first, that's what most schools do. Don't criticize her for poorly formed letters, let her know you value her EFFORT. Be supportive, encouraging and non-critical during the process. She is only four! She'll get the hang of it! Tell her to ask you for help if she wants, but let her do this on her own and praise every try she makes. This was a huge mistake I made, I didn't praise her nearly enough and it impacted her willingness to keep trying. I've learned with little ones, the best thing you can give is praise, support and encouragement and leave judgement in the darkest corner of an unused closet.

Nervana - posted on 02/03/2012

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make her trace a doted curves & lines first.

there are lots of models like this online.

Sarah - posted on 01/24/2012

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Amanda I am glad that my postings helped you, and you are rite about about fact that anything is possible. Just love her and play teach her and who knows what she will be in the future. Good luck and god bless you and your daugther.

Kate CP - posted on 01/24/2012

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Amanda, I said it may not work. I never said it wouldn't work for certain. You try a method until you find one that works and stick with it. I'm glad it's working for her.



You know, for some reason no matter what I say you seem to think I'm dogging on your daughter and that's not the case. So, I'm just not going to respond any more.

Amanda - posted on 01/24/2012

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it will work for her Kate you never know what a child can do and learn i believe in my child and she learn and she love it so you never know will the learning method would work for kids.

Kate CP - posted on 01/24/2012

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The whole point behind my statement Sarah, much like your statement about the girl being a leftie, is that she's a special child and the average methods of teaching and learning may not work for her.

Amanda - posted on 01/23/2012

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Thank you Sarah so much to just understand what i am feeling and this information is helping and encouraging me to keep working with my daugther. I been getting my daugther the help she need it every since she was one year old. when they told me she have this problem only thing i could do is broke down. I put it in God hands, he is my light and salvation and he is awesome and on time God. thank you Sarah

Sarah - posted on 01/23/2012

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Yes I know that she is special needs child, so is my 37 year daugther to this day, her Forbes is only 2 if you know what that is, but she still managed to get RPN degree. Her cognative skills are not all that good, my 13 year old grandson is IP student in greade 8 and just for the fun off it they gave him a standard test for highschool evaluation and he passed it with 75%. Tell me how do you realy determan if child is realy special needs or not at that age unless they were born with some sort of mental chalenge. If I grew up in US or Canada insted of where I did they would have diagnosed me with ADDH because I was always bored with everyday trivial things. Instead they tested my IQ and EQ on things that I was intrested in and ended up getting a high score, and going to advanced school from grade one. Did try the regular one for few weeks and got nothing but in trouble because I was bored to death. I have worked with many special needs kids in past 35 years and most of the time disagreed with doctors and teachers, because they don't get to spend enough time with any "one single child" to realy get to understand it. I have always worked with one at the time and first few weeks were dedicated to me getting to know a child and becoming friends with them trough play. Today children lack family dinamics because of families being torn apart, comming from single parent home or disfunctual home. We depend to much on teachers, doctors, social workers and who knows what else this days, because we have to work to survive and don't have grandparental support because they are working too, or we don't have relationship with them or they live to far away and some are just plain not intrested in their grandkids.

My point is that my heart goes out to Amanda who probably doesn't have any support from friends or family.

Kate CP - posted on 01/23/2012

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No, the point every one is missing here is that this child is special needs. She said so on the first page of responses.

Sarah - posted on 01/23/2012

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Every one is missing a point here; this child is LEFT HANDED. Leftties eye hand coardination is different, so is the way they look at everything else. I have met few lefthanded 2 year olds that can talk better than some grownups, but in a long run it took them longer to develope writing skillss than right handed children. In my family most of us are left handed so I know from experience. My almost 4 year old step-grandson has been send trough every posible test by his biological grandmother for a reason that he was not on what she asumed some magical scheduale like other kids. He was late with every aspect of growing from newborn to todller till now, but on all the test he was normal or even advanced, what was wrong the way they interacted with him. The newest thing with him is that he can't decide wich hand to use as a primery one; left or right, I guess it has to do with him being so good at using electronics and using both hands at same time.

Most important thing is to encurage them at what ever they are good at, and play with them using pencils and crayons, don't forget kids are great copycats. If you start doing things you want you child to do and keep doing it your child will try to copy you eventualy. Make sure that she learns how to get good grip on toys and spoons and what ever else she uses to eat with. If she doesn't use utencils to eat with let her use her fingers, sometimes that is the best exercise for coordination of hands. All she has to know at her age is that you love her very much.

Niccole - posted on 01/23/2012

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Work on increasing the muscles in her hand by using scissors and playing with play dough. This will help with her writing and ability to hold a pencil. It's what preschool teachers recommend. Sounds like you are a caring mom who wants the very best for your little girl. Enjoy every beautiful day.

Doreen - posted on 01/23/2012

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Well said Jodi



Everyone is different I have a 4 year old grandson we have been showing him letters we know he can write his full name but he gets lazy .I tell him "you can show me how you can write your name later on, " It takes the pressure off him and then he wants to show me how proud he is that he can do it, and that's your Q, to let him know what a great job he has done.



I worked in a pre-school ,and my words would be to the parents is try not to push there children every parent wants to see their children do all of these things but it all comes in time.

,Girls will take more interest in learning than boys , give them time the interest to lear will come .

Some kids need to have hands on to learn ,others do well with instruction ,go with your child, and what his comfortable and easier for them all will be good.

Jill - posted on 01/23/2012

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my 4 year old knows how to write some letters and her name (even though she misspells it) but she loves it when i make dots of letters and she can trace the letters. she's only 4 so dont worry. that's what kindergarten is for and she'll learn all those skills once she gets into school. you can also do the same thing by letting her scribble in sand with her finger, scribble in the dirt with a stick, fill a ziploc bag with shaving cream and seal. let her make designs and shapes by tracing her finger on the bag. all those are good motor skills to get her fingers and brain working together. playdoh and cookie cutters are great for letter recognition. at this point, just make a game of it. the rest will all fall into place.

Sarah - posted on 01/22/2012

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Amanda I was four years old when I started reading and could type on my moms typewriter but my birth language is all phonetics, so you write the same way as you say it. My IQ was 145 at the time, but I didn't handwrite till I was 5 and my cousin was in first grade. I would color and finger paint do my chores because I wanted too, but didn't want to write with pencil or crayons and when my mom would encurage me to do it, I HATED IT. I have a grandson who is going to be 4 in May, he plays games with us on WEE and regular I-Phone, types on his moms and our computer keyboard, but does not care to write or color with pencils and crayons. He has been in daycare school for last 6 months and they all agree that what he does is perfectly normal for him. Lefties take longer to get comfortable with holding pencils and crayons in their hand because they see things from different perspective, my 13 year old grandson was the same way, by the way all 3 of us are lefties. I can write with both hands at same time, but prefere to use keyboard, my mom got me cheap typewriter when I was 6. So you see it has nothing to do with other children, every child is unique when it comes to werbal and writen skills. My 2 daugthers didn't write till kindergarden or draw for that matter, my older one became an artist at age 12 over night, she was in hospital with broken arm and bored. I got her some pencil crayons, poster paper and my drawing pad, plus some coloring books, insted of coloring in coloring books she started copying things out of it on to poster paper. She would have been by-handed if it wasn't for injury, she is a great artist still but choose not to become profesional one. So as you see from my story there is not the rite or wrong time for when chaild will start using fingers and hands for writing or painting.

I am going to be 56 in April and don't handwrite unless I have too, my 38 old one is the same way, my younger one and my step-daughter like writing by hand, 2 stepsons are on the keyboard all the time, never seen them write in 6 years, that I have been with their dad.

Carolyn - posted on 01/20/2012

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Nothing. She is only 4. Just encourage her to keep playing with crayons, pencils and paper. She'll get there when she's ready. If you push, it won't be fun for her anymore and you will open up a lot of problems you don't need.

Jesse - posted on 01/20/2012

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thanx for the tip Julie, but I am very aware motor skills are a very different muscle group, that is my point. what i was trying to get across is that every child is different and all children will be good at something different! her child may not be ready for writing but may be really good at sport, dancing, math, who knows all kids are different and really should focus on what they love and what they are good at at such a young age!

Samantha - posted on 01/20/2012

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Julia and Charlotte had some great points. For people that haven't worked with small kids its hard to understand the whole system and foundation for teaching.

We also did Jolly Phonics each day, to the point where I could "quiz" my 2 and 3 year olds by showing them a random card and they could make the sound that goes with the letter!

When they know the phonics they can pick out things that start with certain letters....I would have a whiteboard and write a certain letter like B and have them call out things that start with that letter so I could draw it (and make it into a funny game/story too)

If she is having trouble with drawing the letters, tracing parts of letters (straight lines, wavy lines, curved lines, zigzags) is a great way to build skills and is easier so she won't be frustrated. I hope this helps anyone else out there with a kid of preschool age.

Karen - posted on 01/20/2012

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write all the letters on lined paper very lightly with a pencil and have her trace them. if it's regular notebook paper write each letter using two line (to make them large). do this one time, if you have the patience you might even make the letters using dotted lines. save this master and make copies for her to trace the letters once per day (unless she wants to do it more).

Alfreda - posted on 01/20/2012

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I started with the letters in her name. That always causes great interest because then they can sign their own drawings and read package labels. Also learning the first letter of other people's names. My 4 year old could hand out the Christmas packages because she can recognize all the names in the family.



There are workbooks that have letters done in dotted lines where she can trace the dotted lines and then do some without the lines. They have nice big spaces between the top and bottom line with a line down the middle so they can work on getting the letter shaped correctly.



I also found writing her little notes got her to practice reading more and then she wanted to make them so she practiced her writing that way and got to memorize how to spell I love you as well as the names of people in the family.



Your daughter is very lucky to have a mommy that likes to spend time with her and teach her. I get a lot of static too for teaching my daughter to read and write before school. A lot of people just plop their kid in front of the television or throw some toys at them and leave them to their own devices. I think the people who judge are really just feeling insecure due to the fact that they don't do anything with their own kids. Yes some kids are not ready, and pushing them with just make them frustrated, but others really enjoy the one on one attention and love learning new things. Only you know what your kid is ready for. Ignore other people and keep up the good work.



I know some people that refuse to teach their kids everything for fear that their child will be bored in school. Unfortunately their kids are starting from scratch and then the teachers need to cater to them ignoring the kids that have been taught something or are a little bit quicker. It is sad. You can't rely on the school because they need to cater to the lowest common denominator.

Cheryl - posted on 01/20/2012

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Amanda, I am a BIG fan of the Montessori method. What worked for different children over 100 years ago, works well today. My grown adult children are happy and confident. Enjoy parenting as a wonderful adventure with some sound advice from a good resource...:)

Amanda - posted on 01/19/2012

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Ok Julia my daugther is ready to learn to write to draw and to do everthing she love to do whatever mom do, in i have a good time teaching her, she will give me a wonderful smile.

Charlotte - posted on 01/19/2012

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Amanda, you will do more good by teaching your child the sounds of letters. Teach that each letter makes a different sound, and some more than one sound. Start with simple two and three letter words. teach her how to sound out the letters to make the words. the writing will come soon. And yeah for the left handed ones, they are in their right mind!!

Julia - posted on 01/19/2012

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Pamela- I am very sorry for the misunderstanding. To be honest I rarely post on these because it is always so hard to tell what people mean. I hope you can see how I came to that misconception! What are the chances that would be the way you start your post!! I had been wondering if you were a tutor/teacher of some sort based on your answer but I wasn't sure. So I apologize for not understanding your post. I am glad to hear that the kids are wanting to go...that is a sign of a good program...I am sure you know as a teacher if a program like that was done wrong it could be awful for the kids.

Pamela - posted on 01/19/2012

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No, no, Julia...I was not in anyway responding to your post with my "kindergarten teachers answer"...I'm a kindergarten teacher here in Ontario. All I was trying to indicate was that it was my teacher side writing not my mom side. I hadn't even read your post when I wrote mine.

In the response to the time spent at school....the kids are at school for 6 hours. Many parents agree with you, and only send their children part time, but they usually give in and are sending them full time by October because the kids love it so much. Most are reading level D or higher by the end of kindergarten.

I'm sure your program is equally appreciated and enjoyed. I'm sad that you felt attacked and angry. I do, however, appreciate this discussion because it's interesting to see how people and places differ.

Have a great night.

Julia - posted on 01/19/2012

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Pamela - for not being judgmental a LOL comment really is--in my book anyways. For the record I am very good at what I do and the teachers I work with are outstanding as well. I find it horrific that kids would be in school for all day 7-8 hours at age 3.5/4 what a horrible experience unless your schools for that age are really just day cares in which they are playing 90% of the day. ADULTS go to work and do things for 7-8 hours a day not kids. The whole point is IF her daughter was ready to learn it she would not be posting on here for help as her daughter would be picking it up. Clearly her daughter most likely just isn't ready and I was attempting to assure her that this is perfectly normal.

Pamela - posted on 01/19/2012

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Interesting...I first replied before I read everyone else's response...kids in Ontario start school at 4 years old, and some are only 3 1/2. Most school have the kids going all day every day. (I really don't have a point nor am making any judgements, I just find the difference interesting and thought you might too!)

Pamela - posted on 01/19/2012

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A kindergarten teachers' answer: (lol)

First, the most important thing is how she holds the pencil. Only a couple of ways will let her have the mobility to really begin to make letters. I teach kids to make the OK gesture with their fingers, then pinch the pencil in the thumb and index finger. The other three drop behind. I am a big fan of the thick Melissa and Doug triangle shaped crayons or pencil grips.

I like the Hand Writing Without Tears program (Google it). It teaches the Magic C concept. That is, once you can print C , lots of other letters fall into place ie. a d e g G qQ ect.

I like the kids to get the feel of the letters by making them really big like on a chalkboard or just by using a

fluttery ribbon to make it in the air.

The more ways you can get them to make letters the easier it becomes. For example, make letters in pudding on the table or out of playdough. Again, focus on the letter C first as it leads into so many.

The most structured way, yet very effective, is to get two small chalkboards you model step by step how to make a letter and she copies. Then she does it again with a small wet sponge and the letter slowly disappears.

Finally, for her name...get a sturdy piece of cardboard and use an exacto blade to cut her name into it. She can then use the stencilyou've cut to trace her name whereever she pleases. That should get her interested in writing!

Hope that helps!

Kate - posted on 01/19/2012

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Amanda, i think it's great that you are encouraging your daughter to write!



My son is the same age and he has aspergers. He LOVES learning and soaks everything up like a sponge. I know that people say "let your child be" ect but, in the case of my son (and perhaps your daughter) structured play and learning can be very beneficial not only for their minds but also for their self esteme, my son and i love spending quality time together drawing and learning how to write words - it's bonding.



we also have imaginative play to balance it out but don't feel bad for encouraging her if she is interested. People often overlook the intelligence and desire to learn of young children.

Julia - posted on 01/19/2012

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For the record motor skills and fine motor skills are completely separate set of skills. That is why your daughter can write and yet still trips over her own feet. :) They are very very different muscle groups. Great advice though!

Jesse - posted on 01/19/2012

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DON"T WORRY!! my daughter can write all of her ABC"s and is great at coloring could write her name before she started kindy but.... with that been said her motor skills are shocking, she trips over her own feet, struggles to climb up things she just can not keep up with the other kids! but it does not bother us, seriously every kid is different, some will be good at some things others good at other things... don't push her too hard she will get there in reality some kids don't even see a letter until they start school.... She will be fine remember that 4 is very early and I think it is great that she can do the letters she already knows! just be proud and encourage her don't show her you are disappointed that she can't do more or it will make her self conscious and she will not want to do it at all!

Tracy - posted on 01/19/2012

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i love all your answers. my sons 4 and sounds to be way behind everyone on here. hes very immature for his age and has no real interest in writing or letters. he just wants to play and rough and tumble. we do the bare minimum but im not going to fight him and turn it into a chore when its so obvious he has no clue he just needs time to mature a bit and his teacher agrees. we'll just have to play catch up when hes ready in 6,12 or 18 months whenever hes ready.

before anyone says its me. his older brother was the same and when he was ready we done some extra work and he went from bottom 5 in class to top 5 in 12months out of a class of 30ish. hes now at uni doing well. his 3 sisters would have spent 24/7 with a pen in there hands, its just one of those things

Julia - posted on 01/19/2012

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As a kindergarten teacher, I love when parents take an active role in their kids life...but PLEASE remember that she is only 4. I know you say you are not pushing her and it is still "fun". Great. But there is a reason school doesn't start until 5/6 and you can push her to hate writing and school before she even starts and that would be sad. I see this with student after student...when they are READY to learn it and have the correct muscles developed she will pick it up extremely quickly. Most kindergartners come in only knowing the letters in their name and most the time they are barely legible. Already half a year in this year and I have 18 out of 20 students writing sentences in their journals. Please don't feel pressure to get her writing, especially since there is a proper way to form letters and when they come in with bad habits like not starting in the right spot it is VERY hard for the teacher to break those habits- which will make cursive and other things much harder for her. I would say teach her other things and leave the writing alone...like the other posts said (and it sounds like what you are doing) let her color and just develop those muscles... If you just can't let it go--for her please find out what type of printing your school is doing either manuscript or D'nealian and ensure you are teaching her the way she will have to use.

Joanne - posted on 01/19/2012

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Try hand over hand to help her learn how to hold her pencil better. I think you're doing all the right things. Wahtever works. I stared my daughter typing on the computer first becasue she knew her alphabet at 2 and couldn't hold a pencil. Once she was typing words and spelling her own name she wanted to do it on paper and pencil.

She really know her small case letters or write really well until she started kindergarten at 4. Be patient she'll be fine.

Samantha - posted on 01/19/2012

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I worked at an English preschool in Japan and we taught kids to write ABCs from age 4 depending on the child.

First, left or right doesn't matter! She will be fine!

Second, does she color often? How does she hold the crayon (or colored pencil)? First correct her grip and get her putting the other hand on the paper to stabilize, and get her looking at what she is coloring.

Then, when she is doing that, you can start on writing. Pick up a cheap ABC workbook or print out worksheets.

http://bogglesworldesl.com/alphabet_work... Here is a good site to find ABC coloring activities and practice worksheets.

With writing practice sheets like this one http://bogglesworldesl.com/files/Aa.jpg

It helps to take a finely-sharpened pencil and write out the letters lightly for your daughter to trace. In school, we insisted that children use regular erasable pencil but I don't see why you can't make it fun and use colored pencil (and having mommys color and your daughters color). Plus I don't believe in making it perfect. Let your child see how she improves by leaving the mistakes, saying "Just try again!"

Sit down with your daughter and teach her how to write each letter, sounding out the pencil strokes in a fun way (1-2-3, or up-down,across), or relating to an object (A is a big mountain)

4 is old enough to be able to trace over lines by herself, but don't be afraid to grab her hand and guide her a bit if she is having trouble. Have fun!

Christina - posted on 01/19/2012

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Well my kids are younger so I have no experience but I think you just need to read with her and play games involving reading and letters and get words to be familiar. Most of all make it fun if you get all pushy and judgemental she will learn to hate reading and writing and it will not help her development at all.

Darylin - posted on 01/19/2012

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There's a great tool called "handwriting without tears" http://www.hwtears.com/hwt that you should take a look at. It will give your some helpful tips and you can get a jump on what the teachers will be showing her when she goes to school next year.



I think its great that you're taking an interest in this before she starts school. She won't be so overwhelmed if she's exposed to certain things at home first. Good luck!

Tania - posted on 01/19/2012

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Hi Amanda, your daughter is very lucky to have a mum who cares so much for her well being and learning. If it's only her writing you're concerned about, don't get too concerned just yet. Yes, some 4 year olds are writing a bit but it doesn't mean they are smarter than your daughter at all. She's going to school next year and teachers are trained to teach all that. Your job as mum is to instill confidence in her and make letters and numbers, reading and writing fun and inspiring. Playing and getting along with other children, and practical stuff like going to the toilet, washing hands, packing her bag and following instructions are the most important skills for her right now. For literacy, the best things we can do as mums is play and draw next to our children, and read, read, read to them. They love us and want to be like us so when they see us doing these things, they want to do them too.

Don't worry about her left handedness. I'm left handed and, while I have to admit that as a child some things were confusing to work out (like scissors and learning how to knit from a right handed mother), it made no difference to my learning and writing - I can even use a fountain pen. I do some things left handed and some things right handed. Your daughter may too and that's fine.

I have been through this early learning journey with my own children. My daughter (and I) struggled through her first few years of school. She is now in the gifted and talented program at high school and is a ravenous reader who loves writing. So keep encouraging your daughter, make it fun and talk to her teachers. There is one thing I would suggest you do differently to me. Don't worry! Relax and enjoy the journey of watching your daughter grow and learn.

Kristina - posted on 01/18/2012

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When my daughter was in pre-school she would try to write her first name once a day with a little help. I never pushed her I just gave her the opportunity to try. I also made sure that she had plenty of paper/pencils to draw when ever she wanted. I did go through a ton of paper but she learned on her own and when she was ready. She is left-handed, give time, space, supplies, guidance and love. Don't worry lefties get it.

Judi - posted on 01/18/2012

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At four years old, many children have the ability to write letters, but most children do not have the cognitive ability to actually write a sentence or a thought like "I am 4 years old." Our three oldest children went to a very good private school in England where they began taking classes at 3 1/2. By the time they were 5 they could write two to four word sentences, even though they had been practicing their letters for the 18 months before that. If it's important to you that she learns this, sit down with her no more than 5 -10 minutes at a time with a pre-school lined pad (or lines that you've drawn on paper with a dashed line in the center of two lines, about the size of two lines on regular college ruled paper) and have her COPY what you have written. She will get it and if this is something she enjoys, she'll continue to work on it with your help. Have fun!

Diane - posted on 01/18/2012

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when you draw with your child encourage them to use straight and curved lines, circles and squares, up down and side to side these will help her develop the control that can later be applied to letters

Joanna - posted on 01/18/2012

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I wouldn't push anything yet. I have a just turned 4 year old who loves to write. He can't do it very well, but he tries really hard and most of the letters and numbers I can figure out what they are. However, i did very little to help him. He just loves it. My 6 year old on the other hand really didn't start trying to write until she was 5, and now at 6 and a half, still does not like practicing handwriting. I know she will get it and i am not worried, but all kids are different. Don't stress about it. Oh and I found out to give them very small pencils or broken crayons to help them hold the correct way. Doesn't matter if they are left or right handed. I have one of each.

Alexandra - posted on 01/18/2012

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Amanda, It is good that you only want what's best for your child and you would do anything for her. However, in my opinion, not for anybody to get mad, please let her be a child. She is only four years old, right now she need to play with her friends, eat and sleep properly, and not much more. She will have plenty of time, plennty of years to be able to write and count and read. Why rushing it? If she does not play now, if things are too serious now, then when do we want them to play?

Please don't get mad at people's comments, including mine. You asked for an opinion and this is my opinion., I respect yours, but I also have to say what's in my heart. And, at this point, I think you just have to let her be a child, a happy child, with no pressure.

Bernadette - posted on 01/18/2012

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give her time she will learn on her own and believe me you will be surprised just as I was with my son!

Della - posted on 01/18/2012

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At four have fun. Read to your baby everyday, all day. I started with learning the letters for my kid's names. I had a small group of pre school boys and even at 4 they all loved writing their name.



badart

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