Your Baby Can Read

Chelsea - posted on 12/13/2009 ( 34 moms have responded )

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Has anyone used the Your Baby can Read System? My son is 5 months old now, i was going to see about getting it for him for Christmas. What do you think about it?

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Angie - posted on 12/16/2009

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Iagree woth Loureen, why. Why do you want to rush you baby? If you wreally want to instill a love of reading, read to you baby. I started reading to my children the day they were born. We read at night. They see their father and I reading daily. My children are all well above reading level without spending hundreds of dollares on thing as My Baby Can Read. Dont' spend a bunch of money on a system that probably won't work. Go to the library often to check out books and read, read, read to your baby.

Patricia - posted on 12/16/2009

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Hi, I have the full deluxe package that has everything!! i think u should wait until he's about 18mths to 2yrs!!! u have to spend a long time before the kid can even comprehend what u r trying to teach him, my son is 3yrs now and i only started using it when he was 21/2yrs old and even then only on the weekends! u should concentrate on reading to ur baby becos that builds his love of books/studying... my son is above the average kid becos i have been reading to him from pregnancy n he listens to classical music for bedtime everyday since he was about 5mnths when he started sleeping in his own room. and now he knows his alphabets since 21/2yrs, knows his shapes/colors n he's learning secondary colors n can sound out all the alphabets, he loves to read n study. I think its the fostering of reading habit that really helped, ur baby can read helps but not as early as they say unless u wanna spend a good 3hrs everyday onit with ur kids which i think is way too much for a young child!! so just do every lil bit consistenly!! Good Luck!

Kathryn - posted on 12/15/2009

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I thought it looked awesome and very impressive, so I checked out some reviews from people who have used it (searched Yahoo under "Your Baby Can Read product reviews). Most of what I read was negative. People said that unless you want to spend eight hours a day inundating your child with flashcards, etc., and being a total Nazi about it, it's not going to work.

Sylvia - posted on 12/14/2009

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I wouldn't. I don't think there's any evidence that pushing a young child to learn to read before s/he is developmentally ready accomplishes anything (except frustrating everybody), but more than that, I don't really understand why anyone would want a literate toddler. Seriously, think of all the stuff you can get away with when your toddler or preschooler can't read yet: pretending there's no chocolate cake on the restaurant menu, spelling out words so s/he won't understand them, changing the words in books when the book says something you don't want your child to hear ... And think of all the things you suddenly have to start explaining to your newly literate child ("Protect your sex" condom ads on the bus are my favourite :P -- I mean, I'm glad they're there, but ...).

Bottom line -- kids learn to read when they're ready, just like they learn to walk and talk when they're ready. Some kids learn to read at three, or four, or five. Some not till six or seven. (The son of one friend of mine was reading by the time he was two -- and nobody ever made the slightest effort to teach him to read, they just read books to him the way the rest of us do, and one day they realized he wasn't just "reading" books he'd already memorized, he was reading words he'd never seen before.) It's a lot more important for babies and toddlers to have developmentally appropriate stuff to play with -- blocks and balls and playdough and water to splash in, that kind of stuff -- than to spend money on "systems" to teach them to read. Don't worry -- he'll get there :)

September - posted on 12/14/2009

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To be honest and this is only my opinion I think that it's crap! You can teach your baby how to ready by simply spending time reading to your child and including them in your conversations. We don't watch a lot of TV at our house and when it is on our son is not even interrested. He would much rather be spending some one on one time with Mommy and Daddy. Our son is 13 months old and has an unbeliveable vocabulary and my husband and I can take all the credit.

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Lovelesssarah - posted on 02/25/2014

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Because the perfect way to teach reading hasn't been discovered and there is still much debate over methods, I have decided to try the whole-word approach in conjunction with The whole-language approach. Any interaction with written literature is beneficial, in my humble opinion.

Lovelesssarah - posted on 02/25/2014

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We all read from memorization. We don't look at each individual phoneme. Although, YBCR does include phonic instruction. I am fully aware of all the arguments. "Whole word" vs. "Phonics." Is there comprehension? The one thing I know is when she sees the word clap she claps, same with wave, toes and several other words. I think she is doing very well. She is 7 months with an adjusted age of 6 months. Even if she isn't "reading" her vocabulary has increased. The program is only $158 and comes with 5 books and other wonderful printed text. I view interaction with this material the same as reading books. It is written literature. The material alone is well worth the $158. We interact with the videos together and she loves them. We still use memorization as the fundamental teaching tool for mathematic and children learn the concept of numbers later. I believe she can gain phonemic awareness through reading.

Jodi - posted on 02/22/2014

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If you are in early childhood education, Sarah, then you know your baby is only memorising, not actually learning to read.

Lovelesssarah - posted on 02/22/2014

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We have this program and love it! We have been doing it for 2 months and already see progress! We absolutely love it and would recommend it. My background is in early childhood education and I am well aware of the debates. I am so impressed by this program!

Kelsey - posted on 12/16/2009

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Quoting Sylvia:

I wouldn't. I don't think there's any evidence that pushing a young child to learn to read before s/he is developmentally ready accomplishes anything (except frustrating everybody), but more than that, I don't really understand why anyone would want a literate toddler. Seriously, think of all the stuff you can get away with when your toddler or preschooler can't read yet: pretending there's no chocolate cake on the restaurant menu, spelling out words so s/he won't understand them, changing the words in books when the book says something you don't want your child to hear ... And think of all the things you suddenly have to start explaining to your newly literate child ("Protect your sex" condom ads on the bus are my favourite :P -- I mean, I'm glad they're there, but ...).

Bottom line -- kids learn to read when they're ready, just like they learn to walk and talk when they're ready. Some kids learn to read at three, or four, or five. Some not till six or seven. (The son of one friend of mine was reading by the time he was two -- and nobody ever made the slightest effort to teach him to read, they just read books to him the way the rest of us do, and one day they realized he wasn't just "reading" books he'd already memorized, he was reading words he'd never seen before.) It's a lot more important for babies and toddlers to have developmentally appropriate stuff to play with -- blocks and balls and playdough and water to splash in, that kind of stuff -- than to spend money on "systems" to teach them to read. Don't worry -- he'll get there :)


This is also a good point. I think babies this young are learning alot about science, phsycology, relationships, and their own physical and mental abilities, and it may not be so wise to interrupt this basic and cery vital learning with reading. Reading is definatly a more mature thing to learn than the basic things they are learning right now. Its just not age appropriate. You two ladies have made excellent points, and not to make this about me, but you have convinced me that its just not as good for them as we all might think.

Kelsey - posted on 12/16/2009

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Quoting Loureen:

What the program is is videos that flash words and pictures on the screen followed by a picture of that thing and the whole idea is your child will memorize the words and eventually be able to figure out what sounds the letters make in other words. This technique is called the "whole-word" approach to reading. It was taken out of schools in I think the early 80's never to be seen again because of how difficult it actually made reading for children. With the Whole word approach children learn to read much more quickly but do not learn to spell which can hinder writing (not to mention confidence), and they also do not learn all the sounds that letters can make. A phonetic approach is much more widely accepted, and although it takes much longer for a child to learn they are actually proven to be better readers/writers overall from children that learn to read using the whole word approach. Just think about how many sounds the vowels alone can make for the sound "i" aside from short and long sounds there is i_e, igh, y. There is the sound "ow" as in snow and "ow" as in cow. And a million other confusing sounds that need to be taught.
Of course make your own decision. The whole premise behind YBCR is that they will be able to read sooner so read more and learn more. So when other kids are learning to read they can spend that time filling in the gaps in their own education. There is no program that can ever make your child more intelligent,


Wow, I never thought of it that way. That definatly makes a point. Makes me feel less guilty about not getting it myself.

Kelsey - posted on 12/16/2009

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Quoting Loureen:

geez let your kids be kids , I am a teacher for early childhood and i can tell you the most valuable learning tool for a child that young is in fact PLAY !

Actually play is VITAL to a childs learning , all this pushing to force formal education on young children is not only useless in the long run but it can be detrimental to your childs willlingness to learn when pushed so young .

Simply reading a book to your child everyday is far more productive and pleasent .



That is all true, but alot of babies enjoy this activity just as much as physically playing or reading a book. It is play to them as much as anything else. Babies learn so much faster and easier at this age and this system if nothing else will help instill a love for reading and learning. Their brains are like sponges right now. It is nothing but positive to give them as much as you can for them to learn. Babies love to learn, especially language and what things are. Play is also very important, but I know that my baby is 6 months and she can only play with the same toys every day for so long before shes bored and wants to do something else like read a book or just be walked around to soak in the world. There is definatly enough time in the day to include this. Especially if your a stay at home mom.

Kelsey - posted on 12/16/2009

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I havent tried it. I wanted to sooo bad, but never got the money to get it. Im glad i didnt though because my daughter doesnt have the attention span like most babies. She was colicky and suffers from constipation so she is usually too uncomfortable to be interested in something that isnt physically stimulating. I read her lots of books which she loves, but she gets bored after about 5 miutes and wants to move around. I think its a very good thing though. Especially if your baby is the calm type that likes to watch and listen. Mine is just a spaz! lol! ;)

Patricia - posted on 12/16/2009

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OH! FYI - Girl babies are really early speakers for some reason unless ur boy baby is really fast in that respect, my son did not speak clearly until he was 21/2yrs old, he made sounds but they did not make much sense to anyone even to me!! but i tell u when he started speaking he was talking up all the big words i had been teaching him all along when my husband thought he was'nt listening, he started saying fantistic!, splendid, wondrfil mummy, n alot more than other kids, he makes incredibly long sentences now n can hold a conversation with even adult, of course we r shocked becos it seems that he just opened his mouth n started talking but i have been doing flash cards with him from 2yrs like other moms suggest n it worked! so keep talking n teaching him he is listening even if he does'nt repeat it for now.

Charlie - posted on 12/16/2009

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What the program is is videos that flash words and pictures on the screen followed by a picture of that thing and the whole idea is your child will memorize the words and eventually be able to figure out what sounds the letters make in other words. This technique is called the "whole-word" approach to reading. It was taken out of schools in I think the early 80's never to be seen again because of how difficult it actually made reading for children. With the Whole word approach children learn to read much more quickly but do not learn to spell which can hinder writing (not to mention confidence), and they also do not learn all the sounds that letters can make. A phonetic approach is much more widely accepted, and although it takes much longer for a child to learn they are actually proven to be better readers/writers overall from children that learn to read using the whole word approach. Just think about how many sounds the vowels alone can make for the sound "i" aside from short and long sounds there is i_e, igh, y. There is the sound "ow" as in snow and "ow" as in cow. And a million other confusing sounds that need to be taught.

Of course make your own decision. The whole premise behind YBCR is that they will be able to read sooner so read more and learn more. So when other kids are learning to read they can spend that time filling in the gaps in their own education. There is no program that can ever make your child more intelligent,

Tricia - posted on 12/16/2009

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the best thing for children's language and literacy is to snuggle up and read to your child - no less than 3 story books a day. have board books and cloth books for looking at and pointing to. DK books are great. Talk - talk talk about everything and tell stories often. as they get older start the story and let them tell the rest. you will have fun, they will have fun and no pricey gimmicks are needed :)

Jessica - posted on 12/16/2009

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to the ladies sayin sit down n read with ur child i couldnt agree more!!
my big girl is 3 n we have a words box. its just a container with her words like her name(keosha), door, clock, etc; we used blu-tac n stuck them all ova the house which she thought was brilliant......im not tryin to force anythi onto my child i just thought it would b fun.......
about 6 months ago she yelled out mum look what i made.....she wrote the word HOT n said look i made HOT!!!!
i completely agree with just lettin kids b kids or babies bein babies!!!!

Sonia - posted on 12/15/2009

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Hi! We bought some of the DVDs and word cards -- although now, I think they make you buy the whole system -- kind of a rip off. You can check your local craigslist and see if anyone is selling it for cheap. If you're needing some time to do chores etc, and you would normally pop in a video for your baby -- these are great! Fairly entertaining for the 6 months through 18 months age group, but not so entertaining that you feel like your baby is losing the ability to be creative. As for teaching reading, yes, my 3 year old can recognize ~ 75-100 words now, but we stopped using the videos for her because her interest waned and because I noticed that she wasn't paying attention to the subtle differences in words, but just guessing based on the shape of the word and the font. We're doing phonics with her now instead, but I do feel like the videos increased her vocabulary and helped her to be very verbally advanced. Our 16 month old is also very verbally advanced (uses short sentences, vocabulary ~ 150 words) and we feel like she learned a lot of vocabulary through the YBCR videos. She has started to recognize some of the words... but we will probably also teach her to read primarily using phonics when she's ready. So my take on it is -- don't rely on it to teach your baby to read, but use it as an educational video when you need to keep baby occupied -- it's better than Barney IMHO! As others have posted, there is no substitute for mommy and me time, talking to your baby throughout the day, and reading to him. My 16 month old daughter (as you can tell by my profile picture) is Ethiopian, so her hair is a little time-intensive and she is *very* active, so I'll sometime use a YBCR video to keep her sitting still and looking straight ahead so I can do her hair!!! Works like a charm...

ABIGAIL - posted on 12/15/2009

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i was also thinking of getting the same programme for my son, he is 15 months, but it just a matter of spending time with your child, reading and helping them to understand, that develops there brain very well.

Kayla - posted on 12/14/2009

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We got it about 2 months ago for our 16 month old and have seen where she is beginning to grasp the concept. I don't push it as it wasn't my idea to get it for her but I do see where it works. I think it's really up to you if you want to get it

Sandra - posted on 12/14/2009

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I'm an ECE teacher as well, just get him some good books, cuddle up, and read together! I

Charlie - posted on 12/14/2009

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geez let your kids be kids , I am a teacher for early childhood and i can tell you the most valuable learning tool for a child that young is in fact PLAY !

Actually play is VITAL to a childs learning , all this pushing to force formal education on young children is not only useless in the long run but it can be detrimental to your childs willlingness to learn when pushed so young .

Simply reading a book to your child everyday is far more productive and pleasent .

Erin - posted on 12/14/2009

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I thought I read somewhere, where the system doesn't work and it's really expensive!!

Gretchen - posted on 12/14/2009

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I don't believe in that stuff either. . .I made my own flash cards for the alphabet for my kids and it works just fine. . you can also look on the interenet for ideas on teaching things to you baby. . in my opinion I don't want to force so much on my kids, I want them to learn things at their own pace, I have a nephew who was forced with work and learning before he was in school and now he is ten, he is really really smart, he reads college books and is way above average in school, like they can't test him anymore because he is way past the grading scale, and that is all good but he has a hard time in class because he knows all of it and doesn't want to sit and listen. .so I want my kids to be smart naturally not force a bunch of stuff on them and make them smart. . .I hope I didn't offend any of you this is just my opinion =)

Jodi - posted on 12/14/2009

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I personally think that Your Baby Can Read is a crock! In order to learn to read you must learn the alphabet first and learn how letters go together to make words and sentences and so forth, YBCR simply has your child memorize words. As for the arguments that it stimulates the language part of your brain, so does learning the alphabet and reading books with your child. I think you will be wasting a lot of money on something that does little to help your child! Good luck on whatever you choose!

Jodi - posted on 12/14/2009

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No its not made by Baby Einstein (or vice versa). My original post was simply a cut and paste of an old post I made, because I was too lazy to retype it, LOL. But most people seem to see them as similar products :)

Renae - posted on 12/14/2009

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Is Your Baby Can Read made by Baby Einstein? I have the complete set (yes every last book, flash card, DVD the works) and I never noticed it was a Baby Einstein product, but its in my baby's room and he is asleep so I can't go in and look.



I studied psychology with a focus on infant and early childhood development and the ladies who have said that there is no evidence that it does anything are 100% correct. All the research shows that there is little you can do to influence a baby's development. So why the hell did I spend all that money on the complete set you are wondering? Because it is my personal opinion (developed over a few years of researching the topic) that offering this type of activity stimulates the part of the brain used for language, or numeracy or whatever it is you are doing. It also gives me fun interactive things to do with my baby and it will not do any harm. Even if the baby isn't neurologically ready for it, it wont do any harm, it just wont sink in.



I just want to clear up that some people mention that these products do not teach baby's to read but develop language skills. Well, that is the intention. The product is intended to stimulate the part of the brain that is used to read and write so when it comes time to learn to read and write it happens more easily and to a more advanced level. It is not intended to teach a 3 month old to read.



The "whole word approach" to learning to read is one that I am not opposed to. My son will be taught using both techniques, I do not believe any current teaching method causes any harm, it all comes together in the end. But if I get into detail debating this I will be here all night so I'll leave it there.

[deleted account]

Quoting Michele:

my son is 5 and in kindergarten. He is reading and spelling at at 2nd grade level. I used flash cards. Good ole mommy and me time. Flash cards, when he was 2 we made flash cards and played memory games. I feel the system is just replacing you.


I agree. I tried baby einstein products when my kid was 1 and 2. It was nothing special. I stopped her second year, and took up with flash cards and work books. My child is 3 and doing first grade level work. She does basic addition, subtraction, and we are about to start learning to read as she recognizes all her letters and most of the sounds. Just put in time with him. It will have the greatest effect.

Traci - posted on 12/13/2009

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I think baby einstein is the way to go if you are using a system, other than yourself. The videos teach colors, sounds, animals, ect... all while classical music is played in the background. Classical music is supposed to help with the development of mathematical skills. When the children get older they also have products such as flash cards and some toys for children teach colors in multiple languages.

However, your child learns from you first. Make up some fun songs introducing colors, letters, and shapes. Make sure they are repeatative and simple so baby can learn them quicker. My child is 8 months right now and she can already say multiple words...and has been for a few months. She can also point out her "dog" and "cat" when shown in a book.

All in all if you work with your child everyday and teach them the skills personally, they will more than likely learn at a more flexible level. Don't just plop them in front of a tv and let some program do the teaching for you.

Eve - posted on 12/13/2009

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I m also getting the BAby can read set for Xmas. I agree that you can get the samething by Downloading flash card on google. But I m getting the set anyways. My baby is almost 6 months, and I dont plan to show him the Dvd part untill he is much older. I just want want a system where I can feel more organized. Besides its another excuse for his grandparents to spoil him since they are getting it for him.

Michele - posted on 12/13/2009

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my son is 5 and in kindergarten. He is reading and spelling at at 2nd grade level. I used flash cards. Good ole mommy and me time. Flash cards, when he was 2 we made flash cards and played memory games. I feel the system is just replacing you.

Cynthia - posted on 12/13/2009

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I was going to do the same thing for my daughter she's 2 1/2. I was going to do the 30 day trial for $14.99 to see if it works.

Jodi - posted on 12/13/2009

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Here is a post I put in another thread a while age :



Baby Einstein are no longer marketing their products as educational. While it may be enjoyable for the child, there is absolutely NO EVIDENCE that forcing a baby to undertake tasks before they are neurologically ready is of any advantage whatsoever. In actualy fact, the important part of programs like this is language development, not the reading, and language development can be achieved in a much more interactive way between parent and child by doing a lot of reading together, as opposed to using a TV.



The other argument agains these sort of programs is that they teach by an extreme whole word approach, which essentially teaches a baby to memorise words before they can even understand what it means. This can actually have the effect of delaying phonics learning.



So I guess, my question is Why? Is it because you want your child to be advanced in their reading in later life (they will be no more advanced than the average child - there is no benefit in teaching them earlier with a program like this).



Seriously, it is a marketing gimmick that companies are making a fortune out of by convincing parents that their children need it.



Let your kids just be kids. Interact with them in everyday activities, including reading age appropriate books together. Sing songs. Do counting games, etc. The only people benefiting from these programs long term are the companies creating them.

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