9 month old comfort nursing ALL NIGHT!

Taisha - posted on 01/22/2013 ( 75 moms have responded )

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My almost 9 month old daughter continues to wake every 1-2 hours a night, all night long, to nurse. She refuses to take a pacifier and I know that she's not hungry, she is doing it for comfort. I have tried the cry it out method which has only worked for putting her to sleep in that I can put her in her crib and walk away and she will go to sleep on her own....but she wont stay sleep! Other articles I have read say to have the spouse offer comfort so she doesn't smell me but my husband works nights so that's not an option. At 3am when I have to be to work at 9am and she is searching with her mouth, eyes still closed, she becomes frustrated and angry and screams bloody murder! So I give in....she nurses for maybe 5 minutes and is right back to sleep for another hour or two. I don't know what to do. Any advice?

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Samantha - posted on 02/11/2013

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Co-sleeping is not crazy, ask most of the countries around the world that practice it. We are in the minority and I believe there is a reason. To me it seems crazy to put an infant who has no sense of rules or discipline in a separate room and let them cry, instead of giving them the comfort and nourishment they need to develop healthily. And when they stop crying, that's not because they learned to self-soothe or whatever, it's because they pretty much lost faith in their own mother coming to help them when they're in need. And I was a preschool teacher for 2-3 year olds before becoming a mommy myself, I know a bit about discipline, and usually it involves logical consequences and setting rules and boundaries that a child can understand. Do you punish your babies for soiling themselves? Then why would you ignore them crying because they need you?

Cecilia - posted on 02/11/2013

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Well Mellissa, i have 5 children. All of them co-slept. None had an issue leaving my bed by 18 months. 3 of which are now teenagers. None of them control me. I have very little issues with them to be honest. None of them ran the house as toddlers. Sorry but allowing co-sleeping does not mean we do not have rules and boundaries. You're mixing the two things up.

As far as you being a nurse and seeing mothers roll over on babies. I'm calling BS. Seriously if you're a nurse you know the issue isn't rolling, it's the blankets and pillows. Mothers in Africa co-sleep only. they have a very low rate of it being a problem. The reason is they sleep on bamboo mats with no blankets or pillows. So yes if you co-sleep, have the child either on top of or away from blankets. keep pillows away from head or go without if you can. Don't believe the hype that everything in the world is going to kill a baby.

It sounds like you have an issue of controlling your children. I on the other hand do not control them. My job as a mom is to nudge them in the right direction and let them make choices. Although i might be younger than you, I think that my parenting skill and knowledge seem to surpass yours. I at least understand a child doesn't cry to get back at you and make you bend to it's will. It cries because it needs something and job of parent is to provide for needs.

Amarylis - posted on 01/23/2013

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she might be having a growth spurt, seperation anxiety, or a tooth coming. Bottle feeding won't solve the issue. I'm going through the same thing and have done this before when she was younger. It will pass as she gets more comfortable with being on her own. At this age a baby is starting to change from baby to toddler which is a scary experience since they are now more aware of their environment.

Angelica - posted on 02/02/2013

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Hi, I just went through the same thing with my three month old. I am exclusively nursing and unfortunately was simply nursing on command without any schedule. So he would wake up, eat for a few minutes, fall asleep and then it would start all over again. He went from waking every two hours to waking every 30 minutes. He completely wiped me out and that's when I discovered "Twelve hours sleep by Twelve Weeks old by Suzy Giordano. Basically, set your mind that within one week your baby will be sleeping through the night or almost. You just have to stick through it and if you can get some help from someone for this week, it will be worth it. Also, it helps if you are not co sleeping. She should be in her crib in her own room.

Start by establishing a bedtime and a routine. For me, I like my baby to sleep 7:30 p.m. to 7:30 a.m. So every evening at about 7:00 p.m., we start with a warm bath. I let him splash around. I talk to him, massage his scalp, etc. At around 7:15 p.m. I take him out. I have his pjs, diaper, and cream all ready. I carefully dry him and give him a quick massage. I then sit down to nurse him. Ideally, (based on experience) if he eats for at least 20 minutes, I know it will be a good night. One reason why he was waking was that he was not getting enough to eat during the day. But it all begins by establishing a bedtime routine. So try to rub her cheek, tickle the bottom of her feet to ensure she eats. Once she has eaten, burp her (as gas can also wake them) and then put her in her crib. If she wakes, then you speak very softly (no lights) and soothe her, "Mommy's here, you're a good girl, it's time to get some sleep." Etc. Don't let her cry for more than 5 minutes, and all the while you are soothing and speaking to her softly. She may need to be repositioned etc. In the book, it mentions that the first night is the worse (and it is) and each night gets better after that. It is also important to wake her up at the time you would like her to wake up in the morning, in my case 7:30 a.m. change her feed her. This time opening up the curtains, turning on the lights, playing some music, so she knows its daytime. Again, its important that she eat well. She should be eating solids by now so ensure she has a good breakfast with protein and carbs. She should go down for a nap 45 min to 1 hour and a half after she gets up. And again she should be placed in her crib, comforted soothed and spoken to in a soft voice. The idea is to get them to fall asleep on their own so that when they wake up at night, they know how to soothe themselves to sleep. My baby does take the pacifier but only during the day He doesn't take it at night, but he does like a blankie. I noticed that he would try to grab something as he was lying down and I got him a blankie at Toys R Us and it helps. He likes to hold onto something soft as he lulls off to sleep.

I srongly recommend the book, you can read it in about two hours. It has really helped me. Right now my son is waking up only once per night. Just remember, wake her everyday at the same time, ensure she gets plenty to eat during the day and establish a bedtime routine everyday at the same time. You should be much better in a few days.
Co Sleeping just gives you some sleep but you are just pushing the problem further down the line. The idea is for her to sleep on her own in her own room. Best of luck!

Cecilia - posted on 01/28/2013

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if it helps any my daughter co-slept with us until 18 months. I then bought her a toddler bed, let her pick out her new bedding, bought new stuffed animals, her own pillows- the works.. The day i put it together was the last time she slept in my bed. (beyond when she is sick or has nightmares, even then she will leave and head back to her bed) To start her bed was right next to mine. Then after about a week i moved it across the room. at 24 months she went to her own bedroom without issues.

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Tatiana - posted on 03/12/2013

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Hi, I just found the most exquisite,melodic and enchanting Lullaby on youtube.



Do listen, it is installed with lyrics, so you can sing with it.
It is a soothing gem and will soothe your baby and lull him or her to sleep.

cheers,
Tatiana

Stepsinstilettos - posted on 03/11/2013

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I had the same problem with my first born. Unfortunately, the only thing that worked was to leave him alone in his crib at night. I really tried everything else because I did not want to do that. It was the only thing that worked. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be either. Only took 20 minutes for him to fall back asleep on his own the first night, and less each night after. With my second child, we trained her earlier and she is a fabulous sleeper now!

Dalila - posted on 03/11/2013

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You are not alone my daughter is 11 month and am going throe the same thing she wont take a Buttle or Sippy cup am going throe hell am nursing with one breast because I have sore nipple from sucking all night it hurts even when I pump the milk any one help me I dont know what to do!):

Linda Michaelle - posted on 03/07/2013

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almost embarrassed to say... i have the EXACT same issue with my 1 year old... :(

Mei - posted on 03/06/2013

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My baby didn't nurse but couldn't sleep well at that age due to eczema - think constant itch, constant scratching, hopefully not bloody nights. I let her sleep on my tummy, and I sleep on my back, seemed to help :) Not the best option, but good enough for me that both can grab some sleep without scratching/crying.

Mei

Cecilia - posted on 03/05/2013

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Oh I assumed they would realize 14 hours is all the sleep throughout the day and night. Yes i guess i should be more specific though. I think the problem is people hear of 3 month olds sleeping through the night and wonder what they are doing wrong. The truth is nothing is being done wrong. Babies sleep when they do and all we can do as mommies is try to adjust when they are sleeping to fit into our lives.

I had one who slept through the night ( 6 hours) at 4 months and i have a 2 and a half year old who still never has. The 2 year old does take a 2 hour nap during the day. I could try avoiding the nap to make her sleep during the night.Then she isn't very nice during the day. I am up still when she wakes so it doesn't bother me. It happens maybe 3 times a week. She comes to the living room i make her some hot chocolate she eats a small snack (like a gram cracker) and then lays back down. These 20 minutes of being up are just who she is. She sleeps the right amount of time for her age. Side note, she does have nightmares and i believe these are the times when she is waking up, because when she is up she wants to be in my lap and cuddle until she is relaxed then she'll tell me bed.

Margaux - posted on 03/05/2013

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I think all parents want to do what's best, but unfortunately, some parents have been misled by media, doctors, etc. We would never dream of letting our baby "cry it out". Many studies confirm how detrimental this method is on their brains. Thanks.

Margaux - posted on 03/05/2013

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14 hours, yes, but it's important to specify that it's ok if it's 'interrupted sleep'. This is very "normal" for a baby at this age. Margaux

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It is tough going when your sleep gets interrupted so much. Its easier to just do the quick feeds so you can all go back to sleep. But if you feel confident that its not hunger related, that's she's comfortable (not too hot, wet nappy etc), then it's probably just become the habit she's formed to get herself back to sleep. If you can leave her to cry it out like you mentioned in a reply, she will get used to it after a few nights. Has she always done this or is it a new behaviour? (apart from when she was really little). Sometimes it is a developmental thing, and they are seeking comfort. Go with your instinct. You need your sleep too. My 2nd child was still waking several times in the night at 9 months and we were all so sleep deprived we let him cry it out. We had fairly mixed results, he'd sleep well for a few nights ( asleep at 7pm then waking around 4/5 am for a feed), then go back to waking several times, then we'd go back to cry it out. Then out of the blue at 11 months he slept 12 hours through the whole night and has ever since ( he's 18 months now). Good luck.

Margaux - posted on 03/04/2013

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My honest opinion is that 9 months old is still way too young for a baby to soothe themselves back to sleep. No matter what the Cry It Out "experts" say. Can I please ask you if co-sleeping is an option for you? If so, it's absolutely amazing at helping the entire family get more sleep. And I mean that from personal experience, we started out putting our son in his crib at night. He would wake every 30 minutes to an hour wanting comfort (this is very, very normal for babies, there is nothing wrong with them and absolutely nothing wrong with you :)). After I got smart and started to follow my instincts, I put the crib in storage and put him in bed with us. We have been sleeping together (very safely) every night since. It's been shown to even reduce chances of SIDS. He's right there, with mama, where he should be. I wish you the best, but honestly think about the possibility of doing this, especially if you have to work the next day. xo

Jessica - posted on 03/01/2013

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Hi I actually been going through the same situation. I just came from the doctor today and she told me to just give her some water and she should go right back to sleep instead of breastfeeding. I am actually waiting for my baby to get up tonight to see if that actually works, crossing my fingers:)

Cecilia - posted on 02/26/2013

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Emma, Have you tried to start giving her fruits and veggies before bed time? Please do not give her juice, specially at night. Juice is mostly sugar and not good for her. At night you're only asking for her mouth and teeth to rot because of it. If you like giving her juice go ahead during the day, but always clean her mouth afterwards. Plusl juice is not going to relieve hunger if she is hungry. (that might be why she is waking)

Some people do suggest rice cereal, i personally do not do cereal. It has little nutritional value to it. I will say if you choose cereal please spoon feed it, she is old enough.

I don't know what time she is laying down to go to bed so i can't fully tell how long she is sleeping here. She will still wake up. Everyone wakes up at night, even adults. You just put yourself right back to sleep and don't remember it usually. With babies some are better at going back to sleep than others.

If nothing else write down how long she is sleeping. Naps and bed time. 9-12 months should be around 14 hours of sleep. If she is getting that, then you are fine. I know you might feel tired. You can try to adjust when she is sleeping or try to nap during the day so you feel a little better.

Emma - posted on 02/26/2013

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my baby is almost 9 months too and still slept thru a ngt yet. im so tired from it. i give her dummy and some juice and still seems to wake at 11,4 and 6 in d mourning. i dont know wat to do. iv even changed her formula to c if that will work. any ideas

Dove - posted on 02/14/2013

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I see there are some strong opinions on this (duh... I knew there would be). I have no issue with my son manipulating me simply because I chose to fulfill ALL his needs (emotional ones included) as an infant and toddler. I parented in his best interest and I have no regrets whatsoever. I'd do it all again in a heartbeat.

Dove - posted on 02/14/2013

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My son nursed 1-5 times every night until we gently night weaned at 2. He was physically and emotionally ready to sleep through the night at that point, so night weaning was a breeze. I put no more effort into it other than talking to him... and he had no crying.

We have always co-slept (he doesn't yet have a room of his own) and off and on bed shared, so that might have something to do with it. He still sleeps with me, but has slept all night long for almost 3 years straight now.

Cecilia - posted on 02/14/2013

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Ok the JS link says nothing. it says the baby was asleep in the parents bed. It might have been a medical condition such as a faulty heart. where does it say the parents are responsible for the death?

Sheknows link states "As Vanessa was found to have elevated levels of hydrocodone (a narcotic) and Xanax (an anti-anxiety medication)" Well there is the mystery solved right there. I believe i said not to be on a sedative.

I do find it funny that it does say 11 babies died in a year. Okay lets put that into perspective. How many of those were mothers like this one where she was doing the wrong thing and allowing a baby in her bed while medicated? My guess, probably 10 of the 11. The one that didn't let's even write off as a medical condition in the baby. So 10 out of... geeze i don't even know. I see many many women here admitting to co sleeping so i assume the number is large. So maybe 1 in 10000 chance ( and i'm being very very generous with that number.) of injury.

A "normal unmedicated person" does not simply roll on top of things and not realize it. I have never rolled over on top of my husband, have you? Yes he is much larger than a baby but the same premise works. even when sleeping we stop when we feel something next to us.

Melissa - posted on 02/14/2013

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Well, all of ladies can critisize me as you like. I certainly still have my strong beliefs in what has worked for me. I think I've done a great job raising 3 boys (also with no outside help) and kudos to you because you have 5. I am not "some nurse", I am an educated person in the medical field who has had experience and success with these situations. I think someone took my comment about control a little to far... I was referring to the situation. I'm extremely surprised I need to explain that. I can do links as well but its your choice. I just gave you my opinion.. wasn't expecting to get attacked though lmao.

HERES A COUPLE OF THINGS TO READ IF YOU THINK IT WILL NEVER HAPPEN TO YOU:
http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articl...

At least 11 infants have died last year after co-sleeping with an adult or another child.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/b...

Tarla - posted on 02/12/2013

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Hi, My Daughter was the same. I also tried cry it out - which left me in tears, dummy - she wouldn't take it. At 13 months I had my mum come and stay for a week. we both bunked down in her room and took turns puting her back to sleep.
First we rocked her in our arms till she was alseep - then gently placed her in the bed
this may have been for 3 nights- sometimes rocking for over 40 minutes at a time.
We then changed to holding her on her side an patting her rythmically on the bottom while saying shhhh shhh shhh.
This also went on for a few nights BUT by the end of 8 days she was going to sleep within a few minutes of being put to bed - with pats and sh-sh-sh's, at about 8 pm and generally only waking around 1am and then up at 6am.
We noted down all wake and sleep times - which is encouraging as each day the sleep cycles became obvious. I would feed her after 3-4 hours at first then after 4-5hours.
It was the most draining week but worth it if you can take a week off, and enlist some friends.... I found that I kept my sanity doing it this slow way, as i became very depressed trying the cry it out and the controled crying methods.
The longer that she slept during the day, also helped her to sleep longer at night.
I think my daughter was waking from habit and from overtiredness which stoped her from moving from smoothly from one sleep cycle to the next.
I truly hope this helps.
Now my daughter 3 and a half goes to bed at 6.30 has a story, listens to some music then goes strait to sleep. She still wakes once most nights, but I can cope with that.... It is finding what you can cope with - not what others say your child should be doing.

Tammy - posted on 02/12/2013

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I nursed my daughter till she was 18 months old and she slept in the bed with me. She used me for a pacifier too. You have to let her cry it out, as difficult as it is. Trust me, when I weaned my daughter it broke my heart but after we got thru that first night every thing was fine. And don't put her in the bed with you if she's not already there. It took me till my girl was in school to get her out of my room.

Laura - posted on 02/12/2013

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9 months old is about the right time for a major growth spurt. I nursed both of mine a long while (3 1/2 years) and this was the same way with both. I also worked full time & it is rough. I see that there is an argument going on this thread regarding co-sleeping. I will not get into that, but I will state that both children co-slept with us until they were about 2-3 years old. At now 16 & 12, they are fine. Do what works for you and your family. Do what feels right to you. Don't be afraid of spoiling them. I am proud mine still hug me every night.

Deanna - posted on 02/12/2013

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If she is sleeping with you, it might be time to move her to her own bed. It might be time to introduce a bottle of water if you are breast feeding. Good luck!!

Annie - posted on 02/12/2013

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i think you should try get here substitutes milk or somefin to nurse on whenever she wakes,I have almost the same problem, so I understand your plight,my 16months old baby still wakes up every night just to nurse atleast 2 to 3times at night and she screams the hell out of me when she does,I just pacify her most times or just put her on my chest using the carrier.. I also need help...

Veronica - posted on 02/12/2013

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I agree with Cecilia 100%!!!! I think the crying out method might work for some children but it certainly isn't for my first two. It actually made things worse. I opted to co sleep with my third whose now 12 mos and I wish I would've done it with the others. We all would've been happier and gotten more sleep.

Samantha - posted on 02/11/2013

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I think I'm going to just take UNICEF's word for it over some so-called "nurse" who doesn't believe babies have instincts and believes that they are manipulative as early as 9 months. Taisha, I suggest you listen to UNICEF and WHO as well.

Cecilia - posted on 02/11/2013

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I never said a child knows it has more nutrition.... Not sure where that came from..

I do not know how hard you sleep.. but i know when i feel someone next to me not to roll on them. I know last night my 2 year old had a nightmare and crawled into my bed. Without even knowing she did so, i didn't roll on her. she was in the bed maybe 2 hours before i went to turn over and realized. Believe me, i was very very tired last night.. she amazingly didn't die. Mind you i'm a person who can nap in the middle of the day and i have a large family (as i said 5 kids) they will not wake me. Yet, i can recognize the fact that someone is next to me. Anyways as i stated, the typical issue isn't about rolling over. Yes it can happen. Most deaths from co-sleeping are caused by blankets and pillows.

Do you really think a 9 month old is trying to control you? Really? Doesn't it seem more logical that said child needs their mother? It is proven that by nurturing your children at a young age you teach them to be secure and independent. Would you like me to post links for you?(oh wait i don't need to the unifec link covers that too, but i can throw in more if you like.)

Raising 3 kids on your own doesn't mean much. I raised my first 3 alone. Not even with family support, as i had no family even within the state i lived. Being a single mother has nothing to do with the issue at hand. You're misinforming someone. If nothing else giving very bad advice. Yes, maybe for you, you felt it was okay to let your child cry for you and you ignore their cries. In the scope of things it is not healthy for the child. Go ahead and be cruel to your own children but do not advise others to be cruel with you.

Cry it out method kills brain cells --- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/denene-mil...

another article publish on psychology today--- http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mora...
"We know now that leaving babies to cry is a good way to make a less intelligent, less healthy but more anxious, uncooperative and alienated person who can pass the same or worse traits on to the next generation. "

"According to a behaviorist view completely ignorant of human development, the child 'has to be taught to be independent.' We can confirm now that forcing "independence" on a baby leads to greater dependence. "

Melissa - posted on 02/11/2013

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LOL Babies do not instinctivly know that breastmilk has more nutrition at night time. That's just a ridiculous accusation. And yes, if you come running everytime your baby cries eventually they learn thats how to get momma to come. So yes.. it is control. I've raised 3 boys on my own and went through this. You can easily smother your baby and not know it....without any sedatives. If your tired enough and sleeping good you MAY not wake up to hear your baby crying or fighting for air and do you really want to take the risk?

Melissa - posted on 02/11/2013

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You gals are C-R-A-Z-Y to use co sleeping! Do you have any idea how hard it is to get your little tyke to sleep in his own bed after he's had the luxury of sleeping with mommy? This is an utter control problem. Your baby says "jump" and your all jumping. Do not give in! Stick to your guns! They will eventually come around. Screaming is their tool that gets you up and out of bed. They know it and they're using it. There are a million other ways to bond with your babies, co sleeping is not a good one. Do you know that you can smother a child as old as 7? I am a nurse and have seen this situation. If you as a parent can't FOLLOW THROUGH with simple night time rules how are you ever going to survive the teenage years? I have 3 teenage boys and I went through the nursing through-out the night issue as well. Finally though I got tickered and said, "enough was enough"! and I sadly let my son cry himself to sleep for endless hours. I even cried too the first night..maybe the second as well.. but by the third night he started... and remembered I wasn't coming so he cried for a second but that was it. From then on he woke up every morning fresh and snuggly and I was refreshed with sleeping all night as well. Another thing you young mothers may not want to hear is that if you allow them to control you like that through out the night, things are going to get worse as they get older. They are going to learn to use that screaming for other things they want. If you don't toughen up and nip it in the butt, your toddler is gong to run your household. I know it's hard because we all love our sweet babies but if you don't FOLLOW THROUGH with your discipline your going to have a little monster on your hands! Good Luck!

Hannah - posted on 02/11/2013

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Hang in there! I went through the same thing too!

I don't really have much advice about what to do or not to do, but what got me through that same thing was reminding myself over and over again, "this too shall pass." Eventually, my daughter grew out of it.

She won't be doing this forever!

Samantha - posted on 02/11/2013

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Some of the answers are really shocking. Babies don't cry to "control" you, they are growing and developing, and starting to realize that they are a separate person from their mother and it is scary and worrying for them. Also breastmilk has more nutrition at night and babies instinctively know this and try to nurse more at night. When would you sleep 12 hours without a drink of water anyway? Breastmilk satisfies thirst as well as hunger.
I would try cosleeping, Taisha. We coslept with my now 7 month old since birth, and last night I hoisted my T-shirt up for a dream-feed and woke up later and she was still comfort-nursing in her sleep. She looked so happy and peaceful, I took my boobs back and she was still sleeping fine. And having her wake up with a smile next to me is the greatest feeling in the world as a mommy!

Ettina - posted on 02/11/2013

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Have you tried co-sleeping with her? Contrary to older advice, you will not roll on the baby (not unless you're taking sleeping pills or drinking heavily). If you co-sleep, you can comfort your baby without even waking up.

Melody - posted on 02/11/2013

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I'm having the same issue with my 8 month old right now. I've found that IF I can get her to fall asleep in the crib then she will sleep through the night, once we started using 12 hr diapers. However, it is not easy to get her to fall asleep in the crib, so we bring her to our bed with us and I end up nursing her every 2-3 hrs, for comfort. I just know that all I can do at this point is keep on trying, and eventually she will just adapt. Good luck!

Cecilia - posted on 02/10/2013

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Mallorie, that sounds so mean! I can't imagine doing that to my child.

Jodi - posted on 02/10/2013

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Oh honey I totally feel for you. However I will let you know that this is not forever.... I am a mother of 3 very interesting & powerful personality children. Not one of them are the same. Yet they are all loved the same by there Mom..You might want to try giving her a bottle at night. This can sometimes help keep her tummy full longer.You both will get a better night's sleep & a better morning together.

Mallorie - posted on 02/10/2013

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As a mother of two I will tell you this... Put some hot pepper on your nipple. Not enough to where it will burn too much but just to make hwr comfort a little un comfy. Then ip her pacifier in a little sugar water. My now two year old nursed lilt that until she was one aftermy bobs couldnt handle hae constant sucking I tried this she stopped the same night and never did it again

Jessica - posted on 02/10/2013

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My daughter started sleeping the whole night at 14 months so I understand. Around 11 months I finally starting watering her milk down then after 2 weeks eventually just gave. Her a bottle with 2 ounces of water took a week of water and she stopped waking up. My dr said it became part of her pattern if she wasn't really drinking a whole bottle she wasn't hungry. Good luck

Becky - posted on 02/09/2013

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I think you are going to have to help her learn how to put herself back to sleep. It
Isn't easy, but it is worth it for the both of
You. Look into sleep training. You will be glad you did!

Kathy - posted on 02/09/2013

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I had the same thing with my oldest and he still doesnt sleep though the night at 19. He was diagnosed with sleep disorders 2 1/2 years ago- finally. The sleep test was 6 hour and he woke 146 times. Through the years have complained to the doctors. I went down to 95 pound when pre-pregnancy weight was 128.
Menatonin may be a starting point at 1.5 mg. If it continues L-tryptophen(the hormone that makes you sleepy after a turkey dinner) may be helpful. I believe there is no evidence or studies involving babies with sleep disorders. Something to look into.

Loretta - posted on 02/07/2013

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It is normal for even babies who've been sleeping through the night up to this point to go through a wakeful period around 9 months old. My daughter did this from 9-18 months, although the wakings became less frequent as this period went on. It is a period of big growth and development and I do not agree that "crying it out" is the best way to get through it. I slept with my daughter in a recliner many nights--usually because I fell asleep with her there more than it being a big plan--and continued nursing her on demand and she DID start sleeping through the night again on her own. The fact that your daughter can go to sleep on her own would indicate to me that she genuinely needs you during these waking times. Even if it is just for comfort and security, I would hesitate to dismiss it as if those were not genuine needs for her. No matter what, hang in there--this too shall pass! :)

Kelly - posted on 02/06/2013

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By the way we tried co-sleeping, bottle feeding and everything just to get some sleep, but nothing worked until we went cold turkey on the night feeds. She then decided to wean herself after that. She was 14 months though, if you feel more comfortable, wait until she's 1 then go for it, they just get used. To having the breast to get to sleep. Now she sleeps like an absolute champion and only has a bad night when teeth are coming through

Kelly - posted on 02/06/2013

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My daughter did that until 14 months until I'd finally had enough. I was like you, I couldn't let her scream so I would always give in, but trust me they never stop on their own! You have to decide when to stop, go through with it and never give in. We started on a weekend which was better for us, she woke up for her feed, we offered her water, she screamed so we just patted her and told her we were there, until she finally fell into an exhausted sleep and repeated this for 4 nights. After that she worked it out and didn't wake up. They don't need it but if it makes it better for you decide on 1 feed you want to keep and stretch her out until then. They soon work it out. It breaks your heart to hear them, but its only because they have worked out screaming gets them what they want. If they were younger than 6 months then definitely not, but they are old enough at 9 months to cope. As long as you stay and comfort them but don't get them out if the cot ever. It really does work, good luck xx

Bonnie - posted on 02/05/2013

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I had the same issues with my, now three year old, daughter. She was still not sleeping at two years old! We had a sleep study done and she had significant sleep apnea. Maybe it is time to explore other causes.

Jona - posted on 02/05/2013

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FYI, please don't be persuaded to force your child to "cry it out". It may work for some children, but over the years I've come to understand that some babies need the comfort of human closeness. My friend's son was left with a babysitter who let him to cry until he stopped breathing, and needed to be revived by paramedics. Babies may have anxiety issues as well--I have first-hand experience with this. (Things have worked out beautifully, by the way.) Good luck!

Jona - posted on 02/05/2013

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You say that you know your daughter's not hungry, but if you're breastfeeding, you can't be sure. How I wish that I'd figured that out with my oldest! He woke numerous times during the night, wanting to be fed. He'd fall asleep nursing but then be awake again crying--sometimes after only 40 minutes. It finally dawned on me that he was suckling and getting nothing. What he needed was a supplement bottle. Please consider this if it seems to make sense for your little one.

Veronica - posted on 02/05/2013

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My daughter is 12 months, sleeps in her crib the first 3 hrs then sleeps with my husband and i. On a good night she wakes twice but other nights 3xs. There have been times I've wanted to give up but then realize all the benefits of extended breastfeeding. At 9 mos it felt as if she was nursing all night so there has been improvements in the last three months. Although, i didnt breastfeed my first child he didnt sleep through the night till 3yrs old. the cry it out method did not work with him and everyone suffered. you do some research on Kelly's mom and la leche league you would see that it's developmental just as any other development. Each child is different. Try to enjoy the moment and in the end do What works for your family. Good luck

Avalon - posted on 02/05/2013

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my son is the same age and going thru th exact same thing! he wakes up every 3 hours in th night for th breast. th only thing i found has helped me is giving him a bottle of formula and then breast feeding afterwards for comfort and that will stretch th sleep an hour or 2 longer, however some nights he wont take it as breast milk is all he wants. gud luck and remember these phases do pass eventually :)

Karen - posted on 02/05/2013

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I did this night nursing...and nursing every 40 minutes on demand 24/7 for 2.5 years. At about where you are now my dr said when she wakes in the night to nurse give her a water bottle. She will eventually decide thats not worth waking up for. I was too tired to deal with the screaming i knew would happen when i offered her water so I just didnt try. At 2.5 i had enough, looked like a zombie, needed sleep for more than 40 min.at a time..so i offered the water bottle, night 1, woke up, gets bottle instead, screamed 5 min, back to sleep, about 5 times. Night 2 , one time!!! Never woke in night again. I wish i did it sooner! Good Luck!

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