aspbergers syndrome? something else?

Rosie - posted on 12/22/2009 ( 130 moms have responded )

8,657

30

315

how do you get a child examined for aspbergers and what are some of the things they look for in a child with this disorder? my 9 year old has always been different, and doesn't know how to act socialially. he's been diagnosed with adhd, but i feel like there is something more. i;ve looked at pamphlets and stuff and he does have alot of the requirements to be diagnosed, but alot of the other requirements he doesn't have. i don't know.... are there any other social disorders out there, he's not violent or hateful, he just doesn't act the "normal" way in social situations.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Cheryl - posted on 03/28/2011

13

1

0

Hello Kati...how is your son today? I have written many responses here on Aspergers and wish to impart some information. I don't like to label anymore, but it seems lately there are more special children in our lives. I work with a company called Auum and have had knowledge imparted from the President and Founder (also biochemist). He was diagnosed Aspergers years ago as a boy. Very bright and has dedicated his time now to helping them. If you are interested in his clinical study and helping your child one step further, please connect with me. cherylmillett@auum.ca Look forward to hearing from you. Cheryl

Erin - posted on 01/06/2010

1

0

0

I am a special education teacher and are taking classes for a certification in Autism Spectrum Disorder. I have worked with a child for 3 years with Autism. I have two other kids that I feel are on the specturm. I have also participated in an Autism Conference offered in the summer through University of New Hampsire for two years.



You need to talk with your child's doctor about having them looked at for Autism or Asperger's. It has to be a doctor's diagnosis. A lot of times children on the spectrum (Autism, Asperger's, etc) have food aversions or heighten senses (to loud noises or a soft noise that is driving them crazy).There are a lot of references out there like autismspeaks.com or even look into Institute of Disability (IOD) there are references there are well. Be careful that the references you are using are valid. Good Luck!

Leia - posted on 01/05/2010

5

0

0

hi there. my name is Leia. i am an adult with aspergers. dont worry there is hope. most people with aspergers also have another disorder such as OCD or ADHD. most people go through numerous diagnoses. check for lack of social skills, obsessive thinking and fixation on one particular subject, usually an obscure topic, to the exclusion of everything else. Also, if he has trouble with sensory integration such as being hyper sensitive to sounds, smells and tastes. Most asperger children are also socially withdrawn until about adolescent age. if you need more info feel free to contact me. good luck

Fiona - posted on 12/27/2009

47

10

1

Hi Kati, Below is my experience of how my son was diagnosed with Asperger. I've included information that I have read/learnt during this process however, I'm not a health care professional so while I believe it to be accurate, please check with your Dr.

My son was diagnosed in September 09 with Mild Asperger Syndrome. We always knew there was something different about him, but could never quite put our finger on it. We had him assessed when he was 5 for asperger and adhd however because the teachers and us were on different pages a definate diagnosis was not forthcoming.

What do his teachers think? Do you have their support? Will they provide you with a letter?

While this is not essential, it does help. In the end, I had 4 years of emails between the school and us, a copy of all his school reports, a letter from the class teacher and a 10 page letter from us detailing his medical, behavioiural, social and family history that lead us to the believe that he had asperger. The more information that you can provide to the Dr the easier it is for them to get a full picture of your child and make a diagnosis.

Other conditions that seem to accompany a diagnosis of Asperger include auditory/visual processing issues, food intolerances/allergies and/or sensitivity to light/sound/touch.

In answer to your questions re are there any other social disorders out there ....
A diagnosis on the Austism spectrum is made via the criteria found in the DSM IV. This book is like the bible for health care professionals and lists criteria for numerous conditions and is recognised by around the world. This book uses the term Pervasive Developmenatal Disorder as an umbrella category under which there are 5 conditions. Autistic Disorder, Asperger Disorder, Rett's Disorder (very rare), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (also very rare) and Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified. The last category is used for kids that clearly have a disorder but don't fit into one of the other boxes.

For us, prior to doing all of this we read Asperger's Syndrome - A guide for Parents and Professionals by Tony Attwood. He is the leading Clinical Child Psychologist in Australia. The book provides detailed information on the main areas of asperger and how they may manifest in a child. This book is really what lead us to start the process of having our son diagnosed.

If you are in America, Dr Jeanette McAfee is an Amercian whose daughter has Asperger. She has done a lot of research into the syndrome and has written a book called Navigating the Social World. Her clinic is based in Texas with her website being www.FHautism.com

Each child is different and will exhibit different aspects of the syndrome which can be confusing and at times can make you think - does my child really have this syndrome? My son's friend, who is also an aspie, is really quiet in social settings whereas my son is quite loud.

Finally, before you go and spend money on a Dr make sure their diagnosis will be accepted by his school system. In Queensland, the diagnosis needs to come from a pediatrician/psychiatist. We didn't know this and so to get the diagnosis we ended up having to spend double what it should've cost.

Anyway Kati, hope this helps. We are still relatively newbies to the world of Asperger and so are still learning new things every day.

Have a great day!

[deleted account]

Quoting Raine:

Thank you, Stacey, for posting valuable information about vaccines. Although vaccines are a definite issue with autism, Dr. McBride believes the primary issue that causes autism starts with deeply abnormal gut flora that interferes with development in the child's body on many levels from before they are born. She believes, that like many other things, the vaccines become a tipping point for a child that is on the edge of this or her condition - the straw that broke the camel's back, if you will, rather than the main cause of autism. Her research has uncovered that the cause is very often due to abnormal gut flora in the mother's body before the infant is born. Barbara Loe Fisher - president and co-founder of the National Vaccine Information Center - is a knowledgeable individual who has had a wealth of experience and research in the realms of vaccines, and Dr. Mercola (also a medical doctor) is also extremely knowledgeable and a great resource.

I see a lot of people still referring to doctors for autism, which troubles me because most of their solutions don't actually solve the problems. Our system is so geared toward doctoring, we forget about important environmental and nutritional components that directly affect our health. We don't aim for wellness, only sickness. Primarily, doctors know how to evaluate symptoms and medicate or place children in programs, group homes, or other similar treatment programs.

Honestly ask yourselves these serious questions: are these children actually improving their conditions, or are their conditions just being "managed" and maintained? Mostly what I hear and see is just that. What exactly are these tests doing to remedy the daily problems families are experiencing with their children's issues?

I believe posting information about these topics is absolutely important. And, not bringing this research to light, in my opinion, is irresponsible. There are many people who are simply unaware and/or refuse to consider something other than what is normally done, and our children deserve to have a chance to be treated and their problems resolved. Scientific research, like many other things, is susceptible to fallacies, and also is often funded by companies who are looking for a specific outcome - such as marketing their products and pushing a certain worldview that will work in their favor. Always follow the money in these matters. Are the drug companies making money from autism? You bet. The money trail is every time indicative of what's really going on.

Dr. McBride has uncovered some absolutely startling information based on scientific research and has treated thousands of children for their conditions successfully, including her own son. For those of you who are suspicious and skeptical, she is British pediatrician and neurosurgeon who was trained in the "proper" medical fields, and who looked beyond the normal, conventional beliefs and found that there was something else going on. I believe it is absolutely urgent to at least take a look at what she has found, since so many parents have spent time, effort, and money to no avail. It just doesn't make sense to me to keep repeating the same actions when the outcomes simply aren't changing. Aren't our children worth it?

http://gapsdiet.com/


Research, after research has never found vaccines to be the cause or contributor of any form of autism. Even after certain perservatives were removed from child vaccines, the issue could not be determined. Take the child from where he is and go from there. Autism is the "social illness of the decade" and unfortunately, many are labeled with it. While the condition does exist, you need to be very certain before labeling a child thus so. I have worked with children labeled such and found that they can do all sorts of things that just did not fit the autism spectrum. OCD, Terhettes' Syndrome, Autism, ....................where were these conditions when I was growing up??  They may have existed, but it is truly a problem to misdiagnose a child. Most larger cities have children's medical centers that offer fine diagnostic techniques that can determine if your child has any problems. But be aware, that schools alone cannot be the sole source of helping your child. You will have to work just as hard to teach your child, provide him with the proper structure, routine, therapy, etc.  Good luck!!  I taught special education for thirty years and only had two children who were actually diagnosed as having autism, but I do think some of the students that came into my work did actually have the condition. LLD, fragile X, Oppositional Defiant, as well as ADHD, Bi-polar Disorder, MR , ED.as well as other social disorders.  And some seemed to have them all. So be sure to give the teachers every bit of your support. No two children are alike. And some parents desires for their children are unrealistic. Most teachers are quite dedicated in working with your child to his/her best abilities. Oh, just to add interest, my first student to have autism was in my second year of teaching.........1974. I was told it was due to his father and mother separating when the child was two as the child was suffering anxiety from the "loss" of his father's love. I only tell this as there are as many theories out there as there are diagnosis. So do not depend on unfounded research or diets. There is no known reason for the condition.    

This conversation has been closed to further comments

130 Comments

View replies by

Cindy - posted on 05/01/2011

12

25

1

I also have a 9 yr old son with ADHD, ODD, and multi learning disabilities. He's just started working with a Psychiatrist, Therapist and we have a Parent Support Specialist, all thru Easter Seals. They've diagnosed him with the all the things I listed. BUT, they're trying to RULE OUT A/A Spectrum. He has a really hard time playing with other children except ones much younger. I'm real curious to find out whether he does receive this diagnosis!!

Amanda - posted on 03/28/2011

234

10

26

Talk with an occupational therapist about Sensory Processing Disorder. Alot of kids have even been misdiagnosed with add and adhd when they actually have SID. It can also tie in with alot of the traditional ideas of aspergers. There is an excellent book by Carol Stock Kranawitz called "The out of sync Child" that I would reccomend that you read, it is written in very easy to read and understand language (no dr. talk hehehe) It gives detailed information on differant behaviors etc.

[deleted account]

There are many scales that you can fill out as a parent and/or have his teachers fill out. You should be able to get one from a pediatrician and if not they can refer you to a therapits/psychologist who can get you forms. You might be able to get one from the school counselor or a special education teacher at your son's school. There is a very fine line between extreme ADHD and mild Asperger's Syndrome. You may never know for sure. I am a special ed teacher with a very ADHD 6 year old. I have a student his age who has been diagnosed with Asperger's. His mom is also a special education teacher in my school district. I tell her all the time that my son has many more autistic tendencies than her son does. The difference, my son, so far, is able to function in the classroom--her's is having difficulty getting assignments completed. There may be schools specializing in Autism in your area who will do complete asessments for you. In Alabama, many public schools have a contract with Glenwood in Birmingham. Find out if you have a specialized school in your area. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Michelle - posted on 01/06/2010

12

4

2

Alot of children are socially awkward at this age. However, if you are truly concerned you should see your family physician and then perhaps a psychiatrist. With autism and Asperger's Syndrome the child does not necessarily have to fit all the criteria. You are his Mom, so you know him best, and I think if you have genuine concerns your best bet is to take him to a specialist immediately.

Rosy - posted on 01/06/2010

1

17

0

Useful booklet is All cats have Aspergers. Kind of a tick-box to see if it fits. Lots of help available but you have to FIGHT for it. A shame but thats the way it seems to go. Its ok to be different, theres no such thing as "normal " anyway. Love children for who THEY are. Best wishes.

Meredith - posted on 01/04/2010

1

30

0

Go to the school and demand that they help you out. I had a friend whose child was diagnosed because the school help with insurance and medical roadblocks. He is a very creative and happy teenager now who has been taught how to act. Stay strong and listen to your "Mother's Intuition".

Dianna - posted on 01/04/2010

1

0

0

http://www.yourlittleprofessor.com/diagn...

I found this article- hope it helps. Your family doctor would be a good starting place. I have a mentally handicapped daughter and I know how hard I had to fight to get answers-they insisted that she was undiciplined until she was 10 they finally figured out she was not only mentally handicapped but having seizures(not tantrums like they said)

You stay after them until you get answers. you are mom and your instincts tell you if the answers you are getting are right or wrong.

Julia - posted on 01/02/2010

13

14

0

hi there this is like talking to myself but i have the same problem with my son as he has suspected autisum and aspergers so i understand the fustration you are going through it is so iratating isn't it. My son acts the same way he does not know how to react in different situations either and he gets so fustrated.

go back to the doctors and demand to see a consultant in this feild it is your right as a mother to do this. i hope ive helped .

Melissa - posted on 01/02/2010

1

8

0

If you live in California, I would find out where your nearest regional center is. They are a center for children with developmental disabilities. You call and request to speak to the intake dept. They will ask you a series of questions and if they feel he is a eligible based on their criteria, they will schedule an psychological evaluation, if at that point you find out that he has aspergers they will not find him eligible BUT you have the right to APPEAL their decision. At that point they will send you a notice of proposed action and you will have to follow the instructions, you have 30 days to appeal. once that is done they will call you in for mediation, REgional center elibility is for the following disabilities; Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Mild Mental Retardation, Epilepsy and the 5th category which can be Asperger's Syndrome. ( You will need to really explain why you feel he needs their services). Hope that helps.

Rebecca - posted on 01/02/2010

1,988

118

311

Ok she didnt' really specify and i didn't see anything else but my link to another group. I went and re-read the violations and was really thinking WTF LOL

Thanks!!

Jodi - posted on 01/02/2010

26,465

36

3891

Quoting Rebecca:



Quoting Katherine:

There is NO SOLICITING!!! NONE!! There is ZERO tolerance for advertisements, please refer to the pin at the top of the welcome page ***zero tolerance****






I can not refer he to a group that will be able to help her out more?! Doesn't that seema  bit odd? I am not the person who started the group so i could care less if she joins but i think she need sto be well informed and the group has the informantion she needs.






Rebecca, Katherine wasn't referring to your post.  She was referring to someone else's post which has now been deleted because it was soliciting :)  It is perfectly okay to refer someone to another community here on CoM.

Rebecca - posted on 01/02/2010

1,988

118

311

Quoting Katherine:

There is NO SOLICITING!!! NONE!! There is ZERO tolerance for advertisements, please refer to the pin at the top of the welcome page ***zero tolerance****



I can not refer he to a group that will be able to help her out more?! Doesn't that seema  bit odd? I am not the person who started the group so i could care less if she joins but i think she need sto be well informed and the group has the informantion she needs.

Katherine - posted on 01/02/2010

65,420

232

4963

There is NO SOLICITING!!! NONE!! There is ZERO tolerance for advertisements, please refer to the pin at the top of the welcome page ***zero tolerance****

Marcy - posted on 01/02/2010

3

19

0

Hey Kati! I have a 3 year old who is a little corky and has had some behavioral problems starting in infantcy, so we took him to a behavioral pediatrician in the city where we live. They worked with us to change the behaviors and they also recommended play therapy. The thing that they stressed the most was seeking out things that helped my child adapt and cope with situations rather than a diagnosis, which is the same advice I will pass on to you. It's not about the label, but about knowing your child and coming up with things that can help him cope. Good luck! And, play therapy has been wonderful for us by the way!

Rebecca - posted on 01/02/2010

1,988

118

311

also there is a great asp/autism group on here. i'm in it to learn more for my newphew and how to deal when he is in my care and i love it. Lots of help there:)

Rebecca - posted on 01/02/2010

1,988

118

311

My newphew was diagnoised late, he was 6 i think and my mother had to fight to see a specialist becasue he would'nt poop in the toilet. Within 5 minutes of seeing this Dr he told my mother he had asp. It all fell together. He is very smart and when in a public setting he will hang out with an autistic child over others. This is very common. Ask your childs Dr to see a specialist for autism. They will be able to diagonise and give tips on how to make it beter. Also head banging on walls or floors at a young age is a common sign of it. If your Dr wont send him to see a specialist, call one yourself and ask if he needs to be refered by his family Dr or if an apt can be made.

I wish you luck:)

Wanda - posted on 01/02/2010

8

14

0

Your child could be autistic - there are varying degrees of autism, and aspergers is only one of them. Speak to your pediatrician and ask for a referral to a psychologist.

Joanne - posted on 01/02/2010

1

0

0

My son was diagnosed with high functioning autism at age 9. The school had him tested by the psychologist, and when I went to my pediatrician to get a 2nd opinion, she referred me to a neurologist, which was fof no help. Finally I got a referal to a behaviourist who was able to provide a diagnosis and offer support. Good luck!

Ellen - posted on 01/02/2010

6

12

0

If these types of behaviors are an issue for your son, I would take ask the school psychologist where they would recommend. A Children's Hospital or University should have a diagnosing clinic for autism spectrum disorders and Aspbergers. For the most part MDs don't specialize in developmental issues and have only general recommendations.

Laurika - posted on 01/02/2010

11

0

1

You might want to take him to DR Adri van der Walt Neurological Pediatrition at Panorama Medical centre. One of my friends children are there and he has been diagnosed with aspergers.

Tiffany - posted on 01/02/2010

1

11

0

Take them to a child psychiatrist. Tell them what you see in the pamphlets that you are seeing in your child's behavior. Often there are therapy opportunities that can improve social behavior. The person treating him for ADHD may be qualified to make this diagnosis.

Angela - posted on 01/01/2010

1

0

0

Most children who have developmental disorders have social dysfunctioning so it is not uncommon for doctors to diagnose the most common which is ADHD. Having your pediatrician refer to a neurologist usually can narrow the scope, also you might check into your area and see if there are any children's hospitals that specialize in Autism. No child will fit into all the categories of any disorder, there are a great deal of children with ASD that are not aggressive. A good book to read is "Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew" by Ellen Notbohm.

At this point it seems that your son might benefit from a social skills group, you can check if the school your son attends already have one in place or if not request one be instituted. As a parent of a child with moderate Autism, social functioning is probably the hardest to grasp because of non verbal cues and it gets more difficult as children get older and start forming cliques. Good luck and God be with you.

Odelle - posted on 01/01/2010

2

0

0

Start with your pedi, but don't let him or her deter you. Aspergers can be somewhat daunting to parents, so many specialists will tread lightly in approaching that diagnosis. However, given that you are the one suggesting it, keep pushing.



You could do some reading---Stanley Greenspan is highly knowledgeable. For a family's real life experience, The Boy Who Loved Windows or Born on a Blue Day.



Get things moving as fast as possible. People with Aspergers can seem "different", but are often high functionioning and need special instruction and coaching in specific areas, such as social interactions.

Kris - posted on 01/01/2010

1

7

0

My son is in first grade and was just diagnosed with Aspergers. I went to my pediatrician 1.5 yrs ago and was referred to a pediactric neuropsychologist who blew off an autism spectrum diagnosis based on 5 min of observations and diagnosed him with sensory integration disorder (which often accompanies autism/aspergers). My husband and I were not satisfied with this because it didn't explain his lack of empathy. This fall at school we got a new school psychologist who is trained in performing the ADOS test and is a lisenced clinician. She thought my son was misdagnosed did a very thorough series of tests, evaluations, and observations (his teacher, the OT, the special ed teacher, and her own) and came up with the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Aspergers Syndrome.

My point is that it takes a thorough series of testing to have a posistive diagnosis (not 5 minutes worth!) and that you look for someone who specializes in Aspergers/Autism disorders. I hope this helps!

Sharon - posted on 12/31/2009

5

0

0

Hi Kati

A couple of the things you could look for in your son, does he walk more on his toes ( heels not coming all the way down) does he have certain key interests. You already have noted the biggest one that we noticed in our son, he's doesn't interact with other children his age in the same way as most children. Watch if you have him tested about using the word social situations. When I said that they seemed to think he couldn't dress himself properly or understand how to brush his teeth etc. I now say he interacts differently with his peers. Most children with aspergers are very intellegent there thought process is just different and sometimes things need to be explained in a different way. They test through the school initially here then through the health centre for final diagnoses. If you have any further questions feel free to ask . Sharon O

Nicole - posted on 12/31/2009

2

1

0

My stepson is in karate and that has helped him tremendously! I forgot to write that in my reply earlier. But this is something he is excelling in!!!

Jeanine - posted on 12/31/2009

1

0

0

With my son I had to take him to see a Psychologist bc if his behaviors. She did mutliples tests mostly questionaires thay ask parents hundreds of questions about the childs behavior. I had been concerned since he was two it wasn't until he was 8 that he was diagnosed wth Asbergers. She gave me information and techniques on how to modify his abnormal social behaviors and have been helping us cope and communicate with one another. Besides that I have been unable to find resources to assist my son or myself with dealing with his behavior. My son is not a trouble maker just very stuck in his ways which are not always appropriate and I find it hard to get him to listen at times. Well hopefully this helps and I wish you the best of luck.

Tanya - posted on 12/31/2009

67

37

4

i just wanna say all you moms above have great courage and strength! it is never easy when your child has a problem like this! Your children are very lucky to have such caring mothers...god bless you all!!

Valerie - posted on 12/31/2009

7

34

0

Hi Kati. After our primary pediatrician we found a Developmental Pediatrician who gave our son a battery of diagnostic assessment tests resulting with ADHD diagnosis (along with Expressive language and Social Skills delay). We also went to a geneticist to test for Fragile X. After a few diagnoses and a second Developmental Pediatrician my son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified). This covers a wide variety of autism conditions, including high functioning and asperger's, as well as other developmental disorders. He's also seeing a Social Skills therapist to help develop those skills and it seems to be helping quite a bit.

Stick with it, you are your son's best advocate and sounds like you are doing a GREAT job..

Sara - posted on 12/31/2009

98

1

3

In my experience w/ AS the child usually has social issues and focuses on one type of thing at a time. So thye will be into dinosaurs or music and that is all they will talk about. The social thing is they are uncomfortable with social situations as well as not understanding social cues, like not getting jokes or knowing when someone turns away they are done talking to you.
Hope you can get your son some help!!

Stephanie - posted on 12/30/2009

3

17

0

Totally agree. If the medicine doesn't show an improvement right away, either change meds or your kiddo does not have ADHD. My son is taking Focalin, after trying Ritalin and Adderol. It's been the best with the least side effects for ADD.

Stephanie - posted on 12/30/2009

3

17

0

9 is a weird age anyway for boys. I think they are beginning puberty and are starting to get "weird" anyway. I have a daughter with Asbergers and she is totally anti-social and mean/inappropriate as all get out. You should try diet related cures for Asbergers, many ADD/ADHD symptoms will go away with diets specific to Autism related symptoms.
Hope this helps!

Dana - posted on 12/30/2009

4

31

0

My 19 year old brother was diagnosed with Aspbergers about 10 years ago. He would never ever look people in the eyes. In a social setting, he would stand as far away from people in general as he could. He was very smart, but learned more slowly than others. Wild imagination, He would get very angry very easily but never violent. Those are just a few things that we noticed. It it is very different for every child! Your child could simply not like being around people. But, do not worry! If he does get diagnosed with it, do not fear that he will struggle through life. He may in some areas, but My Brother attends High School, attends his family and friends gatherings, and attends his Sho do Kan classes... The karate classes taught him a lot and has helped with his social issuses!! If you need anything let me know!!

Helen - posted on 12/30/2009

9

21

0

definitly talk to your doctor. Don't give up until you feel that they've answered you fully. It can be unnerving I'm sure as a mum to think that there is more wrong than your child is diagnosed with. remember that your not on your own and that there is help out there. I think everyone else has said it all so that just leaves me to say chin up we feel for you..

Regina - posted on 12/30/2009

7

16

0

Most pediatricians won't know what they are doing in diagnosing Autism, which is what Asperger's is a form of. A good one will refer you to a psychologist for an accurate testing. If s/he does NOT recommend a psych evaluation, I personally would go to one anyway. Just not being great socially can point to a number of things, including something as simple dietary issues, including lack of certain vitamins that are only found in vegetables. Boys at 9 are awkward anyway, and with ADHD, which I have, it would not be uncommon for that to be the major problem. Definitely talk to your doctor, then a psychologist! Even so, it could take years to be properly diagnosed.

Nicole - posted on 12/30/2009

2

1

0

My 9 year old step son was just recently diagnosed with asperger's. He had to get a referral to go see a neurologist. After some testing he was diagnosed with that and a ELD (expressive Language Disorder). I did my own research on the internet, helped me learn more about it and some thing to do. Before he was diagnosed, a friend of the family told me she thought he probably had it because her son acted the same way. Every case is different so when talking to people just know that what works for them may or may not work for you. Patience is one of the keys to progress and finding what does work for your son. When I first met my stepson was 5 and he really didn't speak much he was always making noises and never made eye contact. He has come such a long way since my husband and I have been working with him. My husband had to fight with the school to get him the help he need. I pray you find peace in this situation. Sometimes I really think it is a blessing for him because he doesn't always understand what's going so things just go over his head, since he's in his own world a lot. Unlike his brother, 6, who is very aware of what's going on. A bit to aware lol. There are so many books out there... Check out Special Diets for Special Kids Understanding and Implementing Special Diets to Aid in the Treatment of Autism and Related Developmental Disorders by Lisa Lewis, Ph.D. because diet plays a big role also. Sometimes eliminating refines sugars, dairy, white flour and the like help tremendously. So have him allergy tested and tested for Celiac Disease (the inability to process gluten properly) also, that is common in asperger's. This book has lots of recipes (over 150) and other information and very touching story by the author also. It talks about: Gluten, Casein, Detoxification Systems, Autism, ADHD, Celiac Disease, Antibiotic Abuse, Opioid Excess Theory, Food Allergies, Infections Additives & Colorings, Gut permeability Tests, Organic Acid Tests, Ketogenic Diets, Vitamins, Minerals & Herbal Remedies... and more! I hope this helps. God bless you and your family! I will lift your situation up in prayer ~Nicole

Adele - posted on 12/28/2009

1

0

0

Aspbergers is a form of autism that is more difficult to pick up, because the child communication is normal. they normally take things very serious and seldom have a sense of humour. They can seem rude at times by not acting "normal" in social situations. A Pediatrician should be able to diagnose him, but sometimes you will have to go to more than 1 dr to get a correct diagnosis. My daughter had classic autism, but with right intervention has improved so much, you can barely see that she is "different"

Nerissa - posted on 12/28/2009

3

29

0

Hi kati. Just go to your doctor or a psychologist in your community and have him evaluated for aspbergers syndrome and hope everything will be alright with your child and the best advice i can give you is to pray to God, He is the great Healer remember . Good luck, God Bless!!

Jennifer - posted on 12/28/2009

1

15

0

See a psychiatrist - they're great at telling the difference between ADHD and asperger's. Talk to your family doc and ask for a referral if you need one - if you don't have insurance, talk to your son's school psychologist and express your concerns - the school psychologist's recommendations of a different diagnosis can impact your family doc if that's the person you're forced to see.

good luck! (my son was tentatively diagnosed with asperger's last month...)

Rosie - posted on 12/28/2009

8,657

30

315

thank you everybody! i have made an appointment for my son to see his ped. so he can give us a referral. when he was diagnosed with adhd i mentioned some of his social problems and they dismissed me. i'm not a very forward person so i just let it go thinking he was just shy or he'll grow out of it. i'll just have to stick to my guns this time and not back down until they give me answer that i feel sufices my worries, however hard that may be for me. thanks for giving me the courage to do this.



kati brown

Anne - posted on 12/28/2009

2

2

1

Hi Kati, my son is younger and I too wondered about things like aspergers as he too has issues in social situations. You dont say how your son behaves, mine gets very withdrawn and distressed. We believe our son is suffering from social phobia or anxiety and has been referred to a specialist to try and help him with this problem. Like you I couldnt put my finger on what the problem was but googled social anxiety in children. We only pursued further since we were concerned that if unchecked it could develop further into something more serious as he got older. Good luck with getting help with your son, our health visitor especially was a huge help as was the school with a referral to a child psychologist initially.

[deleted account]

Not able to act normal socially is one of the signs. There is a wide spectrum on the AHDH scale up to Autism. Everything on the scale is related. In my educated opinion, the first thing you can do is NOT to have any more vaccines. Please, all parents, look into this. Google Dr. Sheri Tenpenny. Read and listen to what she has to say. Please do not blindly have your children vaccinated because that is what you are told. Damage is being done. BTW, there was no Autism before vaccines. There is also a lot you can do for your child to recover.

[deleted account]

Aspergers is often misdiagnosed because it can vary in individuals. For instance, my son was not given a correct diagnosis until he was 17 because he is at the low end of the scale. My nephew, however, is at the high end and was diagnosed early. Perhaps the symptoms I recognized in my son may help you decide how to proceed, but the best way to help your child is to understand the syndrome.
1. As a pre-schooler, my son would often play alone by himself
2. In school, he was always behind - there were gaps in his learning
3. Sometimes, he would get in trouble for talking, but he didn't realize he was making any sound.
4. He could not follow multiple directions - only one instruction at a time
5. He has trouble showing emotion (except anger) and appears to be "laid back"
6. He has difficulty understanding the simplest tasks until they are broken down in the smallest steps.

Lists are great for these children and they are often much smarter than they appear. I hope this has been helpful for you. If you believe that your child has this, you may have to go to several different physicians before he is correctly diagnosed. Also, a child with ADHD will show a marked improvement with medication and there will be no doubt that the medication is helping. If you dont see a change immediately, it is not ADHD.

Rosie - posted on 12/28/2009

8,657

30

315

Quoting Aimee:

Here's my question, how do you tell a family member you think their child may have this or autism? Why hasn't the doctor caught the symptoms? Will they be identified in school?



one of my friends has a son who was diagnosed with autism at age 4. i myself knew something was different about him, and i tried in various ways to let her know without coming right out and saying it. she was so adamant against any labeling of her child that i don't think she got the hints. finally 2 years later she started to have him go to daycare at another friends house and that friend told her straight out that she needed to get him checked for autism. i deeply regret that it took 2 years for this to happen, and he could've been getting the help he needed instead of me taking 2 years off of his help. the earlier the detection the faster they can start to help him. i suggest telling them right away, it will save alot of hurt and regret in the end and will also help the child to get some skills that they need. my friends son is now 6 and he is just now potty trained and learning to talk, and she's been getting help for him 2 years now. her younger son is 2 and he was diagnosed with autism at age 2 and i see a dramatic difference in what getting early help for a child with autism can do. please, tell her right away your concerns!!

Kerry-Ann - posted on 12/28/2009

3

12

0

my son is excentric, socially inept, does not respond to facial and hand gestures, you have to follow a strict routine (aspergers kids love routine) and will they will make a big deal when you change it, my son has very interlectual conversations but they can be quite off topic....aspergers kids wont specially not play with other children but they find it hard to actually interact because of their different thought pattern...but if something interests them you wont be able to keep them away from that child or item, etc......

Kerry-Ann - posted on 12/28/2009

3

12

0

my son has aspergers syndrome.....he is now 17yrs old. The best time to diagnose is when the child starts school onwards as alot of the traits arent visable until then. there are alot of characteristics of aspergers. the best thing to do is look up on the internet and also find a good peadiatrician, one you can trust and one that believes in mothers gut feelings. Aspergers used to be known as high functioning autism but now has its own name per say. A checklist is gone through to determine as well as your school can fill out a report...etc...etc. the more peoples input you get for your child the better and proper diagnosis. good luck. tis a tough road.

Gretchen - posted on 12/27/2009

6

3

0

i have a 26 year old son that had similar problems however he is now in graduate school, has plenty of friends and does fine socially. i think he had to learn correct behaviors and responses because they didn't come naturally. Once at the college level he found people he fit with because of the larger environment and people gravitate together by common interest rather than social status. his interests, like in aspbergers are very specific and intense. regardless he functions well now.

have a psychologist and neurologist assess him. it takes a lot of understanding and patience and ignoring judgmental parents to raise different children. help your son learn some social skills the best you can and enjoy his individualism. hopefully once he's an adult things will be easier for him!

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms