aspbergers syndrome? something else?

Rosie - posted on 12/22/2009 ( 130 moms have responded )

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how do you get a child examined for aspbergers and what are some of the things they look for in a child with this disorder? my 9 year old has always been different, and doesn't know how to act socialially. he's been diagnosed with adhd, but i feel like there is something more. i;ve looked at pamphlets and stuff and he does have alot of the requirements to be diagnosed, but alot of the other requirements he doesn't have. i don't know.... are there any other social disorders out there, he's not violent or hateful, he just doesn't act the "normal" way in social situations.

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Kerry-Ann - posted on 12/28/2009

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my son is excentric, socially inept, does not respond to facial and hand gestures, you have to follow a strict routine (aspergers kids love routine) and will they will make a big deal when you change it, my son has very interlectual conversations but they can be quite off topic....aspergers kids wont specially not play with other children but they find it hard to actually interact because of their different thought pattern...but if something interests them you wont be able to keep them away from that child or item, etc......

Kerry-Ann - posted on 12/28/2009

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my son has aspergers syndrome.....he is now 17yrs old. The best time to diagnose is when the child starts school onwards as alot of the traits arent visable until then. there are alot of characteristics of aspergers. the best thing to do is look up on the internet and also find a good peadiatrician, one you can trust and one that believes in mothers gut feelings. Aspergers used to be known as high functioning autism but now has its own name per say. A checklist is gone through to determine as well as your school can fill out a report...etc...etc. the more peoples input you get for your child the better and proper diagnosis. good luck. tis a tough road.

Gretchen - posted on 12/27/2009

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i have a 26 year old son that had similar problems however he is now in graduate school, has plenty of friends and does fine socially. i think he had to learn correct behaviors and responses because they didn't come naturally. Once at the college level he found people he fit with because of the larger environment and people gravitate together by common interest rather than social status. his interests, like in aspbergers are very specific and intense. regardless he functions well now.

have a psychologist and neurologist assess him. it takes a lot of understanding and patience and ignoring judgmental parents to raise different children. help your son learn some social skills the best you can and enjoy his individualism. hopefully once he's an adult things will be easier for him!

Susan - posted on 12/27/2009

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My 5 year old was diagnosed with Asperger's about 3 years ago. When I spoke to his pediatrician.. she would look at him and say oh there is nothing wrong with him, maybe you are doing something wrong. I had to take him to a few specialists to find out why my son didnt interact with other kids, and it was more than being shy. My son wouldnt even play with his brother, he would only play by himself or with adults. Though my son does get voilent and also has ADHD. Now he is in Kindergarten and we are having new difficulties with the new demands that are put on him there. There are namy tests my son took during the diagnosing.. tho your son is older and they may be different. I would call your local MHMR (mental health mental retardation) center, ask what you need to do to get your son evaluated.

Fiona - posted on 12/27/2009

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Hi Kati, Below is my experience of how my son was diagnosed with Asperger. I've included information that I have read/learnt during this process however, I'm not a health care professional so while I believe it to be accurate, please check with your Dr.

My son was diagnosed in September 09 with Mild Asperger Syndrome. We always knew there was something different about him, but could never quite put our finger on it. We had him assessed when he was 5 for asperger and adhd however because the teachers and us were on different pages a definate diagnosis was not forthcoming.

What do his teachers think? Do you have their support? Will they provide you with a letter?

While this is not essential, it does help. In the end, I had 4 years of emails between the school and us, a copy of all his school reports, a letter from the class teacher and a 10 page letter from us detailing his medical, behavioiural, social and family history that lead us to the believe that he had asperger. The more information that you can provide to the Dr the easier it is for them to get a full picture of your child and make a diagnosis.

Other conditions that seem to accompany a diagnosis of Asperger include auditory/visual processing issues, food intolerances/allergies and/or sensitivity to light/sound/touch.

In answer to your questions re are there any other social disorders out there ....
A diagnosis on the Austism spectrum is made via the criteria found in the DSM IV. This book is like the bible for health care professionals and lists criteria for numerous conditions and is recognised by around the world. This book uses the term Pervasive Developmenatal Disorder as an umbrella category under which there are 5 conditions. Autistic Disorder, Asperger Disorder, Rett's Disorder (very rare), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (also very rare) and Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified. The last category is used for kids that clearly have a disorder but don't fit into one of the other boxes.

For us, prior to doing all of this we read Asperger's Syndrome - A guide for Parents and Professionals by Tony Attwood. He is the leading Clinical Child Psychologist in Australia. The book provides detailed information on the main areas of asperger and how they may manifest in a child. This book is really what lead us to start the process of having our son diagnosed.

If you are in America, Dr Jeanette McAfee is an Amercian whose daughter has Asperger. She has done a lot of research into the syndrome and has written a book called Navigating the Social World. Her clinic is based in Texas with her website being www.FHautism.com

Each child is different and will exhibit different aspects of the syndrome which can be confusing and at times can make you think - does my child really have this syndrome? My son's friend, who is also an aspie, is really quiet in social settings whereas my son is quite loud.

Finally, before you go and spend money on a Dr make sure their diagnosis will be accepted by his school system. In Queensland, the diagnosis needs to come from a pediatrician/psychiatist. We didn't know this and so to get the diagnosis we ended up having to spend double what it should've cost.

Anyway Kati, hope this helps. We are still relatively newbies to the world of Asperger and so are still learning new things every day.

Have a great day!

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Quoting Raine:

Thank you, Stacey, for posting valuable information about vaccines. Although vaccines are a definite issue with autism, Dr. McBride believes the primary issue that causes autism starts with deeply abnormal gut flora that interferes with development in the child's body on many levels from before they are born. She believes, that like many other things, the vaccines become a tipping point for a child that is on the edge of this or her condition - the straw that broke the camel's back, if you will, rather than the main cause of autism. Her research has uncovered that the cause is very often due to abnormal gut flora in the mother's body before the infant is born. Barbara Loe Fisher - president and co-founder of the National Vaccine Information Center - is a knowledgeable individual who has had a wealth of experience and research in the realms of vaccines, and Dr. Mercola (also a medical doctor) is also extremely knowledgeable and a great resource.

I see a lot of people still referring to doctors for autism, which troubles me because most of their solutions don't actually solve the problems. Our system is so geared toward doctoring, we forget about important environmental and nutritional components that directly affect our health. We don't aim for wellness, only sickness. Primarily, doctors know how to evaluate symptoms and medicate or place children in programs, group homes, or other similar treatment programs.

Honestly ask yourselves these serious questions: are these children actually improving their conditions, or are their conditions just being "managed" and maintained? Mostly what I hear and see is just that. What exactly are these tests doing to remedy the daily problems families are experiencing with their children's issues?

I believe posting information about these topics is absolutely important. And, not bringing this research to light, in my opinion, is irresponsible. There are many people who are simply unaware and/or refuse to consider something other than what is normally done, and our children deserve to have a chance to be treated and their problems resolved. Scientific research, like many other things, is susceptible to fallacies, and also is often funded by companies who are looking for a specific outcome - such as marketing their products and pushing a certain worldview that will work in their favor. Always follow the money in these matters. Are the drug companies making money from autism? You bet. The money trail is every time indicative of what's really going on.

Dr. McBride has uncovered some absolutely startling information based on scientific research and has treated thousands of children for their conditions successfully, including her own son. For those of you who are suspicious and skeptical, she is British pediatrician and neurosurgeon who was trained in the "proper" medical fields, and who looked beyond the normal, conventional beliefs and found that there was something else going on. I believe it is absolutely urgent to at least take a look at what she has found, since so many parents have spent time, effort, and money to no avail. It just doesn't make sense to me to keep repeating the same actions when the outcomes simply aren't changing. Aren't our children worth it?

http://gapsdiet.com/


Research, after research has never found vaccines to be the cause or contributor of any form of autism. Even after certain perservatives were removed from child vaccines, the issue could not be determined. Take the child from where he is and go from there. Autism is the "social illness of the decade" and unfortunately, many are labeled with it. While the condition does exist, you need to be very certain before labeling a child thus so. I have worked with children labeled such and found that they can do all sorts of things that just did not fit the autism spectrum. OCD, Terhettes' Syndrome, Autism, ....................where were these conditions when I was growing up??  They may have existed, but it is truly a problem to misdiagnose a child. Most larger cities have children's medical centers that offer fine diagnostic techniques that can determine if your child has any problems. But be aware, that schools alone cannot be the sole source of helping your child. You will have to work just as hard to teach your child, provide him with the proper structure, routine, therapy, etc.  Good luck!!  I taught special education for thirty years and only had two children who were actually diagnosed as having autism, but I do think some of the students that came into my work did actually have the condition. LLD, fragile X, Oppositional Defiant, as well as ADHD, Bi-polar Disorder, MR , ED.as well as other social disorders.  And some seemed to have them all. So be sure to give the teachers every bit of your support. No two children are alike. And some parents desires for their children are unrealistic. Most teachers are quite dedicated in working with your child to his/her best abilities. Oh, just to add interest, my first student to have autism was in my second year of teaching.........1974. I was told it was due to his father and mother separating when the child was two as the child was suffering anxiety from the "loss" of his father's love. I only tell this as there are as many theories out there as there are diagnosis. So do not depend on unfounded research or diets. There is no known reason for the condition.    

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There are a lot of social disorders. Your best bet is to talk to your child's teachers and school psychologist. They will steer you to the best source. Aspbergers isn't an easy diagnosis........no set profile. Your doctor or pediatrician is also a great source.........IF they are experienced with this sort of diagnosis. But they should be able to direct you to a medical facility with experts who are. So children are just shy or anti-social. Setting up safe play activities with other children and parroting acceptable behavior can help. Be sure and praise aceptable social behaviors daily.

Lucy - posted on 12/27/2009

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Quoting Heidi:

I would love to study the actual scientific studies used for Dr. McBrides research and basis for her theories. I will concede that some children suffer because of gut flora but NOT ALL OF THEM! I really dislike when people say that this is a cure for all Autistic children...IT IS NOT! There are a lot of therapies that have been proven to help and not a single therapy has been proven to "cure" Autism.


I agree, Heidi. It is widely accepted by the medical community that those with autism already have a genetic predisposition to the condition that can be triggered by environmental factors, such as diet. It is important to note that these environmental factors are simply a catalyst NOT the cause of autism.



One of the major difficulties with diagnosing and dealing with aspergers or autism is that each individual displays very different symptoms, and may not tick all the boxes on the assessment, which means treatment, education, even parenting style, must be tailored carefully to the individual. Therefore to prescribe a "one size fits all" approach, such as the one Raine describes, is well meaning but actually not helpful.



Kati, how supportive is your daughter's school? I don't know what country you live in, but here in the UK schools can often be the key to getting a diagnosis as they will know your daughter well and will liase with the local authority to help with funding etc. The school should also have someone in charge of special educational needs who may be able to offer an opinion on whether your daughter is displaying symptoms.

Heidi - posted on 12/27/2009

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I would love to study the actual scientific studies used for Dr. McBrides research and basis for her theories. I will concede that some children suffer because of gut flora but NOT ALL OF THEM! I really dislike when people say that this is a cure for all Autistic children...IT IS NOT! There are a lot of therapies that have been proven to help and not a single therapy has been proven to "cure" Autism.

Julie - posted on 12/27/2009

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We had our 9 year old tested this last summer. He had to be refered for testing. It took over two hours and was a lot of doing puzzles and thinking games. We did not get the diagnosis we were hoping for but did get help in school with some modifications to his day that are helping him.

Stacey - posted on 12/26/2009

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do the research and pass it on.Many times it is from vaccines. plenty of websites available. www.nvic.org, www.generationrescue.org, the book by Barbara Loe Fisher, A shot in the dark etc. The medical profession wants to always give drugs. diet is very important as well as having the nervous system checked, proper function of the nervous system will help some of the symptoms. All you can do is give the information. search Mercola.com.

Heidi - posted on 12/26/2009

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Quoting Aimee:

Here's my question, how do you tell a family member you think their child may have this or autism? Why hasn't the doctor caught the symptoms? Will they be identified in school?


That is a very tricky thing (telling someone that their child may have a problem). A lot of parents are reluctant to believe that their child may have a problem.  Approach it delicately and see if they have noticed anything, sometimes all it takes is a gentle nudge in the right direction. As for the school... it depends... If the child can maintain and function for the school day (which, surprising, many bottle it up so to speak) they actually dont have to do anything (FAPE only applies if they child cant maintain and function). If it is noticeable they will recommend testing and observation but only upon the parents approval. The parent has a right to refuse and the only time a court will side with the school is if it is a severe detriment to the student and well as it disrupts the learning of the other students. Also, if the parents feel there is a need they need to submit, in writing, a request that the school test their child. The school, however, cannot give a diagnosis, that must be done by an outside psychologist or psychiatrist. Once the request is in place the school has a set of guidelines it MUST follow with regards to the testing and the timeline in which they do it and follow up with the parents.



The doctor is a different story. They usually only see your child for a short amount of time and have to go by the information that the parents provide so, sadly, it is easy to miss a problem unless it is a very noticeable problem. They may mistake the child for shy or quiet instead of seeing it for what it is especially if a parent is telling the Dr. that the child is meeting all of the standard milestones. Its important to log everything so that when you see the Dr., psychologist, psychiatrist, ped neurologist etc they have a full understanding of what is going on and can better serve you and your childs needs.

Aimee - posted on 12/26/2009

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Here's my question, how do you tell a family member you think their child may have this or autism? Why hasn't the doctor caught the symptoms? Will they be identified in school?

Leslie - posted on 12/26/2009

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That would be my 9 year old. He has been diagnosed with Asburgers. His school had us put him through pychological profiling. He kind of stumped the pychologists. The told me that he had Aburgers and yet did not have it. He has some symptoms, but not all. He does not seem to want to play with other kids very much, but loves to talk to grown ups. He also does not act the 'normal' way in social situations.
In the beginning, his school was pressuring us to start giving him psyche drugs. Don't let anyone talk you into that. We adamantly refused to medicate him. The school then decided to replace both the teacher and the principal who were trying to get us to medicate him and the new principal and his new teacher whole heartedly agreed that he should not be medicated at all.
In my opinion, there is nothing 'wrong' with these children. They just think a little differently. They are usually very intelligent (what I call 'book smart') These children will often feel a bit challenged in social situations since they want to analyze just about everything they encounter.

Caroline - posted on 12/26/2009

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hi..my son has aspergers..it took until he was 13 to diagnose.we went down the adhd route,but i knew it was something else.you have just described my son!!he is now 17 and life has been so hard for him.been branded naughty for so long is tough!!my son is so different,not like alot of others with AS.thats the thing with the autistic spectrum..its a wide range of different dissabilities.dont give up.keep asking for more tests.thats what i did..its his life and his human rights as a human being for them to get it right!!!and you are his carer and his mum.thats no easy job!!!! just dont give up if your not happy!!!i didnt,it was a fight a long one but worth it.a bit late tho as alot of damage was done!!!good luck..caroline

Pamela - posted on 12/26/2009

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sounds possible. write a list out of different things he does within a month or two Like eating habits, collecting habits, speaking habits and manner and live skills. Then take this to the doctors and show them. Its a diffeicult one to diagnosed. Time is one that helps. Also how is he with change.

Alina - posted on 12/26/2009

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I am an Educational Assistant and work with children that are Autistic. Quited often children are misdiagnosed with ADHD when they really have some form of Autism. If you feel in your heart that something is stlill not quite right than be persistant. You are your and your child's best advocate. Obviously no one will care about you or your child as much as you will so keep pushing until you get to the bottom of it. I live in Ontario and there is a place called the R.O.C.K. (Reach Out Centre for Kids) and they do free testing as I know this can be an expensive venture. Let me know if there is anything else you want to ask about. I am not an expert but I do have quite a bit of experience with autistic children. Good Luck!

Shirlynn - posted on 12/26/2009

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Your doctor should know...and if they don't...go somewhere else!! a pediatrician or one who specializes in developmental disorders.....they have a book and our doctor literally pulled out the book and went through the criteria....my son was just a few months short of 3 yrs when he was diagnosed but he slowly becoming better w/ interacting w/ people!

Kimberly - posted on 12/26/2009

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Our pediatrician referred us to a pediatric neurologist. There is a lot of info out there, and some of it can easily be check marked... It is a spectrum disorder, and can range from extreme to slight. My son is four years old and while we haven't completely ruled it out, it is agreed that he does have adhd and proprioceptive issues.
I would discuss it with his doctor and see if a referral is warranted to further explore it.
Also, I don't know if you watch Grey's Anatomy, but there was a female heart doctor on there for a while that portrayed Asperger's pretty well. I think it was last season?

Your child is lucky to have you for an advocate.

Sandra - posted on 12/26/2009

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Notebook..... Take notes when out with child or at home of any behaviour that you find uneasy with. That notebook take to local Doctor allow him to read the notes, have a referral written up for as many psychiatrists and Pediatricians.(Also helps if you are with the Doctor and you fall apart emotionally). Don't take no for an answer, I have a very strong personality and wasn't about to be bulldozed into a diagnosis or misguided unless it was and justified. Thousands of dollars I have spent at the most elite school of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere to now at a mainstream State School with a Special Education Unit and he has never been happier. It becomes very confusing with Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, low muscle tone, Speech Language Impairment. sensory intergration. Good diet, routine, is a must...



I personally find the key to a lot of my problem is dealing with his behaviour that is very immature by at least three yearsAssertiveness courses are out there for this area.

I become frustrated we go off to the Psychiatrists and seek advice. Eg: He hates Sea world. Why? Because we didn't set out a plan of what we are going to do before we go to Sea world. The book I found in every Theraphist office all over Australia was " The Child Out of Sync" http://www.out-of-sync-child.com/ This book answers every question you can imagine regarding these issues.



Last but not surely always remember you didn't do anything wrong while pregnant or feed him something that must have been dangerous etc etc for his or her behaviour to have unfolded.

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My friend has a child with Aspbergers. She was so relieved to find out what was wrong, and she is a strong proactive advocate for kids with developmental differences. Her son is now 20 and has been getting the assistance he needs since he was 9. It was very important to find out exactly what help he needed in order to become a successful adult. He has moved out on his own and has learned all the skills necessary to be successful. Social situations will always be difficult, but he is a very nice person. One of the big problems he faced was having other students in school take advantage of him because of his inabilty to "read" other people. But I can tell you this, be proactive and get on every website in the nation until you find the mom's groups that will greatly inform you. Another I know from my friend is that 15 years ago, not much was known and people like her put Aspbergers on the map so that kids would not get misdiagnosed anymore. Being misdiagnosed means you don't the proper assistance at school and at home and in life. Like any child with ANY TYPE of difference (what exactly is "normal" anyway), there are 100s of techniques that work well and consistency in parenting and in school are the most critical aspects. Transitions, going off schedule, over stimulation, unclear directions,--all of these factors are difficult for most ALL children, but become critical in the life of any child with any of the differences such as ADD, ADHD, Autism, Aspbergers, Bi-polar, Obsessive Compulsive disorder, etc. etc. etc. Go forth and be bold in your study, advocacy, and proactive responses.

Stacy - posted on 12/25/2009

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Look at the Irlen.com site. My son is on the Autism spectrum and his teacher was convienced he had ADHD, it turned out he has Irlen Sctopic Syndrome along with his Autism. He now wears the filter glasses and in the first 2 weeks his teacher has noticed he is calmer and able to stay on task better. It takes about a month for his body to adjust to the difference the filters are making but worth looking into before starting on medication for ADHD

Ashley - posted on 12/25/2009

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there are fabulous suggestions in the other comments. my daughter is on the Autism Spectrum Band and is almost 9 years old. the older a person is, the harder it can be to accurately diagnose ASD's b/c of the individual's ability to learn 'coping skills' . Please be proactive and seek a specialist out for a correct label and if at all possible, get a competent 2nd opinion. Do not give up and do not back down. There are terrific resources available in the public schools, but some districts are extremely reluctant to let you get it. It is your child's Right to a Free Appropriate Public Education (say FAPE to any school if they are less than helpful). Anything that causes extra time and monetary investments from a doctors office, insurance provider, or even a school district can be a struggle. It is a wonderful thing to know exactly what is going on with your child so you can be the best advocate for this little person you've been blessed with. You are on the right track if YOU think it's something more. Mommy knows best. :)

Janine - posted on 12/25/2009

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Quoting kati:

aspbergers syndrome? something else?

how do you get a child examined for aspbergers and what are some of the things they look for in a child with this disorder? my 9 year old has always been different, and doesn't know how to act socialially. he's been diagnosed with adhd, but i feel like there is something more. i;ve looked at pamphlets and stuff and he does have alot of the requirements to be diagnosed, but alot of the other requirements he doesn't have. i don't know.... are there any other social disorders out there, he's not violent or hateful, he just doesn't act the "normal" way in social situations.


Hi - my son is 12 and has been diagnosed at quite an early age with Development Verbal Dyspraxia.  This mainly affected his speech which is almost normal now, but he also has very low muscle tone and socially I would say is about 2 years behind.  He has been tested for autism which was ruled out thank goodness, but socially he really struggles because he still acts quite immaturely around his peers.  He is a gorgeous, confident kid who luckily is pretty good with a footy and cricket bat so can fit in with sporting situations but we just hope he will catch up and fit in better.  He wouldn't hurt a fly and gets on with everyone but is SO easily led and will do silly things if one of the kids tells him to because he thinks this will win him friends.  Hope this helps!



 



 

Heidi - posted on 12/25/2009

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Quoting Gerri:

If you have the money, there are some really good places around the country to have your son evaluated. (Unfortunately, insurance doesn't usually cover this testing.) Yale University, (But there's a 2-year waiting list), The Dan Marino Center, there are also two other places that I can think of off the top of my head, but can't remember the names. There's one in Baltimore, which I think is affiliated with Johns Hopkins, and there's also one in the mid-west, I think in Minnesota. There are a lot of different behaviors that children exhibit. My nephew had delayed speech, and obsessed about different topics, especially numbers. My sister took him to Yale at the age of 3, but they said that he was too young at the time. My son also has ADHD, but I am also convinced that he is on the spectrum. Most of his issues are social in nature, which is why I too believe it is Asberger's. Good luck and I hope some of my info helped.


Also there are a couple of places here in California... One is at UCLA ( http://www.autism.ucla.edu/index2.php ),  the MIND Institute at UC Davis ( http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/MINDInstitu... ) as well as The Koegel Austism Cener at Santa Barbara ( http://education.ucsb.edu/autism/) .



 

Gerri - posted on 12/25/2009

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If you have the money, there are some really good places around the country to have your son evaluated. (Unfortunately, insurance doesn't usually cover this testing.) Yale University, (But there's a 2-year waiting list), The Dan Marino Center, there are also two other places that I can think of off the top of my head, but can't remember the names. There's one in Baltimore, which I think is affiliated with Johns Hopkins, and there's also one in the mid-west, I think in Minnesota. There are a lot of different behaviors that children exhibit. My nephew had delayed speech, and obsessed about different topics, especially numbers. My sister took him to Yale at the age of 3, but they said that he was too young at the time. My son also has ADHD, but I am also convinced that he is on the spectrum. Most of his issues are social in nature, which is why I too believe it is Asberger's. Good luck and I hope some of my info helped.

Stacey - posted on 12/25/2009

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www.nvic.org, www. www.lifehealthchoices.com, www.generationrescue.org

there is no clinical scientific evidence/testing to diagnose adhd, aspbergers or autism, all based on behavior. Diet is very important. stay away from processed foods and dairy. chiropractic is also very beneficial.

Heidi - posted on 12/24/2009

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Quoting Raine:

Heidi - If you read Dr. McBride's book, you will find that strict adherence to a GAPS diet plan and lifestyle should eliminate symptoms of autism/aspberger's syndrome, or at the very least, improve it dramatically. The very reason children develop autism and other related syndromes is due to deeply abnormal gut flora. Now, your child may have other issues going on that are not related to gut flora that affect her health. Everything in the body is connected, and if the digestion process is disrupted in any way, it can affect a person's health. If a family is not willing to adhere to a strict GAPS diet plan to remove symptoms, then you will not observe a total recovery in the child's health. Tests that doctors perform often produce results that are incorrect or inconclusive, no matter how experienced the doctor is. Many doctors and medical professionals simply don't understand the nutritional component associated with disease, and with autism, this is especially true.

I am willing to bet you haven't tried the program discussed in Dr. McBride's book, and isn't it worth it to read it if it might help your child? My child could have easily ended up as autistic if I had gone only on what doctors told me and not struck out on my own and looked for natural, more elusive causes. Our society tells us to medicate and eat processed foods. We are so used to this lifestyle we don't even know what it is to live naturally and eat real, traditional foods. Dr. McBride has many fantastic suggestions that really work. Many parents and children have realized dramatic improvements on her program. And she's a medical doctor who didn't like what the establishment was doing to help autism and related disorders. I believe that until you have actually tried the program and gone the distance, you simply cannot say it isn't true or doesn't apply. I believe our children are worth finding out what's really going on in medical communities and getting to the bottom of their health issues. That's why I'm an activist and make sure I educate people about these issues. It's more important than anything to make sure our children have a healthy, stable future.


I dont try try every snake oil treatment offered either. I do understand the way the body works together and being that I was studying to be a nurse until I got pregnant with my son I do have a medical background. And again it is irresponsible for you to claim that this diet will cure Autism. Im not going to continue t o debate this here as this isnt what this thread was about. You are absolutely more than welcome to send me a message and I will do my research on this but this isnt the place for it :)

Sativa - posted on 12/24/2009

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You need to see your pediatrican. Aspergers is different with every child but there are a few common signs. Does your son not really know how to read another person's unspoken language?Facial expressions and the like? Only a medical professional can help you with this. Another resource could be your school districts Special Ed program. Ask to meet with the lead teacher there and they will be able to help you understand what differences there may be. What I mean is: You could take 2 boys from similar backgrounds that have been diagnosed with Aspergers. One functions fairly normally and only seems to be a bit opinionated and sometimes moody. The other may constantly "live" in a dream world of their own creation. Talk to those with specific knowledge of this condition and you will find the help you need.
I am a Special Ed Para, but my experience with Aspergers was limited to only one student during my profession.

Heidi - posted on 12/24/2009

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Quoting Raine:

Aspberger's, autism, ADD, ADHD and other related disorders are always as a result of abnormal gut flora - meaning, not enough friendly bacteria in the immune system/digestive tract due to nutritional deficiencies. This is becoming more and more accepted in medical/health circles, please watch this video by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride (has an autistic son who is now cured) and Donna Gates of the Body Ecology. Dr. McBride is an important revolutionary in austism research and forwarding the cure for this and related disorders. Also, check out the book GAPS diet http://gapsdiet.com/ - one of the most important documents ever to be published on the causes of autism/Aspberger's syndrome. You will be glad you read this book! I manage a web site which provides resources for sustainable living and nutrition - all which are connected to the myriad of health problems our society deals with from heart disease to high blood pressure to obesity to digestive disorders. Come visit us!

-Raine Saunders
www.agriculturesociety.com


Sadly, they are not always linked to abnormal gut flora.  My 6 year old is Autistic and we have been through test after test (including allergy and intestinal as well genetic) and that doesnt fit. It is true that it CAN cause symptoms of Autism it is totally untrue that in every case it is related. We have tried many different diets, probiotics, prebiotics, 5HTP etc and they were of no help for us... That said, that doesnt mean they dont help some Autistic children but it is irresponsible to to say that that is the cause/cure for all Autistic children.

April - posted on 12/24/2009

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my grown nephew was diagnosed with asbergers. He was diagnosed with borderline autism and adhd as a child and teen and when he got older, the asbergers kicks in more in your twenties. his accupuncturist/psychiatrist diagnosed him but a doc familiar with mh/mr problems, or do a search in your area for physicxians who are familiar with asapbergers some specifically treat it. there are meds that help as well as accupuncture.. You have to be proactive though to get him help. there are also schools that specifically teach people with asperbgers if it is needed, my nephew went but he didn't really want to attend as the kids at the school had more problems than he and they were all younger. he is in his mid twenties andhas had two years of college.

Robin - posted on 12/24/2009

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I have just recently had my 7 yr. old son tested. He was also diagnosed ADHD, but his pediatrician thought that there was something else going on because we were having a lot of problems at school behavior wise. They came back an said that he has autism. My son also has problems socially. If you have any questions please feel free to email me.

Noelle - posted on 12/24/2009

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My son was diagnosed with PPD which is on the autistic spectrum. It is close to Aspberger's Syndrom. Trust your instincts!!! My girlfriend thought her son has Aspbergers, he actually had ADHD and Tourette's! Go to your pediatrician and get him a preliminary diagonsis, if necessary. Otherwise, pay a visit to a Psychiatrist, they are the only doctors that can ACTUALLY DIAGONSE any type of autistic spectrum disorder!

Eliana - posted on 12/24/2009

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The first step is to see your family doctor. If he does not give you the answers you are looking for you can go straight to a physcologist, a good place to start is check with your local hospital, especially if you have a children's hospital nearby they can assist. There are also some doctors listed on the internet for your area who are specialist in the area. My son is considered mild case. He is not nor has never been violent, he understands emotions to some level, though has a hard time understanding how his actions, words or attitude hurt others and does not understand the social nuances required when dealing with others. He was always complaining he had no friends. Our biggest tip off was that he would walk around in circles during recess and play act in his head, sometimes outwardly making sounds and acting scenes - other would of course think he was strange. Adults love him, and he would also spend time with the teachers at recess instead of friends. Group work at school is also hard for him, as he does not understand waiting his turn or accepting others point of view. However, he is a straight A student, so school work is never a question. He can not handle group sports, due to the social requirements. Karate is beneficial, because it is solo, but with others. Testing is important for him and for you. As you will understand the social situations he can handle and guide him before hand on how he can act. There are also very many books that will help with your questions. Remember, you son does not have to fit all the criteria to be diagnosed with Aspergers.

Rhoda - posted on 12/24/2009

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Hi Katie,
a clinically phsycologist needs to administer a test to your son. As I understand there are questions your child has to answer. I too wanted to get my daughter tested but she is 22 so it has to be her call. Hope this helps, Rhoda

Patti - posted on 12/24/2009

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Hi Kati, I went through that very same thing with my 9 year old son. At age 5 he was diagnosed with ADHD and medication worked to control impulse but I always felt there was something else going on and having a nephew with Aspbergers I knew it was not necessarily that but definitely something (his social skills were really lacking as well as a few other things that were just not right. I sat down with his pediatrician and we discussed it, he referred him to a local behavioral agency and a specialist, they decided to do a full psychologial development testing which consisted of a series of tests over 2 days lasting about 3 hours each day, they tested EVERYTHING, motor skills, educational skills, social skills, you name it they tested it. The results were that my son had Autism Spectrum Disorder; Pervasive Developmental Disorder, non specific- which means yes he has very mild autism tendencies and lacking in social skills but with counseling, occupational, physical and speech therapy he can over come most all of these "obstacles". My advice is have him tested sooner rather than later so that he, you and your school system can be aware of his diagnosis and by middle school (6-8th grades) he should develop those skills and not be an "outcast". Be persistent, this is your child and you know him better than anyone, if your pediatrician (or whoever diagnosed the ADHD) is decent they will respect your request for the testing as his mother. My prayers are with you in your journey and if you ever need to vent or talk please post or message me I'd be happy to talk with you since I have been there and fully understand.

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My son ASD and his social skills are nil. He is emotionless he could not understand sad, scared, pain, crying. You were either happy or angry that was all he knew. If a mozzie bit him he would scream but if he split his head open he ignored it as his signals seem to be mixed. As it was explained to me we all run on AM and he runs on FM. They say what they think without realizing what they say is wrong or hurtful. They like to spend hours (up 12hrs in my sons case) playing a game and forgetting about toileting or food. If he played soldiers he would set them up exact to the millimetre as a picture. the spacing spot on. His school uniform was maroon so he had to have maroon underwear as well otherwise he wouldn't get dressed. Alll the colours had to be the same as in all blue or black no mixing of colours even down to socks. These are just some of the signs to watch for also obsessions with a particular food etc. Take note of these things and show the list to a pediatrician. Look on sites like www.aspergersyndrome.com which also gives list of things to watch for.

Cheryl - posted on 12/23/2009

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When looking up the syndrome, it will help you a lot to spell it Asperger. Lots of people say/spell it incorrectly and it might slow down your research. Good luck finding your answers. I have worked with several children on the autism spectrum (I am a teacher/counselor) and my brother has Asperger's as well. Early intervention is the key, so I applaud you for recognizing your child's needs!

Pamela - posted on 12/23/2009

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I agree that you should contact your Pediatrician. You can also contact your son's school and ask that he be evaluated. I was a special ed teacher for 6 years. If I saw certain behaviors in a student I would refer them for further testing with the parents' consent. A specialist from our school district would come in and observe the student during a normal lesson. Some students would not meet the criteria for aspbergers but would be considered to have PDD (pervasive developmental disorder). Make sure you have a list of behaviors that you see so that you don't forget something when talking to your Dr or to the school.

Cheryl - posted on 12/23/2009

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Asperger's Syndrome, named for Hans Asperger, is a high-functioning form of autism. As it is part of the autism spectrum, there are myriad levels of the syndrome. Those who have replied below who are recommending a child psychologist's evaluation are correct. Ask your pediatrician for a referral. Your pediatrician may want to know what you are seeing that makes you think Asperger's. If you look up Tony Atwood, he is a genius in the field and his website and books can give you a lot of help. Also, put it in writing to your child's school that you want him tested by their school psychologist. They will test him as well, increasing your child's probability of getting into social skills groups and other assistance. It is all about getting a child psych that is interested in and experienced with Asperger's and other autism spectrum disorders. Good luck!

Rhonda - posted on 12/23/2009

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I have a friend whose son was thought (for a year or so) to have Asperger's syndrome. I think the main thing with him was that he had difficulty in learning how to read. About a year after diagnosing him with this, they then decided that he didn't have it. Here's a good site for information: http://www.aspergers.com/

Good luck!

SUSAN - posted on 12/23/2009

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I have a 19 year old that has always been different also. They (the doctors) will not look at the fact I have 3 nephews with Austism. I son do have voilent moments and with swear when he is upset. Doctor call him bi-polar. I have not believed this and always knew there had to be something else since the age of 3 years. Follow your heart it something doesn't seem right with this diagnosis, then you are most likely right.
My son is on Depokote at this time for "bi-polar episodes". I still think he has some from of Austism and always has. Don't stop until you are feeling good about the way things are going for you, your son, and your family. Good moms always know their own kids. You sound like a good mom. Don't give up, the road get long and rough sometimes. You are not alone. Good luck.

Andrea - posted on 12/23/2009

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my neice was diagnosed with aspbergers at age 12. her teacher sent her to the school counselor and she did some preliminary tests then sent her to a psychologist for the diagnosis. try your son's teacher and counselor for help.

Leslee - posted on 12/23/2009

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Hi--I'm a first grade teacher and Asberger's is a social disorder. His teacher can refer him to the school's spec. ed dept for an assessment and they will have you go to your doctor. Tell your doctor you want him assessed for this. there is a questionaire you, and the teacher will fill out. Asberger's falls on the spectrum of autism and when we talk about a specific child thtais what is stated "he falls in the range..." I have a child with this in my class. Socially he has a hard time, academically he's behind a bit. But the social is our main concern. We do a lot of social stories with examples on how he should respond. The best way I can describe Asberger's is to think of someone that has NO social barrier that we have that tells us how to talk nice, make eye contact, etc. Hope this helps. Leslee

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Hi Kati, i'm not sure where you are located but Tony Attwood is an expert on Asperger's Syndrome. You can find his website here http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/. There is lots of information on the internet which I know can be very confusing, but the DSM-IV criteria is the measure used by most psychologist/psychiatrist. There are also some excellent books out there. One was mentioned about "Eating an Artichoke", others available arethe "Oasis Guide to Aspergers" and Jen Birch's 'Congratulations it's Aspergers".

If your son lacks social skills then you can also ask if there is any social skills training out there. My son attended this training on and off for about a year and I can highly recommend it. He is now able to answer the telephone, something he totally refused to do before, and has learned about interracting with others.

I hope you find the answers you are looking for soon.

Paige - posted on 12/23/2009

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My daughter (now 9) was diagnosed a year ago. She is such a wonderful, out-going smart child. She does so well, but there was just something there socially, as well as involving her motor skills. She was diagnosed by a pediatric nero-psycologist. We have been on the waiting list for the developmental pediatrician FOREVER. HEr regular pediatrician cannot diagnose, since her "symptoms" are fairly mild. I didn't think that a "diagnosis" would do much, as it wouldn't change anything about her, but it has been wonderful. It has helped us find more help. She is curently on a vitamin supplementation schedule, including methyl b12 injections every 3 days. A doctor who can diagnose Asperger's could help point you in that direction, if you are interested.

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You know, my 10 yr old has ADD, and her counselor at school thought she had Aspberger's, too, but when I took her to a respected child psychiatrist, he ruled out PDD (anything in the autism spectrum) and said that she had ADD with subclinical OCD. She also is a little "strange" in some social situations, but here's a kicker--we just visited a family whose son has autism, and my daughter behaved just fine, relatively! :-) I would take your son to a psychiatrist, just to see what you're dealing with. It really put our minds at ease. I hope this helps.

Cathie - posted on 12/23/2009

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There are a couple of tests. Look around on the internet. Maybe a sensory disorder and he is having a hard time processing? Look on the autism webpages and see if they can point you in the right directions. Generation Rescue and Talk About Curing Autism are two of the best. Hugs - Cathie - mom to 10 year old Coltin with severe autism.

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