asthma

Rebecca - posted on 03/30/2010 ( 53 moms have responded )

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my son is 14 months old & just been told he has asthma.its all new to me so has any one got any tips on anything about it.

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Kayle - posted on 04/09/2010

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Hello, I have had athsma since I was 5 years old. Be very careful in spring and fall. Every spring and fall I have ended up in the ER with an athsma attack that I was unable to control at home. With your son being so young I hope your doctor perscribed you a nebulizer and medicine for it. I woiuld also reccomend seeing a allergy/athsma specialist. My athsma was best controlled while I was seeing a specialist. I know it will be hard but try to keep your son from panicing and crying. This only makes it much worse. but I know that when I was younger I would start crying when I felt an Attack coming on. So also look for that as a warning sign. I also will get very red around the chest and itchy when I feel one coming on. I hope this helps I know its a very sucky thing to have to deal with but it's alway possible he will grow out of it. My brother was diagnosed with athsma when he was 4 he now is 9 and has not had an attack in over a year. Good Luck to you and your handsome little guy. =)

H.J - posted on 04/09/2010

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My son was diagnosed at 17mths with Asthma. My Asthma was misdiagnosed for years from the point I started having symptoms as doctors back then were reluctant to diagnose and prescribe Asthma medication. It is good Rebecca that you have asked for help and have pediatricians on the case. Follow their advice but don't ever be afraid of the good old second opinion if what your told doesn't sit right with you. I was told to give my little boy cold showers and put him in front of an air conditioner which I know almost killed my little sister when she was in the midst of a major asthma attack. I took my little boy to a second doctor who I trusted more than the diagnosing doctor to get a second opinion to make sure that this was in fact asthma and not another illness similar to it. Asthma programs are great for disputing a lot of myths about Asthma.

Lisa - posted on 04/07/2010

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my nephew got diagnosed at 3mth hun so he isnt to young for a diagnosis x

Eve - posted on 04/06/2010

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My son has asthma and it can be controlled thats the good news.He has a chance of out growing it also.Its not the end of the world there are many things you can do straight away.Send me a message andI can tell you what I did.....

Jacque - posted on 04/05/2010

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My 15 month old granddaughter was also just diagnosed. We don't know what triggered it but she had to have 4 breathing treatments at the doctor in 24 hours. Just make sure the babies area is dust free and if you have pets be on the look out for that as well. The main thing is to monitor the breathing, she started coughing really bad and the doctor said it was the asthma that made her cough so there is not cough syrup for that. It is not a lot you can do other than making sure the house is dust and allergen free in open places no smoke drifting from other apartments or condo's or at public places. Hope this helps

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Rebecca - posted on 04/07/2010

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well thank you everyone i appreciate everyones different feedback...
i know some people are saying he is to young to be diagonised, but we have been in the hospiatl alot of times since he has been born with his breathing and it took them a long time to say that he has it.ive been to 3 different paedriction.
i will definitly be taking him to a allergist to find out more..i didnt even know about that...ive just booked into a asthma program so hopefully i get more info.

Kara - posted on 04/05/2010

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cold air helps open up the airways especially at night when things can get scary. If your baby starts wheezing in the night, take him out for a drive in the car with the window down. Also if you have a separate bath and shower, sit with him in the bath tub and run the shower on hot for as long as you can. Steam helps open up the airways too. Four of my six kids all suffered from chronic asthma and this was the best way to get them feeling better. I also found out the hard way that you shouldn't pile clothes on them. My doctor always said to me " You make them worse when you pile layers of clothes on your baby"

Sheila - posted on 04/05/2010

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Our son, Daniel, had asthma when he was 2. By the way, he is doing fine now. He is 25 and has not needed medication for 2 years. The Lord healed him:) The important thing i remember is to catch it early. If you start him on the medication as soon as he has sniffles it prevents it from turning into a more serious condition. WE spent a few times in the emergency room. Nights seem to be the worse. hope this helps:)

Sabrina - posted on 04/03/2010

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I have a 6 yr old with asthma and she has had it since she was 5 1/2 months old! It definitely sucks, but fortunately, it gets better...usually! Just keep up on his nebulizer treatments. My sitter also puts a humidifier in the room with her while she is napping and puts lavender and chamomile in it to help soothe and relax her

Carrie - posted on 04/03/2010

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PS...I agree with the chiropracter post. I have had asthma for almost 30 years. I was diagnosed as a child as was my brother. It did not stop me from being in every sport, I jsut medicated as needed. I have had periods in life when it was really bad as with allergies. I started seeing a chiropractor 1.5 years ago and I use all my meds so much less and even have weaned some. I know have all three of my kids getting regular adjustments as well. He even helped with chronic ear infections. The key is finding a good one that you trust and get can talk to. Good luck!!!!

Carrie - posted on 04/03/2010

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When he is having trouble breathing have him sit up right and raise his arms. This puts less stress on the airways and allows them to relax and open a little more. Another good tip is caffine...when you are out and about without a breathing treatment nearby, buy some soda or coffee with cafine, it helps as a stimulant with the breathing. Most important though is prevention. Make sure that no one smokes near your child as well as wears clothing that was near a smoker, Going outside to smoke is not good ennough...cuddling with clothes that were around smoke is enough to set things in motion. Also, watch the spray cleaners, perfumes, and air fresheners as well as air quality warnings. All these things make breathing very difficult for someone with compromised airways.
Good Luck!!!

Emily - posted on 04/03/2010

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I had my children with asthma when they were young your baby;s age. Have him assessed by a doctor first and get the right medication for him. What I found very useful was a steamer in their rooms to help with phlem obstruction. Lift the top of the matress cot (put a towel of pillow) so child is not sleeping flat on the mattress, thus enabling him to breath abit easier. Keep pets outside and room free of dust. notice if he gets trigerred into an asthma attack by certain foods. My daughter was allergic to cows milk and dairy products. All the best.

Samantha - posted on 04/03/2010

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My son was diagnosed around 9 months with asthma. The "miracle drug" that seems to keep Ethan healthy is Singulair. This works for both allergy and asthma. He is going to be seeing a pulmonologist and also a allergy specialist. Both two great people to go see. Get a referral from his doctor. And if he gets a cold or sick, asthma can make it alot worse. I have a home nebulizer set up for him for if and when he gets an asthma attack. Maybe something else to ask for! Keep up the good work!

Ellen - posted on 04/03/2010

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definitely find out what he s allergic too. We got rid of all the stuffed animals and carpets in our house and it made a huge difference in his symptoms. Dust and molds pollens pets. watch him when he gets a cold with the right meds he'll be fine.

Alicia - posted on 04/02/2010

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I also just found out my son has asthma,did they prescribe a ventiline for him?if they did and he has a continous cough give it to him becuz the coughin can act up the asthma, this happen to my son and keep a keen on his breathing and heart beat,if it is too fast take him to the hospital,

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I have been dealing with my daughter's asthma for 11 yrs. It took a great pediatrician to acknowledge that she truly had asthma at 3yrs of age. If possible, get a nebulizer, it has been a life saver. If your insurance covers it, get a portable one too. It is great because you can keep it in a diaper bag and have access to it where ever you go. Also, you may want to get your child tested for allergies, usually they go hand in hand with asthma. Such things like mold, mildew, and pollen can trigger an asthma attack.

[deleted account]

Rebecca, how did you get an asthma diagnosis at 14 months? My son is 2 and our doc told us he's too young to be tested for asthma. We have a tentative diagnosis of reactive airways (similar to asthma and may lead to full blown asthma). So far his only trigger seems to be getting a cold. When he gets a cold we'll give him his puffers for a few days and then he's good to go.

Sandy - posted on 04/02/2010

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I dont know of any scientific facts that might help you, but I can tell you what we do with my grandson. He was born at 25 weeks and struggled daily to live. The doctors said that babies cannot be officially diagnosed with asthma but my grandson showed all signs that he did. We try to keep him cool for starters. We have very hot and humid weather here and he has a very hard time breathing. He has even been hospitalized several times. Every time this happened, he was outside playing; although some of those times were at the lake swimming and the heat was still too much. Until you know for sure the severity of his asthma, I would start out by limiting play time (especially in the heat). My grandson is going on 3 now and is doing great; he just cant go out when it is really hot and humid...it helps! I hope I have helped some. I will get in touch with my daughter and see what she may add to help. I wish you the best!!

Helen - posted on 04/02/2010

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I am really surprised they are calling it asthma usually pediatricians will just say they have breathing problems and say that they are too young to call it asthma...For the first 9 months of my sons life he was on breathing treatments. I really think it could have been from maybe mildew at the daycare from the carpet in there ( we stopeed going)...almost anything can trigger it. You have to figure out the cause. I didn't think my son would grow out of it but he is almost three and its been a 1.5 years since we had to use the nebulizer. Good luck and I hope he does too.

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yes, My son is now 29 and was diagnosed at 6 months with Asthma. He was just diagnosed with Pulminary Embolism as a result of his asthma. I can tell you what not to do. Keep him warm in cold weather. Look for signs of fever at all times, fever can result in Phemonia in young asthma patients. As he gets older, do not let him become overweight or obese. Feed him alot of fruits and vegetables.

Betsy - posted on 04/02/2010

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Also, another trigger for my son was the dust allergy. I always run the house fan on our AC unit before, during and after major cleaning days because of the dust that is kicked up. Making the switch to all natural cleaning products seemed to help as well. Just need to fing his triggers!

Betsy - posted on 04/02/2010

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has your son been allergy tested? Our son's asthma is much worse during his seasonal allergies, and also is triggered by colds. See if your pediatrician or allergy/asthma specialist can give you a plan to go by when a regular cold hits your sons so it does not go right to his chest.

Deneisha - posted on 04/02/2010

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My son has asthma as well and what his doctor told me to do. Was everytime that he gets a cold or starts coughing start him on breathing treatments. It is hard for me to know when he is wheezing and when he is not because I don't really know what I am listening for so just give cold medicine and start breathing treatments. The earlier you start, the better.

Mindy - posted on 04/02/2010

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WOW I cant believe a dr has diagnosed your son with asthma so young. We took our daughter to see a specialist when she was2 1/2-3 . The dr said that she doesn't want to diagnose her has having asthma but all the symptoms are there. So we call it restrictive airways, plus once you are diagnosed with asthma it is considered preexisting and she could grow out of it. I would have your son tested for allergies as well My daughter has what they call a triad.. eczema, allergies and asthma.. When one flairs up they all flair up. She has been on almost all the inhalers, pills, liquids out on the market to manage her flairs. We have always had a neb machine in the house as well. At school , right after lunch she goes into the nurses office and does a treatment and then heads out to recess. I have never heard of foods and/or drinks to cause a flair up and we have been dealing with the triad since she was 2 and she is now 8.

Sunny - posted on 04/02/2010

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My son has asthma, dairy allergies and eczema, which i have been told by every expert are all commonly interlocked. He had the dairy allergy first then after several really bad lots of bronchitis as a baby he was diagnosed at 2 with asthma. He took a preventer puffer for 6 months then as we went into summer he only had it when colds were around and at change of seasons and we havent had a problem since. He is also on a soy diet. He runs around more than any other kid i know! Good luck make sure you see the right people and get the right diagnoses.

Gretel - posted on 04/02/2010

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ps.: when i said "let him play like a normal child" i meant let him play outside, in the garden, get dirty etc...he needs to develop his natural defenses :-)

Danielle - posted on 04/02/2010

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i was not aware that you could EVER grow out of asthma?...i know it can lay dormant for yrs..I thought if you got asthma under 2 or 3yrs of age THEN you may grow out of it because it is baby asthma, and when the lungs develop properly then they are able to grow out of it..

Anyway i have had asthma since i was 4yo...SWIMMING is a great thing to get your child into as it stregthens the lungs! any aerobic activity will help to strengthen the lungs. I have been hospitalised soo many times when i was younger. And have always been able toplay sport. Just take precautions and make sure you have your "puffer" with you at ALL times...

The main thing that triggers my asthma is change in weather, dust and sometimes grass,lol...In my experience i was told NEVER to drink milk when i was having my asthmatic episodes. I would have asthma for weeks at a time and milk coats the throat and lungs which makes it harder for the lungs to work...

Make sure he is rugged up in winter, humidifiers work well to. Now that i am older (22)...i rarely have asthma..sometimes i wont get it for months and even didnt have any signs for YEARS...but in the last 6 months i have gotten weezy and dizzy by the end of the day..grrr,lol
Good luck

Gretel - posted on 04/02/2010

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Hi Rebecca! my father has asthma... and my brother did as a baby and little boy. He even went to the hospital a couple of time, and had to get oxygen. The advice of my pediatrician-uncle, the brother of my mom, was "don´t treat him like a sick boy. treat him like a normal boy. let him play, just like any other child."
she just payed special attention that we both ate healthy (we drank natural, frish pressed juices every day, home made yoghurt, home made cookies...) and kept the house always clean and dust-free (dust ist very bad for asthmatic people)... and i wouldnt use carpets on his bedroom.
Anyway.... my brother had his last asthma attack at 7, and is now 36 and never had problems again :-) he even has cats at home and no one woulr guess that he was an asthmatic little boy. I wish the same happens with your baby. good luck

Dawn - posted on 04/01/2010

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One thing that is very healthy for your young child is a chiropractic adjustment, You need to find a chiropractor who treats small children, I work for a chirpractor we treat lots of small children with all kinds of health problems. This is a very healthy gentle thing to have done. During delivery of the baby when the head is pulled on to deliver the baby a misalinment can be caused in the neck or back and cause problems. Thats why many children have ear aches, stomach problems asthma. Check into it may help your child, My youngest child of four, had his first adjustment when he was 4 weeks old and he was the healthier then his other siblings.

Malia - posted on 04/01/2010

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I would look into Elderberry extract! It is an immune buster and will help with asthma.
my kids have asthma and it has made a huge difference in breathing. both my kids are using inhalers.. but my son used to be on a nebulizer and has been off it for weeks now.

Rosa Lee - posted on 04/01/2010

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My son had asthma up until the age of 8 yrs old, then out grew it.
Simple things that you can do to keep your child happy:
Use MicroFiber filters when vaccuming. Watch his diet, since certain foods can trigger asthma. Dust often, but the BEST is get Humidifiers in your home. Don't baby the asthma by restricting him. Allow him to do what he feels he can do. His body will let him know. My son used to run, then stop for a few minutes to catch his breath. I always worried about him "over-doing" his play, running,etc, but he out grew this thing, and boy was I happy!

I don't know how severe your child's asthma is, so therefore, I suggest taking him to a specialist and seeing if he is going to need breathing "things", or....maybe out grow it like my son has done. My son is now 40 yrs old, and he is fine:)

Sophie - posted on 04/01/2010

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im not foo fooin anything anyone else has sed but in my opinion dont worry about it too much just giv him his puffers as directed, keep dust in the home to a minimum by gettin rid of unneccersary stuffed toys and hovering thoroughly (i bought a dyson especially which seemed to help) and do let him run and play because it can strenghen his lungs. my boy had it from tiny and has just been told he can be weaned off his puffers because he is doing well,ive never cut down on dairy at all and he has alot of it.

Leslie - posted on 04/01/2010

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My 4 year old has had it for 2 years. We started giving her breathing treatments when she was 2 and it was hard at first, but she got used to it. Some things that helps: we bought a really cute mask, it was in the shape of an elephants head. We also read her a story while she was recieveing the breathing treatment. Good luck!

Jane - posted on 04/01/2010

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My son is now 16 and has lived his whole life with asthma. His pediatrician did not formally diagnose him until he was 3 years of age and I would suggest that you ask your pediatrician to do the same...wait. Reason being is that depending on the cause of the asthma (RSV or heredity, etc), he could grow out of it. My son's was a combination of both RSV and heredity but he still waited to write it down in his file. The reason being, I live in a heavy military area and if someone has asthma, they are not able to join the military. Did I care? Heck no but it was fine to wait.



For my son, we ensured that we had a nebulizer at home and the necessary meds to go with it at all times. What wound up happening when my son was your son's age is we were in the hosital once or twice a month for months on end to get him nebulizer treatments. Our pediatrician finally said that enough was enough and he forced the insurance company to pay for it for us to have it at home. I think it's easier now to get them then it was 15+ years ago.



My son also did preventive meds along with rescue inhalers. We started out with Advair but then he switched to Proventil which worked a lot better. I also made sure that I had rescue inhalers everywhere...in my purse, in my car, in each bathroom and one in the kitchen so that they were always available no matter where I was.



Things to learn is what triggers his asthma. For my son, it was hard to figure out. We eventually found that a combination of grass that is wet was a huge trigger. We found this out when he was running through the sprinklers one summer in our back yard. Another trigger for him is extreme cold air. Also, if he got sick with the flu, it was inevitable that he would have major breathing issues. One year, he was on an oxygen tank for a month when he was in 6th grade due to the flu, that turned to walking pnemonia. We ensure that he and every member of our household gets flu shots every year. Even if he gets the flu anyway, it's very mild and the breathing issues do not happen or at least they are minimalized.



Lastly, I let my son live his life. He did EVERYTHING he wanted to...played basketball, he now plays football, he plays a mean trumpet (LOL), run, jump...whatever. I let him learn how to self medicate at an early age....by 7 he was fully able to medicate when he needed to. I had to argue with the school because they would call me and say "your son wants to use his inhaler, is that OK?". I was like "you're wasting time asking me? if he says he needs it, he needs it!". They got used to it and realized he knew what to do.



In the end, while asthma is a serious condition, if managed properly it should not cause you or your son any issues or concerns. Just be vigilant with flu shots, keep rescue inhalers everywhere, determine if you want to eventually put your son on a preventive medication and look into getting a nebulizer at home.

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Some Asthmatics get worse through dairy so you could try soya milk for a bit and see if that helps. Apples and apple Juice is supposed to be a good remedy, at this stage it will be a case of seeing what triggers his breathing problems, I would perhaps stay away from anyone with pets for a bit. He might grow out of it, most doctor's say you can't 100% diagnose asthmas until a child is over 2. Good luck and hope he is ok x

Janet - posted on 04/01/2010

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Hi, I'd confirm it first w/ a 2nd opinion. some drs are quick to give this kind of diagnosis - I was told I had asthma and got a 2nd opinion the next day. I had a very nasty upper respiratory tract infection that wouldn't go away (for almost 4 months). that was 2 years ago and I haven't had any problems since (the 2nd dr checked me 4 months after I got the initial 2nd opinion and I was breathing fine).

Nancy - posted on 04/01/2010

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My daughter was diagnosed when she was about 18 months old. She has cold-induced asthma, and they also did a scratch test to see if she had any other triggers (food, grass, pollen, etc.), and the only one was "dust mites." You should have your allergy doctor do a work up on your son. Also, if you are only seeing the regular pediatrician, I highly recommend getting a referral to an allergist because they will come up with a more specific plan, medications and diagnosis for your child. I love our allergist. Also, make sure he gets the flu shot every year because when they get sick and have asthma, it really hits them hard. The last thing I will say is that if your son starts acting up, crying and being more of a brat (than normal for that age), this could be the beginning of an asthma attack. When they don't get enough oxygen, they get a bit testy! It took me a while to figure this out. :-)

Betty - posted on 04/01/2010

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Hi, Rebecca. My daughter (who was diagnosed when she was about 10) and I both have asthma. We have a great allergist whose goal is to help us stop using our inhalers. Just have to be careful about paying attention to what aggravates symptoms. Good luck!

Sue - posted on 04/01/2010

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I have 2 boys, both were diagnosed with asthma when they were little (approx 18 mos.)we had a nebulizer (we called it the breathing machine) it was like a humidifier with medication mixed in. I set it up so the boys could sit with the machine on and it was their time to pick anything on tv they wanted to watch. It became their special time,When they were smaller, I would sit with them and it would be uninterupted Mommy/Daddy time! They learned not to fight the treatments this way. Emotion has a lot to do with how successful treatments are. The medicine gives you and adreneline(sp?) rush.(I have asthma too). I timed my night time treatments so they would have an hour or so before bedtime to work it out.An extra pillow to prop the child up in a semi sitting position is important. When they're too young for pillows in bed, set one end of the crib mattress on the highest rung and the opposite end on the lowest, so there is an incline. When they are older, coffee helps with sudden attacks. Hope this helps.

Rose - posted on 04/01/2010

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Hi, my son was diagnosed at 3yrs, he was put on the puffers and then had a bad spell were he was have real sudden attacks and turning blue. So had to get a ventaliar machine.
When hes coughing, stay calm, you freak out, they freak out and makes it worse.
Winter colds and dramatic change in air temperature were big triggers for him.
I use to use the plant echenacia (hope ive spelt it right), it helps keep the phlem down so obviously the asthma was not so bad (as asmatha is an overdose of phlem in the lungs).
Happily he seemed to grow out of it (as Ive heard a lot of kids, especially boys do)
Altho after about 6yrs of being free he had some medication for an op a couple of weeks ago which triggered a major attack. So hes back on his puffers again (hes now 18yrs old)
check with your local council or asthma foundation they quite often run free information courses.

Kym - posted on 04/01/2010

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all of my sibblings and myself had asthma as a child, we ALL grew out of it, the boys earlier than me (by age 8) i finally grew out of it at 14. so fingers crossed this is what happens with you guys, best of luck

Jonna - posted on 04/01/2010

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MAKE SURE IT ACTUALLY IS ASTHMA!!! Many babies with allergies and other respiratory concerns are misdiagnosed with asthma. I would get a second and even third opinion on the matter.

Debi - posted on 03/31/2010

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My son was diagnosed about the same age - his asthma only happened when he got a cold - it went RIGHT to his chest & he filled up w/mucus...BUT nothing else triggered it - no allergies, not exertion - we were given a nebulizer to use with Albuterol (bronchodilator, I think) and a steroid (forget the name) - just use the meds as directed, know what to do in a sudden onset of symptoms (which we fortunately never had) and relax...check w/you doctor, but there's a chance he could grow out of it...mine has!

Iridescent - posted on 03/31/2010

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Hayley, I didn't state that all people with asthma have a dairy allergy. I said it can be a symptom, and I cited accurate proof. We know 3 of us (myself and 2 of our boys) have a milk protein allergy, which was discovered long after the asthma diagnosis. Removing the dairy made the asthma completely disappear! Just because that's not your case doesn't mean it's not true in others.

H.J - posted on 03/31/2010

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Amy, I have Asthma myself have lived on a dairy free diet and it did nothing to relieve my symptoms.

I have done a lot of research on the subject for the sake of my son and myself along with for my studies and my research proves that Asthma and dairy are not interrelated. Rebecca you may find this information interesting.



Natural health expert Pamela Allardice has this to say:

"Even though a small number of people are allergic to the protein in dairy foods, overall the majority of people with asthma tolerate dairy foods well. It’s a common misconception that people with asthma should avoid dairy foods and that milk causes mucus. Milk does cause a thickening of the saliva temporarily in some people, but scientific evidence does not show that this is in anyway linked to an asthma attack. Dairy foods are a vital source of bone building calcium, especially during childhood, and are an important food group for all.



The real key is to recognize your child's patterns and avoid any known asthma triggers. However, it’s important to understand that foods are not common triggers for asthma when compared with other factors like dust mites. More importantly, it seems that most food triggers are really the result of an allergic reaction. According to The Asthma Foundation over 80 per cent of people with asthma also have allergies. The most common foods that can trigger asthma (peanuts, nuts, sesame, fish, seafood (especially shellfish), dairy products, eggs and berries) really do so by firstly starting off an allergic response that involves reactions in the skin and gut, as well as the airways. If your son is not allergic to these foods, there is no need to avoid them."



Dr Raymond Mullins has this to say:

"For centuries, milk has been blamed for increased mucus production – and in turn a range of other conditions like asthma and snoring.



But while many people swear milk produces mucus, the effect can't be explained by science"



A 2005 review of studies concluded that there was no link between milk consumption and mucus production or asthma. In one study, participants infected with the common cold virus reported symptoms of increased in mucus production after drinking milk, but when their mucus production was actually measured there was no statistical difference. In another study, there was no difference in the sensation experienced between drinking soy milk and cow's milk.



This doesn't mean people don't experience the sensation, but rather that there is no actual increase in mucus production.



He puts the sensation down to the texture and viscosity of milk, and notes that most people do not report similar effects with other dairy products such as cheese.



Mullins says that a sensation of sticky mucus can be caused by many medications that dry out the mouth and throat, particularly in the elderly, as well as viral infections or allergies such as hay fever, but it's rarely caused by diet.



And while many people call the mucus-milk phenomena an allergy, it's not, he says.



A study conducted by the Department of Community Medicine, University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia.



In the first of three studies investigating the widely held belief that "milk produces mucus," 60 volunteers were challenged with rhinovirus-2, and daily respiratory symptoms and milk and dairy product intake records were kept over a 10-day period. Nasal secretion weights were obtained by weighing tissues collected and sealed immediately after use. Information was obtained on 51 subjects, yielding 510 person-days of observation. Subjects consumed zero to 11 glasses of milk per day (mean, 2.7; SE, 0.08), and secretion weights ranged from zero to 30.4 g/day (mean, 1.1; SE, 0.1). In response to an initial questionnaire, 27.5% reported the practice of reducing intake of milk or dairy products with a cold or named milk or dairy products as bad for colds. Of the latter group, 80% stated the reason as "producing more mucus/phlegm." Milk and dairy product intake was not associated with an increase in upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms of congestion or nasal secretion weight. A trend was observed for cough, when present, to be loose with increasing milk and dairy product intake; however, this effect was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Those who believe "milk makes mucus" or reduce milk intake with colds reported significantly more cough and congestion symptoms, but they did not produce higher levels of nasal secretions. We conclude that no statistically significant overall association can be detected between milk and dairy product intake and symptoms of mucus production in healthy adults, either asymptomatic or symptomatic, with rhinovirus infection.



Please don't take my word for it please go see an allergy and asthma specialist and do some research of your own.

Lisa - posted on 03/31/2010

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my little boy also has asthma as do i but colds are the main trigger for ours your doctor mite put him on ventolin to begin with if its just mild or beclamethasone if its bad my nephew has had it since he was born but seems to be leaving him now theres a few websites that will give you more information hope it helps also get sum anti allergy bedding it helps a lot x

Rebecca - posted on 03/31/2010

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its interesting to find out people have dfferent opinions thank u so much for all your feedback its been helpful...

Beatriz - posted on 03/30/2010

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I've had it all my life.. Prop him up on a pillow when he sleeps, helps him breath. Take him to a specialist so you know what he is allergic to ( very important).

Iridescent - posted on 03/30/2010

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We have two kids with asthma. It can be a symptom of a cow's milk allergy, unlike a PP said. When we removed dairy completely from the household, both our sons with asthma no longer had it, within 3 weeks. And this has been all winter, through several viral infections (colds) that SHOULD have set it off as they have in the past 8 years.
http://www.naturalnews.com/010443_cows_m...

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first off....I'd take him to an Allergy/Asthma specialist soon. It took us 2 years to do it and I am kicking myself for not doing it when we first found out she was asthmatic. Now we know what triggers it better then before and we know which medications work for her better. Also make sure to watch him closely if you giving him Pulmicort or Abuetrol for night terrors, mood changes, and behavoir changes. If you see anything close to that get him off it right away. My daughter suffered for 2 years with those side effects because her doctor told us it was not a side effect of the medicaiton but her specialist reconized it and switched her right away to new stuff....now she's sleep great and back to her old self.

I don't mean to sound like someone on a soapbox but I just do not wish to have your son go through what we did with my daughter.

H.J - posted on 03/30/2010

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Cows milk has nothing to do with Asthma. Look for your child's triggers. Has your doctor given you any information?
www.asthmasa.org.au
The Asthma Foundation of South Australia is a fantastic resource and gives great information on The control of Asthma. It's worth a look and they will give valuable information. I have done my Asthma First Aid training through them and am about to ask about the Caffeine theory as I'm not convinced it will be affective in the case of a full blown asthma attack.

Rebecca - posted on 03/30/2010

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thanks for that.. do u know if cows milk has anything to do with it to aggravate it..some people have told me diet could be a problem. its very scary.

Jackie - posted on 03/30/2010

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be careful of cold as that may aggravate him if he is weezing. caffine is a bronchiodialater, so if in a pinch he seems to be having a hard time breathing and u have no meds, give him caffine, a little soda or coffee may help. there are lots of new meds and treaments so ur little one doesnt have to sit on the sidelines while his friends play all the time! talk with ur doc and keep updated and good luck!

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