crying kids

Mbhannes - posted on 01/27/2012 ( 52 moms have responded )

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Why do so many parents allow their children to scream or cry out so loud while you are out in public shopping?

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Lisa - posted on 01/29/2012

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Some people were raised differently to be prejudiced or to hate homosexuals. Doesn't make it right or perfect. People need to think for themselves.



And while I'm not saying you did anything wrong, perhaps it's not that you did everything right, but were just lucky. There will always be children that are mild-mannered and behave right away. Just their personalities.



When my son, now 7, was 2, I got into it with a woman at a church/museum. (San Xavier Mission- yeah, a place of "God", supposedly.) Though he had not been diagnosed at that time, I, as his mom, was pretty sure he was Autism, or another issue- he was diagnosed with Autism around age 4.



We were in one room that had a little stairwell that led up to a big window, if I recall correctly. This was exciting to my son, and he let out with a loud holler. No, he wasn't crying, but happy. He still often makes these kinds of sounds when he's excited, sad, sometimes even bored. He is verbal and very high-functioning, but that doesn't stop him from expressing himself in the way he feels most comfortable with.



Anyway, a woman who was standing somewhat behind us and facing the other way, jumped, startled by the outburst. She then proceeded to tell me that as his mother *I* needed to do a better job, because *she* was a mother- an older one, she gave me the impression all of her children were grown- and *her* kids had never done anything like that. When I explained he was only 2, and the fact that he was Autistic meant nothing to her. All she could see was that I must have been a horrible mom just because my Autistic 2 year old son let out a loud whoop of excitement that happened to startle her.



Of course, my ex husband and my son's dad was right there (and he said nothing in my defense, which is probably one of the reasons he's my ex), but I noticed she didn't give him any guff for it. Nope, just me, the mother.



To this day, that story can make my blood boil.



And while, sure, someone that is ignoring their kid while they scream the entire time- to be honest, I've never come across this though- at a store, I can see isn't doing their job, but to a child that has an outburst, as toddlers are famous for, I don't see how that can make them a bad parent.



Nobody likes to be judged. And none of us are perfect. I'm not overtly religious, although I consider myself Christian in the most basic sense, but I know there are a lot of Christians that are the first to be judgmental about just about everything, which I find rather funny, since we're taught from an early age that we all make mistakes and that we should not judge others. That's God's job, right?



So maybe the next time, Sherri, you're annoyed by some screaming baby or toddler and you see a parent struggling with her/him, instead of getting on high-horse and turning your nose down at them, try putting yourself in their shoes and thinking, maybe the child isn't feeling well- heck, maybe the parent isn't feeling well. Maybe it's not even a parent, but an older sibling, aunt, uncle, babysitter, who doesn't know the kid as well as mom or dad might. Or, maybe it's just a very willful child who wants what it wants and is not shy about telling the world about it, even though mom still needs to finish grocery shopping and this is the only time she might have on a tight schedule.



Thanks. [End rant... for now]

Lisa - posted on 01/29/2012

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Have you ever just stopped and thought about the fact that some of these crying children could have special needs? I have a son who is autistic & have had to learn to ignore the stares & comments. Now that he's older, he rarely melts down in public & if he does, I try to take him out to let him calm down, but it hasn't always been this way.



How lucky for you to have such prim & proper perfect children because not all children are "normal!!!"

Atira - posted on 01/30/2012

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Wow... This one really has me angry!

I am the mother of a boy that has just turned 6 but looks like he's 8 or 9 (he's always been tall for his age). He also has ADHD, sensory issues and is autistic. I frequently have to deal with meltdowns, tantrums and screaming fits. It's not fun; it's down right exhausting. Because of this I RARELY go out. My errands are mostly done while he is in "school" (therapeutic day treatment) for a couple hours in the morning but sometimes I have no choice but to take my son with me when something needs to get done. When a child's behavior is violent & erratic enough, there is no such thing as day care, baby sitters, or even family members that will watch him for an hour or two. I have been seeking help for NUMEROUS agencies, treatment facilities, parenting classes, doctors, etc and I have been told I am a "super mom" dealing with what I have to deal with. Yet there is still no help for me when I need to get out to get things done...

So when I have strangers in stores tell me I am a bad parent or I need to spank my son more... I get frustrated! From the outside, you know NOTHING about the family you see struggling! Do not judge. Until you have to deal with the challenges that family may be facing, you have no idea what that parent is really going through. "Ignoring" a tantrum or screaming fit is often the most productive way to get through things. Please remember that.

Gaynor-Marie - posted on 01/29/2012

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Spot on Lisa and Joy, you have no Idea what the families situation is. In my ideal world children wouldn't throw tantrums or winge in public. Children do however and mothers have to do their best to care for their children. Sometimes that means the rest of us have to be tolerant and non judgemental. I would hope in most cases becoming a mother makes us more aware of how difficult it can be and that we don't have all the answers. It has me. Oh and Sheri I was raised like that too but then I was also sent to the shop to pick up groceries with a younger sister when I was 6 yrs old so mum didn't have to wake the sleeping baby. In short my situation and my values are not always the same as my mother's. My children were also different. I do try to be considerate of others and try to teach my children to be considerate of others. I also expect children to be children. I also recognize their may be legitimate reasons why you can't leave the shopping. We moved to Germany with a toddler in the middle of winter, we had no car for the first 3 months. So the first day I caught the train into town to do the shopping by the time we walked from the train station the toddler was screaming. I went into the shop to buy her something to eat but that didn't help. The next store she was still screaming I took her out to try and calm her nothing was working. then I realized she was in pain. the two pairs of socks and little shoes were not enough for the weather there. I had no choice but to take her into the shop and just hug her and rub her feet till they stopped hurting and she stopped crying and I'm afraid that the others in the shop just had to suck it up. once she stopped crying we bought her some warm boots. Did the grocery shopping and caught the train home. My point is some times your child or families needs are more important than a bit of noise.

Christine - posted on 01/28/2012

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Because "allowing" children to cry instead of rewarding them for bad behavior is better in the long run for the children and parents both. They're not going to learn to control themselves if you're always giving up on your chores because they're bored, or giving them the junk food and toys they want just so they shut up.

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Sarah - posted on 02/01/2012

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I'm kind of worried by the idea that the only reason not to spank your child and leave a mark is in case pre-school or daycare notice.

Sharon - posted on 01/31/2012

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I remember thinking, BC (before children), when I was on the bus on the way to work: "why doesn't that parent make that kid shut up?". Now that I'm a parent I think "that poor parent - now I know how much worse it is for him/her than for everyone else here".

Sally - posted on 01/31/2012

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I have a feeling that you would be the first to moan about children acting like brats because their parent always gives in when they want their own way. I would not leave a shop because my child was having a hizzy fit. The minute i did they would have won. What do they learn from that. You are thr sort of person that makrs a mothers role harder

Joy - posted on 01/31/2012

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And let's not forget about when they start changing their naps! Many children start dropping their naps (some have quiet times instead) and when they do that they start getting crankier in the evenings. I was reminded of this this week when another kid my daughter plays with dropped her naptime and had a meltdown during dance class. That girl's 3 years old. There's a lot of developmental changes that children go through and they are considered to be 'normal.' Its a normal part of growing up.

Danielle - posted on 01/31/2012

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Not only can most parents not stop a child having a tantrum, but at times there may be other reasons for kids crying. Have you heard of Autism? There are other challenging conditions too that mean when a child has a meltdown, it takes a lot of time energy and patience to help them recover, and for the parents who live this life, judgement from uneducated people who expect you to turn them off with a magical switch so your shopping day isn't disrupted, well I bet they too wish everyday of their lives they could find that switch and help their child communicate effectively. So next time you go there and see a child in tantrum, maybe think before judging because i can guarantee the supermarket is not the only place a child cries!

Stifler's - posted on 01/30/2012

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I agree, it's a troll post. And Mbhannes is getting the reaction she wants, people to be outraged and defensive.

Sharlene - posted on 01/30/2012

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@Gaynor , Very well said ,I dont think anyone can explain to you clearly why a child has meltdowns . it's part being a child lol

Gaynor-Marie - posted on 01/30/2012

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Don't worry people feeling judged by those with well behaved preschoolers. Their are still teenage tantrums to deal with. It's all very well to expect your child to behave we all want that. We all try to prepare and reason with our children but all children are different some are special needs some are really strong willed. Here is another experience. A family member came to stay with her 2 children when my 5 th child was 1. She proceeded to tell me how to make my baby go have a nap during the day in her cot. I pointed out that the oldest 3 had followed such a routine. The 4 th and 5 th had not it didn't work for them. Anyway 18 months later she gave birth to a little girl who didn't sleep and didn't follow her rules. She was confident she new what she was doing and that they would follow her rules and then one didn't. I suppose that is what I'm saying to those that are confident you know the answers your very lucky but don't push it. To those who struggle it will pass keep doing your best.

Heather - posted on 01/30/2012

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Seriously? I don't ALLOW my children to yell, scream, or cry out loud in public, they just do it. You can't control your kids 100 percent of the time. My son also has Sensory Integration Disorder (Under the Autistic disorders), so going out in a grocery store in public is very overwhelming for him. So I have to hurry up and get my shopping done and get home. I can't always leave my 2 kids at home with my husband when he works a lot. You can't spank your kids like you used to when you were younger. My son's PreK class has him go potty in school, and they watch the kids. So if there is a mark on him, even a light one, they question it. Plus, spanking doesn't work on a child like my son. He laughs in my face when I spank him. So, I would rather deal with other people staring at me in public when he is crying and throwing a tantrum in public, then my son not react at all to life.



How rude of you to even ask this, whatever old lady..

[deleted account]

Did you not read my prior comments?? I suggest you do before you tell me I'm "judging" parents for their kids throwing a tantrum.

[deleted account]

Its not just to avoid dirty looks from strangers. Its consideration for the child. They are upset over one reason or another and to ignore their feelings is disrespectful. They need to be taught that their feelings are ok and they need to be given positive ways to deal with stress and being upset. By ignoring them and going about your business, you teach them their feelings mean nothing. They are taught to ignore those feelings instead of using positive coping skills to figure out why they are upset and fix the problem.

Lisa - posted on 01/30/2012

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First up, ladies from a different planet, that's great you have little kids that listen to everything you say. Maybe they're very well behaved kids for whatever reason, or maybe they're advanced for their age. Either way, that's terrific and I'm happy for your kids. But out of all the children I've known- not just talking of my own kids here- the majority of them, at age 2, are not so reasonable.



Also, aren't you, Julianne (off topic, nice name, I like it), painting me- and other mom's, parents, etc.- by saying we're being disrespectful to our own children, because some of us may not be able to drop everything any time our toddler has a meltdown and rush them from the store just to avoid dirty looks from strangers who we'll probably never see again and don't really care about one way or the other? For one thing, only a complete jack ass would stare down a little kid and give them a dirty look. Most likely, it would be the parents of the child they'd be giving the stink eye to.



Just for your information, I myself have never had it too bad. Yes, my kids can be loud sometimes, and being children, yes, they do have their outbursts, but they've never been so horrific that they won't stop crying after a few minutes. Even still, usually the minute they start, people will stare. It's just natural. Often times, when I hear a baby/young child crying, I will look myself, just to make sure 1. They are with a parent and not lost and 2. that they're not injured at all, and perhaps the parent might need some assistance. I don't look at the kid or the parent and tell them to shut up or suggest they leave. THAT would be disrespectful in my opinion. I do make sure that the parent isn't getting abusive like cursing or screaming or hitting the child. THAT would make me take action or say something. I'm not talking about a little swat on the hand or the bottom- although I disagree with physical punishment altogether- but a hard smack, slap or punch, especially on the face.



Having a 2 year old that behaves perfectly is great for you both, and whether you guys have super parenting skills, or, what I'm thinking, the luck of the draw, while wonderful is not the norm. They're not called "the terrible twos" for nothing. I'm just saying that if a normal, average, run of the mill toddler has a meltdown or is screaming or crying, why be so harsh to judge? Why do you expect a parent to be able to shut them up within a second or two, or else flee the store in haste?

[deleted account]

I expect my 2 year old to listen with a quiet discussion about what i want her to do. Guess I'm from another planet...her too because she actually listens! You can't paint all children with the same brush.

Aside from that, I agree with what sherri said, if they flip and you can't calm them down. Take them out of the store if you don't absolutely NEED to finish shopping. If you tell an employee you have to go and can't finish shopping then its their job to put the stuff back. To let your child scream and cry until the end of the shopping trip is completely disrespectful to the child. Would you like to be in that type of mood dragged around in public so people can stare and dirty look you?

Sherri - posted on 01/30/2012

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Sorry Lisa just have a different view on it. This is a place to give our opinions and that is what I did. You gave yours and I gave mine. But please don't tell me me I am living on another planet because I do things differently and they work.

Lisa - posted on 01/29/2012

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I didn't find myself to be overly defensive or sensitive, Sherri. I just wonder why there is so much intolerance for everyone and everything. That's all.



And you know, my 2 year old daughter, isn't autistic, but she has her share of meltdowns. She's one of the most intelligent children I've ever known- I'm not biased or anything. ;P - but she's also one of the most willful. She wants anything and everything she sees, and isn't afraid to let me, or anyone else within screaming distance know that. She screams when she can't buy all the toys in the store. She screams sometimes when we have to leave a place that she's enjoying. It's a part of her growing up. As a responsible parent, I don't give in to all her demands. But, as a human being, I still might have to finish my shopping, so leaving the store (possibly with perishable items in my cart) is not an option. I'm sure I'm not alone.



I'd like to think that most people are good, caring people, who care about their kids and their fellow human beings. But it's a little hard to feel that way when I get a dirty look in a store or somewhere because my child is behaving like a normal child behaves.



Anyone who thinks a two or three year old will- or even should- shut up because their parent(s) gives them a quiet verbal warning is living on another planet, that's all I can say.

Amanda - posted on 01/29/2012

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I don't know that anyone allows their kids to scream or cry out in public, but I bet most parents have had to deal with an inconsolable child while out shopping.

I would have loved to have come across you last week when I was doing my shopping. My 2 yr old daughter was having the meltdown from hell in the supermarket all because I'm not daddy (she has been having major seperation anxiety issues from him that has been going on for weeks) and she screamed and screamed the whole time I was out shopping and there was literally nothing I could do, she had her teddies I'd given her snacks, water, sung songs, played silly games, asked if she wanted to help me find the food and choose what we were getting. I even did something I never do and bribed her with chocolate, nothing was good enough and the more I tried the more she screamed. I was the bad mum that after trying everything I ignored my screaming child and got on with my shopping.



You really have no idea what is going on with a child that is upset so maybe instead of judging people have abit of sympathy, not every child is a perfect angel

Heather - posted on 01/29/2012

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My 2 year old wants to run around and doesn't want to stay in the cart. When I have my 8 year old with me, it isn't a big deal, as he can hold his hand, etc. However there are times I need to go shopping w/ my 2 year old by himself. I usually start out in the bakery where they give free cookies. However sometimes he does start crying before we are finished shopping. When this happens, I try to comfort him and see what is the problem. I offer him something to drink or a snack, however that doesn't always work, especially when what he really wants to do is get down and run. I do try to remain calm, etc, however he is also the type of child that likes to try to hit me. I let him know that is not acceptable, and I walk near the side/front of the buggy. I've looked at people and said "Well, I guess I have a siren today." It usually gets a laugh out of them. I don't LIKE to have him miserable when I'm shopping, but sometimes it happens. He's TWO, he's still learning. I don't always have time or the gas to make another trip to the store, and I do try to hurry when he is behaving this way, however when I get him home, I try to make the rest of the day low-key for him.

Sharlene - posted on 01/29/2012

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@ Kimberly , Are you serious ,That would just make the child more difficult , What was the outcome

Kimberly - posted on 01/29/2012

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Just wanted to point out that I dont think smacking would stop a crying child, this was suggested to me when my daughter was cry that she just needed a good smack on the bottom!!!

~Jennifer - posted on 01/29/2012

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My answer to the stares and comments has always been to say "if you think you can do a better job, you're more than welcome to take over for me"



....usually, they just walk away.

...yeah, thought so.

*continues shopping*

Sherri - posted on 01/29/2012

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@Lisa calm down I said parents who just allowed there kids to scream and throw tantrums. I have never judged anyone or anyone's child for letting out a shriek in delight or cried but was obviously being taken care of and was being settled down, However, there does come a point you have throw in the towel when it has gone on more than a few minutes and it is disrupting hundreds of people.



So I wasn't on any high horse you just are overly sensitive and defensive.

Liana - posted on 01/29/2012

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my oldest nearly 4 has never done this in public but my little one who is 2 is not the same i have had many time in the supermarket that i would say no to my oldest and he understand no means no! my little one 2years would scream and scream! but i would contine with my shopping and he would calm down then i would explain crying and screaming dos not work and when i say no no means no! i couldnt care lease anyone looking at me or my child as it happens kids cry! what do you want us to do pick them up and leave? there are only so may hours in the day and shopping has to be done whether we or the chidren like it or not! i would never walk out of the supper market becase he she is crying as the min you pick them up they have won! if you dont like uther peoples kids crying you leave, because i wont be!

Joy - posted on 01/29/2012

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I think this question is too general. It does seem from a 'non' parent as someone else suggested. There's too many factors from the age of the child, the attentiveness of the parents, the particular reason for the meltdown, to the potential developmental problems a child may have.



ie. My toddler was recently diagnosed with a sensory disorder. We started working with her on the disorder and since we have her meltdowns (both in public and at home) have decreased.



The question as its phrased comes across as too judgmental on any parent who has ever had their child cry out at a store for what ever reason - and so that's every parent.

[deleted account]

I feel bad for the child if the mom just continues shopping and ignores the tantrum completely. They obviously feel pretty shitty and don't understand how to use self control yet. I bet it makes it worse to be the center of attention while in that mood. Pretty embarrassing. The parent should at least be trying to comfort or calm the child if they absolutely have to finish. Best case scenario would be to leave until the child is in a better mood.

Krista - posted on 01/29/2012

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I have to admit I despise when a parent will continue to do there shopping and their child has literally screamed from the beginning of the trip to the end and all through check out that in my opinion is extremely rude. Now a minor outburst and they are over it fairly quickly well that is a total different story and I agree those are going to happen on occasion.



I agree that ideally, if the child just cannot be calmed, then it is best to cut the shopping trip short and get the hell out of Dodge.



But, sometimes that's not always possible. For all we know, it's a single mom who doesn't HAVE anybody to watch the baby, and she works full-time, and this is the only time that she's able to get this errand done.



Yes, it's annoying to hear a child screaming during the whole shopping trip, I agree. And I would hope that the parent would at least be trying their best to calm the child. But without knowing anything about their situation, I find it best to not judge. And you know me...I LOVE to judge! LOL!

Sherri - posted on 01/29/2012

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I was raised differently Gaynor my mother taught me nobody and I mean nobody wants to go in public to hear your child scream or misbehave.



So yes I made darn sure they were raised to know better and yes I am sorry at 2, 3 or 4 they are more then old enough to understand. I would much rather remove them and come back later once they could behave then ever make someone endure their ill behavior. I obviously did something right because as I said out of three kids I only ever had to leave a store once and that was when my oldest was 2ish.



Sorry but if your child is having a major meltdown and screaming and crying hysterically with no end in sight for a parent to not leave is far more inconsiderate then a person on a cell phone.

Gaynor-Marie - posted on 01/29/2012

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All of us before we have children aren't going to have children who misbehave in public, but each child is different. My oldest would have left me feeling like I'd succeeded but 6 children later & 18 yrs. Has left me nothing but sympathetic to young mums with screaming kids.

I have more of a problem with the people who discuss private things very loudly on their cell phones while shopping I don't want to hear about their hemeroids or sex life or even the drama with their teenagers.

The difference being they should know better while the 2 yr old who has just been told no doesn't and when your 1/2 way through the shop are you really dumping it and leaving? Just rest assured that in most cases when you bear a child crying while shopping it is because parents are setting boundaries and better a little crying now than the out and out anti social behavior of the teenager who didn't learn this as a preschooler.

Sherri - posted on 01/29/2012

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I don't know Julianne quite honestly since it has only happened to me once in 15yrs I can't be much help. However, at least everyone knew and could see I was leaving and wasn't just letting it continue.



I have to admit I despise when a parent will continue to do there shopping and their child has literally screamed from the beginning of the trip to the end and all through check out that in my opinion is extremely rude. Now a minor outburst and they are over it fairly quickly well that is a total different story and I agree those are going to happen on occasion.



No I am not bothered by people doing there shopping while talking on the phone. Now going through check out on the phone yes that bothers me. However, talking on the phone while shopping is no different to me then having a conversation with whomever you with while shopping.

Gaynor-Marie - posted on 01/29/2012

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Oh come on really? Aren't you more bothered by the people who have a load phone conversation about personal things on their phones while shopping . Those people are rude while children under 4 are in the process of learning appropriate behavior.

[deleted account]

Sherri....what about when they start throwing a tantrum and you pick them up to walk out of the store to calm them or deal with their misbehavior? In the process of dealing with them they are crying out in the middle of the store. Sometimes its unavoidable. A mother should not be judged because of it.

Lisa - posted on 01/28/2012

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If you have to ask that, you must not be a parent. That's like asking someone who plays with a beehive why he ALLOWED the bees to sting him. Um... can't control emotion. I do all I can, but how do you suppose I keep my child who is having a meltdown quiet? Tape? Gag? Xanax?

Sherri - posted on 01/28/2012

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Well I would never allow it, if they did such a thing I would pick them up and walk out of the store. It is my belief nobody goes out in public to hear my kid throw a tantrum and I won't subject anyone to their misbehavior. I guess maybe that would be why other than my oldest doing it once in his life, non of the others ever have.

Diana - posted on 01/28/2012

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I see parents struggling with loud/unhappy children in the grocery store. On occasion, I have 'shopped' in the same aisle as them and caused a helpful distraction to the bored kid. Or even sympathized with the parent. "Kids are supposed to be like this sometimes. That lady who gave you the evil eye just doesn't remember!" Or even admired the kids for their curiosity/energy/determination. "He's a lot of work, but look at all the stuff he's learning! We granmas know this is how little kids act. Normal." I have gotten smiles, tears, confidences and a few hugs from grateful frazzled young mamas.

Danielle - posted on 01/28/2012

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becuase sometimes you cannot stop it. they scream but you cannot hit them and shouldnt hit them but you displine and you are looked down upon as well it's not easy for the parent either i wish i could get my son to stop throwing tantrums but sometimes it happens. if you are a parent maybe you could be a little more understanding.

Sarah - posted on 01/28/2012

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Sometimes when I'm halfway through the grocery shopping I want to sit down and scream, because the shop's busy, they haven't got what I want, I'm just fed up etc. As an adult, I manage to rein it in, but I can see why kids feel that way!

[deleted account]

Children have feelings and need to express them sometimes. Crying and tantrums are the only way they know how to express themselves. Parents need to teach them how to deal with all these big emotions. Hitting and punishing them only teaches them to suppress them, not to deal with them. Sorry, its not 1920 anymore, we realize that children are humans too and deserve to be treated that way. No I am not saying its ok to behave like this, just that it happens.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/28/2012

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Oh yes Kimberly, and smacking your kid is going to STOP the crying...I forgot about that. Pain=quiet. BAHAHAHAHAHA!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/28/2012

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Ummmm.....because that is what kids do sometimes. Also, if you stopped going out and getting things done every time a child cries, you would never leave the house. This is a troll post, right?

Krista - posted on 01/28/2012

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What are we supposed to do...ball gag them? Some mothers have no choice. They don't have anybody to watch the children while they shop, and if they work, there are only so many times when they CAN go shopping.



Now, if the parent is just blithely ignoring the screaming/crying, then that isn't right. But if you can tell that they're trying their best to calm their kids, but it's just not working, then perhaps we can be kind enough to just deal with it. It's shopping, not a spa. I don't expect serenity while I shop, so it's no big deal.

Stifler's - posted on 01/28/2012

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I don't think they are allowing this. What are they going to do about it? Sometimes kids are just cranky and you really need to go to the shops and nothing you do will make them shut up.

Kimberly - posted on 01/28/2012

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As we are supposed to do what?!?!? Cant smack or really disapline your kid in public as someone might think it not right and report you yet on the other hand people think your a bad parent if they are crying. Sometimes kids just have a gut full and dont know how to control there emotions and let lose. Yes it is annoying but there are lots of things that are annoying in life. I'm pretty sure no parent gives there kid a pep talk in the car that say " Now when we get to the shops and are half way through can you please have a huge tantrum just to annoy other people in the store and make mom want to hide in a hole" I've told my daughter no for something she wanted because she has to learn she doesnt get everything she wants, yes its not pleasant to have her cry but you can walk away we have to deal with it

Kristy - posted on 01/28/2012

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Because if they are having a tantrum because they can't have a lolly or a toy or a fizzy drink, then sometimes leaving them to get over it and realise your not going to give in is so much better then giving in for the sake of others happy peaceful environment.

Sharlene - posted on 01/28/2012

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I dont think we choose our children to scream and cry , It's the child and there behavior , For me I give my 4 children 2 warnings and if they keep it up I take them home as punishment and sit in there room . Plus it's about where and what the child is having tantrum and crying about .

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