Daddy not supportive of my nutrition preferences for our children.

Brandy - posted on 03/26/2010 ( 7 moms have responded )

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My fiance doesn't have any understanding of proper nutrition because he's always eaten whatever he wanted and he has always been thin and never gets sick. He eats alot of processed food and snacks like chips and chocolate and will hardly eat any fruits and vegetables. I like to feed our daughter a well balanced diet and of course I eat the same way. But he is constantly snacking on junk and of course she wants it too and he gives it to her. Even if it's almost supper time or just before bed. When I confront him and talk to him about the possible effects of this, he just says "everything is allowed in moderation" but he's not giving it to her in moderation in my opinion. She still gets all the good stuff throughout the day with me, but I think she is having too much of the other stuff. She's only 2. How do I get him to understand where I'm coming from and back me up? I've talked to him about obesity and the effects of processed foods on the body but he seems to think that will only happen if she's eating only junk and none of the good stuff that I feed her.

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Meghan - posted on 03/26/2010

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I have this problem with my ex. I pack my son's food for his day visits and it all get's sent back because "he doesn't like" what I pack...even though it is all the food he eats with me. Snacks and treats are ok once in while but kids esp. now a days need to be taught healthy eating habbits!!

Brandy - posted on 03/26/2010

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He eats dinner with us, so at least he eats one good meal (when he's not picking out the veggies) and I do not buy junk food at he store, even if he puts it on the list but when he comes home and there's no chips or anything in the cupboard, he goes to the store. And not just for a bag of chips, he stocks up! He has slowly been getting better though over our 4 years together and I tried to scare him with the diabetes thing because he is terrified of needles but that only lasted about a week. But that's basically what I have been trying to do, give her the good stuff and hope she fills up on it before the junk comes out.

Kristin - posted on 03/26/2010

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Can you shoot for a 90-95% good food, 10-5% junk approach? We all struggle with this. But if you keep giving her the good stuff most of the time, she will develop a preference for it. People get really funny about all things forbidden, and just want the crud more.



As for your fiance, I have no idea what to tell you. Some really just need to have that heart attack or diabetes diagnosis to figure it out. I truly hope he isn't one of them. Maybe just ask him to have the junk a little less frequently and to join in the helthy family meals more. You can also tell him that not everyone is blessed with his teenage boy like metabolism, some of need to work at it. Also, if you don't buy the junk, it's a lot harder to eat it when it isn't in the house. I made a deal with my husband several years back about this. We would no longer have that stuff on the grocery list. But, if he really wanted that soda or bag of chips, he could pick it up on his way home. He doesn't get that stuff too often anymore, maybe once or twice a year.



Good luck, I know how hard it is to stay away from the overly processed stuff.

Iridescent - posted on 03/26/2010

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You're welcome. We've had to do similar things here, and it's amazing how much the nutrition in the house has changed.

Iridescent - posted on 03/26/2010

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It's frustrating, but you have to remember they are as much his children as yours. Do the best you can, keep educating him (within reason) and certainly your daughter as she will get more benefit from it than he will. Maybe even print out a food chart for her age, put it on the fridge, and put magnets on each section for the servings she's had of each per day so far, taking them all off at the end of the day. Your fiance' would then see what her diet needs to consist of, as well as what it does. Also make certain it is an age-appropriate chart that includes the correct serving sizes for a toddler, since it is quite a bit smaller than that of an older child or adult.

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