Did you get the 12wk scan for down syndrome? 25 with one child. what did you do?

Ruiha - posted on 01/10/2011 ( 201 moms have responded )

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My doctor today pretty much told me to get it. no grounds, i think she tells every pregnant mother to get it with out telling them its optional, which i knew. Its a worry. My proper doctor is on holiday. Im 25, husband 29, we have a daughter who is 20 mnths. what did u do?

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Peggy - posted on 01/18/2011

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You DO have a choice.. all you have to do is tell your doctor NO. I seen a Genetics Counselor when I first found out I was pregnant. We went over all the test that was available and chose not to do any of them. The U/S and blood test sometimes come back with false positives. The only test that is 100% is the Amnio. There is nothing you can do to prepare yourself for a child with disabilities so why take the chance with getting a false positive? When at the end of the night, you need to do what you and your husband feel is best for you.

Annette - posted on 01/18/2011

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Our 2 middle children are twins. we did the scan and it did not tell us one of our twins had Down Syndrome. do the scan...it can't hurt. if anything it will help you prepare.

Laura - posted on 01/18/2011

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There wasn't a scan for Down Syndrome when I was pregnant. There was another test involving a needle which I was encouraged to get. I had every intention of carrying my baby to term regardless of the result. I told the specialist this and he said "in that case, the test puts you at risk and you shouldn't take it" I could not see any benefit in finding out if my child had down's syndrome if I intended to carry the child to term regardless.

Deanna - posted on 01/18/2011

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what are the side effects? my doctors didn't give me a choice, but I still would have kept my babies even if it was positive.

Tracy - posted on 01/18/2011

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I did get it done with all three of my kids. I didn't want an amnio because I didn't want anything invasive. I was an older mom, too, but wouldn't have done anything if the tests had come up positive. However, I wanted to have the test so that if something had come up abnormal, my husband and I would have time to digest the information and prepare for our precious special needs baby. By God's blessing, we had three perfectly healthy babies.

Cinda - posted on 01/18/2011

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I have a health Newsletter from Health and Healing of June of 1996 and this is what Dr. Julian Whitaker said in it. Children with DS can be treated. This month I want to report the rupture of the DS paradigm---the belief that children with DS are born retarded because of a genetic abnormality, and that there's no treatment for it. Like the "flat-earth" paradigm, our current DS paradigm is wrong. Children with DS are born retarted, they become retarded. Virtually all aspects of the syndrome, including the flattened forhead and narrow, slanted eyes, could be prevented with early treatment, preferably starting in the mother's uterus. And who ruptured this paradigm? Some university professor? Some expert on DS? No. It was Dixie Tafoya, a housewife trying to save her daughter's life. Children with DS are born with 3 chromosomes 21 instead of 2. Normal people have 46 chromosomes (23 pair), but children with DS have 47, because of the third chromosome 21. Just having this extra chromosome is not necessarily a problem: The problems come from the excessive genetic expression" of the genes on that extra chromosome. These extra genes create unusual demands for certain nutrients, and wheb these are not suppliedm DS, with all its manifestations,develops. If these nutrients are supplied, as I'll show you shortly, the severity of the illness is greatly diminished, and in some cases the manifestations are almost nonexistent! Many genes are overexpressed in DS, but as few as four of them are the likely cause of most of the problems. Perhaps the most damaging overexpressed gene is the one that calls fot the production of the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) Understanding the consequences of this genetically cuased imbalance not only largely explains why children with DS are the way they are, but clearly demonstatee how they could be prevented from becoming that way! The gene that controls the manufacture of SOD is located on chromosome 21, so children with DS have three SOD genes instead of two. Consequently, their cells produce an excess of SOD. Normal amounts of SOD arre good. It is a part of your body's defense against free radicals, those highly damaging molecules that play a part in many diseases and the aging process. SOD traps free radicals and converts them to hydrogen peroxide (H202), another free radical. In the next step, catalase, another enzyme member of the free radical defense team, rapidly converts H2O2 to water (H2O) and neutral oxygen (O2) However, the excessive production of SOD that occurs in DS results in excessive production of H2O2, which overwhelms the catalase system. Thus the cells are flooded with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is a very destructive free radical. It will damage everything it touches--and the cells of children with DS are constantly producing this poison. That's the bad news. The good news is that we have an effective treatment--copious amounts of the antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, zinc, and selenium. These help the overwhelmed catalase system neutralize the excess H2O2. The treatment for DS is that simple! If this treatment were given early, the Hallmarks could be prevented. If a child with DS were started on a treatment regimen that included abundant amounts of these antioxidants at birth, we could prevent perhaps the most destructive components of the syndrome. Excessive production of hydrogen peroxide is likely largely responsible for the mental retardation, poor development, early onset of Alzheimer's disease, and short lifespan that characterize DS.This is borne out by the recent report of a child who had virtually all the characteristics of DS, yet had the normal number of chromosomes. Closer study of her chromosome 21 revealed she had three SOD genes. Imagine, the DS was caused not by a third chromosome, but by just an extra gene! DS children also can't build connective tissue. Children with DS are characteristically weak, with poor muscle tone and lax joints. When picked up, they are often limp, like a rag doll. This is because the genes for collagen or connective tissue production are also located on chromosome 21, and their overexpression makes it impossible for the body to build normal muscle and connective tissue. Treatment for this metabolic error is to increase the raw materials necessary for the production of collagen--proline, lysine, vitamin C, and glycine. When this is done, there are almost immediate improvments in muscle strength and joint stability in children with DS, and they lose that "rag doll" feel. The point is, istead of being untreatable, as families are told by the National Down Syndrome Congress and the National Down Syndrome Society, DS is a cluster of specific, predictable metabolic disturbances and nutritional deficiences that lterally cry out for treatment! The rupture of the DS paradigm did not come from medical "experts" or universitie, nor from the charitable agencies set up to "help" those affected by DS. These entities are stuck on a "flat-earth" view of disease. As I mentioned earlier, the paradigm rupture came from a houswewife named Dixie Tafoya. This energetic, no-nonsense woman ran an adoption agency for handicapped children and, fully knowing what she was doing, Dixie adoped an eight-week-old girl with DS, whom she named Madison. The infant Madison showed she was not (yet) retarded. Dixie's routine for chaging diapers always ended with a playful rub of Madison's stomach. One morning, when Madison was eight months old, a fitigued Dixie said to her, "Well, honey, I'm tired, you're going to have to rub your stomach yourself." And Madison did just that. It hit Dixie like a ton of bricks. She realized that her daughter was not retarded, and that if she wasn't retarded, she would develop retardation. If this was the case, there had to be something that could slow it down or stop it! In a modest bedroom in rural Louisiana, Dixie Tafoya "looked through the telescope," and in spite of what everyone "knew" saw perfectly round planets. With tat insight, she jumped light years ahead of all the "experts". Dixie had a mission. It was not that of a scientist seeking some universal truth with hopes of a Nobel Prize along the way. It was not fame, fortune, or notoriety. Dixie was simply a mother determined to save her baby daughter's life. She knoew that if shwe didn't do it, nobody else would--and that she didn't have much time. Dixie read books, did research at the medical library, and bought a computer. Over the next two years, Dixie learned more about DS than virtually all the so-called experts which, unfortunatelly, is not saying much. She discovered Dr. Turkel's nutritional therapy from the '40's. She discovered the work of Dr. Henry Turkel, who had been "treating" patients with DS since 1940. At that early date, Dr. Turkel correctly diagnosed DS as a metabolic disease and, taking cues from Linus Pauling, he developed a broad-based therapy called the U series. It included antioxidants such as vitamin C and viatmin A, enzymes, thyroid supplement, a diuretic, and a stimulant. He had remarkable success with over 5000 children with DS. Dr. Turkel visited the FDA and the National Institutes of Health, presenting cases in which his approach had snatched children from death's door and laned them in regular school. Typically, the FDA not only refused to help Dr. Turkel advance his work, but forced him to limit his practice to the state of Michigan. Dixie took Dr. Turkel's treatment a step further. She was able to go a step further than Dr. Turkel because of major advances in genetic mapping and laboratroy testing, which she used to target Madison's specific metbolic problems and nutritional needs. In her kitchen and for her daughter only, Dixie devgised a specific nutrional support therapy. As she learned more through experience and reseach, she added to the program. Today Madison is a normal child, The results with Madison were remarkale. Within six months of starting therapy, Madison lost her "rag doll" feel when picked up. She also lost most of the DS facial characteristics, and today you would not pick her out in a group of kids as abnormal. Now, six years old, she does have some speech difficulties, which developed in the two years before she started the nutrional formula. Madison is in no special eduacsation classes, and receives no special therapy other than the nutritional elements given to her by her mother. As Dixie says, "My child depends on me. She deserves everything I can do to give her a normal life, and just because it may be difficult, it's certainly no reason not to do it." Today Dixie's formual included vitamins, minerals, specific amino acids, and digestive enzymes. Her treatment also incorporates the use of Piracetam, a safe memory-enhancing drug I've discussed before. However, that's another story. The "flat-earth" pardigm of DS has been ruptured, and like Humpty Dumpty, can never be put back together again. The National DS Congress and the National DS Society had better quickly change their ion, they are guilty of "detrmental reliance". This is a legal term to describe the failure of these organization to give imformation which one would reasonably expect them to have, whether they agree with it or not. I would not be surprised if a family filed suit after they discovered just how much scientific information on treatment options has been systematically censored by these two groups. For more information on this approach to DS, I suggest you read the excellent articles in Cognitive Enhancement Research Institute's (CERI) Smart Drug News. They will send you four issues on DS as well as a referral list. I don't know the cost of this. Address is CERI, PO Box 4029, Menlo Park, CA 94026, or call 415-321-CERI Trisomy 21 Research, founded by Dixie Tafoya (504-769-TRIS, is another good source of information. Nutrvene-D, the nutritional formulation endorsed by Trisomy 21 Research, is available from International Nutrition (800-899-3413).

Sherri - posted on 01/18/2011

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@Melissa and Peggy no matter what if I knew their was something wrong with my pregnancy I would abort. I have 3 healthy children and it would not be fair to them to have to give all my attention to a child with special needs. Their lives would never more be the same and I personally know that I do not want to bring a child into this world that will have to possibly be cared for, for the rest of their lives. Possibly never live an independent life and honestly it just isn't for me. I commend people that can and do handle such amazing special needs children. I simply am not one of them. I can't help how I feel and I won't make apologies for that. Hence why I feel these tests are so very very important.

[deleted account]

We did NOT get ANY scans done. I eat healthy and there's no history of problems in my family. Like you said, it's optional and scan do harm infants. So if you're doing it just for your doc, then don't do it. Can you wait until your usual doc comes back?

April - posted on 01/18/2011

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The choice was mine for both kids. The doctor warned me about the false positives and that the followup test is an amnio which increases the risk for a miscarriage. I decided against it due to a few reasons:
1) There isn't really anything you need to do to prepare for a child like that.
2) Due to a family history of miscarriages I was not willing to do the amnio.
3) I would have the baby no matter what so what is the point?

I was 29 yo with my first child and 33 with my second. Both children were born healthy and without any issues.

The choice is yours. My doctor said that they usually don't offer it to anyone under 30 but with my first child I would be turning 30 a couple of months after birth.

I hope this helps you to make your decision! ;-)

Jennipher - posted on 01/18/2011

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I was in my late 20's when I had my girls they are 2 years apart. You are still pretty young. Usualy Moms in their 40s have this done. I did not have one with either of mine. They are both healthy and fine. I would say no. But you have to make your own descision. But no matter the result your baby is still your baby. God bless and take care.

Latresha - posted on 01/18/2011

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I would not do the amnio. It's risky and it wasn't like I wasn't going to have my children anyway. I did the blood tests and since I had fibroids I was sent to a specialist and had additional ultrasounds. They did not notice anything. Fortuntely I had two healthy children. But I did have a niece with down syndrome. She was the sweetest child in the world and I loved her so much. She passed away (unrelated to downs) but anyone who doubts they can handle a child with downs does not know what they are missing. They are the sweetest and most loving children. It's been 8 years but still feels like yesterday sometimes.

Stacey - posted on 01/18/2011

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I was 35 and 37 when I had my two girls. I did get the scan, but only to be prepared and to see the baby. I had to get scans a few times b/c of my age. But, I made it perfectly clear to the doctor that I would not do the blood work or any other test- My husband and I knew that no matter what, we would have and love our children. What does your heart say? I treated the scan as an opportunity to get look at our little ones.

Mair - posted on 01/18/2011

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I got the regular scan, but didn't get the NT. Images were fine, anyway. Regardless of what they showed, I wasn't going to have a needle inserted in the baby. Too many risks.

Kim - posted on 01/18/2011

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They want you to have the scan because 97 % of people who have the scan end up aborting a child with Down Syndrome. It is basically an issue of....does it matter to you. I had the blood test and we were told 50-50 chance of DS. Our daughter is 4 and does have DS. She has changed our lives for the better and made me a better person. She is wonderful and when we look at her, all we see is our beautiful child. Dr's are still in the dark ages when it comes to potential for a child with DS. It is no different than any child. You could have a child with CP, a learning dissability, heart problems, you name it, it could happen. But at the end of the day...they are still yours.

Melissa - posted on 01/18/2011

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how would it not be fair? I have a child with Downs and it is the best thing for my daughter and all kids that come in contact him. He teaches them more than I ever could. And every parent I know and knows my son, agrees with me. You would have made a very selfish choice.

Peggy - posted on 01/18/2011

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I am 40 and will be 41 when I deliver my 3rd baby. My husband and I chose NOT to have any test done... the results wouldn't make a difference other than to put sadness into one of the happiest times of our lives. And for the fact the only thing 100% is the Amnio but that also comes with a chance of M/C. I think for the lady that said she would abort because "it wouldn't be fair to her healthy children", children who have disabled children in the family cope just fine,

Sally - posted on 01/18/2011

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Firstly "Downs" is not the name of the syndrome, it is Down Syndrome. I have a ten year old son who has DS, and he was one of three babies born on the same day in the one hospital, all of who were not diagnosed despite all of the mothers having some or all of the tests. The mothers ages ranged from 21- 37, with me being the eldest. When I look at my Zac now I still am distressed at the fact that he was the only one of the three children born that day who went home with his parents and family. I won't say it has been easy, but it has been no more difficult than my 8 year old who does not have DS. Zac has enhanced not only our lives but has touched many - the children at the main stream school he goes to have taken on his achievements as their own, as they are all a big part of his life, and he is one of the "popular" kids. He has taught many that a disability does not mean you have an excuse not to try to achieve and has shown that you can achieve way above everyones expectations. Teachers at his school have said that at least with Zac you know what your dealing with, and that the unforeseen difficulties you have with children "who have no problems" often take more time from the class and are harder to understand and assist with their "special needs". For those of you who think having a child with special needs would make your life harder, I have to say, this is not the case, and if you want to smile more, have your "normal" children grow up to be more tolerant and accepting human beings, give ALL children a chance at life, you and many others will be pleasantly surprised!!

Leeanne - posted on 01/18/2011

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I had 19 week scans for all my babies. I had a friend who never had a scan for any of her 5 kids. She calls them seek and destroy scans. Unless you plan to abort any potential problems, are having difficulties, want to know sex or are likely to have a problem you dont have to have any scans if you dont want to. I did like to have the 19 week one so I could see I was actually pregnant and with my second they picked up a potential problem that turned out to be nothing, but as I wasn't going to "do anything" about it anyway, I would almost have rathered not be given the worries.

Christine - posted on 01/17/2011

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I think it is always better to know what you are in for - even if the fact that the baby could have down syndrome would not make you choose to not have the baby - if you know you can prepare your self for the challenges that you might face. you are still young and at a low risk for having a down syndrome baby - but wouldn't you rather want to know for sure?

Jeri - posted on 01/17/2011

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When I was pregnant with my second baby, now 2 yrs old, I got pregnant a few weeks after having my first (oops) lol. The doctors were unbelievably stupid about it, and kept trying to TELL me that I got pregnant the day I delivered my first (um, no?). I wasnt given the option of having the blood test done, and I wasnt informed that it had to be done at a certain time during the pregnancy. So of course the timing for the test was off, because no one would listen to me about when I got pregnant, and they called me on the PHONE, not into their office, no, on the phone t tell me my baby had down syndrome... I was 21, not exactly at high risk for that, and if she did have it, it wouldnt make one bit of difference to me, but come on now. Doctors are becoming morons.

Sherri - posted on 01/17/2011

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These aren't unnecessary tests for a lot of people Anna Maria. These were considered very very important to me.

Angie - posted on 01/17/2011

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We had the test done because of my age but we knew it would not change our minds about our little girl. Both my husband and I felt that the more knowledge we had the better!! It was also a big help in preparing the hospital and staff for her arrival. Kennedy is now 2 years old and is right on target for children with Downs. I don't know what I would not have done without this test, it helped us prepare so much. I think it is a great idea for anyone at any age. I hope this helps.

Betty - posted on 01/17/2011

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It is your body. God made it, not the doctor. Please do not be brow beaten by a doctor. Your baby will be your baby and you will love it, no matter what. Just trust in the Lord and He will see you through.

Candi - posted on 01/17/2011

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I got it and found out I was having twins. I always recommend it to my friends just for that ultrasound! Are you SURE you're having one??? :o) Honestly, though, I have a son with special needs, and he's amazingly awesome. being prepared to have a special needs child is the best gift you can give your child. If you think, "Oh, I don't want that because I would have this child one way or the other," that's fine, but your child deserves parents who cares enough to be educated and informed. And the 12-week scan does a lot more than just down syndrome! For us, it helped to identify Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome early, which meant that both of our guys survived, against all odds.

BONNIE - posted on 01/17/2011

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When my first was born 45 yrs ago we had no ultrasound, no AFP blood test but if we had, I would have had the tests, I would not have considered an abortions but would have wanted to know so that we could prepare for a child with disabilities of any kind. My daughters both had the blood work and so have their daughters so they culd be prepared (and so could their doctors at delivery). All the kids are fine but at least we would have been prepared for anything.

Kristen - posted on 01/17/2011

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I got all the tests including the downs blood tests which came back extremely high risk (1 in 10 for my youngest, and 1 in 250 is considered "high"). and amnio for my youngest two. I would never abort, but I wanted to know anyway. A downs syndrome baby requires medical intervention from birth, and much of the planning can be set up in the months before the baby is born, rather than in a panic just after the birth. Even changing hospitals where the baby is delivered can make a big difference in the child's health. We have friends with a DS child and they were very glad they knew and could be prepared before she was born. BTW, none of my children had DS, and the amnio was very easy.

Susie - posted on 01/17/2011

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You are very young to be asked to have a 'Downs' scan.I had my babies at 37 and 40 yrs old and was not surprised,when asked to have this scan.Do not worry however,it is a simple scan.All you have to do,is give a blood sample and then have an ultrasound,to meassure the width of the babie's neck.She is probably just being over cautious,as you are both young parents and should not have any problem,unless this condition,has occured in your family history before.Maybe,wait for your regular Doctor,to return and get a second opinion,before you proceed,if you have any concerns.

Cinda - posted on 01/17/2011

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I had a neighbor, that had the test, and they told her she was probably having a down syndrome baby, and she worried and fretted the rest of the pregnancy, and her daughter was fine.

Sylvia - posted on 01/17/2011

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Yes. We conceived via IVF, and by 12 weeks I'd already had so many (brief) ultrasounds, I figured it didn't matter. I also had a level II ultrasound at ~20 wks, which most people here do, and that was it.

The nucal ultrasound is for spina bifida, btw, not for Down syndrome. The triple screen for Down syndrom et al. I did decline, because if the triple screen shows an elevated risk then they want you to do an amniocentesis, and there's a not insignificant risk of miscarriage. We'd gone through a lot to conceive DD (though we didn't know yet whether she was a DD or a DS lol), and there was no way we were going to terminate even if there were some issues, unless it was something incompatible with life (which would show up on the u/s), so there was no point in doing the amnio anyway. I told the OB I didn't want to do the triple screen and explained why, and he said "OK," and that was the end of that.

Kappy - posted on 01/17/2011

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Ok. My brother has Down's, and let me just explain to you that these people who claim you don't need the test b/c the results won't change what you are planning to do (they mean you are not planning to abort if baby has Down's) are not seeing the whole picture. If your baby destined to be anything but normal, you WANT to know this before the child is born. If you are informed, you can be sure you have the necessary medical personnel & equipment nearby for whatever risks your baby may have that are different from other babies. You can be signed up for programs even before birth to put you in touch with other parents, or perhaps professional in your area so you can feel more comfortable handling the differences that are to come - heck! Even so you can read up & know what they are! But also important is the adjustment a parent needs to make mentally when they find out the hopes they had for their newest family member will no longer be what they expected. This adjustment is MUCH better made before the baby arrives so you can still have a day of joy when this new life enters the outside world. That is much better than secret glances between doctor & nurse, hurried tests, then the dreaded conversation which has the effect of putting at least the mother, but often all family members into tears on a day that is supposed to be a joyful one. I counsel you to get as much info as is safe about your unborn baby, so you can be best prepared for his or her smoothest arrival into this world.

Cinda - posted on 01/17/2011

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I was 47 when my doctor said I had the option to have the test and I told him, if the baby is down syndrome, I'm not going to do anything about it anyway, so why have the test; and I didn't. Months later, his wife got pregnant and he told me they didn't do that test, either. And by the way, I have a down's brother.

[deleted account]

I'm pretty sure this test is just the blood test. Am I correct? There is no risk other than it being wrong, which is too often. It's just measuring the presence of something and isn't a true indicator. It often just creates undue stress and anxiety. Then the amnio/csv is offered which is definitely more of a risk to the baby.

Meg - posted on 01/17/2011

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I had a choice for the test and decided not to do the test. I had to sign off saying I didn't want the test. If this wasn't your regular doctor I would not listen to this doctor and see your regular doctor. To many doctors push their views on their patients and that isn't right. If you don't care what the results are then don't do the test, it's not worth the risk to your baby. If your regular doctor insists that you get the test then find a new doctor. It is your body and your child, not the doctors choice. Stand your ground in what you believe!

[deleted account]

Because I would not do anything differently (and the doctor wouldn't do anything differently) if my babies tested for Downs, so I opted out. My last baby, I was 36.5 and hubby was almost 41. She was the fifth baby between us. The previous 4 were not Downs (or anything else for that matter). No history of any genetic abnormalities. If the babies were born with a problem, so be it. They would be our babies no matter what. Sure, knowing ahead of time to get educated on the needs of the children is beneficial, we just chose not to test.

You and your husband are young and not at risk based on age alone. Is there a history of Downs in your families? If not, your chances are even lower. If the results aren't going to change anything about how you ride out the rest of the pregnancy, then go ahead and opt out.

If you test positive, your dr will then want to do an amnio or CSV (or is it CVS??) Anyways, both are rather risky and not all that pleasant. Do you really want to put yourself through that?

Shannon Finlayson - posted on 01/17/2011

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I find these comments very interesting. What most intrigues me is the talk about abortion. My second baby (who just turned 1) was born with Downs. After we found out at birth I was beside myself with grief. We hadn't had the test and.had no clue. I was only 30 and not high risk. What seemed like the end of the world then isn't anymore. We are talking of trying again for a third and I don't think I will test then either. Simply put, she is our special angel and I can't even imagine life without her in it. In regards to our other daughter and it being "unfair"....she is becoming a better person as well. People talk of aborting because they are afraid if the unknown. We run that risk whenever we have kids. Just had to put my perspective in the mix. Hope it helps

Amy - posted on 01/17/2011

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I am pregnant with our third, and the test was offered. The risks seemed low to me, but I also told my midwife I would not have the amnio if the risk came out as higher. She was fine with this. I got it more for peace of mind, and being able to prepare ahead of time if I should need to care for a child with a handicap. I also did the blood test, since that posed no risk to me or the baby, but I don't mind having blood drawn (I know some people hate it!). At any rate, you are young, and if you don;'t feel you need it, then you are certainly within your rights to refuse it. I was also told to get a flu shot, but refused. I had to sign a waiver that said I was offered it, but had denied the shot. You have a choice, so do what's right for you and your family!

Arlene - posted on 01/17/2011

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I live in California, and 10 years ago, that was the only option my doctor gave me. And it was based strictly on my age (from what he said), I have no family history of this illness, and was in good health.

Arlene - posted on 01/17/2011

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Perhaps it's changed (my son is 10) but at that time it involved withdrawing amniotic fluid with a needle. I had not intention of putting my child at risk with that kind of test, but if they are safer now, and don't pose the same risk, please disregard my previous comment :-)

Jennifer - posted on 01/17/2011

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Arlene: Dangerous? How so?

Where I live, it's a blood test and an ultrasound. They only do amnio if the risk factor is deemed greater than 1/200. Do they do something different where you live?

Arlene - posted on 01/17/2011

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My doctore recommended it because I was AMA (advanced maternal age), I was in my mid 30's. However, since I was not going to terminate the pregnancy no matter what, I refused it. I think more women should refuse them unless there's a history in the family that makes it sensible. It's a dangerous and unnecessary test.

Jennifer - posted on 01/17/2011

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I was an "elderly primagravida" (mom over 35) who got all available prenatal screening tests for both pregnancies after doing some research on the conditions that they identify. Down Syndrome was the least of my worries -- it is the most benign of the trisomies. Other genetic defects lead to horrific results that are completely incompatible with life. In my case, I decided I would rather know sooner than later, since I could not imagine going through the entire pregnancy expecting a healthy baby only to deliver and bury one that was not. You can probably skip the tests if you think you could handle that kind of shock. I knew I could not.



P.S. Had a small scare with the test results from the first one, but they both turned out fine. :-)

Alison - posted on 01/17/2011

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i had the nuchal scan, and it came back normal!!!! When i had Bobby i left hospital with a healthy baby with a slight heart murmour. He was 6 weeks old before the health visitor noticed the downs. At 3 months old he was on beater blockers andhad open heart surgery at 9 months. Even if id known he was downs i wouldnt of done anytbing about it, hes gorgeous.

Jodie - posted on 01/17/2011

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I did get the scan as i wanted to see my tiny 12 week baby ! Did i need it??? Not really as the results would not have made any changes as i would have had the baby anyway no matter what the results.

Jennifer - posted on 01/17/2011

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The scan can check for things other than Downs Syndrome. We found out that our baby had a severe neural tube defect and wasn't going to survive, even if it survived pregnancy by some miracle. I think it is good to know what you are up against, even if you plan to do nothing.

Tina - posted on 01/17/2011

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I worked in a hospital where they did emergency surgery on infants. There were many occasions where they planned admissions for babies not yet born, with abnormalities identified on prenatal screening. The baby was then delivered by C section in the operating room under sterile surgical conditions, then sent directly to surgery. Prenatal screening was essential for these babies, some with downs and heart defects, some with spinal defects. They all did better for the parents and doctors having more information. Its naive of people to refuse screening, when it can be used to help their child.

Alison - posted on 01/17/2011

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I had only the routine ultrasounds and blood tests. I just couldn't imagine trying to evaluate whether it was a life worth keeping or not. I do not think I would abort unless my life was in obvious danger. So, it really made no sense to me.

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