Discipline for a 9 month-old

Anna-marie - posted on 08/19/2010 ( 211 moms have responded )

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Hi Ladies,



i have a 9 month old son who is into EVERYTHING, i am just after a bit of advice on discipline, tantrums, or any good books to recommend.

he is a very strong character and when i say ''no'' in my big scary voice he just looks at me and carries on.. i end up obviously taking him away from the situation and distracting him.

so i just wondered, ''what do you do?''



thanks for taking the time to read this

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Ivy - posted on 08/31/2010

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Don't worry - this is a healthy sign of a strong personality - he is curious and trying to find things out for himself. Follow his thinking and find what he wants to reach to.

Kristi - posted on 08/31/2010

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I had an exersaucer for my older son. He started using it at 4 months old until he was just over a year. He LOVED it! It kept him out of trouble for many hours while I did housework, etc. Some kids like jolly jumpers better, just depends on the child. We've just bought another exersaucer for the baby coming this month at a garage sale. Needs a bit of cleaning, but much cheaper than brand new. If it's too hard to babyproof your whole house, maybe you could just designate a certain area large enough for him crawl around and explore, but he can't get into anything dangerous. Also, you and all his caregivers need to be on the same page. Discipline won't work, if daddy lets him do whatever he wants. Then you're frustrated and your son is confused.

Emilia - posted on 08/31/2010

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This is tricky because he is 9 months old and not 2 years old. At this stage it is completely normal for him to be exploring his environment and being curious. The best thing to do is to create a "yes" environment instead of a "no" environment. This way he can develop his exploration skills while being safe. At this stage they do not understand "no" and require the statement with an action. So say "no" and pull hand away gently. They don't understand no for a while. This is also very normal development. So saying no over and over again will not usually get results. Best to follow it by pulling hand away for still quite some time. We use the word yes alot. Creating a "yes" environment and then always saying yes. So we do not end up with a toddler that only knows how to say no... how many of those have we seen right?
good luck,
hope this helps.
Also Check out Sears book on Discipline. Incredibly helpful.
Emilia

Barbara - posted on 08/31/2010

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You're on the right track with distracting him. You might also think about what he's into and why. Is there some way to put it out of reach, give him something else he likes, etc. Also, it's important to be very calm, he may be trying to get a reaction out of you, as a way to get attention. If you are boring, he may stop. A good book to read when you are frustrated by your child is "I'm OK, You're a Brat". Another good book is by cline & Fay, something with Love and Logic in the title, but I can't quite remember the whole title.

Erica - posted on 08/31/2010

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My thought is that if you take away everything, kids will not learn what they are and aren't supposed to touch. Babies even at young ages understand a firm voice. They know better, they just like to test and as long as you are consistant they will understand mom doesn't play and it will cary on as they grow older the more you do now the less you will have to do later.

Hannah - posted on 08/31/2010

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Try the "love and logic" approach... With my strong willed son we have a playpen set up in the guest room for his "uh oh" spot. When he does something he's not suppose to, we sing song "uh oh" to him and go put him in there for a few minutes. He learns what behaviors are acceptable. He knows he wants to be with mom and dad and so he refrains from doing what he knows will get him in his uh oh spot. Now he's almost 17 months and will tel himself uh oh if he get too close to the dvd player or something so he's really learning :)

Janene - posted on 08/31/2010

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Hi Anna-Marie,
Being a mom is so great and a great challenge. Everything a child does is to learn about their world. When my oldest, now almost 26, was a baby I would redirect him to his toys, books, and things and tell him what belonged to mommy. I didn't use the word "no" but rather said "that's not so and so's." I used the same techniques for my two daughters with much success, although my third child was much more difficult as she was more determined to explore those things that were not hers. She colored the walls with chapstick and cut a hole in the screen in her room so the kids in the neighborhood cold hear he calling them. She is my most creative child and has given us a multitude of great stories to tell. Be patient and find the joy in every stage - and write down the funny and frustrating things they do. Who knows - you might get a book deal out of it! Remember to give lots of love to your child.

Patti - posted on 08/31/2010

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Please do some research on what toys are age appropriate for your child and offer him some choices.

To avoid saying no or using a scary voice, you can

1) Teach him about consequences. Use the if/then principle. Say if you (whatever the negative behavior is) then (whatever you are worried about him doing)

If you pull that toy off the top shelf, then you are going to hurt yourself.

2) Tell him how you feel by using I messages; I feel sad because. . .

Remember that your child is not BAD, but he may be doing something bad.

I would reccommend 101 Positive Principles of Discipline, a video you could find on the web, and when he is a little older 1-2-3 Magic. Each work very well for me.

You were not wrong to remove him from a situation. Redirecting him into another activity was an excellent technique. Good luck!

Linda - posted on 08/31/2010

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Don't say no..but still remove him from the situation and redirect to something good and praise him for that..

Suzy - posted on 08/31/2010

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Did you hear the one about the little boy who was asked what his name was responded with "no-no" LOL
I have four little boys. Two who are very stubburn. I have learned that if you get into the habit of yelling it sticks and they learn to ignore it. Kids at that age start to think that's just how mommy is. My boys know mommy is very quiet and hates to yell. At that age I always said a firm "eh-eh" and took them away with something else to do. The word "no" can easily be ignored and not taken seriously because we can use it oh too often. I always tried to use other words and always explain why whether they undersood or not. They eventually got it. With my boys it was always around the age of 2 that they matured enough to understand consiquence for there actions and not distractions. (One of my boys was about 1-1/2). You have to get that gage of "do they understand" before the discipline/consequence can begin.

Angie - posted on 08/31/2010

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First of all just being consistent in a solid firm voice not necessarily a scary voice is one of the best things so you are on the right track even if he is ignoring it but continue to do it. And when you feel you can begin to use a "time out" with him. One minute for every year of age the child is. So now would be one minute. Otherwise, "The Strong Willed Child" by Dr James Dobson is a great book.

Phoebe - posted on 08/31/2010

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There is one thing that you can do for your piece of mind, and that is get a playpen and leave him in it when he is starting to get into things. Since he can't be trusted to not get into things this would be your only course of action since your child isn't old enough to do anything else. Good Luck!

Cheryl - posted on 08/31/2010

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maybe try getting into baby sign it really helps stop tantrums and 9 months is a great way to start you will be suprized how quickly they catch onto it!

Lindsey - posted on 08/31/2010

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I personally don't believe in child-proofing your home. Within reason, my daughter will learn to behave and live like my husband and I live. That means when we have something on the table we don't her to touch we will say, "No touching please." ...Or if she's pulling at my hair or earings or at our dog's tail, etc, we say, "Gentle touch, please." Along with asking her to use gentle touch, we take her hand and show her what gentle touch is.

Children even 7 1/2 months old, like our Leigha, can learn. If you don't TEACH them, they will never learn good behavior. As much as we love Leigha, the world does not revolve around her. So far, she has already learned, "No touch please," and can differentiate between that and, "Gentle touch, please." A child can explore but learn that there are boundaries in their exploration.

I also agree with Michelle saying to speak in a firm (not particularly loud or harsh--just firm) voice and absolutely at the child's level.

However, in my experience, counting does not work. When I have used counting in a pre-school or Sunday school setting, I have said my, "1-2-3," and received the precocious reply of, "4-5-6." Obviously that was with an older child, but I don't think that's something we will start.

My parents spanked/slapped me entirely too much, so that is not something I intend to do either.

Shalom - posted on 08/31/2010

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Wow that sounds familiar! My little monkeygirl was walking at before 9 months, at which point my life was over hahaha. At 9 months they really don't understand consequences to their actions in the way a 2 year old does. Time outs, discipline, etc. are just beyond their scope. Your best bet is to change the environment and save yourself a whole lot of frustration. Make everything in his space something he can help himself to... let him explore and work out the mechanics of his environment, because that's all he's trying to do when he gets into things. Same goes for throwing and squishing all his food. It's perfectly normal for his stage of development! Celebrate it with him by babyproofing and watching him go! You'll enjoy your time soooo much more!

Cynthia - posted on 08/31/2010

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I think that if it was as easy as saying "no" for a while and then your babies just learned to not touch stuff there wouldn't be so many frustrated moms on here. The truth is that some of us have some very stubborn kids that don't stop, even after repeatedly telling them no. I don't think parenting skills are to blame. I have three kids and they are all completely different. My youngest has been the best behaved so far. He's 22 months and I can tell him "no" a couple of times and he listens and for the most part, stays out of things. None of our doors have latches on them and even though I have baby gates I only use them on rare occasions. My daughter, on the other hand, was completely the opposite. She may have known what "no" was but completely ignored us and would pull things off counters/shelves and climb on EVERYTHING. She was very stubborn and still is. We didn't go to restaurants for quite a while because she just couldn't stay quiet enough. She would scream for no reason and throw a fit. I used time out and tried my best not to yell and she eventually got it. BUT, it was a long road and sometimes it felt like she spent all day in time out.

I guess my point is that sometimes to tell moms to just say "no" and that it's wrong to baby proof doesn't help them. They are frustrated, for good reason.

Also, covering power sockets, removing chemicals & sharp table corners IS baby proofing. I don't think most parents are buying new furniture and putting their kids in padded rooms.

Maria - posted on 08/31/2010

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Excellant advice Ms Michelle.. and you have to always stay consistent with how your tone and actions....

Krista - posted on 08/31/2010

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9 month olds ARE into everything! It's a time to "practice" all of the things they're learning...crawling, crawling onto and into things, pulling up on things, etc. A baby, at that age, has tantrums when they're frustrated by not being able to do something, get to something, too tired, etc. My best advice is to do, first, what you said you end up doing. Try not to put him, a strong-willed child, in a situation that you know will frustrate him. Every age is a phase - Enjoy him!!

Renee - posted on 08/31/2010

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If you keep moving stufff he will never learn that he is n ot suppose to play w that stuff.. i never moved things when mine were little and now i have grandkids and i will not move stuff when they are here.. i say no and slap their hands .. eventually they will learn.. and there isnt too early of an age to learn what they can and cannot do.

[deleted account]

Just to let you guys know, there are a few new studies that showed toddlers who were tapped on the hand as babies were less likely to want to try ''exploring'' with their hands as a tool for learning, a lot of these babies had ''slower'' motor skills with anything regarding hand eye co-ordination, not judging, just letting you know that there are new studies (we learn as parents all the time, I mean 30 years ago we were told to start solids at a couple of weeks old, things change, people learn)

Veronica - posted on 08/31/2010

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Focus more on putting him in situations where you can say yes..praise gets you further than no and disciplinary action..You're def doing right by diverting his attention when he is engaging in negative behavior..however, focus more on positive reinforcement and he will be more likely to want to continue in that behavior since it produces positive results for him.

Cynthia - posted on 08/31/2010

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It looks like you are doing the correct thing. Are you replacing the situation with something that he can do. if you are just remain consistent. Your little one reminds me of my oldest son who is now 22, he couldn't even go to the bathroom with the door closed because he would get into everything. He grew out of that around 5 1/2 or so. Good luck

Julie - posted on 08/31/2010

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I disagree that a baby that age cannot understand the word no. If you say it in a voice that is different than your normal speaking voice (so he knows it's a different situation) but not a scary voice, you are training him to understand the meaning.

Training is what it's about at this age. He doesn't know what he is allowed to do until you let him know. He doesn't have the ability to automatically stop doing something that is fun, but that might hurt him.

If it's touching, then give his hand a tap when you say no. He will not like it, but he will learn that is something he cannot do. Be consistent. Moving things out of his reach does not teach him to obey, and it is not training him in any way. You will regret it later. Who wants all their 'pretties' put up out of sight until the child loses interest? That could take years!

Better to train him what is and is not acceptable. Redirection is good, after you've reminded him that he's not allowed to touch, or get into something. He will appreciate the boundaries when he's older, and you'll have a child who obeys. Keep it up!

Jenna - posted on 08/31/2010

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Distraction only works for so long. Try tomato staking which means you are within 10ft of you baby at all times so when he goes for something you can blindside him with a little VERY light swat on a diapered bottom and the stern but not yelling NO. Not only will you have gotten his attention but also did not give him a chance to get into something. You stop it before he already made a mess of something in addition to letting him know even though he thinks you're not watching you are. This only works if you're CONSISTENT. If you stop before he's gets into something one out of five times it wont work. Then after all that show him what he can touch ;)

Bettie - posted on 08/31/2010

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I have had to recently deal with this subject with my 9 month old and 2 year old grand kids for a week babysitting. It isn't too young to start letting them know you mean what you say. I have to make sure I have control of myself first, but to tell them no and do it with a follow up of sitting them away from the problem they are getting into. I do believe in spanking when necessary, but crossing the line in screaming and losing control makes matters worse. Thanks for standing up for yourself and dicipline. I don't see any use for the time out crap when I see 5 year olds telling their parents what to do and screaming about not getting their way in stores. I spanked my kids and they knew I meant business. just like my parents did to me and my sister.

Angel - posted on 08/31/2010

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I have an almost 8 month old son and he ABSOLUTELY unerstands "NO". He has known what "NO" is since he was 4 months old. You have to be consistant. I think that a lot of moms take the easy way out and end up giving in to the baby/child. It is definitely hard work but worth it. Everywhere we go people are astonished with how well behaved he is. Sometimes I have to tell him "NO" 3-4 times but he ends up stopping whatever it is that I was telling him "NO" to. He has thrown a few tantrums but that just gets him put down and he often stops his tantrums within minutes of putting him down.
He is the baby and you are the boss. Be consistant and don't give in, not even once, or you will find yourself back at square one.
Hope that helped :,)

Teri - posted on 08/31/2010

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Maybe you should not say NO so much -- really... my guess is that you are the cause of most of this frustration. We always removed things that would cause me to say no, so that the house had only what was accessible. (it only lasts for a while). This really helps. you want yoru child to understand NO when yo uahve to say it. if yo usay it too much, they will become immune.

Provide a great place for your child to be successful... and let them do what they want. if there are things that he sould not have, then remove them before he starts playing.

9 mos is wayyy too young for big discipline. he's just being curious. if you reprimand him for being curious, then you could be squelching his curiosity for life.. seriously.

Debbie - posted on 08/31/2010

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I don't believe there is any right and wrong in the way people discipline their children(obviously beating them is a definite no ) but if a child is playing with wires and plug sockets, I think the best discipline is a tap on the hand, no matter how old they are, they will no it's wrong. All parenting is different

[deleted account]

Does it seem that he is driven by an internal motor? You are describing your little one the way that I, and most moms, with a child with ADHD describe their child from birth until whatever wonderful point they seek treatment.
I would not personally use medications on a small child, but wish that I would have known more about this with 2 of my children. This sort of active child can wear out both mom and dad.. and cause much stress in a family.
Do what you do to make sure you never think of your child in a negative way. Look into ADHD to find ways to cope and treat. Best!

Danielle - posted on 08/31/2010

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I don't know that he even understands what he is doing is wrong. I would just say no and continue to take him away from what he is doing that you don't want him to do. If you keep doing this firmly, but gently, he will eventually understand. I don't know about discipline at 9 months. They barely understand yes and no. I also have a 9 month old that is chasing his big brother and sister and into everything, I just say no and move him, yes, over and over again, and he screams and goes back, but they are just exploring and trying to find things out.

Penda - posted on 08/31/2010

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first thing to remember is all babies are different. I have 9 month old twins (boy and girl) and they both understand no and why I tell them no, with a stern look. Over a period of time they understand what it means. Now my son knows he isn't to touch any cables because initially i would say no and give him a gentle flick on the hand (not to hurt just to alert), a month of doing that and h e knows he isn't to touch cables and when he tries to do so i say his full name and 'no' (gently), this results in him crawling to me and hugging my leg (kind of like to say he's sorry). sometimes i wonder if he does it just so that he can keep hugging my legs lol because he can do it 5 times straight and come and hug me.
my little girl is the same except just a bit more stubborn than her brother, she understands when she is doing something wrong.

i suggest if one method doesn't work, try something else, i did. just be economical with the stern 'no' and face, so when they see/hear it they know it means something.

Debbie - posted on 08/31/2010

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My middle child was like that. He wouldn't leave ANYTHING alone! I also felt like I was always saying the word no to him. So I moved everything out of his way that was important to me or that he could hurt himself with, took a deep breath and just watched him go! He was a holy terror when he was little, into absolutely everything he could get his hands on. However, I had more peace when I boxed up my material possessions and concentrated on my true gift from God!! He has had accidents over the years because that's just the type of person he is. He is now 21 years old and still alive!! lol Just relax and enjoy your baby. Our stuff can be replaced, but you will never get these years back again.

Janice - posted on 08/31/2010

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At 9 months you are doing exactly what you should be doing. Saying no, then taking him away from the situation. My daughter is also very strong willed and sometimes laughs at me when I say no in my discipline tone. However, at 9 mo. babies can not understand time outs or physical punishment(which is never recommended). My daughter is 10 mo. and also into everything so I understand your frustration but continue saying no and using distraction until he is a older.

Jessie - posted on 08/31/2010

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I personally combined a few of these tactics and it seemed to work fine for me-anything he isn't to be touching get out of his reach. He just wants to know what's around and figure things out-my method was anything below mid-thigh to knee level (depending how tall you/your son are) is free game for him. Second, when you tell him "no", tell him why. This will help him associate the word later on if you are consistent. If these don't entirely work, then try counting to bolster it a bit before "distracting" him with something, which could also lead to him thinking that he can do what he likes and you'll just come tote him away and stuff his favorite toy in his lap and call it a day.

Judith - posted on 08/31/2010

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In an effort to teach my son not to touch what was not his at this age I made a small pile of my things and a small pile of his things. His pile was the yes pile, my pile was the no pile. Over time (hours not weeks) I only had to say calmly, ".WmJ, that would be a no," and he would move on to something else. WmJ now has two sons of his own and still I say, "that would be a no" and almost always get positive results. No one likes to hear NO in a loud bullying voice! When as a kid I would hear NO (because that is all my parents knew to do), I would think to myself, oh yeah... so I knew it not work on any child of mine. lol
Be consistent with your discipline. If you make a rule, be sure it applies always. This serves to avoid confusion and second guessing or putting you to the test.. and always always give them the respect of looking direcly into their eyes whenever you speak to them. All my best, Judith

Melissa - posted on 08/31/2010

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Yikes..I just read a post advocating hand smacking by Abigail. Maria Montessori, founder of the Montessori schools was the first opponent of hand smacking. She said little hands were meant for exploring and never should be smacked.
A test study was done with two sets of toddlers. One set had their hands smacked as discipline..the other did not.
When revisited several months later..the children who had their hands smacked were delayed tactily compared to the other non-smacked group.
Don't smack ever.
Spanking should be illegal.

Melissa - posted on 08/31/2010

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Some books I suggest would be Dr. Sears book on discipline, Barabara Coloroso "Kids are worth it" and the Supernanny books. All of them, however will not have any help on discipline for children until they are two years old. Little babies learn by exploring. Keep what you don't want touched out of his reach and what you don't want opened, locked.

[deleted account]

Oh my word!!!!!!! Babies are so much smarter then what some of these mom's think!! My daughter (nearly 2 now) could clearly understand the word "No" from like 6 months! You know how you can tell, when you say "No" and then they look into your eyes. Trust me, they're super clever! I don't believe in "baby-proofing" your house. PLEEASE!!!!! Buying new furniture! Crazy stuff!! What will you do if you visit another house that isn't baby proofed then!? Problem! Just do the things that are dangerous to them. Such as: power sockets, chemicals & sharp table corners. All else besides that - they will learn with your guidance. Good luck :) Putting the effort in now with consistency will def pay off later!

Cynthia - posted on 08/31/2010

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I agree with the previous posts. He's too young to "discipline". When my kids were this age, I set up a separate area for them (baby gates may be necessary), usually in the living room where we all were. Then, remove things that you don't want him into from his exploring area. You can say "no" to things he is supposed to leave alone and as he gets older he will start to understand. Getting down to his level is good advice but personally I think it works better for an older child (18mos and up). At this age, it IS all about distracting and removing him from the situation.

Tammy - posted on 08/31/2010

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Well, being that your baby is just at the point where he is able to get into things, child proofing the home is the biggest part. I myself have a grandbaby that is nine months old and he is determined! I do the traditional popping the hand. Then I pick him up and move him to another area. Eventually he finds the object again. Repeat while telling him no, and a key word to use with everything he shouldnt touch. Such as "bite". Eventually he will learn what the bite means because you cant follow him every second. He will eventually get tired of getting his hand slapped and "mostly" stay away. Then there is always putting him in the playpen when he absolutely refuses. Its better to hurt his feelings than for him to grab and electric cord and electricute himself!
I get frustrated myself with the dog food bowl but now I just pick it up while he is here with me.
Good luck!

Lisa - posted on 08/31/2010

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Ok. not going to repeat the same thing over. some ladies have great advice here for ya...especially love the post from Holly.but don't care for the advice of Rachael- "popping hand and time out" why would you do that to a baby-oh my! babies are very smart and can understand "no" but don't understand why not or have the self control to adhere to this so...bottom line:baby proof (for safety purpose), redirect, pray. i'm a mother of 3: ages 7yr, 3yr & 9months. good luck n god bless :-)

Amanda - posted on 08/31/2010

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http://www.gospeltruth.net/children/pear...

The Book Train up a Child by Michael and Debi Pearl has to be the best book. It is written by an Amish couple. Simple yet affective. I wish I would of known about this book when my oldest 2 were babies. Here is the link for the book online. It is a small book but great info. I wish I still had a copy.

Claire - posted on 08/31/2010

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like your advice Michelle exactly what I did with my child( 10 month ) they turned out great now its the grand with the same routine

Brigit - posted on 08/31/2010

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At that age all you should really do is say "no" firmly remove him from the situation, distract him and carry on. He's a baby, and he won't understand other forms of discipline yet... you should never spank a 9 month old- it will not work, it will encourage him to start hitting and you'll just escalate the situation. Plus once you start spanking you have no where else to go- you'll have to always spank to get their attention, kwim? Besides whatever your 9mo old is doing, it's not bad enough to spank- there is no "naughty" intention on his part, he's just trying to learn.

Most importantly- for all kids of all ages- be consistent. It's hard, it takes time and effort but it's the most important thing we can do for our children- it will teach them their boundaries, give them comfort in knowing we're there for them always, and won't confuse them. I work on this every day, and I'm working on getting better at all the time- I have a long way to go still though!

Francetta - posted on 08/31/2010

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I have a 14 month old son who is probably 10 times more active and strong willed than your son, decipline is very diffocult considering you can't pop them because they don't quite understand, I bought a time out chair from TJ Max, and it's great the chair says time out and he sits in it for 30 seconds when he's frsh with mommy, it works a little but he gets the idea.

[deleted account]

Hello Anna,
I've read a few books on discipline for younger babies and toddlers (what to expect the the first year and toddler years, and also On Becoming pre-toddler and toddler wise) and basically distraction is your best line of defense until he learns your expectations. But on top of that I listened to a message on parenting by John Fitchner and he said to tell your child once not to do something (in a regular voice) and tell him what will happen if he does not listen and respond to your instruction. If he continues to do that action you have instructed him not to, you then do exactly what you said you were going to do. If you say you are going to remove him from the situation, do it. If you say he is going to have a time out, put him in time out. There's really no reason to repeat yourself over and over because he heard you the first time & if you tell him 3 times before you act on your word then he lears that he has 2 more times before you are going to act. He learns that you don't mean what you say until the 3rd tim. He is learning how to repond to instruction right now and you are training him. We didn't do a time out until our child was 12 months and that was only because her emotions were out of control. I instructed her to sit in the chair and she didn't so I did what I said and removed her from the chair and she slapped me in the face. I told her in a calm voice what and why we were putting her in her crib for a time out and when she could come out and play. It took all of about 30 seconds before her cry changed from "I'm mad that I can't have my way" to "mommy I'm sorry". Because we have trained her that we will instruct her once and we expect her to respond & she does most of the time. And I don't ever have to allow myself to get aggrevated enough to raise my voice, that doesn't really help anyways.
With tantrums, I just walk away & let her fight it out with the floor. She stops once I've left the room because I'm not fueling it by paying attention to it. Now she doesn't really pitch fits anymore. It was a short and sweet phase of about 2 months.
Everyone feels differently about spankings, but this is how I feel. We agree with spanking but not until the child is more like 2 or 3 and fully aware of their actions. And spanking shouldn't last passed the age of about 7 or 8 if you have done all the other training and stuff & spanking should be a last resort. With that said, you never spank out of anger or heightened emotion, you always tell them why they are getting a spanking and afterwards you always love on them and tell them you love them and you spend time playing or hanging out with them. We believe in the Bible so thats our basis for this belief.

Tamara - posted on 08/31/2010

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In reading a couple of the responses, they come across as very harsh. All I would like to say is lets not project and support. We as Moms need to support one another as this is the hardest job we will ever have. Set the Egos aside and love one another.

[deleted account]

You can't discipline a 9 month old! Just distract him away from whatever it is that he's getting into - or put things away, put up gates, etc. Removing the source of contention is really the only thing to do.

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