Early Intervention Question

Gillian - posted on 09/22/2011 ( 278 moms have responded )

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People always tell me not to compare my son with other babies or that all babies learn on their own but my son will be 20 months in about 2 weeks and he only says 2 words. The pediatrician recommended Early Intervention for him to help his communication social and verbal skills, at 19 months he could only say 2 words, duck and cat and even those are not full words. We can understand if he wants something but he has yet to verbalize anything and i wonder if this program could help. Has anyone had a similar problem or gone through with this program? i guess its not a question i just wonder if anyone else is like me and could shed some light or just give me some words of encouragement.

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Dana - posted on 10/04/2011

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Do not wait to get your child into an early intervention program. My pediatrician told me to wait and see but at 22 months was diagnosed with autism. He's had speech therapy for 5 years and at the age of 7 does not speak one word. He uses some sign and pictures to communicate. It could be that your child just needs a little push to get things going and in that case EI will really benefit you. In my case, even with EI, speech has not progressed even though he had several words at your child's age then lost them all. Don't wait, don't listen to anyone who tell you that boys talk later, listen to your gut. It won't hurt one bit to have him evaluated and get some help early if he needs it.

Amy - posted on 09/23/2011

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Did his dr check his hearing? My son was having trouble also when he was little & the hearing test showed he had fluid behind his ears. We had ear tubes put in & his adnoids taken out & he started talking less than a month later. Good luck!

Liz - posted on 10/04/2011

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I think it's a great idea=) I don't have experience with early intervention but I do have a nephew that I think really could have benefitted from something like that. He's 4 now and due to start kindergarten next year, but barely speaks at all and what he can say, is only understood by those who are around him often. I think if his parents had started working with him younger, he'd be more prepared for school next year but now they are talking about having to put him into a special education class. So I think if you have concerns, better to address them earlier than later. That said, it's really is not uncommon at all for a 20 months old to just be beginning to verbalize... and also, in my experience, boys usually start a little later than girls. Best Wishes!!

Amie - posted on 09/24/2011

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I teach early intervention and believe it is a wonderful program that is really beneficial to most children who attend.
Although some of the children who attend our program are likely to be diagnosed with disorders such as autisim as they get older most are with us because of delays with speech, fine or gross motor and most will go onto a mainstream kindergarten program when they are old enough. My own son went through early intervention and when he reached school his teacher commented on how well he held a pencil and used a pair of scissors, it was all that practice he got when he was at EI.
Don't fear it, I'm sure you and your child will love it.

Heather - posted on 09/23/2011

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When me son was turned 2, my husband and I saw that there was something wrong. He didn't say anything even though we would try basic easy words like dada or mama, dog, cat etc. I know that two year olds have temper tantrums but he's was beyond that. He would point to what he wanted and when we couldn't understand that he would bang his head on the floor, table, you name it, it was bad. We took him to his ped's and he recommended EI. They came out to our home, took an assessment, worked out a routine for us. He was 22 months when they took the assessment and it turned out that he was operation at an age of a 12 month old. They sent a lady out once a week to our home to help with his speech and cognitive delays until he was three which is when they helped enrolled him in our local school district with EI also for preschool. He still has speech and cognitive delays. He is now 9 years old and has speech twice a week in school and is in "special needs" classes in school and even though he is 9 years old, he operates at about 6 maybe 7 years old. But wants to be so like all the other kids. I couldn't love him any less. He's my world and I love him. EI will only help your child so I would recommend it. It worked mirocles with our son. Good luck.

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Binita - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi Gillian,
To begin with, Early Intervention Program is a brilliant program and there is nothing wrong if a child has to undergo any therapy under it. My son was hardly sayin any words till bout 2 and half years. We started with his therapy under the said program at around 2 yrs. Now this therapy not only encouraged him to be more verbal about his needs but also helped me immensely on how to deal with various day-to-day issues that generally most toddlers have (throwing tantrums, not willin to share, cooperate etc). His therapist is a wonderful lady and I am sad that my son will have to be opted out of this program as he be turning 3. Also, they conduct an evaluation test to check whether your child qualifies for this program or not (considering the program is financed by the government, they make sure that only the ones really in need gets the services). Only because of those evaluation tests did we (my husband and myself) came to know what all things our son was capable of doing and how we can encourage to enhance his skills (he was excellent at puzzle/ problem solving which we were not aware of). So all the tips/ suggestions/ advices given by the Early Intervention Team has helped us a lot to encourage our child to do better in all the aspects of development. He was 15 months behind in Speech Expressive when he started with the therapy and now he is almost there. He is just 4 months behind now. To conclude, PLEASE DONOT THINK THAT SINCE YOUR CHILD MAY REQUIRE SPEECH THERAPY, THERE IS SOMETHING WRONG WITH HIM. I AM SURE YOU WILL BE EQUALLY GLAD IF YOU CHOOSE TO GET HIM THE HELP OF THESE SERVICES. GOOD LUCK AND GOD BLESS:))))

Julia - posted on 10/04/2011

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Also, sorry I would like to add to my last post after reading others and this is in no way aimed at your personal question. I personally am not sure of enrolling a toddler into a program. These programs never existed years ago. Children were able to be just that, children. My goodness, 2 - 3 -4 years old should be treated as such. Putting them under therepy at 2 years old I feel can be avoided. If there is a problem at school age then so-be-it, but for goodness sake give your child their youth, innocence and freedom.

Kamrah - posted on 10/04/2011

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There is nothing wrong with your son Gillian. Kids do things when they want to. On their time. My son didn't talk really until he was two, then he started talking a ton. He is 26 months and repeats all words and counts to 12 and knows all his body parts. I thought he just wasn't going to be a smart kid. I compared him with all of his friends who were way faster at walking and talking. He has caught way up to them and past where some of them were. He all the sudden just had a desire to do it. So you just keep encouraging him to talk and he will do it when he wants. Don't ever blame yourself. The fact that you are concerned and reaching out for help lets me know you care and are doing a great job with your son. Remember he is his own person and he will decide when he wants to do it. One day he will probably just bust out sentances and you will be shocked like I was. I am sure he is just as smart as any other kid as his age.

Julia - posted on 10/04/2011

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My daughter at that age was having converastions with me, however, my twins who are now 26 months are quite limited with their words and some only I can recognise.
My sister-in-laws twin boys had speech therepy at the age of 3 or maybe 3 and a half because they would communicate with each other but wouldn't talk, literally, at all. They are in their second year of school and are just talking now how my 4 year old talks.
Basically what I am trying to say is please don't be worried. What parenting books and sites and, yes. doctors. fail to tell us Mums is that all kids progress at a different rate. By the time they need these skills that we all fret about they will be holding their own.

Jennifer - posted on 10/04/2011

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Yes my daughter is 21 months and says 10 words.I had bright start test her and she qualified for speech.this is working out great,she is now learning sign language and picking up on words right along with it.so good luck hopefully u are able to find a great program as well

Kristin - posted on 10/04/2011

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Research shows that early intervention is effective. Our premies had the deck stacked against them at birth. Why would we not do anything and everything to help them overcome that risk factor. In Colorado the evaluation and services are free of charge. I take my son to screening once a year even though I have no concerns - just to have someone else's unbiased opinion of how he is doing. (I'm a licensed school psychologist birth-age 21)

Amanda - posted on 10/04/2011

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I'm not sure what early invention is, but I'm assuming it similar to the same program my son is in. My son is 2 1/2 and has been seeing a speech specialist for 4 months now. They come to my house once a month and play with my son and pretty talk the entire time while they play. He's improved since but still has a ways to go. Until about a month ago, my son didn't say 2 words together. now he says "I go" and "want that". He still only says the first sound the word makes. My son is very laid back and very mellow tempered, so I'm not sure if this is why he doesnt talk much. Every child will talk when they are ready. I've had my son's ears checked and his hearing is just fine. November will be the 6 month mark for my son and the speech specialist, and then we will discuss what further steps need to be taken. The program my son is in, is free. This program you talk of, should tell you what to expect and what steps will need to be taken. I love the program my son is in. He actually looks forward to them coming to the house and playing with him. Hope this helps!

Amy - posted on 10/04/2011

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At my sons 2 yr check up the doctor asked me the same question and my son only said maybe a word or two then. So I called got an evaluation and yes he needed speech therapy which helped a great deal. He also needed occupational therapy and that too was a huge help. Yes every child is different but if there is something and your child needs that extra push why not get it instead of waiting to see of they are able to "catch up"

Mary - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian, my daugher - now 9 years old - was not speaking very much at all at 24 months. Her pediatrician said not to worry she'll catch up, but I was concerned. I had her assessed by early intervention at 26 months. Her verbal recognition was above a 3 year old level, but verbal expression was at 15 months. Talk about frustrating, she wanted to talk and just couldn't seem to get it. I went to sign language prior to intervention. She worked with a speech therapist for 6 months and I swear it was like they found the switch. It was incredible. And she's quite the motor mouth today!! Best thing I ever did. She's a smart little girl, but has had some developmental delays. I have since learned to jujmp at any offer for assistance with speech, reading, math .. any of it. I figure the more the better. She is one of the best dynamic out loud readers I've run into .. I say go for it!! What can it hurt? The governmental programs will pay for it - your taxes go towards that! Use it to her advantage!!

Rebecca - posted on 10/04/2011

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As an Early Intervention provider AND a mom of a child who went through Early Intervention, my advice to you would be to have your son evaluated. I know it is hard for many parents to want to think that something is 'different' about their child - but the reality is that the earlier we can provide help to a child the better of the child will be in the long run. The tests may come back that nothing is wrong - I've seen it happen =). I have also seen Early Intervention services work with an 18 month old child with Autism and eventually help that child function WITHOUT HELP in a REGULAR kindergarten classroom!!!! Early Intervention is definitely worth looking into.

Laura - posted on 10/04/2011

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You should get an evaluation done, I have wonderful progress made with my son through the Infants and toddler's early intervention program. When he was first evaluated at 18mths old he had the speech of a 5-6 mth old, he is now 31mths old and has the speech of a 14mth old. Which is amazing improvment from a child who could only say dada! So, please look into it it is a wonderful program with great resources. I will write more in response but right now I do not have the time to tell you everything I think of the program! Hang in there there are a lot of mom's and families going through this Gillian!

Heather - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian, don't worry. My oldest son barely said anything till just about 4 years. I was very concerned, and had him tested for everything and everything. Even medical staff kind of scratched their heads. I guess he just didnt have anything to say. I understood his body language so well, he never had to talk. I was a too attentive mother!! Anyway, long story short, he is now 22 and extreemly articulate and well spoken (studied radio journalism). This might not be any help, but in a nutshell, if your child is healthy and happy, I am sure he is fine. Trust me once they start talking, he'll make up for it......mine did!!!

Jennifer - posted on 10/04/2011

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I agree with Claire. All children's hospital also has a program called Early Steps with EI specialists. Have you had your child's hearing tested? Sign language is a wonderful tool for children with or without hearing loss. The signing times dvd's are also a great tool with lots of dailu

Rebecca - posted on 10/04/2011

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I am going through almost the same thing right now. I have a son who is 16 months old and the only real words that we can understand are mama and dada. I have been so concerned for him because he also does not wave bye-bye or try to tell us what he wants either. The doctors don't seem too concerned, but as a parent, I am. I have 2 other children who seemed to do all the milestones early. Nathan is the baby and sometimes I wonder if that could be it. I just get worried because of all the autism talk nowadays. Hopefully by you asking this question, I can learn something as well.

Sarah - posted on 10/04/2011

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my kids were 2 and barely speaking. Got them in Early Intervention, now they won't stop talking! Great program!!! My little one is 13 months now and I called for speech therapy just to go through this wonderful program again! Your son will be in good hands, they come to my house to do the speech class, then at 3, they go to NEIU. it's ok, he'll be fine!!

Cathy - posted on 10/04/2011

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gillian, as a former special education teacher, i want to reassure you that there is probably nothing at all wrong with your son. a) boys develop slowly. b) speech is not a high priority for boys. c) he is probably a very physical little boy. for all of those reasons, i would not jump to conclusions and assume the worst. but on the other hand, any special help a child can receive can only enhance their development.and if a doctor is reccommending ei, i say take full advantage of whatever services for which you are able to qualify. and evaluations will yield invaluable information for you as his parent. and you can use this information to work with your child. more importantly, if it turns out that he does need help, it will help his transition into public schools easier. you won't have to "fight" for accommodations for him. once he is in the system, a public school is obliged to provide specialized services for him. but once in the system, it is almost impossible to get districts to agree to evaluate children. once they identify any learning differences, federal law requires that they provide whatever level of services a child might require. therefore they have created a myriad of ways to avoid evaluating children in the public system.. they need to conserve resources. so in mho, you should take advantage of whatever is offered to you and the sooner the better.

Tina - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi Gillian, My son is 22 months now and you'd never know he was 9 weeks early. We weren't sure about early intervention either, but we did 6 months (starting when he was 9 months old) and it did a world of wonders. Crawling, motor function, etc. It’s worth it to have them come out and evaluate your son and see what they have to say. I loved the EI person that came once a week in the evenings. They were very accommodating to my work schedule. Hope this helps.

Jennifer - posted on 10/04/2011

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My oldest didn't speak more than five words when he turned 3. About 2 months after he turned three he was speaking like I had never seen. So many words I couldn't even count..... so don't compare. Just be patient :) It'll come in due time.
Jen M.
Mom of three boys ages 7, 5, and 3

Rontae - posted on 10/04/2011

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well my son will be two next month and cannot get his words out plain yet either, and the doctor said not to pressure him into it, he will get there in time. i took long to talk as well when i was a baby. Some children just develop certain skills before others but i dont advise you to pressure him. While my son get his words out plain enough as yet, he is very intelligent, he knows how to turn on the radio, he opens the fridge, opens the windows and closes them, he matches the right colors, and when songs are playing he tries to sing them and is in tune although he does not have the words, so look at it from another prospective instead of just the fact that he is not talking as yet.

Sima - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian, what "people always tell you" is absolutely right! Some children simply don't talk by 20 months, but once he gets rolling, you may miss the quiet! I overheard my au pairs comparing their sets of 2-1/2 year old twins at one meeting. One said that only one of her twins talked for both of them and the other said her charges only talked to each other and argued in Spanish! Call me old fashioned, but "early intervention" is something you do for a teen with drug issues; not for a little boy who is learning the world at his own unique and comfortable pace. My daughter escaped from her crib and car seat at 18 months but didn't get really verbal until she was a full two-years old. Enjoy!

SHilpi - posted on 10/04/2011

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I have seen most boys speaking a little late. I know atleast 3 different cases where the boys spoke after 24 months and now speak perfectly fine. I would rather have you wait for a few months than going for an intervention. Also, send him to a play school if he is not going already. Interacting with children his age is the best way for them to learn to talk.

Marie - posted on 10/04/2011

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I spoke late when I was a kid, but then I wasn't talked to a whole lot. If you feel that you're dealing with a delay talk to your doctor/go ahead and see a specialist because the sooner you get to the bottom of things the better for everybody.

Heather - posted on 10/04/2011

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My kids were all this way and started talking a lot at about 22 months. Then they had a language explosion and today they talk a lot! Just model correct language now, label things throughout the day.

Monica - posted on 10/04/2011

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YES! The program works but it takes a little time. My son which will be 3 is in the program and it is helping him with sounds and working with words. From using the E.I he has come a long way with some words compared to just a few months ago from saying nothing. So go for it!

Lucy - posted on 10/04/2011

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do you read to him? Do you talk to him alot? I have a nephew that was talking like a 2 year old when he was 5 and now he is a grown man and never stops talkin....

Danielle - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son is 24mo, and has a limited vocabulary as well. I've had lots of people tell me that boys develop speech slower, and girls faster. It does seem like my 4mo. girl is much more chatty than he is sometimes! We taught him some sign language so he can communicate with us until he has the words for it. He uses "more" at the dinner table, but also to indicate wanting to do/have something, or continue an activity. He also uses "all done" at the dinner table and really whenever he doesn't want to do anything. With those in place, we at least have the chance to communicate until he develops his speech thoroughly. I think you are doing a fine job, Gillian!

Rachel - posted on 10/04/2011

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Early intervention recommended, as in terms of learning and plasticity of the brain the sooner the he learns the better. I would ask your pediatrician for a referral to SLT. Speech therapy as if there is anything specific then they need to check him out and see if its an issue with understanding, expression, speech or whether he just has little need to communicate. but do lots for him now, dont sit on it, if he needs help he needs it now, if he does not extra intervention will not be a problem!!!

Holly - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi! I understand what you're going through, I find it very hard not to compare my son with other babies. My son was born 10 weeks premature. And has been going through physical therapy with Early Intervention since he was 4 months old and the program has helped a lot! My son is now 15 months and is still in the process of learning to walk. And the only thing he really says is "dadadada," no real words or other consonant sounds yet. But his physical therapist says that he's just concentrating on trying to crawl/walk, and hopefully once he masters that, he can concentrate on learning to talk. And when that happens they'll switch him to speech therapy. The Early Intervention program is great, and the staff and therapists that we've worked with are really nice and caring. My son is always excited and happy to work with his physical therapist. Hope that helps!

Tyra - posted on 10/04/2011

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mine littie gril do the same thing dont worry every child is difffer talk on there on time,

Audra - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son only had about 6 words at 18 months and 6 at 24months, though seemed to regress in his attempts to communicate verbally. He also had a new baby brother, who was born when he was 20 months old and started the terrible twos at around 18 months, neither of which helped the situation. His pediatrician also recommended Early Intervention and her general policy was to recommend testing all areas because sometimes they're interrelated. I was skeptical, but thought it couldn't hurt and then was surprised to find that both speech and social-emotional developmental therapies were recommended. But I followed through with the recommendations. He enjoyed the therapist coming to "play" with him once a week, plus I was able to watch and participate in the interactions. The sessions gave me great ideas for how to encourage his speech as well. In the long run, it really helped tame the fierce tantrums, which were resulting from an inability to release pent up frustrations. When he was 3, services in our area transitioned to public school, where he was in pre school and had an IEP. The IEP was removed before he started Kindergarten, and he's thrived every step of the way, once we got past that initial hump of working with him to encourage him to express his needs constructively (verbally & sign language). Anyway, I highly recommend the program -- if nothing else, the feedback can help you understand your child better and address those unique needs. Good luck!

Jayne - posted on 10/04/2011

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Both of my children (boys) did not speak a word til they were 3yrs and 3months old. They have both been diagnosed with Autism and yes early intervention is a good idea, Shay my youngest of the two, is now 4yrs 8mths and still only says around 30 words - no real sentences yet... So I should not worry until there is something to worry about, when he starts nursery he will soon pick up language and is he goes to early intervention they will help a lot. You cannot blame yourself though because this will not help him or you. 20 months is still very young to be worrying about this sweetie. Peace out sister

Renu - posted on 10/04/2011

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My sister went through something similar w her toddler at 18 mths and i suggested a speech therapist. It worked out great bc before he would yell to communicate but now he can verbalize what he wants and is doing great! There's no harm in trying but dont get discouraged, it will be fine :) good luck!

Katie - posted on 10/04/2011

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Both my son and daughter have gone through the Early Intervention program. They are great and they come to your house and work with them and the kids have a lot of fun while at the same time they are getting speech therapy. My son is autistic so he was delayed in all areas but is doing better every day and his younger sister was behind in speech but I think it was because her brother didn't talk much. Now they are both little chatter boxes!! It definitely wouldn't hurt to have earlyintervention come out and evaluate him and see what they have to say.

ShellyAnnette - posted on 10/04/2011

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Early intervention will be your best bet... even if it's not officially a "delay"... EI will be able to offer very helpful advice/therapy for your son. I would try to to see it as a leg up and an opportunity for him to excel.

My son was about his age and speaking very little. I was concerned but my ped said to wait it out a few more months... by 26/27 months, his vocab exploded and we haven't been able to quiet him since! 80)

I say go for Early Intervention. I mean, it's like a private tutor to help your son be even more spectacular... and who doesn't want that? 80) Good luck!

Stephanie - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hey Gillian ok all i am going to tell you is honestly if you as a mother suspect something is wrong call Early Intervention. My daughter was also almost 2 and barely said anything i only could understand her because i was always with her and knew what she wanted. I told her doctor many times and she always said no shes ok all babies are different but as a mother i knew something was not right. I decided to call Early Intervention and i did all the steps to get her evaluated and it turns out she did need therapy. She was getting home therapy for about a year and now since she turned 3 shes in E.I school. I would recommend you call

Jessica - posted on 10/04/2011

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For my son, a schedule is what has helped him. They made pictures for him to show him what we were going to do next and say what the picture was. There are other kids in his class that are like that too. They all have their own IEP (individualized education program). I personally think it is a good thing just to get them tested to see if they need extra help or if they are fine and just going to do things on their own.

Gabrielle - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian, I have a question--first, do you have any older children? If so, the older children may be speaking for your son instead of just letting your son talk for himself. The reason why I am asking is that my middle son wouldn't speak for quite some time either. Fortunately I was working for my parents at the time ( I live in a small town of about 2,500.) Anyway, you are just going to have to work with your son. My dad would take him to his workshop, where my son would grunt or point to tools that he wanted. My dad would not let him have the tool until he said what he wanted. Now, I won't say we haven't had other problems, but the only other "speech" related issue we had was when he was in Kindergarten, the teacher said that he was hard to understand, so they had him tested for speech problems, none of which he truly had. He reads well, talks well, has good grades, much like his older brother. My middle son is in 2nd grade now, and I haven't heard any issues since Kindergarten about his speech, so there is hope. Good luck!

Tanya - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian, my son didn't talk until he was just about 3 years old. I had him tested and was told that I was "anticipating his needs" so he didn't feel he had to talk. I was actually scolded because I did everything on schedule and my son didn't have to ask for lunch, naps, toys, etc. I ignored her but I did get my son a speech therapist who came to the house to work with him. The upshot of all that? He actually didn't need it; he simply didn't feel the need to say anything. Once his sister was born, he became very chatty with her, despite the fact that she wasn't talking yet. There were no real developmental problems, but he liked the attention of the speech therapist and the games they played. He is 17 now and I can't get him to shut up! LOL Be encouraged, it can't hurt and he'll probably have fun, too!

Meaghan - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son is a little over 2 years old (2 years this past May) He was barely saying anything, a few words that were all pretty garbled and only I could understand. My Niece was born at the same time, she could speak in sentences right at 2 years old. I was exactly where you are, I was scared that he was having trouble, and a thousand things went through my head.

But then one day? At like 26 months he just spoke, and so clearly, then it was a snowball effect and he kept saying more and more and more and repeating everything.

My son, has always been a watcher. Maybe your child is too? My son watches people do things, and doesn't try to do them until he thinks he fully understands them, then usually, he just stands up and does them! It's insane, your son might be the same, he's listening, he hears you, he probably understands most of what you say. When he starts talking you wont be able to stop him. Be patient Momma, he's going to be OK.

Jessica - posted on 10/04/2011

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Mine is 3 and hardly talked and could do like 3 word sentences and thats about it. I heard through my MOPS group about early intervention so I called and they came to my house and tested him. He qualified and worked with him until he was 3 (started when he was 2.5ish, worked all summer) When he turned 3 they couldnt see him at the house anymore, but just that short time helped A LOT! He is talking a lot more and can do sentences and says what he wants. He is actually going to pre-school right now to get more help with speech, but I would definetly recommend calling your local AEA and see if they can come evaluate your child! Good Luck

Sara - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son is about to be seven and he only says a few words. At six months he was diagnosed with a developmental delay and started early intervention services. These services are for children from birth to 3 that are at risk or diagnosed with any type of developmental delay (meaning delay in the developmental milestones). In this program, children are provided with tools (speech, physical and/or occupational therapy as well as others) to allow them to progress through each stage of their life. Any concerns you have should be addressed. I would also recommend going online or talking to people to help find an advocate. When the child turns three and is still found to have a developmental delay, he will be placed into the school system according to his needs. Educational testing will be conducted (psychological, speech, language, physical and occupational) to determine where your son is at developmentally and help to decide what the best placement is. There are laws that protect the rights of individuals with disabilities enrolled in school. An advocate is someone that understands the process well enough and provides support. If you are unsure of what is being said or how a decision is made (parents have the final say, nothing is done until a parent or caregiver signs the paperwork), an advocate can provide guidance to help move you through the process. Check out wrightslaw.com and it will give you information about the individuals with disabilities educational improvement act of 2004. That information is very important. It is a stressful experience but with help you can be successful in making sure your son receives every service he is entitled to. My son is 6 1/2 and he would not have gotten as far if I had not made sure he was receiving all the services he is entitled to. Any questions you can call me 904-312-9177 or email me at saramauk1024@yahoo.com.

Liz - posted on 10/04/2011

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My daughter was 16 months old and no where near walking or doing much else physical. She was having trouble weight bearing on her legs and her feet were rolling over and something was not quite right with them. We went to an orthopedist and she was also evaluated for EI. She qualified based on her physical delays and some underlying sensory processing issues. They have been coming for about a month. they give us great ideas for stuff to work on with her between visits and she is making gains :) there really is no down side to having your child evaluated. They are professionals who know more about child development than your pediatrician (gasp! doctors don't know everything?!) They will be able to tell you where he is developmentally and where he should be. Every child is different but it doesn't hurt them in any way to get them extra help.

Amy - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi Gillian!
My son was in Early Intervention until he was 3. It is nothing to be concerned about, I promise. It is actually great that he can get therapy this young. It is always better to start children in therapy when they are younger! The long-term effects are much better! My son received occupational and physical therapy through early intervention. He also couldn't speak many words at 2, but he didn't qualify for speech therapy. Hang in there! Believe me, this is a blessing!

Anna - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son was similar. But he hit 2 and speech came on much faster. We used a lot of sign language with him and that seemed to help - he liked being understood and so wanted to be able communicate with speech as well. I know loads of people who say 2 was a turning point. My friend didn't talk till he was five after having speech therapy and is now an accountant (hmm, I think that's a good thing!).

Dawn - posted on 10/04/2011

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I went through the same type of situtation with my daughter who is now fourteen. I would look into the early intervention program in your area. They usually will come and evualate your child and let you know where they might need a little help. My daughter started when she was 2 1/2. she did well with the program and doesn't stop taking now.. .

Celina - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son is now 26 months and he barely speaks also and he is my 3rd I do have enrolled in soeech therapy as they should be saying at least 2 words in a row by age 18 months

Ellen - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi Gillian! My youngest daughter was diagnosed with delayed speech when she was 3. Like you, I knew there was something wrong before age 2, but the Dr. blamed it on my older 2 kids "talking for her". I didn't buy it. As soon as she turned 3, the Dr. acknowledged a problem...that's when state could step in and help (free). Speech therapy helped her a lot. When she was 6 she still only had a vocabulary of about 25 words. She had her own language that only we could understand! Music and the words to the songs helped tremendously! She would learn to sing along. She was put in special needs classes in school. She is now 23 and doing very well! Graduated high school early and holds a full time job. Take all the help you can find. There are books on the subject (delayed speech) "Late Talking Children" by Thomas Sowell was very helpful. Ellen

Diane - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian,I am an Early Intervention Specialist I truly recommend EI. Contact your local. Regional Center and ask for a. developmental evaluation speak to your. case worker about your concerns and they. will help you with all the therapies your. baby needs. I promise you will see a huge. Difference in no time at all.

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