Early Intervention Question

Gillian - posted on 09/22/2011 ( 278 moms have responded )

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People always tell me not to compare my son with other babies or that all babies learn on their own but my son will be 20 months in about 2 weeks and he only says 2 words. The pediatrician recommended Early Intervention for him to help his communication social and verbal skills, at 19 months he could only say 2 words, duck and cat and even those are not full words. We can understand if he wants something but he has yet to verbalize anything and i wonder if this program could help. Has anyone had a similar problem or gone through with this program? i guess its not a question i just wonder if anyone else is like me and could shed some light or just give me some words of encouragement.

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Jennifer - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian - The Early Intervention Program is wonderful. I have twin girls who will be 10 next week and their entire lives I've heard you can't compare them. Well it's really hard when you have 2 children the same age in the same house. At 18 months, one twin was so far ahead of the other in terms of speech. We expressed our concerns to our pediatrician and she recommended the EIP. It was a godsend. The twin that was a little further behind, just needed a little kickstart and even though the therapist did exactly all the things we did, it was extremely beneficial. The twin with the issue recieved services up until the summer before she started kindegarten. Now I can't get her to stop talking. LOL. Follow through with it, they will get you the services you need. Good Luck!

Suzie - posted on 10/04/2011

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I know this is hard to hear. You are right you shoudld not compare your child to others, but there are milestones for a reason. The minimum number of words that a child should know by 18 months is 6 and that is counted by words they know outside of family names. I think the early intervention program is a wonderful idea. In our state we have something called Birth to Three and it is very helpful. Programs like this can help you determine if it is just a speech problem or something more involved like autism. I know this is a scary thing, but it is better to know and get help early.

Eva - posted on 10/04/2011

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I just read another post "Is it normal for 16 months old not talking" Why we expect so much of them so early beyond their capacity. What is wrong with this picture? If he is blah blabing...makes other noises and sounds...or knows two words there is nothing wrong. Anyway I thought reading that tread may help you as well.

Kathy - posted on 10/04/2011

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Gillian,
Contact your local ECI and see what they have to say. They evaluated my twins (now 10) and came to our home for speech, physical and occupational therapies. When the boys turned 3, they went into PPCD (Preschool Program for Children with Disabilities) at our local school district in Kennedale, TX. They were virtually non-verbal and their physical development was behind others.
Later, they were diagnosed by a neurologist with Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Dyplegia (I think this is another term for something's up, but we can't put our finger on it.) It was his opinion they did not have Autism (I called it the "A" word.) No one wants to hear that there is anything "wrong" with their babies, and all of this was quite overwhelming - still is sometimes.
My sons still receive speech, occupational, social and physical therapy at school. That, along with multiple activities at home and outside of school have made my guys thrive. They are both in Talented & Gifted programs at school, are blue belts in Karate, play baseball, and in general, are awesome guys. They amaze us every day. They still have speech and physical issues, but they more than make up for those with their intellect and desire to learn and please others.
I know they wouldn't be where they are today had we not called ECI to help their progression. Current diagnoses are CP, Asperger's Syndrome and Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PPDNOS) which to me is another one of those terms that means they can't put them in a specific category. One thing we do know, they are the best Tommy and Jimmy ever!
Bottom line is it certainly couldn't hurt your son to be evaluated and, if he has any developmental issues, it would most certainly help him - and your entire family - to get on it now!
Praying for your family,
Kathy Crisp
Tommy and Jimmy's Mama

Sarah - posted on 10/04/2011

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Prior to having my son I worked as an Early Intervention Specialist. The program can do wonders. If your pediatrician is suggesting your son be evaluated I would highly advise you do just that. It sounds like his delay is rather mild so he may not qualify unless his receptive language seems to be behind as well. There is no negative about getting the services for your child. He will be reevaluated every three years at a minimum. This is done because when issues are addressed young, children often completely overcome them. My own son had some small issues with fine motor, he did not use his left hand as a baby due to tightening of some muscles in the neck. He was out of occupational therapy in about 3 months and should never need to go again. The younger you address things the better!

Beth - posted on 10/04/2011

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I have two boys, 3.5 and 22months. My oldest son hardly said anything intelligible for a long time, but I could usually figure out what he wanted. My younger son has a lot to say! I think my older son is just slow to develop language skills. Even now we are working on pronouncing certain syllables correctly.

Aleathea - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hello Gillian,
I am a mom of 4 children, One with special needs (austistic) If you feel that there is an issue with your child you must push it to the limit. It was not until my son was 7 years old and a huge break down did we find out what was actually wrong with my son. You are his voice, if you feel that he should be farthur ahead then push the issue. Ask your doctor to see a speech thearapist, Call your local public school and ask for a early screening of your child. My son started school at 3 years old due to his delayed speach. Be his mom and his voice you are all he has to get him thru his silent world.

Tiffany - posted on 10/04/2011

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My youngest goes to this program although his is for his movement at first as we started at 6 months but they are also helping with his speech and fine motor skills. I love the program. My therapist comes to the house once every two weeks and works with him. When he was 6 months he couldn't even roll. He is now 13 months and we are very close to getting him walking. I would recommend the intervention program. It will help with your little guys speech.

Eva - posted on 10/04/2011

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I don't know any program and anyway live in Canada but I would like to tell you that I hear this from mothers very often. Most of my friends' kids did not start speaking yet at 2 ..your son is not even that yet. I am from european country where perhaps we are all slow learners (we do not lack any intelligence later in life though :) but nevertheless to us it is normal and there may be a problem when a kid doesn't verbalise at all only. To help your son to speak faster with some program may be a good idea though. However, why we are pushing our kids so much...shouldn't they grow in their own pace? Please do not get yourself going crazy over the 'speech millestones' . Sometimes I think they were developed to make mothers worry sick. Just kidding. :o)))

Diane - posted on 10/04/2011

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Hi Gillian,

the people who tell you not to compare your son with other people are right. Boys are often a little slower than girls at developing their language because they have other priorities! My daughter could talk much better than my son at the same age but he can do SO much more physically than she could it's amazing!

That said, trust your own instincts. You know your son. Does he ever go to nurseries or playgroups as these can be great places to foster language development as they see other children of a similar age doing it.

Another thing to consider is his hearing. Although it was checked at birth, this could be an issue (glue ear affects about 10% of children I understand) and if he has had a problem with ear infections, this could be an problem which can affect their language development.

Whatever you decide will be the best for him. Just trust your instincts,

Suz - posted on 10/04/2011

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My son is almost 22 months....he was saying some words and then quit and we had him entered in an Early Intervention program near us. They come to our home for an hour twice a month. We have noticed that during the therapy, he is doing GREAT with words...up to 16 words spoken during the last session but still isn't using many when not in therapy....however, just KNOWING that he can say them is helping me! And he is saying the words that he does have more consistently and more appropriately. Sometimes he was just saying words but now it seems like he means what he does say. We also started teaching him baby sign language which has been GREAT! Our therapist comes in and is using signing with him also and it is emphasizing that words and signs are really important and I think he is catching on to that! Good luck! You are not alone! I probably freaked more than you simply because I have three girls who all talked before they were one so this seems like FOREVER for my little man!

Shannon - posted on 10/04/2011

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My situation is the same as Erika's. My DD was speaking paragraphs at an early age but my frist son was right about where yours is. Don't worry, he'll get there. My county fortunately though does provide speech therapy even if it's only for expressive. Call your school district, it's probably free!

Carrie - posted on 10/04/2011

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Get early intervention. Why would you wait? If you wait to long EI is not available to you. either way your son can only benefit from the extra help and support...

Erika - posted on 10/04/2011

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I had my son evaluated around the same time because of the same issue. They evaluated him for expressive speech (what and how many words he says) and receptive speech (can he understand speech, can he do what they ask him to do or point to objects that they say). Receptively, he was fine. He was just delayed expressively. Because of this, he did not qualify for early intervention. They just told us to keep encouraging his speech. If he wants something and pulls us to get it or points at it, ask him, "Do you want the milk or the juice?" and make him say it. I would say definitely get him evaluated if you feel something's not right, but if you know that he can understand what you say or what you want, he's just slow to say the words. In this case, like I said, just keep encouraging the use of words. Take out all the picture books and practice saying words with him, etc. Boys are notoriously slow in the speech department. My son is now 5 and I can't shut him up! lol Good luck.

Julie - posted on 10/04/2011

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My first question to you is, is this your first child or does you son have an older sibling? A few of my girls didn't speak until around 2 1/2 because they had older siblings speaking for them or they figured out how to get what they wanted by pointing and grunting. It's hard to get the siblings to let the younger child speak or to get them to make the younger child say what they want or at least attempt to say it before just giving it to them. Most speech pathologists I have spoken with have told me there is no need to be concerned unless a child is 3 years old and not saying much. My son currently receives services through Early Intervention because when he was 2 months old he had strep pneumo meningitis and suffered a stroke causing permanent brain damage to the frontal lobe of his brain. He also was developmentally delayed from spending so much time in the hospital(62 days all together between 42 days in the NICU as a preemie and 20 days for the meningitis). The wonderful thing about Early Intervention is that it doesn't cost you anything for them to come out and do an evaluation of your child. They are trained therapists and will be able to tell you whether or not your son is in need of services. So it will either alleviate your fears and let you know everything is okay or if there is a problem your son will be able to get the help he needs. Generally they provide services based on your income. Usually the therapist will come to your house every 2 weeks and you will have a 45 minute session or they might have you go to a center. It probably depends on where you live and how it's done in that school district. The initial consultation will be more like 2 hours though because of all the questions they need to ask. They may require income verification or may just ask and take your word for it. If you have health insurance you also may have benefits for speech therapy. For instance our insurance lets us have 20 visits per year. Of course it's subject to our deductible first and then a $50.00 co-pay per visit after that until the out of pocket maximum is met. Then it's covered 100% until the end of the year. Anyway my son isn't old enough that they've done more than babbling with him. He's only 12 months and their focus has been on getting him to eat and his large motor skills; rolling, sitting, crawling, walking. When my 3-year old was 18 months our pediatrician was very concerned that she didn't say at least 10 words. She was pushing for us to have her evaluated by a speech pathologist. My 2nd daughter didn't speak until 2 1/2 and we knew that Emma had 5 older sisters that spoiled her and did everything for her so we were not concerned and didn't take her. We just worked really hard on pointing to things and saying the word and prompting her to say the word and try to say the word for things she wanted. By 2 1/2 she started talking and now that she's 3 she says a LOT and doesn't want to stop talking. So my opinion would be it's way too early to think there is a problem, but like I said the Early Intervention Evaluation is free so it's not like it would hurt to do it and might reassure you that your son is just fine. In the meantime show him lots of pictures of things and say the word and then ask him if he can say the word and maybe he'll start talking more. Also make him try to say the word for something he wants before you give it to him. A lot of times they can say words they just choose not to if they don't have to and you'll give them what they want. Good luck and know that everything will work out fine.

Sandra - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son is 18 months and only says a couple of different words also. He has periods where he says one set of words, then nothing at all, then a different set of words, and then nothing at all. He may be focusing on improving some motor skills and there fore will not say as many words. His brain focuses on one task at a time when they are little. As long as he is showing you new things that he can do all the time then I dont think you have anything to worry about. Boys especially develope their verbal skills a little later than girls do. Early intervention wont hurt though. Also, keep reading to him and have picture books. My son loves animals and when I make an animal noise to go with the word and picture.

Helen - posted on 10/03/2011

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my daughter now 34yrs only talked baby gibberish till she was 3 yrs old then suddenly the flood gates opened but if i was you i would take the the intervention route as well what harm can it do to be carefull

Tosca - posted on 10/03/2011

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I have a friend who's son did talk until 3. Then he had a verbal explosion and now he never stops talking. Its true kids learn at their own pace. Get it checked out but dont worry too much.

Meredith - posted on 10/03/2011

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When my son was two he was only sauing a handful of words and even they were unitelligable. By 2 1/2 we were worried. I went to Easter Seals Blake Foundation Early Intervention and it is the best thing we have ever done! 1st two wonderful ladies came and spoke with me and my son, tested his hearing and observed him. They found he had trouble with expressive words. So free of charge they came to our house each week and worked with him. It was fun and they did it with play. We also took him to the foundations play group where typical and 'special needs' kids both went. The foundation then got him into our local preschool for FREE. Long story short...my son is now 6, is in 1st grade and is doing above average work. His speech is SO much better but he still takes speech 2x a week. There is no stigma, his confidence is very high...All I can say is go and get him tested. It can't hurt. Your insurance or the state's insurance pays for the program. It may put your mind at ease! Good Luck!

Cheryl - posted on 10/03/2011

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If you had said 2 1/2 or 3 yrs old then yeah I might have suggested early learning tools, but 20 months is in that timeframe when children begin talking.. girls earlier a lot of the time, than boys.. older children sooner than younger, especially if the older ones do the talking for the younger..my son only said a couple words as well around that age then boom at 2 or so he just started talking in complete sentences, almost like a little adult!! LOL He was very physical, walked at 8 months and ran!! Don't fret be patient, gather toys or things he really gets excited about or food or drink or treats he really loves.. like "duck" and "cat"... our son just almost burst trying to say "truck" with his face all red.. one of his first words..and practice with books or flash cards and give him a little m n m or something small when he attempts a word.. make a big deal about any attempt at talking with praise and laughs and smiles.. God bless, good luck, don't stress!!

Robin - posted on 10/03/2011

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My daughter just turned 2 in August and was diagnosed with a speech delay in April. She has been working with a therapist once a week since May, and has made great improvements. She is still shy and does not always "talk" when you want her too, but she understands everything you say to her. She has said a few three word phrases and seems to be picking up new words about three a week. She is quiet for the most part, but has a great willingness to learn. As much as I would love for her to be a total chatty box right now I just have to love her and pray for her everyday. Don't let other "brag moms" out there make you feel bad. Surround yourself with friends who have young children about the same age. My daughter has been in dance class since she was 17mos old and that has helped her out tremendously. I don't know if that would be an option for you, but any sport or even a once a week daycare experience might help to get the ball rolling.

Ana - posted on 10/03/2011

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Hello, my daughter was the same way and I enroled her on early steps program which helpef her a lot. She spoke few wird when she started on the program and we had speech and behavior therapist coming to the house. I am so glad I founfound that service, my girl improved so much. If you need more info let me know,I'll be glad to help you. anapaulacordeiro@hotmail.com

Carina - posted on 10/03/2011

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I do not know if it is the same pogram as we got into here, because we are in Norway. But we were sent to a center for all types of autism to see if they could help us a little. It seems my son had a slight touch of autism, but we do not yet know what type of diagnosis he will get. The people at the center are great, and I am glad we went, casuse studies show that there is a big difference between children helped before and after the age og 4. Good luck, and hope u get all the help u need :)

Sherry - posted on 10/03/2011

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my son would not say 1 word at even 18 months. not mama or anything. he started talking about 24 months. he's 7 1/2 now and the most social of my 3 kids. he will not shut his mouth. lol. he's just really stubborn i've found. i think he just didnt want to talk and nobody was going to make him! haha

Liz - posted on 10/03/2011

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I must say I have worked with early intervention for many years now. If my child needs it I would not hesitate to have my own child get help! It really is a wonderful FREE service and we see GREAT results with most kids!!! Helping develop language on-time or earlier rather than later can help cut down on frustration and eventually cut back on some behavior issues (very common with kids who have ideas they can't communicate). Really, your tax dollars at work! Enjoy this wonderful service!

Tara - posted on 10/03/2011

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Hi

I had similar concerns with my son. My doctors told me to be patient. I had his completely rechecked - as they did some sensory speech check or something and that was all good. He moved from the toddlers group to pre-kindy at his daycare and has now been saying a lot more words.

Pragati - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son was about the same when he was 20mo. Now he is 31 mo and can communicate reasonably well in 3 languages. ( his dad, the housekeeper and I are all from different parts of India, and speak to him in our own language). I'm not sue what EI is, we dont have it here. But if your child is otherwise developing normally, I think you could just wait till he is 24- 26 mo+ to take any more steps.

Sandi - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son didn't talk much until he was 3. I don't know how many words he had, but it wasn't many. He was great at communicating what he wanted, but not with words. We slowly encouraged him to speak more, and realized his biggest problem was that he thought to fast! He is always thinking and some days his mouth just can't keep up! He's now 7 and talks almost constantly. I agree with many others that say go with ur gut.it's usually right.

Amy - posted on 10/03/2011

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One more word of encouragement. It maybe that your son just needs alittle guidance for this short time, so it wouldn't hurt to give him any advantage he can get. There fore the therapy would be great. Who know this could boost him right past the other babies and you could have a vocab genius at 4 years old :).
Don't worry to much, it seems huge now, and it is impotiant, but je will learn to talk lots of words, maybe it will just take a alittle longer. We all reach and some get there early, some on time and some just behind but ultimately we all get there. :) best of luck.
* I hoped posts are coming out ok. I am typing on my phone please excuse those typing errors.

Keisha - posted on 10/03/2011

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Hi, Gillian
My son was around the same age when we took him to another pediatrician for a second opinion. His first told us we should wait until he was 2 to see if he spoke, the new doctor wanted to take action asap. About time we got him an appointment, evaluated (diagnosed on spectrum) and into the Early Intervention Program, he was 2. They have been working with him now for 10 months. He turns 3 in December and we are transitioning to Pre-K. Even though he was 2 he was functioning at 15-17 months. Now he is 25-27 months with some higher scatters. Not all his words are clear but we and others can understand him. He points now and uses single word to request. we are working on 2-3 words sentences. he will say Milk, please or water please. he sings songs, he imitates sounds, noises and you. all this he could not do 10 months ago. So it does help. Its hard not to compare, but you know your child best. go with your gut feelings. Mine told me to get second opinion and get him help. I'm glad I did!

Amy - posted on 10/03/2011

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Mu son ( now 14) had very limited vocabulary at all early years. 3-4 yrs. My pediatrician was very proactive and we had state issued in home speech therapy. It helped tremedously as he got older and needed to communicate more. He did develop a health vocabulary and the intervention was well worth the time. I would recommend taking it under consideration. It can also supply a paper trail if other services should ever be needed down the road. We learned my son was dyslexic in second grade. So some of what we saw early on helped verify this. I am not saying in any way that is your child's case, but it was nice to have had the therapy early on so it was documented and it made some sense to us later as well as the diagnosing neurologist and school districts.

Jasmine - posted on 10/03/2011

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Yes, we just went through this evaluation. Many call it a Sensory Processing Disorder..it is so varied that kids can be placed in different categories. My 17m old qualifies for speech, occupational and developmental therapies, however they are more concerned with speech and OT work. I learned a ton while watching them "play": and observe my son. He had low tone in his mouth, couldn't move his tongue side to side, but only in and out, these things are important to build speech, so there are specific things for him that needs to be worked on and something simple as getting him to bite down on hard breadsticks or carrots. He already drinks through a straw which I knew is important for speech development. They want to see if he is a sensory seeker, ie when he sees a new object does he try to touch and learn or put it directly in his mouth when not teething. It does help. I read Out of Sync Child which I found helpful.

Somer - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son did the same thing! But, as soon as I verbalized it to his doctor, his vocabulary exploded and now he talks up a storm! Don't worry too much about it, just try your best to communicate with him and try to have him use words not motions to communicate with you :)

Dawn - posted on 10/03/2011

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Early intervention has been doing wonders for my son. He is 21 months and has been in it for about a month now. We saw tremendous growth in his development in just the first week. Although he is still not saying much, he tries so hard too. He is learning to communicate in other ways now too. What harm can come from it

Ildiko - posted on 10/03/2011

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My 4 1/2 year old was on the program, he started at 16 months. He didn't hit any of his milestones and I knew that something was not right. The program is great and depending on income usually free. If you feel that he is not progressing the way he should be you should have an evaluation done. Don't listen to anyone but yourself!! listen to your gut. My husband kept on fighting with me about having our son evaluated but because I had already had 2 other childern with my first husband and knew how and when they should develope I didn't listen and had it done anyway and it wound up being I was right!! my son was more than 35 % difficient in 3 area's and more than 25% difficient in 2 other area's. They approved us for Physical therapy, Occupational therapy, Developemental intervention and Speech/feeding therapy. My son finally started walking when he was 34 weeks or 4 months shy of 3 years old. Once he turned 3 the program ends with the state but your public school system it required to take over after you notify them and they do their evaluations, but they usually take all the info from early intervention along with their eval's. Don't for a minute second guess yourself, have an evaluation done, it doesn't hurt and if he needs any kind of treatment he will get it early on, which is better than later. Good luck and God bless. Ildij3@verizon.net if you want to chat.

Colleen - posted on 10/03/2011

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Definately pursue early intervention, but do it without worry! If he has a problem you can take comfort in knowing that you tended to it early, and if he doesn't he still will have learned some skills and benefited from the attention. That being said, here us a story of encouragement. My friend Paul, had a son who was THREE before he spoke! The child went for lots of tests, they found nothing wrong but everyone around Paul was worried for the child and worried that Paul didn't seem to worry enough. Paul can quote his son's first words verbatim to this day. Although I don't recall the sentence it contained adjectives and adverbs, was enunciated very clearly, and was a somewhat philosophical question about the science behind the sunset they were watching together! Everything Paul had shared with his son was under the assumption that the child was intelligent and receptive. Paul was right all those years. But he DID take the child to all the specialists and is not one drop sorry that he was careful to pursue all possibilities. Whether your child is a REALLY late bloomer like my friend's child, or has a yet to be diagnosed issue, he is your baby forever and you will love him. Take care of YOU. You must find a way to tend to him, without depleting your energy with worry. We already know you are a great mom just because you are reaching out for answers. Be a super mom by tending to yourself as well! Wishing you the very best, Colleen.

Anna - posted on 10/03/2011

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I've used our state's early intervention program and have been very pleased. The therapists come to our house, and Grace has made good progress in six months. Even the sliding fee scale is very reasonable (our health insurance is pretty good, but doesn't pay anything toward speech therapy).

Faye - posted on 10/03/2011

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my daughter is just like tours when she was at 19 months..i always talk to her and encourage her to say things..don't baby talk your son,so he can easily say words.

Heather - posted on 10/03/2011

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I do think it is beneficial, I went through something similar as you and I had a lady come to my house once a week, and interact with my child and teach me new ways to teach my child to speak and also to work on fine and gross motor skills. Talk with your doc, and geta referal to see a speech therapist, they are great and know ways to teach children to talk while having fun!

Kelley - posted on 10/03/2011

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I am an Intervention Specialist, and EI would definately be benificial to your child. The first step would be to make sure his hearing is okay. It is often over looked, but if a child cannot hear, he cannot talk. A typical child has 20+ words at 2, and should be starting to put words together. He should be able to identify family members, and some body parts (i.e.- eyes, nose, etc.). If he is able to communicate his needs (through gestures), and understand and follow directions that is great! However, he really should be using his words to communicate. Here is a link for 1-3yrs expected speech-language development. Hope this helps. Good luck! ...and remember, when it comes to intervention, THE EARLIER THE BETTER!

http://children.webmd.com/guide/speech-a...

Emily - posted on 10/03/2011

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Early intervention worked wonders!Our daughter refused to open her mouth for us. She would "talk" and we could hear the different tones and inflection in her voice but her mouth was pressed closed. She is stubborn, she knew what we wanted and refused to open her mouth. Tough love didn't work-forcing her to say what she wanted-too much crying on both parts! We had her evaluated and she qualified for services. She had speech therapy 2-3 times a week for 9 months, made wonderful progress and tested out. The therapist was an "outsider" so our daughter performed for her and did what was asked, there was no power struggle!. Now she is in kindergarten, is the social butterfly and we cannot get her to be quiet for 5 seconds. Don't get hung up on hitting allof the milestones, your child is an individual not a chapter in a text book, look at the big picture. Utilize EI, they are there to help!

KAREN - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son is 20 months and he has several issues going on including speech. He only has a few words. I would definitely call early intervention. I don't know where you live but here in New York it is a wonderful program. If there is something going on, it is better to get help with it now. They will probably evaluate him on several things and if he can get services, I say all the better! It can only help him as he gets older and gets ready for school!

Annette - posted on 10/03/2011

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Go with your gut feeling. If you think there may be a problem there is nothing wrong with being proven wrong my getting your son evaluated. I have a son who is 18 now and I worked in an accredited preschool when he was approaching 2. I saw how the other kids interracted and spoke and was concerned as well. I had his hearing tested, (he had several ear infections as a baby.) I was still concerned and sure enough at age 3 he had a language delay and got into a Title 1 preschool and he got speech and language therapy. He ended up with a language, (word retrieval problem), not as much articulation. He was always very quiet in school and all involved were VERY surprised when he turned out to have an over 130 IQ, (gifted range.) All were surprised because he wasn't performing at that level at all. So, throughout gradeschool and middle school he received special services so that his performance would match his intelligence. Good luck and persevere! I know I did! Only you know what is best for your child!

Carol - posted on 10/03/2011

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Early intervention is a great tool. The sooner communication improves the less frustration for your son. Sometimes we just need a boost. This may be the boost that will get the ball rolling and there is not stopping after that.

Susan - posted on 10/03/2011

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My son pediatrician suggested the same thing but first said i should get his hearing tested first because since he understand everything i tell him it might just be a slight hearing probelm to where its muffled to him so he can understand but not repeat it back. So ask his doctor to make a hearing test for him because it could be the for that reason. My son hasnt had his hearing test yet but its coming up. I hear good things about the early intervention program however one of my friends brothers had to go for speech and it helped him so much. He went from saying one or two words to full sentences in a matter of a few months.

Kerrye - posted on 10/03/2011

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another thing to look into are his ears..my son only spoke a few words up until he was nearly 3..we blamed it all on his older sister doing all the talking for him etc...but a Dr found he was one of those that the wax in his ears doesn't come out like most and that it just builds up..when the flushed his ears the wax was like a pencil...and after that we couldn't believe the difference and he could hear..

Amanda - posted on 10/03/2011

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My daughter was put inpatient for 72 hours of IV antibiotics for an absess tooth at age 19 months (she was on phenobarbitol as an infant, it destroys teeth) and the doctor in the pediatric ward suggested "this kid's got some delays, let's get her tested". She started speech, physical therapy and occupational therapy once per week by 22 months. My daughter was born blue and jaundiced, at age 4 an MRI was done which shows a brain injury at birth. Thanks to PT, OT, and speech and involvement in our school district's Early Childhood Special Education she just started kindergarden 3 weeks ago in a MAINSTREAM class. I have been told "the earlier the intervention the better chance to be all caught up by kindergarden".

Kelley - posted on 10/03/2011

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I have actually been going through a very similar situation with my daughter, who is now just over 2 1/2. Our ped recommended hanging in there until 3 as that was kind of the 'mark' as to when to get worried. My recommendation, as this is what seems to have been helping our daughter is - reading to her, practicing normal household words all of the time and we sing kids songs in the car. My daughter happens to LOVE Raffi, which is seeming to help, but we also have another kids CD in the car...her favorites are 'Wheels on the Bus', BINGO, Old McDonald and then Raffi's 'Brush your Teeth' and 'Aikendrum'. Good luck!! Definitely all kids do develop differently & at their own paces, but I know it's tough as all of the other kids at the sitters speak in full sentences and they're all about the same age as our daughter...but hang in there & just keep working with him!!!

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