FYI: Dropside Cribs Have Been Outlawed in the U.S.

[deleted account] ( 84 moms have responded )

Here's the article the AP put out today

After dozens of deaths, drop-side cribs outlawed

WASHINGTON – It's the end of the traditional crib that has cradled millions of babies for generations.

The government outlawed drop-side cribs on Wednesday after the deaths of more than 30 infants and toddlers in the past decade and millions of recalls.

It was a unanimous vote by the Consumer Product Safety Commission to ban the manufacture, sale and resale of the cribs, which have a side rail that moves up and down, allowing parents to more easily lift their child from the crib.

The new standard requiring cribs to have fixed sides would take effect in June. The move by CPSC would also prohibit hotels and childcare centers from using drop-sides, though those facilities would have two years to purchase new cribs.

CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum hailed the new standard for cribs as one of the strongest in the world.

"I believe these new standards will markedly reduce crib-related hazards and help to ensure that young children sleep more safely in their cribs," Tenenbaum said after the vote.

Around for decades, drop-side cribs have come under scrutiny in recent years because of malfunctioning hardware, sometimes cheaper plastics, or assembly problems that can lead to the drop-side rail partially detaching from the crib. When that happens, it can create a dangerous "V"-like gap between the mattress and side rail where a baby can get caught and suffocate or strangle.

In all, drop-side cribs have been blamed in the deaths of at least 32 infants and toddlers since 2000 and are suspected in another 14 infant fatalities. In the past five years, more than 9 million drop-side cribs have been recalled, including cribs from big-name companies such as Evenflo, Delta Enterprise Corp., and Pottery Barn Kids.

Michele Witte of Merrick, N.Y., lost her 10-month-old son, Tyler, in 1997 when the drop-side rail on his crib came loose, partially detached and then trapped his neck between the rail and the headboard.

[Related: Journalist's website helps women cope with tragedy of miscarriage]

"It's been a long 13 years," said Witte. "I feel like it's a celebratory time because things are finally being done about the issue."

Witte appeared at a news conference on Capitol Hill with Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., and Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., all of whom have pushed for stronger crib safety rules.

The new standard mandates tougher safety testing for cribs, tests that more closely mimic a child in a crib. As children get older, they can apply more force to the crib — shaking on it, running around in it, jumping up and down. The new tests aim to make sure the cribs can take that kind of pressure.

Better labeling on crib pieces will also be required — a measure that aims to cut down on the misassembly problems that some parents have encountered, problems that can lead to the death of a child.

Parents who lost their children in drop-side cribs say Wednesday's ban couldn't come soon enough.

Chad Johns, whose 9-month-old son, Liam, died in a drop-side crib in 2005, said he was a little relieved.

[Related: Mother still breastfeeds her six-year old son]

"Yes, it's a long time coming," said Johns from Roseville, Calif. "But the fact that it is happening — that's what is important."

Crib makers were already phasing out drop-side cribs over the last couple years, amid increasing problems with them. And last year, the organization that sets voluntary industry standards — ASTM International — approved a drop-side ban.

Many parents, however, still have drop-sides in their homes. They can also be found at secondhand stores.

[See also: Is Miley Cyrus' smoking a desperate cry for her parents attention?]

Parents who are using drop-side cribs are advised to check the hardware on the cribs to be certain it's working properly and to make sure their crib has not been recalled. The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association, which represents over 90 percent of the crib industry, says properly assembled drop-sides that haven't been recalled can be safely used.

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Sherri - posted on 12/17/2010

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I am pissy with the gov't Morgan and I don't believe for a second they are trying to lower death tolls. 37 deaths and injuries have been reported due to baby slings why aren't they outlawed?

Baby walkers have been responsible for the deaths of at least 34 children since 1973 and have led to more than 70,000 injuries requiring emergency-room treatment. These injury rates are higher than those associated with any other piece of baby equipment. Why aren't these outlawed?

Why not just demand they use the proper hardware vs. ban them all together. That makes entirely much more sense.

Just use a stool people say. Has anyone ever fallen or had a stool slip out from under them. Now imagining this happening with an infant in your arms. Who do we get to sue then, when are babies are dead or seriously injured from a fall. Simply because instead of fixing the problem they went and banned them without realizing the inconvenience and possible danger to shorter parents.

Medic - posted on 12/15/2010

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Its technically not outlawed unless they can come to my house and take my crib. If parents would pay attention to the condition of their things these things can be prevented. The government can kiss my rear because I am not giving mine up.

Kelina - posted on 12/18/2010

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I'm not short but i'm not tall either and trying to put either of my kids down without the dropside would have been a nightmare. i never would have slept. Yes, a stool might have been an option for other people but not for me. I'm clumsy enough on my own two feet. When my son was about 6 months old I tripped over my own two feet and started to go down hard. The only thing that saved me from serious injury and my son who was in my arms was the fact that the crib was saved from tipping completely by the toy box when I slammed into it. That was the most terrifying experience I'd ever had at the time. I find those scary experiences becoming more and more frequent now that my sons getting older :) Morgan I definitely understand where you're coming from, no childs death should be acceptable. But i think that the BAN is unreasonable. They could have easily remedied the problem by regulating the parts used on the cribs rather than banning them altogether. i see it kinda like cutting off a finger because of a hangnail. There was a better solution here, but they chose to jump to an extreme.

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Jodi - posted on 12/21/2010

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****MOD WARNING****



OK, ladies, feel free to debate the issue, but please keep the bickering out of the thread, or it will be locked.



Thank you

Jodi Adams

WtCoM Moderator



Edited to add: Yes, posts have been deleted.

Sherri - posted on 12/21/2010

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Christina I think she is saying it is a viable option for parents without a drop side crib and who have a fixed crib that can not reach their child.

Krista - posted on 12/21/2010

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The Ikea crib that I pointed out was about $150, Christina.

And the point, is that we can rail and get angry at what "they" have done, and talk about what "they" should do, and when it comes to things like this, all it tends to get us is a big fat nothing (or an ulcer.)

Sometimes, it's better to decide to solve our own problems. And one way to solve the problem is to take an existing item and then customize it for your own needs.

I understand why you're frustrated, I really do. But there comes a point where looking for solutions is a lot more productive than bemoaning the problem. I was simply offering a potential solution. If you don't like it, don't use it. As others on here have said, if you already HAVE a drop-side crib, nobody is making you give it up. I'm simply offering ideas to women who might decide to give theirs up, or who perhaps have not yet purchased a crib and are at a loss for ideas.

SHOULD short or disabled women have to get the legs cut off of their cribs? No, they shouldn't have to. But, there's a lot of shit in life that we shouldn't HAVE to do, but we have to do anyway. That's life, unfortunately.

And if you think my idea blows goats, then I'm eager to hear your own ideas or suggestions. Because all that I've seen thus far is you shooting down every single suggestion that I (or others) have come up with.

C. - posted on 12/21/2010

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I don't have a lot of time right now, Krista.. But I wanted to just reply to this one part real quick.

What's the point in spending $400+ on a crib and then chopping the legs off?? That doesn't make any sense..

Krista - posted on 12/21/2010

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Anyway, I refuse to believe that a crib will all-of-a-sudden break like that with ABSOLUTELY NO signs of wear beforehand.

Refuse all you like, but it DOES happen. That's the bugger about things like that -- they really CAN look fine, and then one day they're not. So even the most vigilant parent, who inspects the crib often, can be taken by surprise.

I do empathize with your frustration, though. And I agree that they should have stayed with the metal pieces and not gone to cheap plastic. I also agree with your bigger point that in some cases, they just find it easier to ban things rather than to spend the time and the money in making those things safer.

However, we unfortunately live in a disposable society, where our economy depends on things NOT lasting from generation to generation. If we wait for our economy to go back to one based on quality craftsmanship...well, we'll be waiting an awfully long time, I'm afraid.

I do rather like the idea of cutting the legs off of a regular crib -- I think that would make things measurably easier for moms like yourself, as most crib legs are at least 6 inches long, so that can make a really big difference having the entire crib be 6 inches shorter when you're reaching in to it. The Gulliver crib from Ikea, for example (from what i've read, Ikea cribs are shorter than most to begin with anyway), is 32 5/8", so if you chop the legs off, you'd lose about 5 inches, easily. That would bring the total height of the crib to about 27 inches, say, which is a lot more do-able than most cribs.

Morgan - posted on 12/21/2010

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Sherri where was I being nasty?

because I disagree with you makes me nasty?

like I already said you use your dropside and I'll use my stool no need for being rude, my daughter sleeps for 12 hours so I am very rarely tired when I get her up and at 11 months old 99% of the time she stands up anyways or is at least sitting andeven at 4"11 I have no problems reaching her. I dont agree with you, but I never called you "nasty" or "snarky" so again please tell me how I am nasty??????????????



Your the one who got an attitude when I said get a stool, I was refering to able bodied people, then you got "snarky" with your "why should we have to" just like a five year old would say.

[deleted account]

Christina I have to disagree with you on this one. I believe that plastic being used over and over again over time could develope a hair line crack. That very last time the side of the crib is pulled up it could be functioning properly and finally break while in use when you least expect.

C. - posted on 12/21/2010

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Just wanted to add.. The Innovative crib designs.. $399!!!! PLUS SHIPPING.

The Babee Tenda cribs.. HAVE A DROPSIDE!!! Go to the parts list and it will show you. One side has a gate, the other is a DROPSIDE!

And they don't even list a price, so I can only imagine how much THAT one costs..

C. - posted on 12/21/2010

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Quoting Heather: "Sherri did it occur to you that the crib may have been working just fine and came loose for that very first time because the crib was manufactured with garbage parts."



Yeah, I see it was addressed to Sherri.. And she may have responded to it already, I don't know (didn't finish reading the rest of the posts).



Anyway, I refuse to believe that a crib will all-of-a-sudden break like that with ABSOLUTELY NO signs of wear beforehand.



I bet bottom dollar that the majority of the deaths were either b/c parents didn't check their cribs periodically, KNOWING they were made with plastic parts now.. They checked and didn't think anything of it (IE, didn't fix anything that they saw was remotely out of place or worn), OR that they put it together poorly.



I honestly think they should have never strayed from metal parts to plastic, but they did. And instead of them CHANGING that, they banned the cribs!



Stools may be great for some, but first thing in the morning, if you're anything like me, you WILL fall regardless of whether there is a baby in your arms or not. Concussion, anyone??



Cribs with doors are great.. IF you don't have to insert your whole entire body to set a baby down b/c you only have full range of motion in ONE arm (like me). AND not to mention bumping heads on the top rails.. Ugh.. And the price. They are more expensive and some people just don't have that kind of money.



Seriously, if they would stop jumping the gun and actually FIX the problem, no one would have a problem with this. Instead, they ban them altogether, leaving people with disabilities in a lurch. Are they going to pay for us to have surgeries so we can function like 'normal people' and not have to worry about it anymore? Hardly. Are they going to pay for a special brand new crib for us should something happen to the cribs we do have, since anything is likely to wear over time..? Doubtful.



This whole thing is ludicrous. There are so many things they should have done FIRST, including going back to metal parts, instead of just upping and banning the dang things!

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2010

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wow i never even knew dropside cribs were such a safety issue i was annoyed that my sons didnt have one at first because my pop made it for him but now i am very glad!

Stifler's - posted on 12/20/2010

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A lot of things are banned in the US that aren't everywhere else and there are lots of things that are banned here that aren't banned in the US. It's really weird :S

Sara - posted on 12/20/2010

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I have a drop side bed that I bought my daughter last october. I have a disability so the drop side bed for me is much needed. I have not had a prob with it yet. Grant it at first I was skiddish about it cause it was recalled. But I called it in as I was suppose to and they sent me the safety parts. I have yet to put them in because I have NO problems with them. As to the stool idea for someone like me who has this disability I could not use one Id be to scared that I would harm my daughter. My parents also had bought a drop side crib at the same time and Im pregnant again and plan to use the other drop side. Everyone can feel the way that they do it really isnt going to matter what someone says you are going to do what you want. To all those parents who have lost a child my heart goes out to them. One issue happens with something and then its recalled its not just on beds its on everything. Our government half the time dont want to fix the prob they just find it easier to drop it. If they where to have listened when the first baby passed away and fixed it then maybe there would not had been 30 more. As like others have said getting in your car and driving is beyond dangerous but yet we continue to do it. They will never ban it. Look at some cars that have been recalled what did they do....they recalled them and fixed the problem why could they not do the same in this situation....? Idk maybe its not as important to them as the other. Either way its a life thats being taken and there will never be anything that can bring them back. I like the idea of having a crib that has doors that lock I think that would be Awesome. Im sure some how they would find something wrong with it down the line. As to the walkers, if they have been banned in the US thats new to me because I have walkers and I see them all the time in stores. If I have offended anyone im sorry.

[deleted account]

I called her super women. Two thumbs up for anyone able to take the steps she has, but not everyone can do this though.

Jessie - posted on 12/20/2010

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BTW I should clarify that if I felt my daughter was in any danger or that my crib wasn't right, I would get a new one tomorrow! Also, if I ever need to buy another crib the one's that I believe Krista posted are awesome!!!

Jessie - posted on 12/20/2010

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I have a dropside crib and am 4 11" and will not be buying a new crib. For one I don't need a stool in my daughters room to lug in and out, b/c let's face it that isn't safe in her room for her to climb all over quite yet. Two, it is VERY well put together and even if the dropside did drop there is NO way she could be trapped or hurt by it. For one I have to push my knee on the outside of the crib for it to release to drop, and the top and the bottom never come close to her mattress (it ends in the middle) so she can't get fingers and arms in there. She can put her legs and arms in the railings but even if it dropped it wouldn't harm her unless she knocked her head on it, which could happen without it dropping. She is 13 months and has not had a problem. While I can see that some types are prob. not the best for use not all dropside cribs are deathtraps. Over reaction but if people don't feel comfortable using them it is understandable. Everyone should do what makes them feel at ease for their child.

[deleted account]

Well Morgan you just must be super women.

Me on the other hand feel just fine with the crib I have and it drops down on both sides.

Isobel - posted on 12/20/2010

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meh, I didn't ever have to do it because I had a drop-side crib...but that was WAY back in the days when we put whiskey on their gums for teething (damn it...my grandmother is slipping out again)

Harmony - posted on 12/20/2010

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I'm wondering if they are only dangerous when the side is raised. I only ever used mine in the lowered position and moved my daughter to a mattress on the floor when she was bigger because with the side raised I couldn't get her in without waking her up. With a second on the way, I'm not sure what to do with our dropping side rail crib.

Morgan - posted on 12/20/2010

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I have no problems lifting my 23 pound daughter into her crib on a stool, but each there own right.

Katherine - posted on 12/20/2010

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They need to have cribs that lay flat. Just like a bed without a box spring. Hmmm maybe I'll patent the perfect crib.

Isobel - posted on 12/20/2010

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well...for those who say stand on a stool...I dare you to pick up something that weighs 20 pounds, then climb up on a stool and then bend WAY over.

hint: have somebody beside you to catch you.

but...those cribs that Krista posted made way more sense.

Katherine - posted on 12/20/2010

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@ Kelly, my friend did have a crib with a door! It was really cool.

Pauline - posted on 12/20/2010

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Storkcraft sent us a piece that slides into where you have to push to get it to drop so you can make it into a solid crib. I have no intention of doing so until she gets big enough to need it, and by then, she'll be upgrading to a big girl bed. I'm not sure if canada is banning these drop down cribs, but we'll still use ours as long as it's still in excellent condition.

Stephanie - posted on 12/19/2010

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My cot has 3 posiions to the base, the highest position until they can sit, then the middle position until the can stand. Iv never had a problem getting my daughter in and out, and once they can stand you dont even have to bend to get them out.

Kelly - posted on 12/19/2010

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They need to come up with something better and more safe.. why not make a crib with a door lol... that locks

Kelly - posted on 12/19/2010

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Im glad... my childs safety is more important then money ...my arms are not long anuff to get my daughter out of her crib.. and I got a dropside and I can tell that it is messed up .. Im getting ready to send mine back.. But I care to much about my daughter to let anything happen to her.. even if my crib was working good Id still get rid of it.. to lose a child is alful and I guess people wont understand untill they lose their's

Merry - posted on 12/19/2010

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A stool wouldn't work for me since I'm pregnant.
Lifting a 30lb sleeping boy into a crib with a stool while pregnant, not a good idea!
But if I wasn't pregnant, well even then, I find myself quite half asleep ini the middle of the night. I trip over nothing in my daze. I think a stool wouldn't work for me personally even if I wasn't pregnant.

Sherri - posted on 12/18/2010

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Actually Brittany walkers have never been banned in the U.S. I used them for all 3 of my kids. They did change the design to be safer but have never banned them.

Iysha - posted on 12/18/2010

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Oh, for people like me that are super short, my husband has an idea....MAKE THE CRIB SHORTER!!! he said when we get a new crib for the next baby (our first is almost ready for a toddler bed) he will saw off a few inches from the bottem =]

Iysha - posted on 12/18/2010

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I loved my dropside crib...I am only 5 feet tall and depended on that drop side to get my daughter in. We have gotten rid of it because we were moving and now that we have moved back, we have another drop side crib that is older and not as pretty and the drop side doesnt even drop...I have to swaddle my 1 1/2 year old and have her fall asleep in my arms and have to hold her by the back/neck and in the back of her knees to get her in there without just plopping her in.

I did see a crib that opens from the middle of the railing...the bars open up. i think with the next kid I'm going to invest in that...it is super expensive but should be worth it.

[deleted account]

My daughter's crib is a drop side we got it from Craig's list. It does have its flaws and because of that I don't use the drop (it takes a lot of work to get it to rest up properly); but it is also over 10 years old.

At least it isn't like the crib my inlaws have. It's not much bigger than a bassinet and just looking at it I could see my daughter climbing out.

I'm pregnant again and we plan on getting a new crib so that we can use it for more than one child.

As for the walker thing... they were outlawed in the US until about 2 years ago (so from about 2000-2008). I couldn't find them anywhere until the end of 2008. I love it.

Most deaths like these are because there was something the parent did wrong.

Julie - posted on 12/18/2010

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43 kids died over nine years where there are about 4 million births? Yes that is tragic...buuuuut seems to me that it kind of proves that cribs are more safe than unsafe...

Merry - posted on 12/18/2010

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Thanks krista, all I can say is wow.
I'm not one tiny bit scared of using a crib bumper. But the info is interesting to say the least!

Morgan - posted on 12/17/2010

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I will risk my childs life by using a stool and you can risk you childs life by putting them in a dropside crib, now were even.
case closed.

Krista - posted on 12/17/2010

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Baby walkers are outlawed in Canada, actually. Canada tends to be a little more gung-ho about banning children's items that have known safety issues, I find.

@Laura: here you go. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislati...

Basically, "In summary, aesthetic value, the risk of limb entrapment, and the risk of a child hitting their head against the side of their crib are overshadowed by the hazards of entanglement, entrapment, strangulation, and suffocation (potentially leading to death) that children are exposed to through the use of bumper pads."

Merry - posted on 12/17/2010

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Why are crib bumpers not safe? The boy I babysit for wakes up with red and purple dents in his skull from sleeping with his head pushed onto the bars. Once he woke up screaming and I found him stuck with his thigh wedged so tightly in between two rails and he was writhing around so much he could have strained, sprained, or broken his leg!

I can see how a teeny baby if placed right next to the bumper could be breathing back their carbon monoxide and die, but a teeny baby stays put so a bumper is unnecessary. but once they can roll over, and get themselves injured on the rails then I think bumpers are a must.

Renee - posted on 12/17/2010

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Things come and go with regards to safety with the government. When I was a baby you were supposed to lay your baby on their stomach so if they vomit they wouldn't gag on it and bumpers were used to keep babies from getting stuck or hurt by the crib slats. Now babies are to be on their backs to prevent SIDS and bumpers are dangerous. NUKS were bad for children to have at night now they say NUKS can prevent SIDS. Co-sleeping is dangerous but MANY people sleep with their infants in their beds. My children both have bumpers on their crib. They both slept on their backs, but my daughter almost choked to death on her spit up when she was a few weeks old. If I wasn't listening to her on the monitor and acted so quickly she would have been dead.
I have a "hand-made" crib. My father-in-law built it for our first child and now our 2nd child is sleeping in it. Everything has metal brackets where the store bought cribs have plastic brackets. Mine has 2 drop sides but I have NEVER used it. Granted I am 5'10" and can reach down to the lowest setting without an issue but I can see where a drop side would be nice for people with disabilities or that are too short. Step stools can become unsteady and you can fall-playing devil's advocate on another posting.
Car seat safety is another one of my pet peeves. So many people out there don't know how to properly use their car seat. I was a car seat safety instructor and also worked as an EMT and a child welfare social worker. I have seen car accidents where infants would have been uninjured IF the car seat was installed properly. The government can make all the safety regulations they want but if people don't follow them it doesn't matter. Manufacturers also want to make things cheaper and make people pay more for the same item. By cutting corners to make thing cheaper you are also making them unsafe. Like Heather said, they test 1 in a bunch. What if that 1 is the ONLY one that was safe in that bunch?? Or what about doing real life tests instead of controlled lab testing. Kids do things with their toys that you would never think of. My 2 year old just ripped a bolt out of our wall that was holding up a gate across the stairs. Who would have thought a 2 year old could do that?!? Not me!

[deleted account]

Susan they probably are checked before they are sold in the U.S. but they are not going to check every one unless they have to. Here's an example: They may only check 1 for every 100 or 1 for every 1,000. So if that 1 tests ok then that makes the whole lot ok. If there is a problem then they will check the whole lot. So their way of checking is not perfect by any means.

Morgan - posted on 12/17/2010

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I agree Joy, if you think its safe use it.
but dont get pissy with the goverment for trying to keep the death toll low.

[deleted account]

You know, if they did nothing, then a whole other group of women would be angry and upset because the government wasn't doing enough to keep our babies safe. So they did something about it and apparently the OTHER side is up in arms about it. Anyone ever stop and think that the government isn't trying to "be all up in your business"? Instead, maybe they're trying to keep as many babies alive as possible. I mean, I know it's "ONLY" 32 (possibly 46) deaths since 2000 but if they didn't do anything and that number rose, in 10 years we'd all be crying "WHY didn't they DOOOO something???" I'm tall so I never had a problem getting my son in and out of our drop side. Half the time I didn't even lower it unless my back was bothering me. No offense to the "vertically challenged" (lol that's a JOKE people) out there, but I'm sure if you're that short you already need a stool to get to higher places in your house (cabinets, etc) so what's the big deal to get another to get your baby in and out of your crib? I mean really, is it that big of a deal? And if you have a drop side crib and are conscious about its condition and feel safe and secure using it, then use it. It's really not that big a deal.

Merry - posted on 12/17/2010

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Well, since 230 babies in America die every year from circumcision, I think maybe they are over reacting about 4 deaths a year where parental fault isn't certain.
I have a drop side crib, it's about 12 years old. I'm not getting rid of it, I think it's quite safe.
Priorities are messed up, maybe we should outlaw oh let's say, cigarettes! Those kill thousands like weekly!

Laura - posted on 12/17/2010

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Heather, your point is quite valid! Part of this problem had to do with quality (or rather lack thereof) of parts. This may very well be the reason the ban went into effect: Manufacturers did NOT want to spend extra money to use higher quality parts. Instead they opted to do away with some of these mechanisms altogether--using "safety" as a reason--so that they could make the product cheaper. They still charge the same amount for the crib, I bet!

Morgan, life itself carries risk yet we move through it everyday without blinking. Statistically drop-side cribs were very low risk! Strapping your child into an automobile carries a very high risk, by comparison, of causing an infant death. Will you ban children from being placed in cars? According to the NHTSA 1,538 children under the age of 15 (430 under the age of 5) died in vehicle accidents in 2009. This is significantly higher that infants dying by a drop-side crib! Yet every day folks around the US strap their infants into a car and assume the risk of potential death from an accident involving that vehicle. Why? Because the benefits of using a car outway those risks. This same priciple applies to everything people choose to do or use. So to answer your question, Morgan, "yes" many more infants would need to die to change the "assumed risk factor" before I would see a need to ban them outright. Most people find the benefits of using these cribs far outway the assumed risks. Besides, more infants die from SIDS, drop-side or no drop-side...

[deleted account]

Susanne I think the safety standards are good in the U.S. The problem is the companies overseas manufacturing the cribs have no standards whatsoever. So now when the U.S. receives these goods from these companies we are under the assumption the product is all well and good and it is not. They get away with opting for inferior without anyones knowledge because they are not under a watchful eye as they would be if the product was manufactured in the U.S.

[deleted account]

Sherri did it occur to you that the crib may have been working just fine and came loose for that very first time because the crib was manufactured with garbage parts.

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