He doesn't know many words :(

[deleted account] ( 157 moms have responded )

Read at 18 months my son should know 10-50 words? Saw a social worker and she recommended speech therapy. I figured he was just taking his time... but now I'm worried about him developmentally. What should I do?

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Sarah - posted on 08/05/2011

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My daughter could say three words, until she was about two and a half, then spoke in sentences. She's now 16, and has no problems at all with her speech. In fact she never shuts up! Each little person will learn at their own speed and it's too early to start worrying about it.

Lauren - posted on 05/25/2009

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Quoting Lisa:

Word of advice! I waited and it turned out my son was autistic. Before you start worring, look for the common signs of autism. Does your baby look at you when you call his name or does he maintain his focus on what he's doing? Does your baby know when your happy and smiles when you are pleased with him? Does your baby have any sensory issues; afraid of loud noises,does not like water to touch his skin, may appear hyper, or seeks deep pressure input, etc? If you expereince these things, I would call early intervention. If you do not expereinces these things give it a few more months and practice saying words to him. Good luck.



I had the same experience with my son. At 18 months, he didn't know a single word, didn't point, wave or respond to his name. I brought up all these concerns at his 18 month well visit and the pediatrician just blew me off saying he's a boy. I knew in my gut that something was "off" and suspected Autism. I called early intervention and they got me in touch with a developmental pediatrician who quickly diagnosed him. by the time he was seen for his two year visit he had had about five months of therapy and we were already seeing major improvements. Every day is precious at this age and the longer you wait the harder it will be for any child to catch up - be it autism or simply a speech delay.

Kim - posted on 05/25/2009

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Hi Jessica! I read a lot of the replies you received and most offered some good advice. As a Speech Pathologist and a mother of a 2;10 year old daughter, as long as your son's hearing is normal, doesn't suffer from frequent ear infections, and understands you without any given gestures, then I wouldn't worry too much at this time. From my experience, boys do develop their speech later than girls. Read lots of books everyday and talk constantly to him. Name and describe everything around him to build up his receptive vocabulary. Encourage him to talk or to even make a sound. Don't overly push him, just try a few times then move on. Give tons of praise for any verbalization. If your son is still not talking much by 2 1/2 to 3 years, then definately seek an evaluation from a Speech Pathologist through Early Intervention (FREE), a clinic, or private (last choice - expensive). If there is more than a 3 months waiting list, then that's ridiculous and seek else where. Just to let you know, at age 4 a child should be understood in conversation by an unfamiliar adult (despite a few later developing speech sound errors - R, CH, J, TH) with 90 -100% accuracy. A kid who enters kindergarten with moderate to severe speech delays, will have some difficulty in school with reading and spelling and he/she will most likely be in speech therapy for a long time. I worked in Early Intervention with 3-5 year olds and now work in an elementary school. The earlier the therapy the better. When I worked in Early Intervention, the majority of my students were boys. I was able to dismiss most by age 5. Now working in the elementary setting, I see very slow progress at this stage. All, but one of my students are struggling with reading and spelling; and most will very likely still need speech therapy by the time they reach 3rd grade. I have a few that will be heading off to middle school and will still need speech therapy for a few more sounds in error. With regards to one of your responses: by age 3, if a child is said to have a speech disorder/delay, he or she will highly unlikely grow out of it without any speech therapy. These kids need a structured setting where they can be taught how to say the sounds properly and an opportunity to practice it over and over again. The key to successful therapy is practicing their speech homework at home everyday. The more practice they get the faster their speech will improve. Good luck! Hopefully your son will be chattering away and you won't have to go down the road of speech therapy.

[deleted account]

My son is 19 months old and only speaks a few words that we can actually understand. I was worried so I spoke with the pediatrician. He told me that when a book or article says that a child "should know X number of words by a certain age", first of all, it's a generalization that sometimes isn't accurate. Like someone before me said, every child is different. I read to my son every day, point out things and name them to him...basically, he gets a running commentary of my day...all day lol. The second thing my doctor said was that it's more important how many words a child UNDERSTANDS at this age, not so much how many he can speak. For example, when I change my son's diaper, I always wrap up the dirty one and say "Go throw it in the garbage please" and he does. He knows "Let's go brush our teeth" "Let's take a bath" "Wanna go bye bye?" "Are you hungry?" "Are you thirsty?" "Get the blue ball" etc. etc. etc. If I say any of those things (and more), he knows exactly what I'm talking about. I hope this eases your fears a little. I always joke with my husband that one day Jacob will just open up and say "Mommy, I'd like a cup of juice please." LOL

Kim - posted on 05/24/2009

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My son, who turned three in march, was diagnosed speech delay. He has been on the waiting list for speech therapy for 6+ months now, plus he has had hearing checks etc. I was so stressed over this as everyone made it out to be such a big deal, and i was putting so much pressure on myself and my son to try get his language up to the 'standards' i was told he should be at. After awhile i decided you know what? Im gonna stop stressing out so much coz really he will (and has been) doing it in his own time. I thinks its rediculous that the 'professionals' put every child in one catagory saying they should do this by this age and that by that age. EVERY CHILD IS DIFFERENT. At 18 months your child really doesnt need to talk that much and when the time comes that he needs to, he will. Maybe just get his hearing checked to make sure he can hear, and then i would just wait and let him enjoy being a baby, while he still can! Lol!

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Gianna - posted on 12/02/2013

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Help pls.
My son is 2.5. He is still saying single words. Says a lot of gibbrish. But he likes to repeat words and sentences in cartoons. He requests for stuff using single words. He also SOMETIMES follows simple commands. But repeat the same command another time and he will not respond.
He is hyperactive. He seems not to focus on anyone thing at a time
Help!!!!

Gianna - posted on 12/02/2013

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Hello
I have a son who so 2.5. He started learning words and also and speaks to me in single words. The problem is he hasnt been able to combine two words. He is also speaking a lot of gibbrish, though I understand some of them as statements from cartoons he watches. He is a able to request for things in single words, like "water", "pee sure"-(for pediasure), sleep, and so on. He is fairly hyperactive. What worries me the most is that he seems to choose things to respond to. Sometimes he responds at other times he will just not follow any command at all.
Is anyone out there with this problem? Pls help

Brittany - posted on 08/09/2011

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I talk to my son all the time and not even about kid stuff or just baby talk I'll talk about makeup i want or grocery stores things what i should make for dinner etc. Be around other children helps a lot! I also discuss his favorite shows with him. I wouldnt even worry about if i were you if he understands you and can communicate as best he can in age group level I wouldnt worry

Paulette - posted on 08/05/2011

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leave him be.Boys are a little more delayed.I did speech therapy for my son.He just wasn't ready to talk same as a little delayed writing as was my daughter readingNow my son can talk your ear off with a beautiful speaking voice and my daughter writes books.so their timetable may be slow.Generally they aren't ready.go figurethey both now excel where people thought they had problemsKeep an eye on it Boys often really start talking at 3 girls at 2

Beinda - posted on 08/05/2011

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hi,
my son 3 and half wonder where he sure be up to with his speech and how many words he sure be saying! wondering rather sure go for speech thearpy
cheers belinda

Lisa - posted on 08/04/2011

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Have a birth - 3 evaluation done. His pediatrician can give you a referral. They then can set you up with a therapist if needed and you may even get state aid for it depending on the delay and your household income. They will be able to tell if it is just speech or something more and be able to recommend the best course of action.

When my son was 21 months we had the eval and he excelled in everything except his speech was at a 12.5 month old's level - so very delayed. He has a therapist and has already started to say a few more words and experiment with his mouth more.

Just having the evaluation will help you because you can see where he is at and if it is just speech or more. If it is just speech it will, if nothing else, help him communicate better so you both will be less frustrated.

Connie - posted on 06/21/2011

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As a preschool teacher I see the struggles children face when their classmates are not able to understand what they are saying. I see the hurt in their eyes when another child gives up trying to understand them and starts talking to another friend. I believe in the importance of early intervention. I believe in it for the sake of the child who is struggling to communicate. The statistics on positive results from early intervention also support the importance of early intervention such as a speech/language therapist. If you are concerned about your child's lack of speech then seek help. The "worse" case would be he qualifies and gets to have a person come and play games with him, give him one on one attention and encourage his speech. That same person would also be someone who would give you positive suggestions on how to encourage more words and who understands what you are going through. Not such a bad thing. It is also very important to know that just because he isn't using as many words does not mean you have done anything wrong. As parents we can carry a world's weight worth of guilt on our shoulders.

Bruna - posted on 06/01/2009

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You might want to get his hearing checked out. Sometimes speech development is delayed because your child is having trouble hearing.

Bruna - posted on 06/01/2009

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You might want to get his hearing checked out. Sometimes speech development is delayed because your child is having trouble hearing.

Jessica - posted on 06/01/2009

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I would definitely be concerned. However, everyone child is different and learns at different paces...Just pay close attention to the things he likes; make up sentences about that block or truck in repetition and ask him questions and see if that works. Patience is key dear, however God is in control...

Maribel - posted on 05/31/2009

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He suppose to know receptively vocabulary words as food, body parts, clothes and things around the house. Expressively, he needs to start naming appr. 50 words for his age. I will recommend consult with the pediatrician to revise his development. Males sometimes develop language later. Many states have early intervention programs. Check around your city for those programs. Since 1997, Bill Clinton approved a law for early intervention as soon as the doctor corroborrates developmental delays. The team will be visit your house and if he qualifies the Speech Pathologist will provide language play therapy at home. Google in the internet a Language Developmental Scale will help you to see what to expect for each year in all the areas:language, motor, social and physical. Look for services soon if better than wait...on time everything has a solution. Good Luck!

Hally - posted on 05/31/2009

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I personally had my son in speech early on. He couldn't communicate with others and become very frustrated. Contact your school district, and they can assess him. We had home visits for a few years and then special preschool when he was older. Is he around other children? Does he have a need to talk?

Gina - posted on 05/31/2009

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My son just turned 3 this past Feb. I read all the things about milestones and development too. One thing I can say is that not all kids are the same. Some show what they know and others just observe. I'm not saying that you shouldn't be concerned because Mommy's instinct is the best and its better to be proactive then reactive.



My son has just started speech therapy. I don't know what state you are in, but sometimes the state or the school district (like mine) will provide the therapy for free!! My son's tongue was "tied" from birth and I had to make the decision against my peds advise to have it clipped because I could hear words forming wrong. I think I waited too long, but therapy isn't as scary as I thought it would be!



I say go for the therapy!

Laura - posted on 05/31/2009

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My daughter didn't start talking until 20 months. I mean no mama baba nothing. Now she will be 3 in july and she has a million things to say. Sings every nursery song you could think of and talks a mile a minute. So enjoy the time he is not talking bc once he starts he won't stop!

Laura - posted on 05/31/2009

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My daughter didn't start talking until 20 months. I mean no mama baba nothing. Now she will be 3 in july and she has a million things to say. Sings every nursery song you could think of and talks a mile a minute. So enjoy the time he is not talking bc once he starts he won't stop!

Jessica - posted on 05/31/2009

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i remember worring every day that my son was behind..... he is now 3 years old and speaking in full sentances.... dont worry

just keep working with him

how much is he around other kids

Jessica - posted on 05/31/2009

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i remember worring every day that my son was behind..... he is now 3 years old and speaking in full sentances.... dont worry

just keep working with him

how much is he around other kids

Amy - posted on 05/31/2009

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Talk to him.....tell him what you are doing throughout the day. Tell him that you are sorting the dark colors from the light colors and why you do that.......tell him that you stop at red lights and go on green.......tell him that you are watering the plants so that they will grow big and strong......tell him what you are doing and why. It will not only build up his vocabulary but will also help him to learn how things work. We did this with our daughter and she has always had a very impressive vocabulary, speaking full sentences at a very young age. I felt like a crazy person at times, but then I reminded myself why I was doing it and then I no longer cared:) I hope that helps. Good luck!

Krista Lee - posted on 05/31/2009

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My son only knew 3 words at 18 months and I was told the same thing. We just started really focusing on telling him what everything was. He is 23 months now and knows soooo much. He knows the difference between trucks, cars, vans, motor bikes, airplanes, city bus, school bus... you name it. The key is consistancy. I never spoke myself til I was 3 years of age, and my mother did send me to threrapy. But the reason for my slow development was that my sister did all my talking for me. So definately just tell him what everything is, and what you are doing, all the time. My son learned so much withing that first two weeks after we went to the clinic for his needles and found out he was behind in his words. He surpasses most 23 month olds now. I know it's cause we are thorough with teaching him anything and everything. It becomes habit after a while. Good luck!

Gayle - posted on 05/31/2009

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I think the key is to look for other signs of developmental delay other than just speach. My daughter could not say many words at 18m/ but she understood them fine. Then she just exploded with words.

Kerrie - posted on 05/31/2009

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I have a girl whos 19months and she doesnt say much at all but I was the same whn I was her age I believe they will speak when they are ready.

Nicki - posted on 05/31/2009

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Speech Terapy - what a load of rubbish, if he's not speaking a few words by the time he's 3 then perhaps start to think about it. My eldest daughter is now 8, and has a reading and writing age of 12, she didn't say 1 word until she was 18 months and then took until 2.5 to be saying a quantity of words etc. My niece is 2.5 and only says a few words and my sister didn't speak at all really until she was 3, now she doesn't shut up, has a very good degree and until she gave up work was in a very good job, so 18 months is no bearing at all. Don't worry - he's fine - boys are always slower at these stages anyway. It is very normal for an 18 month old to not be saying much at all. Hope that helps.

Joni - posted on 05/31/2009

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My son didnt speak that much either. He certainly had gross word recall at school, was in a special needs class till grade 7. TODAY HES IN THIRD YEAR CHEMICAL ENGINGEERING! AND is a DEANS STUDENT EVERY YEAR SO FAR (in South Africa that means he comes in the top 10 students every year at university)

So dont worry yet! ENJOY HIM, AND DO ALL THE DIFFERENT THINGS THE MOTHERS HAVE SHARED WITH YOU HERE - but dont worry that will affect him much more than anything else! xxxx

Jill - posted on 05/30/2009

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I would say not to worry, unless he is showing other signs as mentioned. However, regarding the issue of girls versus boys, when my son was 18 months he had over 80 words and our pediatrician said they should have 8 at 18 months. Then by the age of two many more words. So all children develop at their own pace, but I agree reading is essential as well as repetition and look him in the eye when talking.



Singing to him is a great idea too! I used to sing the alphabet song over and over again, for example.

Diamond - posted on 05/30/2009

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Don't sweat it! My son didn't start talking until he was 2, he is 7 and is never quite! Children all develop differently and your little one is no exception to that rule!

Jaclyn - posted on 05/30/2009

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i put both of my children though speech therapy not because of of a development challenge but because i knew it would help them in Kindergarten. And this year my daughter graduated 1st in her class in Kindergarten reading on a 1st grade level.

Cheryl - posted on 05/30/2009

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no --dont worry- no child can rush into words-it doesnt mean anything is wrong- my son is two-and he is just starting to speak alot of words now(i still dont understand them) . wonders take time.you'll see.And a nother thing--they say boys are' less willing' when they are young than girls ,my daughter was @ 12 months when she started talking-words..-they are all just different--AND speech therapy is a good thing_if he is autistc.but .you are his mom-.you can teach while you play-SEE ALL THE DAMN TOYS OUT THERE... :) another thing--DO NOT EVER let your social worker tell you what you can n cant do-or should or shouldnt do...believe me!! :) good day!

Cheryl - posted on 05/30/2009

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no --dont worry- no child can rush into words-it doesnt mean anything is wrong- my son is two-and he is just starting to speak alot of words now(i still dont understand them) . wonders take time.you'll see.And a nother thing--they say boys are' less willing' when they are young than girls ,my daughter was @ 12 months when she started talking-words..-they are all just different--AND speech therapy is a good thing_if he is autistc.but .you are his mom-.you can teach while you play-SEE ALL THE DAMN TOYS OUT THERE... :) another thing--DO NOT EVER let your social worker tell you what you can n cant do-or should or shouldnt do...believe me!! :) good day!

Cheryl - posted on 05/30/2009

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no --dont worry- no child can rush into words-it doesnt mean anything is wrong- my son is two-and he is just starting to speak alot of words now(i still dont understand them) . wonders take time.you'll see.And a nother thing--they say boys are' less willing' when they are young than girls ,my daughter was @ 12 months when she started talking-words..-they are all just different--AND speech therapy is a good thing_if he is autistc.but .you are his mom-.you can teach while you play-SEE ALL THE DAMN TOYS OUT THERE... :) another thing--DO NOT EVER let your social worker tell you what you can n cant do-or should or shouldnt do...believe me!! :) good day!

Judy - posted on 05/30/2009

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dont worry yet! i had a nephew that at age 3 and 4 could not speak very well at all. i thought he had a problem but turns out he had nothing wrong with him. his speech that i thought was sometimes hard to understand, he knew it all. he is now a rocket scientist at nassau

Holly - posted on 05/29/2009

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Honey ,i know its hard my so is the same way !!! every one said its ok he will talk in time when he is ready ,well when we went to the dr for check up ,he noticed that his ears were full of fluid pluged up ,he sent us to a ears nose and thoght dr he said oh yes you need tubes .we did it now he is taklking like crazy ,mama ,dada ,bark ,thanku ,(i guess it sound like under water muffled )have the dr look in his ears ,u might want to go to a ears nose dr ,they also say look rite at him in the face when you are talking to him ..i havea book called Help me talk pi communication materials ..Dont think that this is ur falt or your husbands cause its not ,my son is also in speach therapey and i love it ,they have helped me so much mine is calle dearily on and project skip ..you can proubly call you rlocal elementry to see if they have an earily on tell them whats going on they should beable to help deer ,some medical insurences will cover speach therapee ..Good luck

Maddy - posted on 05/29/2009

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talk to him constantly! ie- "now we;'re walking down the streeet, oh so you see that bird? what noises to birds make? look, a blue fence" and so on... he'll soon pick up words and repetition helps.

Margaret - posted on 05/29/2009

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My son was not saying a lot of words at all around that age. He was pointing to a lot of things and saying "eh eh". We put him in Early Prevention Program through Erie County and he received speech therapy. It helped him. He is now three in a half and he is going to preschool through the school distict and he recives speech and occupational therapy. his speech has come along a lot. He still isnt up to his age level but he has shown a real improvement. I highly reccomend getting speech therapy, it is never to early to start or to late! If you have any questions, let me know. I wil be happy to chat.

Kerry - posted on 05/29/2009

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My health visitor suggested the same thing, it turns out my child has mild autism. I dont mean to scare you, it could just be he needs regular speech and language therapy, but i think it best he see one just to give him a head start if therapy is the only thing needed.

LaToya - posted on 05/29/2009

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Quoting Debbie:

This is not going to be a very popular answer, so I'll apologize in advance if I offend you. I think too much emphasis is put on too many "should be's" by doctors these days. Every child is totally different! If you are really concerned, learn sign language. Teach your child to sign. Maybe he is just a little shy. It has been shown that children can communicate long before they develop speech if they are given the right tools. Maybe he's just not ready to talk. Be careful not to baby him too much because that can give him justification to be lazy. If you know he knows how to say drink, then make him say drink. Don't give in just because he points and cries or throws a humungous fit if you don't give him his cup until he says the word. It's okay that he knows you are mom and what you say goes. Throwing a fit and crying or screaming is another form of rebellion. If your child does that at a very early age I would recommend you stop it at a very early age before it really gets out of hand. That may mean changing your lifestyle for a while until everything is under control. However, talk around your child, to your child, applaud his efforts, put on music and sing songs - silly songs, kids songs. Don't worry unless your child is about to enter school and still not talking. No one, no doctor, teacher, therapist, social worker, friend, neighbor or even facebook friend knows your child as well as you do. Follow your instincts, it really is okay.



Hi, Debbie! I was just reading your answer and I must say, I absolutely loved it. U got straight to the point and just simply kept it real. Love it!!!!!!!





 

Linda - posted on 05/29/2009

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As a speech language therapist that works exclusively with children age 3 and under, I highly recommend that you contact your local school district and ask for the Early Intervention or Early Childhood Special Education office. There are Birth-3 teachers (developmental specialists) and speech-language pathologists, and occupational therapists, physical therapists and audiologists that make up the Birth-3 service "team". This is a federal mandate to provide special services to qualifying children under the law. No cost to you -- all part of your public school provisions.

The team will come out to visit and can make a determination if further evaluation is necessary - at the very least they can provide helpful tips and follow up in a few months to make sure things are staying on track.

Do not just 'wait' for your son to get older. You have concerns- or concerns were brought to your attention- waiting only makes you lose sleep thinking about it - and the professionals are out there to help! Let them tell you things are on track - and to wait. Unfortunately, not all physicians are as aware of early intervention as they ought to be...so they may suggest private therapy which is costly and if you have limited insurance, all out of pocket. They may fail to tell you about the same services offered through your local school district. Free of charge (just like kindergarten does not cost you)

Now, if there are 'mild' concerns, your son may not meet the State's qualification standards, and then you may choose to go to a private therapist- or you may choose to do both- to supplement/compliment services. Lots of choices -- waiting may not be the best. Delays caught early really do respond well to early intervention...the earlier you can teach and train the brain, the better!

Now, it may be that all is within normal limits and your son is just a later talker -- but having a professional speech-language therapist track the progress over time is better than just waiting and hoping. There is no harm in going through an assessment and finding out that your child is well within normal limits. It is peace of mind. And if there are delays found- then early help makes the most changes!

Best to you!

Kelly - posted on 05/29/2009

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Hi, my daughter is younger than your son (13 months) but I was worried about her speech too, as she only knew a couple of words. When I saw my health visitor she told me that because they have so much to learn at this age, they tend to concentrate on just one or two things at a time, ie. walking OR talking. She suggested I take her to a few playgroups so she could interact with children around her age, and it should come naturally. She also said that talking to her as much as possible might help, even if its just talking her through doing the dishes or housework. It seems to have worked as she has learnt more words in the past month than for the previous few months put together! She even hums now in the same off-key voice as me! Maybe try this? By all means, if your social worker thinks he needs speech therapy, go for it, but as long as he is developing 'normally' in other areas, and babbles in his own 'language', I wouldn't worry too much. All babies develop in their own time - although I know its hard not to compare them to others the same age!!! As I said, she is younger than your son, but there shouldn't be any harm in trying the above? All the best anyway. xx

Jessica - posted on 05/29/2009

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hey i have an 18 month old and she is the same way but she is starting to pick up on more!! she recently started day care and i think being around other kids her age is what helps the most!!!

Ashley - posted on 05/29/2009

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My son was an only child for the first 2 and a half years of his life and his father stays at home with him. Because Junior doesnt get interactions with other kids his age, he's a little slow too, in the language development (he's fine in everything else). Since he has turned about three, he all of a sudden says whole sentences. He has learned very quickly in the areas he was lacking. I would say not to worry as long as he is doing the things he needs to be doing to by kindergarten. Just talk to him like he's a person ( my husband did a lot of baby talk to Junior at first) and when he starts saying words, repeat them, so he knows he is on the right track.

Ashley - posted on 05/29/2009

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My son was an only child for the first 2 and a half years of his life and his father stays at home with him. Because Junior doesnt get interactions with other kids his age, he's a little slow too, in the language development (he's fine in everything else). Since he has turned about three, he all of a sudden says whole sentences. He has learned very quickly in the areas he was lacking. I would say not to worry as long as he is doing the things he needs to be doing to by kindergarten. Just talk to him like he's a person ( my husband did a lot of baby talk to Junior at first) and when he starts saying words, repeat them, so he knows he is on the right track.

Kelly - posted on 05/29/2009

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I am having the same problem with my 2yr old. My older children were talking all the time by age 2 and she is not. We are starting with a hearing test at the local children's hospital. Then we are having a speech evaluation after that. I would get his hearing checked first then go from there. Good Luck!

Tami - posted on 05/29/2009

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let me ask you this..is he pointing? is he waving? does he have nonverbal gestures to get your attention? does he put his arms up to be lifted up, does he pull at you to get your attention? does he seem engaged with you? pointing and waving are extremely vital by 18mths from what i read. as for words, give or take. each child is different. receptive skills usually come in first, meaning your child can understand some of what you say but is not as expressive. i have 1 child with autism (on the spectrum - high functioning only b/c i feel jumped on it in time) and 1 nerotypical (normal developing) child. with the normal development, pointing and waving came in at around 12 mths. he does say some words and makes lots of attempts at others. the big clue with my other son being autistic was that he never pointed or waved or anything until therapy. he had to be taught to do what comes naturally in a normal developing child. he never mimic'ed which is a normal developmental milestone. toddlers are big mimic'ers. if you are not seeing the pointing or waving, i would at least talk to a developmental pediatrian to get an evaluation.

DESIREE - posted on 05/29/2009

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MY SON JUST SAID MOMMY AT THREE.....THE DOCTORS EVEN TOLD ME THERE WAS A POSSIBILITY HE WAS MUTE! HE WILL TALK WHEN HE IS READY...IF HE TURNS 3 AND STILL DON'T TALK THEN WORRY....MY SON WON'T SHUT UP AND IS SMARTER THAN A WHIP. IT IS ALMOST LIKE ALL ALONG HE WAS JUST STORING INFORMATION AND PLAYING DUMB BECAUSE I MADE IT EASY FOR HIM AND HE DIDN'T HAVE TO TALK! SHORTLY AFTER HE TURNED THREE WE MOVED INTO A MUCH BIGGER HOUSE AND I THINK HE FOUND THAT HE HAD NO CHOICE BUT TO START COMMUNICATING CAUSE HE GOT TIRED OF WALKING BACK AND FORTH TO "SHOW ME" EVERYTHIME HE WANTED SOMETHING!

Karen - posted on 05/29/2009

7

10

2

dont worry about it is the first thing... when he wants to he will talk, my daughter was the same now i cant shut her up, you also need to burn the books you are reading, i have 3 children and they all did stuff at different times, the one who wouldnt talk is now on a gifted child register and she is 7.good luck

Tonya - posted on 05/28/2009

2

9

0

A lot of moms can identify with where you are. The thing to keep in mind is that early intervention is key. The more assistance a child receives prior to age three (for any delay), helps propel them forward so that, hopefully, when they are school age you can't tell there was ever a delay. At 18 months our kids know way more than we give them credit for. So as moms, it's our goal to do all we can to help them be all they can be and communicate as much as possible during each stage of development. I've done a lot of reading on this issue since one of my twin 2 year old boys is currently in speech therapy. There have been a couple really good pieces of advice I've heard/read and one I'll pass on... As you child grunts for something (cup of milk), say (and sign if you can) the word, "milk." Repeat it until the child says or signs the word. Once the child says/signs the word, give them what he's asking for. And, keep in mind, it's not going to harm your son to start speech that young. It can only propel him forward. However, you are your sons advocate and you know him best. Definitely seek help if he isn't talking by age two (at that point he should be starting to put two words together.. "throw ball") Good luck!

Amanda - posted on 05/28/2009

4

19

0

Wow, you have gotten a lot of replies on this so I will try to be as short as I can. I agree with a lot of the other posters. I just wanted to say I have two boys who have struggled with their milestones. A lot of their issues ended up being from having low muscle down which delayed their development over all. My advice to you is strictly this. In my experience ECI or PIP or whatever social worker based program that the state provides you is at no or minimal cost to you. Ours doesn't even bill us if our insurance doesn't pick up the tab. I have a lady that comes once a week and her suggestions come in handy. He might of progressed just fine without her but maybe not. She will say to us, great he is doing this and this so I would encourage this or try this toy or take him outside and say this. Encourage him to say eat eventhough he would perfer to grab for the food. My youngest understands everything I say to him, everything he sees and follows every command I give my older child. I know he knows exactly what is happening but yet he doesn't always express himself. The state has been very helpful for me with both of my children and they have a great wealth of resources that you may find incredibly useful and if you aren't satisfied then you can sign him out, no questions asked. Also he will have to qualify so you don't have to worry about someone just trying to push you into a program your child doesn't need.

Sorry I wasn't brief even though I intended to be.



Best wishes to you

Jennifer - posted on 05/28/2009

5

9

0

My second child was a late talker. She watched and absorbed everything, then around 2 yrs old she just started talking in sentences. Now she's a quick learner and a self teacher. She was reading chapter books in kindergarten. My oldest started talking early and he struggles with everything in school. I would be more concerned about how much he seems to be interested in his environment and what people are saying and less about what he is verbalizing. Einstein didn't speak till he was 4.

Aimee - posted on 05/28/2009

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2

2

I worked in early intervention for 5 1/2 years. If it were my son I would call my local birth to three/early intervention program and see if he qualifies for services. They will do a developmental evaluation and see if he is really that far behind his peers. Research shows that getting extra stimulation early is the key. On the other hand don't worry too much they all eventually catch up unless there is something medically that is inhibiting his speech. A few people said talk to the pediatrician which is a good idea only if he/she is from the prevention philosophy. Most pedi's are from the wait and see camp...which as an early intervention professional I do not recommend. Best of luck I'm sure everything will work out fine!

Stacy - posted on 05/28/2009

10

37

0

I wouldn't worry about it to much. I have twins that are behind in their speech as well. You can call 1-800-earlyon and set up an appoitment with your local school district and they will come out and test him. If they think he is behind they will help you on ways to get him to talk and what not. It's all done at your home were he will be more comfortable. When they came and did my twins they were all very nice and helped out a lot! But in the long run I'm sure everything is fine with him, just as it was with our twins, just a little behind because every child is different.

Stephanie - posted on 05/28/2009

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Hi jessica my name is stephanie. I have an eight year old who literally did not start talking until almost five. At four and half he went to school to register for kindergarten they found issues and referred me to a rehabilation center. depending on where your from call a place that deals with mentally handicapped people not saying your son is mentally handicapped they would know where to go from there. My son went to a preschool type thing and it helped him. he also gets speech therapy five times a week at school. it never hurts to have tests done on him for speech and auditory memory. any questions email at cheerbear167@yahoo.com

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