how do you get teachers to look past labels to see a childs true ability

Coreen - posted on 10/13/2009 ( 43 moms have responded )

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disability means you just have to push the limits not confine the human inside to a world of cant do

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[deleted account]

From a teachers point of view.... I have had children with ADHD, spina bifida, and this year a student with diabetes and one with epilepsy. The two with ADHD were just fine. I kept them in the front of the class and made an effort to ask them how they were doing all the time. I would always have to go and check their work since sometimes they would say they were fine but didn't understand the directions. Students who finished quickly usually helped too. I make sure my students always understand that we are a family and need to help each other. I was given letters by the parents on the first day explaining the child's situation and advice. I kept in touch with the parents through notes and email. I'm grateful they went through the trouble since this year the mothers just came and ran down an oral list of what to do and not to do. It wasn't even a sit down meeting just a couple of minutes and the parent was gone. I worried so much that it was hard to concentrate. We are teachers......not doctors and nurses. I went to the school nurse and told her about my students. She came to my class and talked to them individually. She then prepared information for me which I have on my notice board. I still worry especially when they have PE. The school has set up meetings with the parents so that we can all sit down and I can ask questions and hopefully set up a system where I can be in touch with them easily during school hours. It is extra work but worth it. We really do need the parents/caregivers, school staff, teachers and anyone else involved.

As for your child being labelled... if your child does not have a special situation then I would go in and talk to the teacher. Dispel any rumours or misunderstandings. If you don't feel the meeting was productive or have future problems then go above the teachers head. Do not wait or keep trying to get the teacher to cooperate. Sometimes kids just have a hard time adjusting or are very shy. If your child does need special attention in any way then you need to meet with the teachers, not just the home room teacher but all that are involved with your child. If possible bring medical reports, reports from previous teachers or caregivers. If the teacher isn't taking notes I would be worried. We can't remember everything. Providing those involved with the care of your child with an emergency check list would be great. Show the teacher that you are there to cooperate and help in any way. That little bit of reassurance is greatly appreciated! Unfortunately there are teachers who are quick to judge and label students. To them this gives a reason for why a student isn't doing as well as others or gives them an excuse not to give extra effort. When things don't go well they use the label as an excuse instead of trying harder or taking the time to find a solution. You must stay involved and don't let a teacher intimidate you. It is your child and your child has the right to a unbiased education.

Denise - posted on 10/16/2009

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After raising an ADD boy to college and with an ADD girl in High School, I have found that most teachers are willing to work with you. My daughter is Honor Roll, and a lot of teachers try to argue that she's not ADD. I have educated myself and provided pamphlets and educated teachers. I have suggested teaching methods and looked for different ways to help them learn. Don't think of yourself as fighting the teacher and school system, think of yourselves as teammates.

Nancy - posted on 10/14/2009

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It may be helpful to bring some written info to the teacher. Parents have the right to advocate on behalf of their children. Also, any child with a known and documented disability should be working with an IEP. Everyone attends the meeting to create this document. This is a good time to discuss your child's particular issues and to give suggestions for how best to deal with your child.

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Vickie - posted on 07/27/2011

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Sad to say, there are very few teachers out there who really care about the children. All they care about is how much money they can get from government grants & other programs. If your child ever does get a good teacher, make sure that teacher gets the recognition he or she deserves.

Tracy - posted on 07/27/2011

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I teach students with disabilties and I don't read their entire file until a few weeks into the year. That allows me time to get to know them a bit. If you don't feel the teacher is supporting your child, contact your principal or request a 504 as a safety net for your child in school.

[deleted account]

My son is 7 years old and has ADHD and a moderate learning disability so I feel your pain.. I have an open email with his teacher, special ed teacher,speech, gym etc.. I e mail them daily about his day and I have them each send me something about his day, be it be homework, behaviors etc., I (lol) have been labeled the pro active parent!! In this day and age we have to be!! so many kids in one class and with only one teacher some REALLY get missed..his student/teacher ratio is 32/1. I also have an IEP in place so that if they slip I am on it!! Focus on what he can do..with the new law that states "no child left behind act" has really saved our children.."A child is the seed of our future, feed it and it will bloom forever." a quote from my dear grandma!

Cindy - posted on 10/21/2009

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this is so true that you need to be loud for your childs wellbeing. its tough road to hoe but it can be done. my 11 year old is AD'H'D and he gets labeld at times. his 1st grade was pretty much eliminated from his life due to teacher trying to dictate until the dr spoke out to me so I realized what they were trying to do.....avoid dealing with him and wanting him medicated so they didn't have to bother with him. He's now in 6th grade with and IEP team (individual essessment program) and I am involved consistently with him and the teachers/principles. The hardest thing from 2nd - 6th grade is when a substitute for any part of the school day or student teacher comes into the program and they have never worked with Drew. CONSISTENCY is another key note.....as the student gets older (jr high and high school) they need to try and remain with the same teacher(s) throughout each school year; which is obtainable; however, if you don't watch and speak out for your student/child you or they won't be heard.

You are not alone in this by an means and with society the way it is you NEVER will be alone! "YOU ARE YOUR CHILDS VOICE"!

Vickie - posted on 10/20/2009

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Sometimes, one gets a teacher who is interested in only 2 things. One is doing whatever it takes to keep getting money from government grants and not caring about the children. The other is trying to insist that children are so over medicated, they have a classroom full of little zombies and the teacher(s) do not have to deal with the children as much.

Edesa - posted on 10/19/2009

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labels may be either help the child or not. This actually depends on the teacher-parent teamwork and how they see the situation-- a challenge or a burden? The problem sometimes lies on the lack of communication and cooperation between the parent and the teacher. Somehow the former thinks the teacher has the greater responsibility since it's her job to deliver..the same with the teacher thinking it should be the parents who have to do something about it. Neither would like to take the bigger chunk of the responsibility.Each pointing fingers at each other, forgetting that while their busy passing the bucks the poor child suffers.

[deleted account]

Some of what parents have to go through make my head spin. I must say my students who had ADHD did better in a regular class and one hour of one-on-one then help at home. They became more responsible and the walls and labels set by other students were coming down. There is a better understanding and acceptance. They made a lot of new friends. To see them come out of their shell was precious. If you can keep your child in a regular class with some help and help at home I would suggest it. It might seem like a lot of work but well worth it.

Evelyn - posted on 10/18/2009

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I have two children with disabilities one obivous the other not. Some teacher know just how to get them to learn in a special way. Those years I feel blessed.

Carolyn - posted on 10/18/2009

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The meeting and addressing your concerns are great. When you do not hear the answer that will help your child. You have to go all the way to the top of education chain of command. YOU have to speak for your child as long as he can not defend himself, do not let this fall between the cracks. Your child deserves all the rights as any other child and the school is required to give it to them. If the teacher does not meet the needs, she or he must be called on it. Some Teachers whom have lost the sight of the job, should be accountable. They all have a responsibility to do their job. If they do not like it, may be they should be in a different profession. Do not settle for less than your child deserves. Your child has rights and you need to be his or her advocate for proper treatment.

Kendra - posted on 10/18/2009

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Quoting Mary:

There are no learning disabilities, only teaching disabilities.



What a wonderul idea. Wonderful but idealistic. 



I am unwilling to blame every single teacher my son has ever had for his difficulties learning and succeeding in school. He's now a junior and he still struggles with many things. I am perfectly fine with saying that he has a learning disability because it is the truth. He does not process information the way the majority of the average student population does. He does not do well with taking notes, following steps, or writing. He continues to struggle with standardized tests and has not been able to pass required state assesments (thank you NCLB) nor the SAT with scores that reflect his true knowledge and abilities. He also has a physcial disability. This does not make him dumber, less of a person, or unworthy. It is just an obstacle in life that he must overcome, and that is the best gift we can give him. The skills to cope with his disabilities and rise above them. And the only way to do that is to acknowledge them for what they are. So whether you call it a disability, handicap, difference, or whatever, it is the same.  I have always told him that he can do anything. He just may have to work a little bit harder or find different ways of accomplishing things than many of his peers/friends. It's not fair; it's not an excuse; it's just life.



 



And just to add- it is my job as a parent, not his teachers', to make sure that he is successful in life and acquires the knowledge and skills he will need. It is my responsibility to raise my child, not the school's.

Kendra - posted on 10/17/2009

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Quoting Nikkii:



Quoting Annalee:

thats a question I have asked many times. I have a daughter who had adhd and she was so smart but she just could not focus the teachers were ... well some of them had no sympathy for that. I just did my best to explain to the teachers what the disability was and what I as a mother was doing to help her cucceed in that class.






I have three children. Two are boys. One struggled with ADD, the other with ADHD. I worked consistently with both boys, their teachers, and the school administrators to see they received the additional help they needed to stay focused and on track. Each were pulled from their classes daily to spend one-on-one time with another teacher. Together, they worked on the same things that were being studied in the classroom. The difference was in the one-on-one. At home, we did the same thing. I had one-on-one instructional/study time with each of the boys. Gradually, the teachers and I began to see the changes for the better in each of the boys, and it definitely showed in their grades.






Now, some 10 years later, I am going  back to school to get my teaching degree. I have learned that the basis of the No Child Left Behind Act is to weed out the less qualified and have the best qualified teachers in classrooms. Schools are supposed to be equivalent to a Democratic society. The model school promotes social justice, human rights, human dignity, and equality. The school itself should become a model of democracy that leads, rather than follows, societal practices. Under these social equalities, school should be equipped to offer gifted, talented, honors & special needs students additional programs to heighten their learning. Because, every child, no matter what race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, religion, or physical ability has the ability to learn at a high level.






If your child's school is not supporting these ideals, start making a lot of noise!





 



NCLB has good ideas but is another buerocratic nightmare. It does not "Weed out" those who are not highly qualified. On the converse, it just provides more hoops to jump through with less productivity and does not benefit anyone in the end. The federal government has no business dictating education. That should be at the local level because the schools need the support of their individual communities. To make matters worse, NCLD advocates and actually requires standardized testing for all students to measure success. Doesn't that go against the very idea of individualized education based on a students needs? It is a contradiction of itself.



The only thing that NCLB does is make it more difficult for individuals to be good teachers. There are still plenty of people who should not be teachers who will still be in classrooms. Just because one takes more courses or has more degrees does not make him/her a better teacher.

Kendra - posted on 10/17/2009

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Labels are neither positive or negative. It is the connotation that we associate with them that is the problem. I was a high school teacher for ten years, which is MUCH different from elementary. Often I would not find out much about my special needs population until we were at least a month into the school year. With well over a hundred students, I could not possibly read every child's file. And privacy laws do not allow for lists of information being shared. Therefore, I had to rely on instinct and observation rather than labels. I could usually pinpoint a child with classic ADHD relatively quickly- but not always. I might not know that I had a bipolar student sitting three desks away from one with slight behavioral issues that would flip out at the kid fidgetting and tapping his pencil fifty times in a minute. Anyways, I digress. The problem is not the labels so much as the way that people use and interpret them. They are meant to be a tool to help teachers use the appropriate strategies and modifications. For example, when I found out a student has aspergers I could understand certain behaviors and be more sympathetic- I could also go pull that student's IEP and learn more. I also had children enter my classroom as 9th graders who were placed inappropriately. The last couple of years I co-taught with an ESE teacher full time. That meant that we had a very diverse ESE population that ranged from kids with learning disabilities to those with behavioral issues and so on. The labels helped me to meet each student's needs to the best of my ability- not judge them.

I cannot speak from the perspective of an elementary school teacher. However, I can say that the educational system is fraught with buerocracy and obstacles that make it extremely difficult for teachers to do their jobs. I have seen people who should NEVER have become teachers in the first place. They exist just like people in other professions. However, the majority of my colleagues were immaculate professionals who did not judge students by labels. It was a HUGE benefit to have a parent who advocated for his/her child in a positive way- sharing the child's needs and strategies with the teachers. If you had any idea just how many disabilities, strategies, modifications, etc are out there you would understand what an overwhelming and nearly impossible task it is for a teacher to know it all. But as a parent, you know your child the best and can assist the teacher.

BTW- I speak as the mother of a teenager with ADD, spina bifida, and SLD as well.

Nicole - posted on 10/17/2009

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I am a preschool teacher...and rule number one for me is NEVER LABEL A CHILD...the child has a condition that needs to be helped with not LABELED...if a child has a disability it is our responsability to make sure he/she is easily integrated and most of all loved and respected by the class. In my opinion is very unprofessional to do. A childs condition should only be discussed between the person or persons that are taking care of him/her and helping in his/her development. And our job is to see, recognize, seek help, develop, understand, love, integrate, make curricular adecuations to help in his/her learning process.

Nikkii - posted on 10/17/2009

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Quoting Annalee:

thats a question I have asked many times. I have a daughter who had adhd and she was so smart but she just could not focus the teachers were ... well some of them had no sympathy for that. I just did my best to explain to the teachers what the disability was and what I as a mother was doing to help her cucceed in that class.



I have three children. Two are boys. One struggled with ADD, the other with ADHD. I worked consistently with both boys, their teachers, and the school administrators to see they received the additional help they needed to stay focused and on track. Each were pulled from their classes daily to spend one-on-one time with another teacher. Together, they worked on the same things that were being studied in the classroom. The difference was in the one-on-one. At home, we did the same thing. I had one-on-one instructional/study time with each of the boys. Gradually, the teachers and I began to see the changes for the better in each of the boys, and it definitely showed in their grades.



Now, some 10 years later, I am going  back to school to get my teaching degree. I have learned that the basis of the No Child Left Behind Act is to weed out the less qualified and have the best qualified teachers in classrooms. Schools are supposed to be equivalent to a Democratic society. The model school promotes social justice, human rights, human dignity, and equality. The school itself should become a model of democracy that leads, rather than follows, societal practices. Under these social equalities, school should be equipped to offer gifted, talented, honors & special needs students additional programs to heighten their learning. Because, every child, no matter what race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, religion, or physical ability has the ability to learn at a high level.



If your child's school is not supporting these ideals, start making a lot of noise!

Ann Marie - posted on 10/17/2009

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Coreen,

From the questions you have asked, I will tell you the basic building blocks.

1. You need to find out what the "regular ed" requirements are for your child's functioning grade level. (This will be on your state Department of Education website.)
2. You need to make 8-10 IEP goals for cognitive and social, and 4-5 for speech or any other disability area your child may have. Set goals that your child can reach which are part of the regular ed curriculum. The school cannot refuse these goals under any circumstances.
3. Fax a demand for an IEP meeting to the principal, the school district superintendent and the director of special education.
4. If you have an advocate, have them come to the meeting with you. The more the merrier. (I personally bring at least two.)
5. When the IEP invitation arrives, sign it and send in a copy of the goals you have written. Also, write in the accommodation section of the invitation you will need seating for your advocate(s).
6. At the meeting, negotiate with the school as to the goals, but do not just give in to their idea of what the goals "should" be.

Begin the IEP by saying, "We are here as a team to meet the needs of ________. In order for his success, each of us must work together to help him meet all of the goals."

I fought this fight with a teacher who should have retired about 15 years ago. IEP goals were the same for every disabled child in the class because the teacher had been doing the same thing in that class for the last 23 years. There was nothing individualized about the class except what the therapists did.

By you writing goals which look like the goals of the children in the "regular ed" classes, you are showing your child has the capability to learn and excel despite the label or disability. Continue to be positive during the meeting. If you are positive, they will be more accommodating.

Offer suggestions and to help. Talk to them about the learning activities you are already doing at home with your child, and the success you have had with it. Offer to share your techniques as to what works with your child. And keep working at home everyday, even after the school agrees to do more/better.

Today, my teacher is scheduled for training in my child's disability (and two of the other disabilities in her classroom). All of the providers must give me daily feedback (under the accommodations section of the IEP) about my child's daily activities and progress.

You can do this. If one person tells you no, go to his/her boss. Never quit. Think of it this way...If your child needed blood and the first person said "no", would you stop there? Then, don't do it with education. You just keep asking. The "yes" may just be with the very next telephone call.

Ann Marie

Linda Sue - posted on 10/17/2009

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The problem is most teachers are not trained to handle children with disabilities. My son who is now 23 had major problems in school. I had the school district in due process and mediation on more than one occasion. I even removed him from school for three years, because the school system tried to make him a criminal. Then when he returned they wanted me to place him in an adjudication program. They tried to kick him out at 18, thank god for the "no chid left behind". The attorney we had said it is a marathon not a sprint to educate these kids. Today, my son is off all the meds, has a job, is not a criminal and is quite a productive citizen.

Karen - posted on 10/16/2009

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Yes... I have a son that would be labeled if in school, but I have homeschooled my kids. After all, I know them the best, and I am their best advocates. We have freedom to be flexible and try different things. In a school, often, you are stuck with what they decide is best for the masses... and your child has to fit the mold. It is a challenge. Even with special ed services, they are often overwhelmed with so many children and IEP's that it is hard for them to truly help every child the best way.

Andee - posted on 10/16/2009

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Try homeschooling your child. When the local school district tried putting a label on my daughter, we pulled her out of school for 6 years and I taught her at home.

Annam - posted on 10/16/2009

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hi! im a mother of a 12 year old boy who was diagnosed with austic-asperges syndrom june last year. he didnt have speech till he was 4 yrs old n had gone to speech therapist. all doctors and therapist i had taken him to said that he is a borderline case n not to send him to a special school. he is going to a regular school. my son's class is a very small group. at the beginning of every year, i will go n see the class teacher and explain that my son has to b sitting in front of class near the teacher's table n to please keep an eye on him. jus prompt him when he is distracted or not paying attention. after 6 years, there was a teacher this year that was willing to teach him maths at 6:30am every morning! when i told my son, he was the one that is up every morning bright n early insisting on being in school by 6:30am! he does enjoy the morning classes n thanks to that teacher has learned a lot! he has improved in many ways but there is still a long way to go. he will be going to secondary school next year. im not sure what will greet him there but as his mother i jus `battle on'.

so dear mothers out there, no matter special child or not, we are the only ones that know our child well. so BATTLE ON AND BE STRONG!

Kate - posted on 10/16/2009

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Hi, I was a label when i was in school for my own learning challenges. Few months after high school I met the man I married. I am now a stay at home mom raising our 2 children. I will tell you from experience in my own life here: Be the advocate for your child. Also consider what programs are in your area that may be able to help you. Your child's doctors are also good way to get the school to listen. I found out even with my oldest child being in a special ed type preschool that i've had to be a voice for her many times and even before she began preschool. This year I spent even more time talking with the drs and they wrote letters to the teachers with what would be the best things for my child to do to help her learnings. The school has taken that into action. I also have many other programs such as statewide family support, parent connection and navigation program, and others. Dr's told me never label my kid cause one day she may not have the problem anymore. Everyone I work with for my child knows this not only from me but from the drs and has the clear understandings not to do so anymore. Her school doesnt label kids though sometimes I feel like they are. And even her defined learnings as listed by the dr are complied with but not discussed with outside the teacher working with her.

Denise - posted on 10/16/2009

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Stict to your guns! Complaint to the highest level possible if you have to to get them to stop labeling your child!



One teacher targeted my son as ADD, however he was not. At the time, my husband worker for the Texas Dept. of Mental Health & Retardaion for over 30 years, I worked in the same office for almost 10 years, so between us we have almost 40 years of extensive background on mental health & disabilities.

The teacher kept insisting and kept pushing. My husband told her not to label our son, but she did anyway. The principal was pushing to for us to get him tested -trying to force us to get him tested - (which I found out later that because they were a brand new school, they would get extra funding for every child they had tested for ADD/ADHD). My husband consulted the legal department of TXDMHMR and they told him under no circumstances was the school allowed to force us to get testing done nor did the school district have the authority to do so and we could file a lawsuit against the teacher, the pricipal & the school district for harrassment.

So my husband went to have a little chat with the principal - after he asked the teacher once again "what part of DO NOT LABEL MY SON DID YOU NOT UNDERSTAND"? (and after the teacher telling the pricipal the my husband threatened her! HA!) He told the principal what was discused with the legal department of TXDMHMR and told her if they didn't back off and remove any labels they gave our son, we would follow through with a lawsuit - She couldn't say a word - and we NEVER had problems again with that teacher or that school.

Cherri - posted on 10/16/2009

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i agree, i have a son who is 15 nexn month. he has aspergus syndrome,, adhd, and dispraxia. he goes to a main stream high school against my better judgement. there was no places in a special school cos down here in devon they don't put any resorses into special children. it all goes into oldpeople! and every year i've had to goe in to see his subject teaches cos they keep lableing him as naughty!!! even though they reasured me over and over again he would be taken care of!! you have to take the time to make the teachers understand that these kids are cracking kids, and not just ones with lables that the teachers neither want to see past, or understand ! i spend most of my life either on the phone to, or at his school talking to his teachers. and finally at the end of last year, his report said ,, a lovely, careing, very funny and a valuable member of our school !!!!!!!!!! at last, i got the school to look past the label, and look at the child ! and there right, he is lovely ! and very cleaver! he may not be able to talk very well, or write v well either, but you should see him on the pc ! thats no thick child! so chin up all you mums, you know your kids are very brite, lovely people, and with a lot of hard work, so will the teachers too !!

Sharon - posted on 10/16/2009

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I have to agree with Cynthia's reply, all have to be involved, that includes the teacher, teacher aide, student and most importantly the parents. You parents know your child's needs and what they can and can't do so don't let anyone tell you that you don't know anything. Use your voice and be heard these children are going to be our leaders in the future and they deserve the best that they can get now. There are great Teachers and Aides out there doing a great job, we just need more education for the educated. best of luck

Lyn - posted on 10/15/2009

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I work for Community Living but before that I was an EA. I worked with a really great teacher who every day while filling out the students' communication books to go, he always made sure he put something positive first! No matter how bad the day! PArents of kids with disabiities get so used to people telling them negative things and it makes any parents' day to hear the great things people notice about their kids! Remember to advocate always! A true teacher/administration won't hold it against you!

Kelly - posted on 10/15/2009

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it takes a lot of time and effort on your part,but it is worth it. my son has ADD besides muscular dystrophy and for awile i had to go in the school every morning and afternoon to keep up with him and the teachers. i start out every year letting the teachers know what to expect and ask them if they have any questions for me about his condition. he is in 10th grade now and i still go in to check on things.

Sherry - posted on 10/14/2009

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Hi I say that labels are wrong on so many counts. I think that sometimes we forget teachers are human too. Some are good and some need to be reeducated. I have a wonderful daughter who learns differently. And I am an educational Asst with children who are deaf. So I am on both sides. For me and the people I work with it is how can we best meet the needs of the student. Labels do not help in that sense. So I say advocate for your child. You are a valuable member of that team and if you do not do it no one will.

Maria - posted on 10/14/2009

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Coreen, I could not have said it any better! A lot of times, stereotyping, specially by the educators themselves, hurt the child more than help him.

Joann - posted on 10/14/2009

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Always be your child's advocate. Speak in depth with the teacher and what disability is and ask if she's ever dealt with certain issues. Ask the teacher if she is willing to be a partner in education realizing all children are special and each child has different needs. One child may fly through the times table while another may need a tutor. The important thing is that the children have a safe environment to learn. One without shame or fear of being "targeted". Not all teachers are "good" teachers. Moms, stand your ground. I had a situation in which I wish after I spoke with the teacher and Principal and got nowhere ,I went to the Head of the entire school. We had our child tested,we had her observed in class and outside of class. The Doc that administered the test said it was clearly a teacher issue. The teacher had a few kids she didn't like, imagine that, not likeing a 3rd grader.Our daughter will forever remember this teacher as her worst teacher in grade school. This particular teacher truly hurt our child but with positve reinforcment and counseling she made it through that class and 4 years later she is thriving. This teacher did not have her contract renewed. You are the advocate. Parenst & teachers should work in partnership for the good of the child

Vandna - posted on 10/14/2009

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The best way out of this is to have a heart to heart talk with the teacher and making her aware of the child's special needs...best of luck

Cheryl - posted on 10/14/2009

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i'm having problems at present with the teacher who is in charge of kids like mine, she has autism. a very long story, but this person doesn't know a thing about autism,she told me, so how in the heck am i to deal with this?? i am glad she has a wonderful aide who knew nothing but went and learnt.....there are still some genuine people around. school goes back monday and i have to deal with this somehow.....

Nancy - posted on 10/14/2009

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I am a teacher turned ADD coach. I loved the kids in my class that were a little less conventional. The creativity and personality of kids with challenges are usually so much more interesting. I feel sorry for the teachers that look for conventionality, its boring.
Nancy

[deleted account]

copying stephanie's advise...make your voice heard at all IEP meetings and parent teachers conferences. They more you are involved, the more they will look to you for information about your child. You must never back down. They may get sick of you but so what. Do whatever you can to get your child through school.

Stephanie - posted on 10/14/2009

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Teachers may not look past the disability because they have to make sure they are modifing the program to meet the childs needs. They want the child to acheive all that they can but the must keep the child special needs in mind. I have a child with a LD and I want the teachers to remember what he needs at all time but I also want them to push him as much as possible. I am think you have to really make you voice heard at all IEP meetings and parent teachers conferences. They more you are involved the more they will look to you for information about your child.

Coreen - posted on 10/14/2009

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Quoting Coreen:

how do you get teachers to look past labels to see a childs true ability

disability means you just have to push the limits not confine the human inside to a world of cant do



also what do you do if you have the corage to say you yourself  have a ld label  and are not beeing taken serious because of that when figthing for your child. I am a single mom who manages my own home so my capability is proven .

Cynthia - posted on 10/13/2009

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A good teacher doesn't look at the disability they look at the child. If a teacher is stuck on the disability you have to get loud and make a voice for your child. A great system is a teacher, parent, student team :) All have to be involved

Carly - posted on 10/13/2009

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i dont know if you can make a teacher see what you want them too. i agree with you though. my best freind is dyslexic, and she had such a hard time in school, but she pushed through. she ended up completeing high school with online courses at home, but now, at 31, she is married with 2 beautiful childeren, works in office settings when she works. she has been staying home with her youngest for awhile now. my point is thatshe was labeled with a learning disability and let it define her for years. but she realised that she could work around it, it didnt have to be who she was. i dont think many people even know that she has it now. her folks never let her use it as an exuse, so it never became one.

Carly - posted on 10/13/2009

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I think it depends on what the child is dealing with. I is hard and terribly unfair but some people including teachers will never see part a label. Hopefully you have a teacher that is willing to see you as a resource and your child has a great team of education assistants, if not you will need to get loud and get your child what they deserve.

Annabanana6448 - posted on 10/13/2009

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thats a question I have asked many times. I have a daughter who had adhd and she was so smart but she just could not focus the teachers were ... well some of them had no sympathy for that. I just did my best to explain to the teachers what the disability was and what I as a mother was doing to help her cucceed in that class.

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