How to wean my breast addict!!!!

Michele - posted on 01/11/2010 ( 45 moms have responded )

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My almost 17 month old has always refused a bottle,which wasnt really an issue since breast feeding has been quite easy for us! I have tried cows milk in a cup (which she happily drinks from during the day) but she spits it out and refuses to drink it. I am planning on going back to work (and having a bit more of a life away from her!) but cant fathom stopping the BFs! She is fed to sleep and is still having 5 or more BFs a day, not to mention during the night! She is also very sensitive and I have not been able to get her to settle any other way since she was born. Im terrified - for her - of stopping the feeds! I WILL NOT leave her to cry but need some help! Any advice on weaning her from the breast in a GENTLE way would be appreciated! Also if anyone has any advice on service in Australia I can use for support and advice would be great too! Im a desperate under the thumb mum! Thanks :)

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Cassie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Bonnie:

You waited too long and I don't care what the LaLeche League says, if a child can realize what a breast is, its too long. Example: In the middle of a party, my associate was sitting on the couch, her 3 year old son walked up to her in front of everyone, climbed in her lap, lifted her shirt and began to suckle. Age does matter and that was ridiculous!!

Once they start getting teeth, done. 6 months tops and you doctor will tell you it is only medically necessary for 6 weeks as far as immunities go. Stop it cold turkey, it will take less time, a little more stress, but in the long run, they will adjust quicker. Decide the date, wake up in the morning and give him a cup or bottle depending on his age. Take it from there, kids have very short overnight memories, so morning is best. Don't get me wrong, its a wonderful bonding experience that you share with your child, but it should not be a long term thing. Bottles as a supplement for Dad's bonding time from day one, should be done as well. It makes the transition when you stop breast feeding much easier on you and the baby.


I'm glad we don't have the same doctor.  My daughter is 15 months, still nursing and still receiving immunities from me every time we nurse!



 



If you do begin to wean, please don't do it cold turkey.  I would suggest the don't offer, don't refuse approach.  Try to keep her occupied during the times that she might normally want to breastfeed but if she asks for it, allow her to nurse.   You will find that by keeping her active and her focus off nursing, your daily nursings should start to dwindle a bit.  This approach is much gentler on your little one as well as your body.

Minnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Bonnie:

You waited too long and I don't care what the LaLeche League says, if a child can realize what a breast is, its too long. Example: In the middle of a party, my associate was sitting on the couch, her 3 year old son walked up to her in front of everyone, climbed in her lap, lifted her shirt and began to suckle. Age does matter and that was ridiculous!!

Once they start getting teeth, done. 6 months tops and you doctor will tell you it is only medically necessary for 6 weeks as far as immunities go. Stop it cold turkey, it will take less time, a little more stress, but in the long run, they will adjust quicker. Decide the date, wake up in the morning and give him a cup or bottle depending on his age. Take it from there, kids have very short overnight memories, so morning is best. Don't get me wrong, its a wonderful bonding experience that you share with your child, but it should not be a long term thing. Bottles as a supplement for Dad's bonding time from day one, should be done as well. It makes the transition when you stop breast feeding much easier on you and the baby.


If your doctor told you that immunities only last six weeks he needs some serious education on breastfeeding.



Stopping breastfeeding cold turkey is likely to result in a bewildered unhappy child and a sick mom with mastitis, clogged ducts, and roller coaster hormones.



The biological age for weaning is somewhere between 3-7 years.  Your problem is you are completely sexualizing the breast.  I personally do hope that my daughter can remember breastfeeding- the love and security that she gained there, and that she will pass that on to her children.

Cassie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Well I think we should get back to the point at hand. The child the OP is asking about is 17 months. This is not a debate about extended breastfeeding and how long is too long. If you do not wish to help this mother but want to argue about extended breastfeeding, it may be best to start a new thread.



Again Michele, good for you for breastfeeding for so long. If you feel it is time to wean your daughter, I still suggest the "don't offer, don't refuse" method. If you are returning to work, you could continue nursing in the morning and evenings and your daughter would be just fine with water and food while you are away from her. This is what I do with my 14 month old daughter while I work in the mornings. Good luck.

Deanne - posted on 01/11/2010

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Bonnie your choice MAY have been correct for yourself but your opinion on breastfeeding is very shallow and ill informed. First off babies continue to receive immunities and nutrients no matter how long they are breastfed months or years quoting Dr Sears breast milk does not turn to water at 12 months it continues to be beneficial as long as you breastfeed. and the bond created by breastfeeding is never broken even by weaning it's there forever, and Dads can bond in many different ways they do not need to feed baby to bond with them my 3 children are very securely bonded with their father and he never once gave them a bottle. all children develop independence naturally allowing a child to self wean does not hinder independence in fact it has been shown to enhance self esteem and independence.

My oldest child nursed until age 4 my second child happily weaned himself at age 2 my third is 18 months and going strong.

Gentle natural weaning is the best approach your child will adjust to you not being around as much you can work and continue to breastfeed she will gradually learn other comfort methods when you are not with her but continuing to breastfeed her during the transition of returning to work is best

Brenda - posted on 01/11/2010

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I had the same problem with my son. What I did was start making his milk drinking a little more fun.....I used a little natural food coloring to "tint" his cool blue cows milk, and since he had the emotions of happy, and sad learned, I started telling him that mommies breasts were getting sore because he was such a big boy with his teeth, and I would tell him how much I loved him, and I know he would not want to accidently bite mommie because that might hurt..... the thing I used the most though was love and praise, I found this easier to break the habit, by praising the fact that he was my big boy now, he started relating to that, I even implemented a small prize chart for drinking out of his cup more, he loved it and it really gave him something to look forward to, and you do not need to buy toys, and trinkets for a prize chart, I did things like staying up 15-30 minutes later one night, or watching his favorite show before bed, or even and afternoon at the park....
I hope this helps, in the end you know your child better than anyone, just remember to associate the weaning in a positive manner, and you should have no problem:))

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Jessica - posted on 01/18/2010

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I couldnt agree more with you pro breastfeeding moms... if you are not sexualizing the breast in any way... you will then think of them only as a way to feed and bond with your baby i have breast fed both of mine and when i stoped feeding my son and started him on formula his bowels became impacted from sever constipation ! and he broke out in a rash it was a MESSS he had never went one day with out making a BM untill i introduced formula BIG MISTAKE so i started nursing again and it was difficult because my milk supply was some what depleted by this time but it came back the human body is an AMAZING ! thing my son is almost 6monthes and 20lbs all from my breast milk and when he wants to stop he may SO i APPLAUD all you breast feeding moms for taking the TIME and having the PAITENTS it takes to breastfeed WELL done and keep up the good work!

Cassie - posted on 01/14/2010

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Jerlynda, it may be best to use the "Don't ask, don't refuse" approach to weaning your son. This means that if he asks for it, allow him to nurse; any other time, don't offer it. The key is to try to identify times when he may normally ask to nurse. If you are able to do this, you can find activities that will distract him from nursing and eventually, he will be weaned. For example, if he usually likes to nurse late morning, try to come up with some very involved activities for him or leave the house everyday for a week and keep yourselves occupied. When he is actively involved in other activities, he is less likely to want to nurse.

Jerlynda - posted on 01/14/2010

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i find it extremely hard when i refuse he will bite me or hit me so i feel at the moment i will just give him a wee while longer he does drink from a bottle and a cup and also eats very well but he just asks all the time all the best for weaning your daughter if you do please tell me how you did it :D

[deleted account]

One gentle method of weaning is to use "Don't offer. Don't refuse." This is just like it sounds. Don't offer your breast, but don't refuse when she asks. Also, a bit of gentle distraction can work sometimes. Nursing doesn't have to be all or nothing. Is there a way you could do partial weaning? If she drinks from a cup then she can have fluids during the day while you're at work. If it's just the milk she refuses, she can get any calcium she needs through cheese and yogurt. You might find that having the connection that your nursing relationship provides during the evening and night will help both of you deal with the separation brought about by your return to work. I wish you and your baby all the best.

[deleted account]

I have two children, both of which I breast fed only, they never took a bottle. The only way I could get either of them off of the breast was to just stop and not give in even when they screamed and cried. I know you said you would not just leave her to cry. I let my children cry, but I didn't just leave them. I held them and comforted them, and I had about two days with no sleep with my daughter and only maybe half a night with my son before they gave in and took the cup of milk. With my son I flavored his milk with chocolate or strawberry syrup, a tip from my doctor, gradually decreasing the amount of syrup used until he took just straight milk. Also both of my children slept through the night once they were off of the breast, about 10 hours a night. So yes there is no easy way to do this, but if you are ready to stop then you just need to be strong and not give in. Hold and comfort your baby and try to remember the crying will only last for a couple of days. Good luck, and know it does get better!

Aleshia - posted on 01/12/2010

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Thanks for posting this question, because I too will soon have this same problem. My daughter is nine months old and sometimes she will take a bottle, but usually not...she just cries until I get home. I thank everyone for the input and advise, both GOOD and BAD. When the time comes I know I will try to slowly scale back on daytime feedings, continuing with just morning and night until her and I call it quits together. In response to some of those moms bad-mouthing BF at older ages, shame on you. I don't like it either, for me that is definitely too long a time. HOWEVER, I feel that those of you who chose to share this opinion give others a bad vibe on BF entirely. Let's really dumb it down: your neighbor is the most sweetest woman, loves to have parties and BBQs for the whole block...but she picks her nose. Oh man, it's so disgusting because she eats her boogers too! Seriously people, that's the only way I can compare what you're saying to because that's how ridiculous you sound. It's a PERSONAL choice and none of your business. By complaining about it and saying how wrong it is gives those new moms out there who haven't breast fed and just aren't sure whether or not they want to a second thought as to whether or not it's the best thing for their baby. Bottom line, breast is best and that's IT. Two weeks, six months, four years...that decision is totally personal.

Susanna - posted on 01/12/2010

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Try cutting out on one breastfeeding a day until you are down to one a day and work your way down to just nursing her when she is hungry instead of when she just needs something to soothe her. You have to be strong and give your will power a chance. Just remember that when she is crying she is not hurting and this is just a way she can get you to give in, she has more power over you then you think. Also, you might want to try giving her a sippy cup with juice to see if this will spark an interest in her taste buds. You have control of this just use some trial and error you CAN do this!

Merry - posted on 01/12/2010

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My youngest was over 24 months old before I could wean him. I thought he'd be plugged in 'til high school. It took about a month of putting Texas Pete hot sauce on me, before he finally gave up. It was a bit uncomfortable for me, too, but I was desperate! Go figure... he grew up to be a tough Marine.

Maggie - posted on 01/12/2010

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try cutting out one feeding during the night to start. Instead of feeding just cuddle her or rock her. At her age she's doing it more for comfort than for hunger or nutrition. You can slowly cut back until you are down to an acceptable amount for you. I kept the waking up and the going to bed one for last. Also to get her to drink from a cup you could try pumping some milk and mixing it with regular milk to get her used to the thicker less sweet taste of cows milk. You could also transition to soy milk first which is sweeter than cow's milk.

You might also try a sippy cup with a soft spout so it's more like a nipple. We used one from Nuby that was great!

Rachel - posted on 01/12/2010

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I understand that everyone has a point of view but to attack other peoples opinions on a public post is rude and immature. Weaning is the best idea for both mother and baby most agree on that, We live in a free society where having a opinion is admired not scorned so ladies please stop calling people names and attacking their education or mothering skills because it makes you no better. Havea great day

Jerlynda - posted on 01/12/2010

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i am also breast feeding still and my son will be 2 in march and i have tried everything to stop and he feeds like a new born any advice please he pulls at my top all the time and says titties it gets imbarrasing sometimes

Jessica - posted on 01/11/2010

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My daughter used to make a horrible face every time I tried to give her a bottle when she was breastfed. Eventually my body just kind of stopped making it and I had no choice but to give her a bottle. I just kept trying different ones until I found one she'd accept. Granted, she was only 3 months so it will probably be harder after such an extended period of time, but I'd say keep trying it. Eventually she may decide it's not so bad after all.

[deleted account]

Julia, you can't force a child to nurse. So what makes you think that nursing beyond a year or 2...or God forbid, 3 is solely for the moms benefit? I'm sorry, but I just don't believe you when you say you've done a lot of research on the subject.

Terri - posted on 01/11/2010

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Hi I was in your boat,my daughter was 2 and I tried everything to get her off the breast.She refused to eat baby food or drink from a bottle.Every time I put baby food in her mouth she would gag,would not even have a bottle.

Finally I decided I would try something weird I know but it worked and I have told several mothers in the same boat and it worked for them also. "SOYA SAUCE"

strange but it worked.

I would put soya sauce on my nipples and told her she was too big and there was no more milk.After the first attempt at the breast she looked at me with this funny face and tried again same thing.I gave her another alternative to the breast a cup of milk.Finally no more biting me and I was finally my own person again.This hole soya sauce episode took about 3 or 4 attempts before she gave up and we never looked back since.My daughter is now 9 and she thinks it is funny when I tell her what she used to do,and yes she is a very happy little girl.

Julia - posted on 01/11/2010

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Uneducated? Unresearched? Sorry with a background that I have to include a BS in Information Technology and 8 years of experience in research being an All Source Intelligence Analyst in the Army. I think I am a pretty educated person. I've also done my share of research on MANY MANY subjects. Breastfeeding being one of them. This isn't a research issue, this is my opinion. My OPINION being that when does it end. I did breastfeed and I will continue to breast feed every child I have, however my children will be on whole milk when they are one, they will be out of diapers at two, they will no longer have pacifiers at 18 months, bottles will be gone at one. The longer you wait the harder it is to take these things away from the children.

That being said, Michele, do not go cold turkey your breasts will swell and become extremely painful for at least a week. Slowly weening your child would be the best bet, try to cut out the breast during the day and feeding only at night and/or naptimes. Slowly then exclude naptimes and only for bedtime. Then cut those out too. Your breasts will slowly dry up and you will stop producing milk which will be much more comfortable for you and will be easier for your child.

Amber - posted on 01/11/2010

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UR so called facts are very wrong and u need to do ur research and come back and try to make the same statement . Benefits of breastmilk go well beyong 2 or 3 .For YOU to say that children who breastfeed into these ages are not independent and the mother is benefiting and not the child is a ignorant statement . The US is one of the few countrys that have people like YOU that think this way .Its pretty sad that our breastfeeding rates arent higher in the US . You coming here and putting ur un educated and un researched response is what cause this low rate. How about u look at some resources that differ from ur ignorant response
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/eb...

http://www.llli.org/FAQ/advantagetoddler...

http://parenting.ivillage.com/tp/tpweani...,,3x5j,00.html

http://infantstoddlers.suite101.com/arti...

and many many more

Julia - posted on 01/11/2010

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Please Amber elaborate. Because I am far from ignorant. Just stating the obvious.

Julia - posted on 01/11/2010

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Perhaps you should quit breastfeeding your 16 year old... I mean seriously where does it end? That wasn't an attack only a metaphor. I am just saying end the baby things when they are no longer a baby, because yes you could breast feed your 5 year old but then why stop there? Cut the umbilical cord already. It is more for the mother and NEEDING the bonding than for the benefits of the child.

Amber - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Julia:

I am a HUGE Advocate of breast feeding. I wish I could have breastfed my 2 daughters longer than what I was able to, first one I was forced to stop when she was 4 months and the second one is just a little fatty and I wasn't producing enough for her so I was only able to go 6 weeks with her. However I will agree with Bonnie that there comes a point in time when it is just too long. Age 2, ok...maybe however 3 is WAY too long seriously at that time it is mostly for the benefits of the mother not the child anymore. Any older than 3 and you are just trying to keep your toddler a baby. These are probably women who change a 5 yr olds diaper before they go off to kindergarten. Seriously your child is no longer a baby so stop the baby things. Diapers, breastfeeding, pacifiers, bottles, etc. Allow your children to grow up and become independent people. Not dependant on mommy for everything. Then they become my ex husband who chose his mom over me, who never heard what his mom was saying and never listened to his wife...which is why he will die a lonely lonely man.



again only one word for this post. IGNORANT:)

[deleted account]

Perhaps you are an advocate of breastfeeding...but a HUGE advocate? I beg to differ.

Ugh, the myth that a child breast fed beyond a certain age will not become an independent human being drives me crazy! I personally have met a mom who was still nursing her 5 year old daughter. The little girl was a wonderful, intelligent, normal child. I see breastfeeding into the toddler years as a very wonderful thing. Toddlers are constantly on the go and when you're nursing, it provides a special down time for bonding between mother and child. It's very healthy as far as mental development goes. Here's an article about breastfeeding that I find very enlightening. Perhaps you should read it...



http://drmomma.blogspot.com/2009/07/brea...

Julia - posted on 01/11/2010

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I am a HUGE Advocate of breast feeding. I wish I could have breastfed my 2 daughters longer than what I was able to, first one I was forced to stop when she was 4 months and the second one is just a little fatty and I wasn't producing enough for her so I was only able to go 6 weeks with her. However I will agree with Bonnie that there comes a point in time when it is just too long. Age 2, ok...maybe however 3 is WAY too long seriously at that time it is mostly for the benefits of the mother not the child anymore. Any older than 3 and you are just trying to keep your toddler a baby. These are probably women who change a 5 yr olds diaper before they go off to kindergarten. Seriously your child is no longer a baby so stop the baby things. Diapers, breastfeeding, pacifiers, bottles, etc. Allow your children to grow up and become independent people. Not dependant on mommy for everything. Then they become my ex husband who chose his mom over me, who never heard what his mom was saying and never listened to his wife...which is why he will die a lonely lonely man.

[deleted account]

So wonderful that you have gone this long! It's really sad that some people have such twisted views when it comes to BFing. You have given your daughter such an incredible gift. That woman telling you that you've waited too long is seriously off her rocker. The story she told about the 3 year old boy going up to his mommy and nursing when he pleased, I happen to think that's lovely!
As for when you go back to work, you don't have to stop entirely. I know a woman who nurses in the morning and the evening and she pumps once a day while she's at work in order to supply milk for her husband to give their son during the day. Perhaps something like that could work for you. If she's not ready to stop and you're not totally comfortable with it either, then DON'T! :) And definitely don't listen to anyone who tells you that you should, or should have ages ago. It's entirely up to you.

Tina - posted on 01/11/2010

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Well done BF for so long, I finished when my daughter turned one.. Most early childhood learning centres have a drop in breasfeeding clinic. I went & saw a midwife to get advice on how to stop BF & basically you need to start dropping one feed at a time every few days until you stop completely, the day feeds are easiest to drop first as she'll be getting solids through the day so doesn't really need them, give her a bottle with water.. if she's thirsty she'll drink it. I stoped the day feeds first, then the night feeds and the last one I cut out was the one just before she went to sleep & I simply explained to her that it was all finished, nothing left in there & that was it... she went to sleep easy & has been fine ever since. Cutting the night ones was quite hard though (few sleepless screaming nights but I never left her to scream, just went in and cuddled her & told her it was time for sleep, few nights she'd be up for a couple of hours but it didn't take long & she slept right through) good luck :)

Kacee - posted on 01/11/2010

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Donna, your opinion is that you think teeth and 6 months should be the limit...my LO is 6 months plus and still does not have teeth, should I stop BF him? Are you also going to tell a mom with a 6 month old to stop bottle feeding?? In essance, this is what you are telling all of us BF moms. Personally, when I read your answer, I felt that you are attacking us moms for BF. Please don't pass judgment on us for breastfeeding. Our children thrive just as much as bottle fed babies...I should know, my first would not BF. Each child is different so the experiences that we have with our children are different as well. Through experience, I have bonded with both my children, which is better...I cannot say. But I am going to defend breastfeeding.



Michele, I applaud you for BF so long...I HOPE that I can go as long...some possible tips for you:

-They make a bottle called Adiri...it is actually for BF moms...it is a little expensive ($12 for one) but my son liked it after he got used to the bottle itself.

-Try pumping and putting the breast milk in a bottle. I don't produce during the day anymore...my son is still on stored breastmilk during the day...we are supplementing with Formula due to my supply (I just would not produce for the pump like I did my son)

-Try chocolate or strawberry milk, or they make a pedisure that tastes like milkshakes



I would go for the gentle approach myself...and being a parent/child educator I advise my moms not to go cold turkey if at all possibe.



I know that it is going to be hard for you...I dread the wean myself...but good luck and you have done the best for your daughter by breastfeeding!

Jessica - posted on 01/11/2010

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I breast fed my daughter and now my son the playtex bottles have rubber niiples which are much softer than laytex and so its more like the breast and start pumping and putting your milk in the bottles during the day and ease into the night time feeding if there are any

[deleted account]

Quoting Bonnie:

You waited too long and I don't care what the LaLeche League says, if a child can realize what a breast is, its too long. Example: In the middle of a party, my associate was sitting on the couch, her 3 year old son walked up to her in front of everyone, climbed in her lap, lifted her shirt and began to suckle. Age does matter and that was ridiculous!!

Once they start getting teeth, done. 6 months tops and you doctor will tell you it is only medically necessary for 6 weeks as far as immunities go. Stop it cold turkey, it will take less time, a little more stress, but in the long run, they will adjust quicker. Decide the date, wake up in the morning and give him a cup or bottle depending on his age. Take it from there, kids have very short overnight memories, so morning is best. Don't get me wrong, its a wonderful bonding experience that you share with your child, but it should not be a long term thing. Bottles as a supplement for Dad's bonding time from day one, should be done as well. It makes the transition when you stop breast feeding much easier on you and the baby.



The World Health Organisation recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months and then continue for a minimum of TWO YEARS.



http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/br...



 

Amber - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Bonnie:

You waited too long and I don't care what the LaLeche League says, if a child can realize what a breast is, its too long. Example: In the middle of a party, my associate was sitting on the couch, her 3 year old son walked up to her in front of everyone, climbed in her lap, lifted her shirt and began to suckle. Age does matter and that was ridiculous!!

Once they start getting teeth, done. 6 months tops and you doctor will tell you it is only medically necessary for 6 weeks as far as immunities go. Stop it cold turkey, it will take less time, a little more stress, but in the long run, they will adjust quicker. Decide the date, wake up in the morning and give him a cup or bottle depending on his age. Take it from there, kids have very short overnight memories, so morning is best. Don't get me wrong, its a wonderful bonding experience that you share with your child, but it should not be a long term thing. Bottles as a supplement for Dad's bonding time from day one, should be done as well. It makes the transition when you stop breast feeding much easier on you and the baby.



ignorant is my only word for this . :)

Minnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Bonnie:

Personal Experience with 3 healthy kids. LeLeche, CDC, WHO can say what they want, but who's child is it anyway. No personal attacks here, remember? Let the poster make up her mind by reading all opinions. If I think you opinion is ridiculous, that so be it and vice versa. To each his own, but I do disagree as stated.



Not sure where you have found personal attacks.... everyone is entitled to an opinion, of course, but no one is entitled to have everyone RESPECT that opinion.  In order for that to be respected, one needs to provide credible sources for backing that opinion up.



You can say the world is flat, Bonnie, and I would be sitting here with my sides splitting.  You have that opinion, but I don't respect it.  It's silly!  No logic behind it.



Now, are you telling me that you would up and transition a six month old exclusively breastfed infant to adult food and water?  Since that infant doesn't need breastmilk after six months...

Bonnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Hey Deanne,
Good for you, happy for ya. Glad it all worked out! Using your quote, "Dr Sears breast milk does not turn to water at 12 months it continues to be beneficial as long as you breastfeed." Beneficial does not mean NECESSARY." Here's a good link that explains breast milk and its advantages.

http://www.americanpregnancy.org/firstye...

Breast milk is produced naturally by women and provides the basic nutrition for a baby during the first several months of life. Breast milk has three different and distinct stages: colostrum, transitional milk, and mature milk. Visit with a Lactation Consultant to learn more about breastfeeding and breast milk.

Colostrum
Colostrum is the first stage of breast milk that occurs during pregnancy and lasts for several days after the birth of the baby. It is either yellowish or creamy in color. It is also much thicker than the milk that is produced later in breastfeeding. Colostrum is high in protein, fat-soluble vitamins, minerals, and immunoglobulins. Immunoglobulins are antibodies that pass from the mother to the baby and provide passive immunity for the baby. Passive immunity protects the baby from a wide variety of bacterial and viral illnesses. Two to four days after birth, colostrum will be replaced by transitional milk.

Transitional milk
Transitional milk occurs after colostrum and lasts for approximately two weeks. The content of transitional milk includes high levels of fat, lactose, water-soluble vitamins, and contains more calories than colostrum.

Mature milk
Mature milk is the final milk that is produced. 90% is water, which is necessary to maintain hydration of the infant. The other 10% is comprised of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats which are necessary for both growth and energy. There are two types of mature milk: foremilk and hind-milk.

Foremilk: This type of milk is found during the beginning of the feeding and contains water, vitamins, and protein.

Hind-milk: This type of milk occurs after the initial release of milk and contains higher levels of fat, and it is necessary for weight gain.

Both foremilk and hind-milk is necessary when breastfeeding to ensure the baby is receiving adequate nutrition and will grow and develop properly.

Victoria - posted on 01/11/2010

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I would just like to add a little post to say that different areas have different cultures. The poster mentioned Australia, I'm not sure where the 3-7 year poster is from, but I am guessing that the poster saying that that age was way too long is from the United States or another similar place. Yes here we don't breast feed that long as a norm. The guideline is usually told to us as 1 year, but many moms only do it for 6 weeks or 3 months depending on work or whatever else. And to the poster about bottle feeding for the husbands bonding time - we did both breast and bottle feeding so my husband could have his bonding time. Usually 2 or 3 bottles a day and it doesn't do anything to harm the purpose of breastfeeding.

Bonnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Personal Experience with 3 healthy kids. LeLeche, CDC, WHO can say what they want, but who's child is it anyway. No personal attacks here, remember? Let the poster make up her mind by reading all opinions. If I think you opinion is ridiculous, that so be it and vice versa. To each his own, but I do disagree as stated.

Minnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Quoting Bonnie:

 They don't need it past 6 months and I will argue with anyone who thinks differently.


OK, please state your reliable, informed sources for this.

Bonnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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Hey to each their own, but I have a 9 yr old, 14 yr old and 16 yr old that are perfect examples of my correct choice.

Sexualizing the breast is totally not it. Recognizing that the breast is anything but a natural food source is crazy. They don't need it past 6 months and I will argue with anyone who thinks differently. Expecially someone who feels that 3 to 7 years is fine!! So do you visit your child in Pre-School and Elementary school for a feeding? No. They need to be independent of you way before that time. They should not have to depend on you for sustinance at those ages.

You need to ask yourself, "Am I now doing this for my satisfaction or for the baby." It is a hard bond to break and by satisfaction, I'm not referring to sexual satisfaction. Satisfaction of being the provider of nourishment for the baby. You can do that without suckling.

Minnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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You can still continue to breastfeed your daughter after returning to work. If you enjoy it and of course she enjoys it, why not continue? While at work send her to her caregiver's with water and table food and at home you can nurse on demand.

Bonnie - posted on 01/11/2010

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You waited too long and I don't care what the LaLeche League says, if a child can realize what a breast is, its too long. Example: In the middle of a party, my associate was sitting on the couch, her 3 year old son walked up to her in front of everyone, climbed in her lap, lifted her shirt and began to suckle. Age does matter and that was ridiculous!!



Once they start getting teeth, done. 6 months tops and you doctor will tell you it is only medically necessary for 6 weeks as far as immunities go. Stop it cold turkey, it will take less time, a little more stress, but in the long run, they will adjust quicker. Decide the date, wake up in the morning and give him a cup or bottle depending on his age. Take it from there, kids have very short overnight memories, so morning is best. Don't get me wrong, its a wonderful bonding experience that you share with your child, but it should not be a long term thing. Bottles as a supplement for Dad's bonding time from day one, should be done as well. It makes the transition when you stop breast feeding much easier on you and the baby.

Joylyn - posted on 01/11/2010

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hi,

i am mom of 10months old baby boy...

and i breastfed him since i had him until now, i am xactly the same as you a couple of months ago.

what i did is in the morning when he wakes up i give him suckle then 30mins after give his breakfast then in between playin i give him juice a variaty flavour then water then sometimes i trick him by give some milk in his juice beaker and before he realize the diff of the taste then he stops taken it by that time he finish over half of it.

and if he ask a feed i just distruct him by giving juice that he like and some food dont get me wrong about giving him so much juice coz i did ask my health visitor about it first,ask yours as well what she thinks about it..

and it helps by having someone in your house that u trust ei the father,your mom or afriend just ask them to look after your baby for couple of hours bcoz it helps you alot by not having her alot and she will realize that she cant have a suckle all the time so she will take what u give her it would help also for you to go back to work for your lil own time.

but when i get home from work if he's still awake i give him some powder milk first even he dont finish it then for him to settle alot easier for us is give him a suckle in the night and and do d same again in the morning.

i hate leaving my lil one to cry but i make sure u know the difference of his cry of want something for him to be distructed and a cry of just want you not your boobs and a cry that he want to settledown/rest.



take it slowly of reducing the feed dont stop just like that coz it'll make you sad,upset and the baby and of course your health too we dont want to have mastitis at all...



well i wish you all the best and for your lil one too...



thankz.

[deleted account]

Hehehe, my 17mo boy is the same! I don't have a schedule for him to wean as I'm not planning on returning to work for a while longer. Maybe you could cut back to just feeding to sleep and when she wakes up. I used to offer water at night with my daughter from about 18 months. The ABA help line (1800 mum2mum) that Stacey recommend would be a great resource. I guess you've just got to be president with the cows milk. You could try mixing up her night time routine too, introduce music/stories etc, or take her for a walk to put her to sleep. Good luck, it's hard to stop a boobie monster!

Stacey - posted on 01/11/2010

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Welldone on breastfeeding for so long you are fantastic. The Breastfeeding Association is probably the best service that I can think off, that or the Child and Family health services. www.breastfeeding.asn.au or the breastfeeding helpline 18006862686.

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