i think my 6yr old has add/adhd

Sharon - posted on 03/08/2010 ( 207 moms have responded )

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I think my child has add or adhd or both, but my husband doesnt want to have her try any medicine. I struggled with add as a child and still do. I know how frustrating it is for me, and I don't want her to have to struggle any more than she has to. And I don't know if I can handle her driving me crazy. My husband works alot so he doesn't have to deal with her as much. She gets in trouble at school for constant talking and not sitting still. What should I do?

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alright.. I am one way thinking on this.. so please forgive me if I step on anyone's toes.. this is strictly MY opinion and what I have experienced I am not judging anyone not am I stating what is right and what is wrong.. this has just been my experience which has been extremely hard.

My son is 9 years old now.. since he started school at 5 years old, all the teachers kept saying he was ADD..he needs to be medicated, I told them he's not he's just BORED.. I gave in and had him tested in 1st grade.. results were he's NOT ADD but doctor said he could put him on Ridalin and try it.. I SAID HELL NO!.... he kept getting suspended from school, couldn't sit still, wouldn't look at people in the eye.. It was really hard being a single parent working and having to constantly leave work to pick him up from schol because the teachers could not deal with it. Second grade, same thing, teachers are always complaining.. he's talking to much, blurting out, not staying in his seat blah blah, 3rd grade same thing..

Last year in December, I got so angry with the teachers and principal because they kept telling me that my son needed to be on medication that he's just out of control that the teachers have 20 other students to deal with and they cannot continue with his beahavior that if I didn't get him under control that he would not be able to come back to school. So.. I cussed them out, told them that they can kiss my big brown behind that my child was NOT add, that the teachers just dont know how to teach and I took him out of school. Broke my lease, and I moved out of district and enrolled him in another school. Since he has been in that school..
NO SUSPENSIONS,
NO BLURTING OUT,
NO TALKING BACK,

The teachers had him tested and guess what.. HE'S BORED he is reading on a 4th grade level and his math is on a 4th grade level .. once he is taught something he retains it so the teachers are challenging him with 4th grade work.. and are very hands on which is what he needed all this time... He loves his new school and new friends.. He's like a completly different child

my point is.. TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS!.. just because a child is acting out does not mean they need to be medicated! Look at your child and talk to her, listen to her and what she has to say.... it's not always the child that has the problem, In my case, it was the teacher... These medications has terrible side effects..

Please just think about it before

Iridescent - posted on 03/08/2010

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In regards to medication in children with any disorder, it is really the last resort. Medications are not safe. Their safety has not been tested (and will not be) in children under 12. Children under 12 have bodies that work completely differently than a teens, which works differently from an adults, and that is different from an elderly person. That means you get a ton of bad side effects. They are never tried unless there is a great need for it and nothing else has worked.
http://www.addadhdblog.com/adhd-medicati...

Gerri - posted on 03/09/2010

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Please talk to your pediatrician about this, we just found out through the school's intervention that my 6 yr old grandson is adhd. His father opted to change his diet rather than go with medication much to the dismay of the Psychiatrist. He has been gluten and casien (dairy) free for over two weeks and has calmed down by 98% and is now able to focus and read a book. (before he would struggle to read anything). We have since been back to the Psychiatrist, and he was shocked to find out that changing his diet was actually helping. I am not saying that this would be true for all kids, but it is worth trying first before resorting to any type of medication. Hope this helps.

Connie - posted on 03/12/2010

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You have a ton of comments on here so I cant obviously read them all! My 8-1/2 yr old boy was diagnosed the 3rd month of Kindergarten.He didnt have any problems in preschool but he was only there 3 days a week for 3 hours a day. 1st 2 weeks of school was good, then it all started. Of course I knew he was ADHD when he was like 2-3, no lie!! Of course, get him diagnosed first, thats a given. Drs wont prescribe anything unless he is diagnosed, Im sure. Trust me, we have tried a lot of different medications for Austin. The best I have found so far is VyVanse. The only real side effect he has from it is he doesnt have a very good appetite, so he is tiny... But so was his dad when he was younger, which dad was never diagnosed but had some of the same symptoms.I know it isnt as common for girls. As I got to know more about the illness, to this day, I believe I am ADD, no hyperactivity! Answers sooo many questions for me for when I was younger and in school. I have yet to be diagnosed, either, but that is my procrastination why it hasnt happened yet!

We have tried with Austin, Strattera, Adderall, Daytrana, and Focalin, and different dosages of them all, also. He also has had to take Risperdal or Clonidine as another prescription to help with the ADHD and his other meds. He even went thru an ADHD Medical Study at OSU last school year, without any medication for about 3-1/2 months. That was the hardest, of course! He has also went to a Psychologist a couple of times and had some testing done a year and a half to 2 years ago. So, I do know a lil about ADHD but I am not a professional, just experienced! The Study Coordinator at OSU, who is a child Psychologist, told me that Austin can not function without medication. He would never make it thru life, so I feel he is pretty severe. He is also ODD and has some OCD, too. If youd like to talk, chat, email, just add me to your circle, maybe we can chat on facebook or something like that. By the way,my name is Connie, married, mother of 2.Hope to get to know you better, Sharon! Good luck with your daughter in whatever you decide to do.

Terri - posted on 03/12/2010

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hi sharon my name is terri my daughter was diagonosed with adhd when she was 8 years old . and now she is 13 years old and still has adhd.i took her to 3 doctor and they all diagonsed her with adhd.she was on all kinds of medicanes nothing really worked for her .except .concerta it worked for a while but then she was like a zombie at school and then she would walk around the classroom and not sit but she hasnt been on medication for over a couple of years.she is doing better in school .but not at home she is mouthy and very talkitive all the time.and fights with her friends and her sister .i get frausted very easily.its hard to deal the a child with adhd.so i would take your daughter to the doctor to be sure she has adhd it will give you peace at mind.i hope everything works out for you good luck sharon terri

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Charity - posted on 03/12/2010

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I too have a child with adhd. Let me say he is a much happier child with his medication. His grades have improved and he can fuction in the school setting. My advise is to make your childs doctor your partner in this. Together the three of you can get through this.

Paula - posted on 03/12/2010

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Adhd does run thru your family. It is better to have your child tested to be sure. There is other ways to deal with add. Since your husband does not want to go the route of try medicine, there is a diet that you can use. Stay away from red 40 and blue 40 in food, which also makes your child hyper.

Tabitha - posted on 03/12/2010

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Sharon, both of my boys have been diagnosed with adhd , my oldest one has grown out of it . I understand excately what you are going through and I was alot like your husband at first not wanting them on meds but i agreed to try it and we have had wonderful results. My other son has not yet grown out of it , he takes a low dose of meds and we have had no side effect problems at all , he is a very happy boy, eats me out of house and home to. He has been on meds for 3 years and his grades have improved so much it is unreal, because he can actually concentrate on his work and his mind is not going 100 miles an hour, also the behavioral problems have stopped.Hope this will help . I wish you the best and you are not a bad mother for wanting to try to help your child get to a level that she can focus more in school.

Sharlene - posted on 03/12/2010

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Don't do meds! I know some parents swear by them but they didn't have their children checked for food allergies or sensitivities. They thought they'd try the drugs first. I think meds should be a last resort instead of where to start. I recommend looking for a kinesiologist in your area that can test for sensitivities. It's a very friendly visit, no blood tests. If you happen to be in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, I can recommend one to you. So many issues stem from our digestive system. It's a great place to start when trying to figure out something that just doesn't seem right. Best to you!

Hope - posted on 03/12/2010

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well i understand what u r goin through.i have a son with adhd and was finally diagnosed in !st grade,but i had suspected it a year prior.when he when in first grade things really got worse.he had all f's and wasn't learning things cuz he couldn't pay attention even though he tried.so i di have him put on meds,even though i was leary of it.I am glad i did i have seen big improvements!his grades r now a's and b's.he is doin much better behavior wise at home as well.i recommend u have ur daughter tested.it's better than ur child and u both being frustrated with each other.

User - posted on 03/12/2010

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We have known for years that my son had some issues, we didn't know what they were...we went to private PD when he was 5 but started costing us to much so we stopped - but last year we went back to GP & got a referral to a different PD(which BB after first visit), on his second visit my son had to do the computerized test(which the name escapes me at this moment), the test is used worldwide & is used n diagnosis of many things such as ADD, ADHD, Epilepsy & others. It was found that my son is ADHD, the PD didn't put him on meds, as teachers have teaching techniques to deal with those kids. I suggest you get your child seen & get proper diagnosis, if you don't she will be labelled the naughty child by her teacher and will definitely NOT receive the help that she really needs. My son is doing well so far this year & is receiving personalized help, from the teacher & SEU. Medication seems to be used when teachers aren't informed & therefore have no idea on how to deal with those poor kids.

Micah - posted on 03/12/2010

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i would also like to just point out the the medicne the give to help calm a child for adhd is amphetamine based which is a street drug none as speed or base when we were younger imy mates used to buy my persciption off me and we would all go and get off are heads! here is the side affects of concerta....

Dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; headache; increased sweating; loss of appetite; nausea; nervousness; stomach pain; trouble sleeping; weight loss.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Concerta Extended-Release Tablets:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; joint pain; purple or brownish red spots on the skin); behavior changes (eg, aggression, hostility); blurred vision or other vision problems; chest pain or discomfort; confusion; dark urine; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or sore throat; hallucinations; mental or mood changes (eg, abnormal thoughts, agitation, anxiety, depression, irritability, persistent crying, unresponsiveness, unusual sadness); seizures; severe or persistent dizziness or headache; suicidal thoughts or attempts; uncontrolled speech or muscle movements; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

i only took this medication because i was forced to the medication mad e me feel horrible as soon as i turned 16 i refused the drug i will never take it again i find a healthy organic diet is the way foward

Micah - posted on 03/12/2010

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hi i have adhd myself and through 18 years of trying to understand it its alot to do with what you eat alot of foods have additives colours and flavering wich make the problem worse try your child on organic food only and see if you start to notice any diffrences however adhd isnt jus being talkative or fidgetty i remember i was a very naught child allways fighting being rude to teacher very loud fidgety i would argue about absoloutly anything i suggest you take your child to the docter who will then refer you to a child physoligist who will do lots of assesment to find out wether your child has add, adhd or maybe somthing else however with your description i tend to feel you just have an energitic child!! xxx

Cynthia - posted on 03/12/2010

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My son has been seeing a pediatric neuro physician since he was 3 because at 2 1/2, early intervention placed him on the Autism spectrum. He is now 5, out grown alot of his issues and has been pre-diagnosed ADHD by the ped. neuro phys. The physician has us trying all kinds of different things (behavior therapy, classes on having a child with ADHD) to try to help him before she will even consider medicating him. My point, take her to a pediatric neuro physician and have her examined and tested. See if they can help you help her with behavior therapy first. My son is doing very well, he is still quite hyper though.

Teresa - posted on 03/12/2010

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I have a completely unprofesional opinion about ADD and ADHD. A couple of my siblings had it growing up. I have a friend with a son who was just diagnosed and put on medication which he said helps (however he eats a horrific diet, its sick). Personally, if I were in your position I would research diet changes before medication. I believe a lot of things can be improved or even cured through a healthy, fresh diet!

Good luck to you whatever you decide!

Amy - posted on 03/12/2010

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Try other ways then medicine. The medicine for ADD/ADHD has great health risks-cardiac. I know it sounds bad but my family tried Mountain Dew before school and at lunch. The caffeine is the stimulant that helps control the symptoms.

[deleted account]

Hello,



I have had to deal with that same issue. My only advice is to seek profesional help for your child. It is proved that 1 in 5 children have a mental illness. Good luck and don't give up.. Help is on it's way for you and your child...

Vicki - posted on 03/12/2010

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Before trying meds for ADD or ADHD, try eliminating all food additives from her diet. Any food dyes, preservatives, etc....many allergies to these items cause very similar symptoms. One of my relatives had a lot of problems with their young child and the doctors wanted him on Ritalin. She refused to put him on the meds and instead removed additives. Within a short period of time, he was a completely different child. It was wonderful. I think it is definitely worth a try. Hope it works for you, too.

Jennifer - posted on 03/12/2010

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There are so many replies, I couldn't read them all. I don't want to be repetitive, but would like to weigh in on the side of NO MEDICATION. Her brain is still growing. Before you resort to this, I would try a strict diet that includes no added sugar, check out other triggers, gluten, dairy, etc. You might find that optimum nutrition improves your ability to cope, and how cool would that be! If you can afford a naturopath's opinion, go ask. If you don't agree, you are still the one to decide. See if homeopathy offers any options, even if it doesn't help, it won't harm. There are even computer exercises that can build your child's brain. They might be experiment still- I think they are called bio-feedback. Worth googling though. Alternative options will be harder to discover, because they don't have pharmaceutical money for advertising. I take care of a child with diagnosed issues (I don't know what, but he is on meds). He has the same problems at school, including crawling under the teacher's desk. I know he refuses to eat properly at home, but I won't let him eat junk. I do think he is high energy and hard to control, but I don't think he needs meds. I know I am more firm and patient than his parents, and I he behaves better for me, because he knows that with me there are simply no other options. I am not trying to insult you, lots of people find it tiring to stand up to a persistent child, but if you think that might be a factor, I think you should see it as an opportunity for personal growth. I also wonder if marriage issues are making him agitated. The poor kid that I take care of has memory problems and they are too pronounced to be other than a med side effect. I worry what permanent effects it is causing. Good luck!

Linda - posted on 03/12/2010

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If your husband objects to even having her tested, then you probably are not going to get a diagnosis. If you truly believe that she has ADD or ADHD, try some alternatives, do some research. I've heard that a change in diet is helpful, as well as behavior modification...pointing out to the child that they are acting inappropriately, and guide them to the correct behavior. In time they will learn to recognize this on their own. My son has never had a formal diagnosis, but these things have worked for us. Not to say he is perfect now, we still struggle from time to time. But things have gotten much better! Good luck, and remember to stick with it! It doesn't change overnight!

Jhoni - posted on 03/12/2010

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I can totally relate to your frustration.There is a computer program that I would definately use if my son was 6 now. I'm sure it could help. I know you have alot to read in all the responses. If you are interested in the program, let me know and I will show you how to get it. It's well worth the try and fun for kids.Your school district can and should be testing her completely. Do not let them label her and do not use it as a crutch yourself for bad behavior. But DO be consistent, loving and patient. I found this worked better than anything. Unfortunately most teachers are not patient enough to work with these types of kids. They want to teach the kids who do not interrupt class or who learn easily. Tell each teacher and family member what you want from them and make sure they follow through. We tried all sorts of meds and it only changed our sons personality, it didn't change the problem.

Patsy - posted on 03/12/2010

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I have had friends that have had good luck with diet. I think there might be a few books out there about it. If the Doctor diagnoses it and diet doesn't work, I think medication can be a good tool. I have seen children who's parents are against medication, and they just try and cope, but I've watched their childs self image just take a nose dive because they are always getting scolded, and told they are bad, when they really can't control it.

Kelly - posted on 03/12/2010

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They have testes for that . I would goto the doctors. If you arethe one having deal with everything. I am the same way my husband works all the time. If you think it is a problem I woulg get it check out. You would rather know then not. Or at least I would.

Kelly - posted on 03/12/2010

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They have testes for that . I would goto the doctors. If you arethe one having deal with everything. I am the same way my husband works all the time. If you think it is a problem I woulg get it check out. You would rather know then not. Or at least I would.

Colleen - posted on 03/12/2010

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a first step is talk to the teachers, and counslors. See if they feel that your fears are justified. next step would be observations and/or experts in the feild to meet with her. I have several family members with add. medicine isn't always the best answer if this is what she has. talk to your doctor and the profesionals before you worry needlessly

Christi - posted on 03/12/2010

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I honestly think that you should just keep trying to open his eyes about how much add can’t affect a person. I find it helpful to read books with my partner to get her to understand what I struggle with. I wasn’t treated for my add until I was an adult....and it has made the biggest difference and in fact I’m really upset that my parents never did anything about it when I was younger. It would have made my life SO much easier! But I would at least start with books so at least he can see how others are dealing with their add and what happens to their life when it is untreated. I hope this helps. :)

Brittani - posted on 03/12/2010

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from my personal experience working with homeopathic and natural remedies. one of the best ways to help children with attention issues and hyperactivity is fish oil. they have it in a form that is like pudding. taste like chocolate. it has helped SO many children! i've witnessed their the before and after, truly amazing!

Liz - posted on 03/12/2010

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I hope that today is a good day for you. As you see, there are so many different options for you to consider. This is a family journey that lasts a lifetime. While you figure out the right answers for your child and your family, I encourage you to focus on what your daughter does very well and nurture that to its fullest, every single day!



My story as a mother with a hyperactive (ADHD), gifted child with learning differences began 26 years ago. In a nutshell, our family survived intact though not without tremendous struggles on every level and at each age. Medications helped tremendously at first, but took their toll over the years. Would I do them again? I think so, yes, but only if my doctor was as good as mine was at tweaking to find optimum levels for learning, which are lower than medicating for behavior. Also, I would come to an understanding with your husband before you even suggest them to your daughter. I was the parent who was skeptical about meds. But when I learned that they were totally excreted by the kidneys in four hours, I agreed to a trial dosage one weekend. The positive effects were immediate, almost miraculous. (I still have the note from his teacher from that first day of school on meds.. It was unbelievable how delightful and polite he was from that point forward.)



I am so thankful for the support that I received from CHADD. I needed the company of these other parents who were going through what I was, to know that "it wasn't me" or bad parenting.



I am also thankful that once my family found a routine that worked for us, and we stuck with it; that I had the courage to stick with it against the criticism of others (e.g. like at a Parent Teacher Conference where it was suggested that we let the kids watch TV on weeknights so that our son would be better at socializing about current shows; when TV in the evenings just made my son less able to settle for bed).



When my son was diagnosed, his doctor asked to meet me on a weekly basis. "How odd" I thought at the time. But truly that time was such a gift to me, my family, and especially my son. His doctor helped to educate me and helped me to sort through all of these issues and options, and led me to CHADD. During that time we identified the strengths in my son and our family, and we constructed an imperfect but resilient family life around what worked for us (routine!).



I still get a smile when I hear my son talk about his "idyllic" childhood. It's not quite how I remember it, but, AMEN, I am so thankful that this was his experience and memory of those early days!

Ta - posted on 03/12/2010

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Hi, sounds like its been difficult for you. How old is your daughter? What does she love to do? See if you cannot find someone to give you a break once in awhile to begin with....and then see if you can take her places that require the engery that she seems to have. Each child has their gifts and yours does as well. This is the thing...we never know who she will grow up to be...so encouragement is the best thing for her...no matter what...when she does what you want her to do, give her rewards that she can identify with and that are age appropriate. A new barbie, a soccor ball...that is the other thing get her involved with sports that take her energy, ball, but swimming is a good one for small children. Try and get her in a class that is around 7:30, and then its bed time after that...if you cannot afford this, see is the YMCA can help you...I hope that this helps alittle....kids need to have the stimulation, you need peace and quiet...so all and all if these can work for you...you will have a helathy happy enviornment!

Lynn - posted on 03/12/2010

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Drugs are not the answer! Drugs for ADD/ADHD are horrible, same as cocaine... Read about them. If your daughter needs to talk and move around, that is completely normal! I know where you're coming from, I have children diagnosed with this. Let her talk, let her move around, it is what she needs. The schools want to drug our kids so they will be submissive little robots. That makes their job a lot easier. A better solution is diet, herbal remedies, Bach Flower Remedies, getting out in nature...

Ta - posted on 03/12/2010

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Hi, sounds like its been difficult for you. How old is your daughter? What does she love to do? See if you cannot find someone to give you a break once in awhile to begin with....and then see if you can take her places that require the engery that she seems to have. Each child has their gifts and yours does as well. This is the thing...we never know who she will grow up to be...so encouragement is the best thing for her...no matter what...when she does what you want her to do, give her rewards that she can identify with and that are age appropriate. A new barbie, a soccor ball...that is the other thing get her involved with sports that take her energy, ball, but swimming is a good one for small children. Try and get her in a class that is around 7:30, and then its bed time after that...if you cannot afford this, see is the YMCA can help you...I hope that this helps alittle....kids need to have the stimulation, you need peace and quiet...so all and all if these can work for you...you will have a helathy happy enviornment!

[deleted account]

My son is doing the same thing I think he is ADHD also so starting monday morning I am taking him to go and see someone but I am not letting them give my son medication at all so me being a mother with the same problem . I would suggest that you get her tested and go from there.

Dawn - posted on 03/12/2010

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my 10 year old son was diagnosed at age 6 with adhd. we tried the patch which was horrible! it's a pain to put on, you have to put it on an hour before your child's ready to wake up and it kept him up all night. if your daughter has to be medicated, don't choose this; i dont think you'd like it. we tried herbal treatments and it didn't help with his hyperactivity. it did seem to help with his short term memory however; it helped him retain some info that was taught to him. finally we tried generic adderall and it works great! he's still able to sleep at night and he went from getting c's, d's, and f's to getting on the honor roll! now he is in a special class for reading and math and on a modified curriculum. he's in regular classes for social studies, science, etc. but, sharon, if your daughter needs to go to a special education class, don't be afraid or offended by the school if they suggest this. it'll really help. your homework experience is exactly like ours was! when your child is put on a modified curriculum, they are able to understand a lot more, therefore they will learn and retain the info, especially if they are on meds to help them focus and sit still. even with meds and modified classes, you're still gonna have to deal with a little frustration every once in awhile, b/c well, school work gets a little harder every year as we all know! it'll be difficult when they start new material, but with meds, help, love, support, encouragement and lots of praise, your daughter's gonna be ok.

CASEY - posted on 03/12/2010

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that is what my daughter is on, concerta, my son is only 3 so he is on a 5 mg short acting ritilin, and i love it, i feel sane now, espically with 4 kids 2 are adhd, and i myself suffer from bipolar and adhd, si i'm sorry to anyone that don't believe in meds cuz i'll tell u what, i sure believe they r a miracle!

Nadine - posted on 03/12/2010

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My dear the only advice I can give you is take her to a Neurologist for testing. It is painless, I promise. My son was diagnosed at 6 and I have seen a huge change in since he went onto his meds. I refused to put him on Ritalin and we went for Concerta which has no side affects. He has excelled at school and a pleasure to have around. If he misses a tab I know all about it!! Take to Hubby and tell him that Ritalin is not the only meds for this condition. If you want to go the herbal way there is ADDvance but that only helped for a short while. GOOD LUCK

CASEY - posted on 03/12/2010

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hello, my name is casey. i have 4 children, i'm 25 and they r range from 5 1/2 to 5 mo being my youngest, i actually went through the same thing, i'm sorry to say and don't take this the wrong way, but ur husband is in denial, i struggled as a child, and my mother would not put me on meds, i also struggled with bipolar, i started on meds about 3 yrs ago, and have been a totally diff person, anyway, sorry this question was about ur baby, i finnally took my daughter to the doctor with out his permission, because i couldn't handle her anymore,she was diagnosed with adhd at age 3 1/2 it has taken a while to get her on the meds that actually worked for her, but when she started school, she needed something stronger so she was started on 36 mg of concerta, she is doing awsome in school now, but because the first few months she couldn't sit still and learn anything, she will fail kindergarten, but she has came soooo far in the last few months, it really is a miracle on what meds can do,i have also had to do the same with our 3 yr old son, wasn't trying to go into life detail, but now that my husband see's how much calmer the kids are and that meds don't make them zombies he thanks me for taking them now.....any other questions maybe i can help with....

Sherie - posted on 03/12/2010

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First... Have your daughters IQ checked. She might just be too smart for her own good and getting into trouble because shes bored and under stimulated. Second... I would highly recommend looking into food allergies. I know a lot of people think it sounds hocus pocus but food allergies are very real and can cause all kinds of symptoms that are most times misdiagnosed as something that Drs are all too quick to otherwise medicate for. I strongly urge against medicating your daughter because the health problems that go along with these medications are no joke. And thats if they dont kill her. I have a friend who has been medicated for this kind of thing since the age of 7 and now at 39 he has all sorts of serious health problems from long term ingestion of prescription drugs. And in my opinion, though I do believe that these sorts of problems do exist in young children, what is otherwise just normal child like behavior is perceived as something much more serious because we, as a society, are ill equipped to handle a healthy high energy child. With the stresses of todays economy, whats usually a requirement for 2 income households and technology sucking our attention away from reality and responsibilities because we spread ourselves far too thin that we need that escape... Medicating a child, more times than not, is an issue of convenience for the parents... In my opinion. Im not saying you specifically so please dont take offense to anything that I said. Im speaking in general terms though I do say it with conviction. Just pleas, please, please think long and hard before you make the decision to medicate and only after youve done your own research because remember a lot of these doctors, if not all of them, make money off of the drugs they prescribe to their patients.

Vanessa - posted on 03/12/2010

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Hello, there, again.... I appreciate you marking my prior comment as helpful & after reading through some of the newer comments, something hit my memory like a ton of bricks! My cousin who was misdiagnosed as a child turned out to be allergic to red food coloring! You know when you read the ingredient list the "Red 40" at the very end? Yup, that was the culprit for all of my cousin's craziness! Also, the suggestions to check her eyesight is right on point, but don't forget about her hearing as well. My grandfather has a condition where he can hear audio volumes just fine, but the constinents(any letter other than A-E-I-O-U-Y) are muffled to him. I'm not sure what the technical name for it is but with children, anything that inhibits them from functioning along the same standard as the other kids can be cause for acting out. You said in one response that she cries due to not understanding her homework- check for dyslexia (when people read things backwards) My step-son thought he was "so stupid" and it was hell trying to tutor him(I used to till I moved) because he just seemed to be so convinced he was stupid that his motivation was deteriorating. Now he knows he's not stupid, just different. Again good luck.

Amy - posted on 03/11/2010

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I've read the first 100 posts on here and found a lot of helpful information! So thanks to all who've posted. I too have had my sons teachers tell me he may have ADHD and suggest I medicate him. As a mother I want him to live the best fullest life possible; it is my intention to exhaust EVERY resource out there to help my child. I found several ways to do that from all these posts...



I was shocked when someone mentioned dyslexia, because just recently after my son celebrated his 100th day of kindergarten I found out he can't identify several lower case letters. So this was helpful, we'll have to test that one out.



A change in diet, I think seeing a Pediatric Dietitian is an amazing idea. To test for gluten or HFCS allergies, or to eliminate MSG, preservatives, artificial colors, additives, etc.



He can't sit still....including activities that require high energy are working for us so far, I think he can't sit still because he wants to do gymnastics! When I watched Dancing with the Stars, at the age of 3 he was mimicking their moves while watching...in perfect rhythm.



Hopefully this is a good summary for those of you who didn't have time to read the first 100 posts :)



Other good mentions:

*Get a full "neuro psych evaluation"

*Use a stress ball in school for fidgets

*see a Behavioral specialist for behavior modification

*See a physician who actually specializes in ADHD, try getting an EEG, EKG, bllod work, and cognitive testing

*See a neurologist

*See the eye doc- test for visual tracking

*Do an IQ test.

Amy - posted on 03/11/2010

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I've read the first 100 posts on here and found a lot of helpful information! So thanks to all who've posted. I too have had my sons teachers tell me he may have ADHD and suggest I medicate him. As a mother I want him to live the best fullest life possible; it is my intention to exhaust EVERY resource out there to help my child. I found several ways to do that from all these posts...



I was shocked when someone mentioned dyslexia, because just recently after my son celebrated his 100th day of kindergarten I found out he can't identify several lower case letters. So this was helpful, we'll have to test that one out.



A change in diet, I think seeing a Pediatric Dietitian is an amazing idea. To test for gluten or HFCS allergies, or to eliminate MSG, preservatives, artificial colors, additives, etc.



He can't sit still....including activities that require high energy are working for us so far, I think he can't sit still because he wants to do gymnastics! When I watched Dancing with the Stars, at the age of 3 he was mimicking their moves while watching...in perfect rhythm.



Hopefully this is a good summary for those of you who didn't have time to read the first 100 posts :)



Other good mentions:

*Get a full "neuro psych evaluation"

*Use a stress ball in school for fidgets

*see a Behavioral specialist for behavior modification

*See a physician who actually specializes in ADHD, try getting an EEG, EKG, bllod work, and cognitive testing

*See a neurologist

*See the eye doc- test for visual tracking

*Do an IQ test.

Kayna - posted on 03/11/2010

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Believe it or not, I actually read all the other posts and still have something else to add to the discussion. My youngest son now age 22 was diagnosed in second grade. His teacher suggested I get him tested with a psychologist. I trusted her judgment because she had also taught his two older brothers who don't have AD/HD. We have a joke in our family that it wasn't a coincidence that she retired after that year with our youngest! My husband and I chose the route of medication and behavioral therapy. One thing that helped me become more educated about AD/HD was finding and attending our local chapter of CHADD. It's a support network for people who are faced with the challenges that come with AD/HD. It's a monthly meeting with local medical and educational professionals who speak on a variety of related topics. CHADD is a national organization that does not take an official stand on whether or not to medicate. What it does do is provide a place where ideas can be exchanged in a friendly supportive atmosphere. I attended meetings for years, learned a great deal, and eventually became a speaker myself. My topic was dealing with the teachers and administrators who I'm guessing all did the happy dance when my son finally graduated from high school! I consistently advocated for my son and made sure his 504 Accommodations were being met - often to the chagrin of teachers who don't like being flexible. I no longer remember how many times I heard, "It's not fair to the rest of the students if I make this exception for your son." If you have a 504 in place at the school, the teacher must adhere to it. I was not always liked by the teachers (after elementary school) because I challenged their authority. But, they were not the ones who would still be responsible for my son after he took their single class that only lasted 180 days of his life. As a parent, I was much more invested in my son's success than any of his teachers were. I continually explained that the personality traits that caused tension in the classroom (high energy, sociability, clownish antics) would be the very traits that would make him successful at something in the future. In fact, he's very successful at sales and probably earns more than some of his teachers! He's also turned out to be responsible and respectful as an adult. So I finally feel vindicated for all those hours I spent trying to convince others that he would turn out alright in the end.

[deleted account]

I can see you've already gotten a lot of replies on this, but I wanted to add my encouragement, too, since I know how hard it is to raise a child with ADHD. My 7-yr-old daughter was diagnosed last year with it. Before then, we wondered if she was mentally deranged. She would have such horrible temper tantrums and cause such contention and friction in our house (we have 4 other children), and between my husband and I. Like another mom said above, if you haven't had a child with ADD/ADHD, you have no idea how truly difficult it is. We went through leukemia with our oldest daughter, and, truthfully, ADHD has been more taxing on us than that experience was. People can readily sympathize with physical ailments like cancer, but with mental ones, there isn't as much support, and a lot of judgement and resulting guilt. We have spent the last year trying different meds, and finally found one that seems to be working. The difference in our daughter's behavior was night and day. Having a child that breaks things because you told her to put her shoes away is frightening and can cause you to question your ability to be a good mother. I am for medication. Scottie Hamer put it best in her post that medication for a child that truly has this challenge is a life raft. I'm sure diet can help, too, but, for us, anyway, it was not enough to change her behavior. The side effects for us have included loss of appetite and insomnia (only on one med which we discontinued use of). She is now on Metadate, which is working well for her. If she is diagnosed with ADHD, just remember that many other moms face the same thing and you're not alone in the struggle! I wish you the best!

Tracy - posted on 03/11/2010

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Hi Sharon, my daughter has been diagnosed with ADD after I recognised all the signs at age 7. I have it too! She was put on medication and it definitely helped in a lot of ways, not least with her confidence and self-esteem. My husband supported everything, however I know from speaking to the Dr that a lot of men have a problem accepting their children need help as they feel it reflects on them. They'd rather pretend the problem doesn't exist and spare their own ego's, and of course, as you say they pop off to work and don't have to deal with it much. Try going away for a weekend and leaving her with him 100%, I guarentee he'll change his tune, lol. May I suggest you try giving her fish oils in the meantime, before you get to your appointment? I started my daughter on something called IQ (after checking it was ok first) and the difference was amazing, the good thing is that they can keep taking it along with any meds that are perscribed and will provide her with a double whammy. Good luck for the future, I'm sure all will turn out well.

Suellen - posted on 03/11/2010

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Please try homeopathy! I live near Chicago and started to see "natural" doctors after the medical doctors had my 1 and 4 year old sons on too many prescription medicines. One day - after holding my kids down to take their meds. - I said this is nuts - I'm not doing it anymore and found an awesome naturopathic doctor that literally saved our families' life. My sons and I are on a no sugar diet (of course we cheat on sundays) and we take homeopathic remedies (for my sons' behaviors - one has a biting tendency and the other has major melt downs). I knew that homeopathy was the way to go after a serious situation of my 4 yr. old having horrible coughing spasms at night with induced vomiting - this went on for several nights in a row. We went to the homeopathic doctor - she gave a remedy and after taking the candy tasting pellets, my son had NO more cough! We used to be sick all the time and since the natural doctor switch - NO sickness and so HAPPY - good moods and health is everything to a Mom! And of course, if you are religious, Pray - it works wonders as well. Take care and the best of luck.

[deleted account]

One more comment - in figuring out the proper dosage for my son, we addressed a food allergy and seasonal allergies. Our son is on the lowest dosage available. At first it wasn't enough. We moved him up to the next dosage level and it was too much (and it is OBVIOUS if you are overmedicating because of the crash when they come off of it). We changed his diet for the food allergies, have him taking a daily claritin type allergy pill, and the lower dosage that originally didn't cut it is working perfectly. There are so many factors to the symptoms that it is important to look at physical/environmental things that can be changed FIRST and then treat for the neurological aspect of it last.

[deleted account]

I haven't read through all of the comments you have already receive, so I apologize if I am a repeat. My husband has ADHD, as a Psych student I studied the topic at a University level, and my six year old was diagnosed this past year.



Because of the genetic connection with my husband and because of behavior that triggered questions with my son for as long as I can remember, we decided to have the school do a screening on my son immediately upon his entry into Kindergarten. The great thing about having the school do a screening is that the teachers are aware of what is "age-appropriate" behavior and what might be actual symptoms. Our experience was really validating to compare our responses to the screening with what the teacher responses were. They were very similar and we realized that although we were concerned that our answers would be biased as the parents, that we were consistent with each other and with the teacher.



When the screening came back for ADHD-C (which means he has both hyperactivity and attention defecit) we scheduled an appointment with the pediatrician. He reviewed the school screening, had the teacher fill out a different screening, and scheduled a 90+ minute appointment for observation. Again it was very validating to have the pediatrican give a really educated explanation of what ADHD is, what is going on with the child, and then to watch first hand as my child exhibited the symptoms during that appointment and followed the pattern that the doctor explained.



I had spent months WONDERING and thinking that ADHD is such a difficult and ambiguous thing to diagnose. It isn't always. Sometimes it can be really clear cut. ESPECIALLY because you have a genetic connection, it is DEFINITELY worth doing a school screening and talking with your pediatrician.



Before I took my class on this subject, my husband and I were very opposed to using medication for this. My husband is medicated as an adult and we have seen first hand the impact for good it has been for him, but as an adult, we feel more comfortable in his ability to manage the correct dosage etc. However, the more I learned about the disorder and the more studies I read about the medication and also about alternative treatments, the more our position on that topic changed. We have opted to treat with medication and it took about two months to figure out the right dosage, but it has been a very positive thing for our son.



One thing our doctor had us do before starting on the medication was give our son about 6 oz of a sugar free caffinated soda. If you give a child with ADHD caffine without sugar, it will medicate them for about 20 minutes. Test it out and see if it helps.



Also, boys with ADHD-C and girls with any form of ADHD often have difficulty in regulating their emotions. If your daughter tends to over-react to situations or have emotional outbursts that don't seem consistent with other children her age, this may actually be a symptom of ADHD. Until I took my class, I had no idea that this aspect of my child's behavior had anything to do with ADHD.



And one final comment just about termonology. In the past the terms have been ADD and ADHD. Now it is all called ADHD. There are three types of ADHD. ADHD-I (inattentive) ADHD-H (hyperacivity) and ADHD-C (combined).



Good luck in finding what is best for your child and your family!

Heidi - posted on 03/11/2010

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The only thing that the meds will do will make her stay focused and help her out with life. These two children had a very hard time keeping friends because of how they were, and now it's easier for them to be able to interact socially with the kids too. I wish you the best of luck. I can only imagine how hard this decision is.

Deborah - posted on 03/11/2010

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Does your husband suffer from ADD/ADHD? Does he not understand the frustration of getting into trouble all the time "don't do this, sit still, sit down" etc. - when you are trying your hardest and doing the best you can to focus and be the best you can but just can't. I suggest you make an appointment with a counselor or doctor that will take the time to explain things to him and how a low dose of medication will benefit you child and help build up their self-esteem rather than having people tearing it down. It is not worth the constant battle between you-the child-the teacher-and everyone else involved, especially since he doesn't seem to see it. Good luck and be sure to take letters from the teachers with you concerning their input.

Ashley - posted on 03/11/2010

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i find out tomorrow afternoon which one it is my daughter has. and i am so not sure what to do. my husband and i both dont want to put her on meds but i'm with u about going crazy. theres a little part in the back of my head that is happy that i have this option but i'm just not sure what to do either because i just dont want my daughter to change........

Heidi - posted on 03/11/2010

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I work as a teacher's assistant, so from a childcare giver's opinion, take her to a dr. first and get her tested. Don't do anything yet until she is diagnosed. If you had it growing up then it is likely that she does have it to. And my brother had ADHD and sometimes still struggles with it, and he's 28 yrs. old. The medicine actually is there to help the child cope with life. There are actually a couple kids in the class I help out with that just was diagnosed and it is like night and day when they went on medicine. She might not even need to be put on a high dose, just enough to keep her focused. Otherwise she will struggle all through school, and that is not good for her either. Good luck in your decision-making.

Holly - posted on 03/11/2010

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I have some natural options that have worked really well for my daughter who is now 11. Feel free to call me and I will share with you what I have used and what has happened. I think many times we can tell without a diagnosis that what's going on is not within normal range. And I think meds are over prescribed for children who are simply energetic and inquisitive. Natural solutions can bring your child's energy into a normal range. Feel free to call if you like.



Holly Gerchen

St Louis, MO

314-629-3858

Kim - posted on 03/11/2010

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There is lots of advice given here. I will add my two cents. Definitely diet, no sugar, no juice drinks, lots of water etc. Reduce TV and video games and any screen type activity. If there is an imbalance in the brain chemicals you don't need drugs but natural Amino Acids. Check out www.neurorelief.com.

There is also meridian tapping or EFT (emotional freedom technique) to deal with the excess energy.

There are tons of wonderful ideas and solutions that honor the body, mind and spirit.

Good luck

Fiona - posted on 03/11/2010

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I was recently informed by the school that they thought my 6 yr old boy maybe ADHD

and asked me to take him to see peadatrician which I did he said he would not diagnose a child at six maybe when his 8 to bring him back as sometime children this young are misdiagnosed. Also I personally would not go down the medication track until all other avenues are exhausted having had two nephews (who are now men ) diagnosed and both placed on Ritlin as very young boys whom are now and have been since teens heroin addicts I believe you must thoroughly research anything you are about to give your children not just for the now benefits but as to what effects it will have on them later in life. Whatever you decide I do sympathise with you as I too am going thru the same with my boy at the moment. Good Luck.

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