is it wrong for not wanting my child to believe in santa?

Cassie - posted on 07/09/2010 ( 202 moms have responded )

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my daughter is only 10 months old, and i know i still have a while before she starts learning about santa and christmas. well i do not want her to grow up believing in santa claus. everyone tells me that i should let her believe and that im in the wrong to make that Decision and that i will be taken all the fun out of christmas. I remember when i was little i would get made fun of cuz i believed in santa. and when i found out that there was NO santa it broke my heart because i believed that he was real. I dont want my daughter to believe in some Fictional Character that isnt real. at a young age i want to teach her that its all about jesus NOT SANTA. and why we celebrate christmas. so do you think im wrong for not wanting my daughter to believe in santa?

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[deleted account]

Yes. Let kids be kids. There is too much reality in this world when they grow up. Sure, teach her about the true meaning of christmas but also let her believe in fantasy. Do you also want to ban the tooth fairy; tell her Tinkler Bell is not real? The easter bunny? All these are a part of childhood that makes it special. You were heart broken when you found out, but she is not you. It would be heart breaking for her not to believe in fairy tales. Let her be a kid and you will get so much pleasure seeing her little face light up at christmas than see a disappointed face because she was told not to believe.

Gertie - posted on 07/10/2010

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You're the parent, it's up to you. But just know that you're taking the magic out of Christmas for your kid. I never felt let down when I found out Santa wasnt' real...so it wasn't a big deal for me. It obviously left a mark on you, so do what you think is right.

This reminds me of the quote

"It's better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved"

I'd rather love and lose, than to never had experienced that magical Christmas feeling you get as a child...but that's just me.

Kelley - posted on 07/13/2010

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Love this...I am amazed at the things we worry about as new parents. As a mom of 3 kids and one entering in to college, I can tell you hands down; this is not something you should be worried about. If you have ever heard the phrase pick and choose your battles? The other phrase I always lived by was pick and choose my worries. There are plenty of consequential things in life to worry about and this really isn't one of them.
My kids all believed in Santa, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy. We had fun with it. We are Christians and taught them the meaning of Easter and Christmas to us, and they understood. They also understood the myth of Santa and the Easter Bunny later on. It seriously wasn't an issue. That you had such a trauma from it is the exception, I think, not the norm. And, kids are so very smart. I think deep down they know there isn't a Santa when they see one on every corner as they enter grade school, but they like the game of believing.
I say quit worrying...:)

Sherri - posted on 07/10/2010

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Yes I believe you are very wrong. She will always hear and see Santa and you are taking away a big part of what being a kid is about. My kids believed until they were 12 and in 6th grade. I wouldn't take it away from them for all the tea in China.



By the way we are very religious and all my kids know the true meaning of Christmas is to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Christmas is not all about the presents for my kids.

[deleted account]

if you are going to not let her believe in santa, then are you going to not let her believe in princesses, and fairies, and love at first sight as well? sounds like thats taking away a whole lot of childhood. but it is your choice. for me, i want my kids to believe in magic, and wishing on a star and love at first sight and all that fun stuff that adults ruin.

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Michelle - posted on 07/14/2010

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People keep saying that the reason for Christmas is the birth of Christ and teaching about Santa Clause is telling our children a lie. But since there were no birth registries or such in the time of Christ how do we truly know that his birthday is on December 25th. December 25th was originally celebrated by the roman pagans with a great feast to honor the winter solstice. The Christian church adopted this date in 440 AD as the official birth of Christ to try and bring the Pagans into the fold. So how is teaching your children that this is Jesus birthday any different from telling your child about St. Nicholas who was a kind and caring man, both stories are real Christ was born and Nicholas was a real person. Shouldn't we be telling our kids that we chose to celebrate his birthday on this date, as telling them it is his bday may not be a truth. This being said I am religious I was born and raised catholic but we also celebrate St. Nicholas. Christmas does not have to be materialistic it is about celebrating life, togetherness, and family. For those who want to celebrate the birth of Christ go for it, if you choose to tell your kids Santa isn't real that is your parogative but don't ruin it for those of us who allow our children to believe that Santa is real....tell your children that Santa may not be real to you and your family but others do believe and that is their right so don't go telling them otherwise. No one has the right to dictate what someone else believes in. My kids have been told Santa will only come as long as they believe, they get told the spirit of giving lies in their heart. My nieces who are 14 and 17 make a big deal out of Santa coming because there are many younger cousins who are little and still believe and they don't want to ruin the magic for them.

Julie - posted on 07/14/2010

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You're depriving her of one of the greatest mystical experiences of her life. Children live for make-believe. I understand you wanting to not have Jesus forgotten during the holidays though. I make sure that my son knows that Jesus' birth started Christmas and that it's basically his birthday. We have a nativity scene and I read him a book about that magical night when Jesus was born. Plus, we belong to a church and he goes to Sunday school. I think you can have both. Life is too serious. Let your child be a child. Not everyone is heartbroken when they find out there isn't a Santa. I just thought it was cool that my parents would go through the trouble of doing the whole Santa thing for me. Plus, Christmas mornings were some of the best memories of my mom's life, as they are mine.

Alisha - posted on 07/14/2010

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I also told my daughter that I would never lie to her, so I honestly have to uphold that.

Alisha - posted on 07/14/2010

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Putting your faith and beliefs in Christ will get you a lot farther than believing in someone that isn't real and can't do anything for you. I'm not saying you can't pretend and do fun and silly things with kids but don't give them too much false hope.

Alisha - posted on 07/14/2010

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I don't enforce Santa with my 4 year old daughter. I do get a million and one people telling me I am ruining Christmas for her but I disagree. She knows that Santa is just pretend for fun but I don't give her presents from Santa. It is a bit tricky though getting her to not tell other kids, but I tell her don't tell other kids because their mom will be mad with us for ruining their surprise. I do teach my daughter Jesus sees her when she's sleeping and knows if she has been bad or good and that Santa is pretend just for fun. It is all about Jesus girl and praise God you are aware of that! You are not wrong (OR ALONE) in not celebrating a big fat hairy man!!

April - posted on 07/14/2010

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I felt the same way, I thought it would be best to completely erase Santa Claus from our Christmas. Them I realized that living in our world that would be impossible. Santa is EVERYWHERE for at least a month out of every year. We have settled with including Santa in Christmas, but not as a real person. We will include Santa in our real vs. pretend discussions (when our kids are old enough) just like Elmo and Clifford.

Jessica - posted on 07/14/2010

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I think it all comes down to your personal decision based upon what you believe. Do not let anyone tell you that you are in the wrong for doing so. In the end, you are her mother and you make the decision to do what you believe is best for you. I, personally, am letting my children believe in Santa, but that is mine and my husband's choice. Even though it isn't something I would choose to do, I do not feel you are in the wrong for making a choice contrary to mine.

Jennifer - posted on 07/14/2010

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Thank you for posting your question. I too have the same dilemna and enjoyed reading everyone's responses.

Jennifer - posted on 07/14/2010

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I do not think either way is wrong. I believed in Santa and by the time my parents told me he wasn't real I already knew. I just played along. Anyway my oldest is 3 and well we haven't really done the Santa thing with him but I don't think it takes away from the joy of Christmas time for him.

Lynda - posted on 07/14/2010

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I have a special needs child who is 16 but still believes in Santa and I want to keep that going for as long as possible he knows that the santas he see in shops are not the real santa, he also is fully aware that Mum and Dad pay for all his xmas presents and that santa brings them and to see the sheer joy and delight on his face when he wakes up on xmas day to see that santa has been is worth it all, he knows there is no easter bunny or tooth fairy but he worked that out no one told him but I hope he believes in Santa for a very long time for his sake, mine and all future generations, but my son can also tell you all about Jesus and the true meaning of Xmas, it never hurts to believe we all need something whatever it maybe to believe in, but it is your choice and you have to do what you believe is the best for your daughter, I wish you luck

Diana - posted on 07/14/2010

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oh course Jesus Birth is the most important thing to teach the children. It is first to where to start

Maya - posted on 07/14/2010

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You have my sympathy on your dyslexia. One of my best friends has struggled with that her whole life. She's been able to overcome it, but it's taken her years.

Unfortunately, it sounded as if you were attacking Christian belief by likening it to a fairy tale—in all caps—which, online, is used to indicate a raised voice. Words are pretty powerful things. Do you see how what you said might have bothered people who hold a belief in the Virgin birth?

Joan - posted on 07/14/2010

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Yes, as a parent I feel that I should teach them about life and what is real, not fictional characters. They needed guidance in their thinking. One thing I see today is that children are so comsumed with the gifts and not the true meaning of Christ's birth. Everybody has different ideas.

Diana - posted on 07/14/2010

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I always told my children that they could believe in what ever they wanted too. When they were old enough to ask me about Santa; because the kids at school said there wasn't one. I told them they could believe in what they wanted too and that I believed in Santa. So that's how we approached the subject and they were fine with it. When my kids became teenagers then we stopped putting Santa on the gifts. As far as your family? You can raise your child any way you want and your decisions are not wrong. They are yours and that's all that is important.

Joan - posted on 07/14/2010

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I didn't want my children to believe in Santa either. I felt like I would be lying to them. When I was little I was told there was a Santa, but then when I got older, I felt stupid in believing in someone who isn't real. We celebrated Christmas as Jesus's birth. So no, you are not wrong.

Tamra - posted on 07/14/2010

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No, I don't think there is a right or wrong here. I have 2 close friends that never started the Santa thing with their kids and the children are fine with it. You can teach her how the make believe Santa started from the very real St. Nicholas, that way you can still incorporate Santa into Christmas since he is everywhere. Kids seem to learn so early anyway that he's not there, so I don't think that will matter much. Hopefully she won't spoil it for other kids for a little while. Whatever you do will be the right decision for your family. We do Santa here, and 3 out of my 4 children know the truth, however we still all play along for my youngest. I don't however give Santa the credit for all the gifts. Money is tight and the kids need to understand that they can't have everything they ask for. I also don't want to have to hide ALL the presents until Christmas Eve. Santa brings 1 gift each wrapped in his own special paper. The rest are from friends/family. We also teach the kids about giving to others because Jesus gave to us.

Karen - posted on 07/14/2010

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Why are the 2 mutually exclusive??? We do both Santa and Jesus, both have their place IMO. My DD is almost 7 and is starting to figure out what myths are, however I think the heartbreak can be avoided by how you choose to handle it when they are of the appropriate age to understand. In fact, the "Santa" myth is based on a Christian Saint who did good things for others. I personally think that kids can make up their own minds as to when to believe or not to believe and some of the "heartbreak" comes because the kids are just not ready to give up the fun and they feel they have to. I still believe, otherwise I don't get toys ;-) However, it is easy to go too crazy with the Santa thing. DD's 2nd Christmas was too much - DH and I didn't talk about what we were picking up for her. Now we limit the gifts and stress that the holiday is to celebrate Jesus and the fact that all of the family is together and it's not about the gifts. I would be sad if we didn't do Santa, the joy and fun that has come out of it, the precious pics of her and her cousin, the excitement of XMas morning, the writing of the letter, the fun in finding the remains of the milk, carrots for the reindeer, and cookie crumbs are memories of a time in her life that we won't ever get to get back. And no, we haven't lost the meaning of the season, it's just harmless fun with which she gets to indulge her imagination. There are already too many pushes for kids to grow up too soon. It's also a way for her to share some of what some of her friends do in other nationalities and how each puts their own stamp on the Santa thing. However, in the end it's your decision. Just be careful how you present it so your child (and you) are sensitive to other kids' believing and you don't spoil it for them.

[deleted account]

OK. I should know better to not come back to this post. Some of these responses are REALLY getting on my nerves. People that do not do Santa, the Tooth Fairy, or the Easter Bunny are NOT ruining their children's childhoods or imaginations at ALL!

I fully respect people's rights to do these fictional characters w/ their children, but the people that choose not to do them for whatever reason deserve the same respect.

I think those of you saying there is no proof of Jesus's existence would do well to study history for yourselves. His existence isn't the part that is debatable. Him being the Son of God (which I DO believe) is the part that is debatable.....

Carol - posted on 07/14/2010

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No, I don't think it's wrong, but it is good to tell her about both sides of the 'story' so that by the time she reaches school age she will not be kept in the dark when most of the kids her age are talking about Santa. We did the same thing for our 2 children when they were growing up, & now my son & daughter in law who are Catholic & raising their kids the same tell them all about St. Nicholas & who he was, but they also learn about the baby Jesus & the true meaning of Christmas..

Anna - posted on 07/14/2010

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Not at all. My family doesn't do Santa Claus at all. We have a 3yrs old, 1.5yr old and another on the way. Our 3yr old only knows that Christmas is celebrating Jesus' Birthday. We do get A LOT of grief from family and friends, but this is our decision. I have a very dear friend who grew up never doing Santa Claus and she tells me that Christmas was her favorite holiday. Also, we don't do the tooth fairy, Easter Bunny or any of those either.

Michelle - posted on 07/14/2010

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Wait Santa isn't real? lol ok maybe not funny. But I believed in Santa til I was quite old and it was more than the presents, it was the whole spirit that he instilled in all the different story books and movies about Santa. Christmas is still my favourite time of year and Santa and Rudolph are big parts of it. I love our family tradition of putting out brownies and coca cola for Santa and water for the reindeer and my daughter and nephew get as much joy out of it as I do.

Melanie - posted on 07/14/2010

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We don't do Santa here either as a reality. My kids know he is not real, but he is make believe and that it is fun to pretend. So he is not banned from the house, but they know he is just a story and is not really going to come bring them presents. And yes, my 7 year old knew from day 1 not to tell other kids in school that santa isn't real because i did not need some psycho parent yelling at me for it.

Zoe - posted on 07/14/2010

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Maya, i spell so bad becouse iam dislexsic, and i wasent trying to attack anyone, just make a point, some peopel belive things that others think are totaly beyond belife so how can theyr say what is true and what is not.

Effie - posted on 07/14/2010

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We kind of put a unique twist on this subject for our kids. We wanted them to enjoy the part of childhood that believes but understand that the gifts come from us and Santa is just a nice person who is responsible to making the gifts and storing them until Christmas. So, we take them to Kmart. Sears or somewhere where they have a layaway option. Let them choose the gift, bring it to what we call Santa's workshop (layaway) and throughout the time that we are making payments, we are telling them that Santa is watching and checking in w/ us to make sure they are being good. We bring them w/ us to pick up the items and tell them that along time ago Santa was able to deliver all of them but now we help him to complete the task so he can make sure all the kids in the world get gifts. We tell them that we pay for the gifts and everyone gets gifts based on how much each family can afford. Santa is just the nice person who holds the gift in his warehouse until Christmas. We feel that this allows them and us to have it both ways. We put our main emphasis on the true meaning of Christmas so now they still believe in Santa but also understand the it is really a birthday party for Jesus and the presents they recieve are really about Jesus.

Amanda - posted on 07/14/2010

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I know where you're coming from. Problem is, it's not even Jesus' birthday. It was a celebration that came from pagans, that christians didn't want to give up, so they 'altered' it. (Just in case you want to be totally accurate.) I told my kids that I didn't think Santa Claus was real, and that I just put the presents at the end of the bed when they're sleeping (yes I still do that bit!) but they still choose to believe that Santa is real!!!!! Crazy! It comes from their friends and all the hype. But as long as I don't lie to them, I don't see the point in making a big deal about it. It's fun to them.....and I know that by me putting doubts in their minds about it, they won't be shocked in the end.

Amanda - posted on 07/14/2010

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I totally agree!!! My husband and I talked about it when our son was borm (who is now 1-1/2) We talked about santa clause, easter bunny etc. we want him to learn about the true meaning of Christmas and Easter. I mean, we will teach it to him either way, but my husband and I just don't see the point of having in believe in SC. I mean, we will still watch movies with santa clause and do visits at the mall (just b/c of cute pics!) our son and daughter will just know that these are fictional characters and not real. Of course, it's your own opinion on what you decide to do. :o)

[deleted account]

Hang tough, but silent. That's the best advice I can give you. I did not believe in Santa Claus as I grew up and I enjoyed Christmas just as much as any child. My DH grew up believing in Santa, but did NOT want to teach our kids that. I don't think it's right to lie to kids & then expect the truth from them. Also DH & I don't want our kids to have that crushing let-down when they find out the truth nor do we want them doubting Jesus along with Santa.

Just make sure you let her know to NOT spoil it for others. I have received hate e-mail and occasionally been fussed at by other parents because of my opinion and/or my kids dared to tell other kids the TRUTH. Stick to your beliefs and don't bow to peer pressure.

Gina - posted on 07/14/2010

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True, the festival is of winter solstice and that is where celebrating at this time of year came from. Mary was a virgin at the time of conception. And Jesus Christ was actually born on Sept 11 (how's that for ironic) If you study God's word and follow the time lines - the Shepherds would not be out tending their sheep in the middle of winter - which it was where they were. Just a side note. But I still teach our children that God is their sufficiency and still have fun with the holidays w/o getting all caught up in the religious aspect of the holiday.

Maya - posted on 07/14/2010

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Zoe, I'm not sure where you learned to spell, but you might consider that it's hard for readers to understand what you're saying when every other word is misspelled. I'm not ragging. I just want to understand what you're saying.

One thing that was clear is your comment about the solstice being hijacked by the Christians. It wasn't hijacked. They were under a lot of pressure to be just like their neighbors (Romans, Greeks, whomever) who were celebrating solstice or Saturnalia or some other holy day. The Christians worked with the current system and set their own celebrations to take place during a time when the folks around them were celebrating. I have a number of friends who are Wiccan and who, therefore, celebrate the solstice (and Christmas in some cases). Not one of them would accuse the early Christians--then a religious community under fire--of hijacking their holy day.

I'm a little perplexed as to why you would turn this usually friendly chat into a forum for an attack on someone else's beliefs.

Which brings me to what I intended to say before I read your accusatory post: I think one of the most important things we can teach our kids is not to make fun of other people's beliefs. Whether their friends believe in Santa Claus and celebrate Christmas, or believe in the Goddess and celebrate Samhain, I want my kids to appreciate that diversity and celebrate it.

Zoe - posted on 07/14/2010

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There seems to be a lot about the true meaning of christmas, so maybe time ti put down your bibel and pick up a history book. the winter solsties was celibrated by the pagens(peopel of the land) to welcome the start of a new year after the shortistd day, this was hijacked by the chrisians, yull tide, holly and ivy all pagen. the romens had a festivel at about this time of year for orgies and drinking. THE SON OF GOD BORN TO A VIRGIN. i ask you which is the fairy story.

Sue - posted on 07/14/2010

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We're with you Cassie. My husband and I did the same thing some 15 to 16 years ago with our two sons. Fortunately, his sister and bro-in-law felt the same way. So Christmas was about Christ and us loving each other as a family. We did not want our kids to feel like we could deceive them about something like that. My family probably thought we were weird, but we just dealt with that. Overall, I'd say parenting is a lot about choosing things for yourself or you and your spouse and learning how to balance getting other people's input (often valuable) with carrying out your own convictions and not being understood or applauded much of the time. Ask God to give you the thick skin you need and commit to moving forward on your journey under the best wisdom and guidance there is - the Holy Spirit!
Sue

Leah - posted on 07/14/2010

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ok, i'm getting really bored with those post...good luck on fantasy Island! I'm too busy for this...no wonder I never participate...what was i thinking LMAO

Gina - posted on 07/14/2010

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Our family made the same decision we want our kids to know that God is our sufficiency (not Santa) and that through Him we are able to provide what ever we decide to give them . Honestly i don't remember when I found out that there was no Santa or any of the others - so for me it wasn't traumatic but we just did not want to lie to our kids and teach them not to lie to us. That was how we made our choice. But everyone and every family is different you need to do whats best for your family. We have had some say we have taken the fun out of it - but our girls (now 9) haven't complained. I still hide some gifts and put them out on Dec 24th - we still hide eggs and give them money for their teeth but we teach them the truth about it and the Love that God has for them.

[deleted account]

Lets just say your daughter will have a very boring Christmas! Yes for Christians the true meaning of Christmas is Jesus being born but there's no evidence to truly support that he existed and there actually was a man called St. Nicholas who Santa is based on. Yes you can celebrate the true meaning of Christmas but what sort of fun is that for a child...none! The same with Easter and the Easter bunny.

Belinda - posted on 07/14/2010

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I have to say I kinda agree with you on this one. You do your best to teach your children to be honest and ALWAYS never talk to strangers especially ones who offer you lollys and yet once a year we feed them the biggest lie of all and then go and plonk them on a strange old mans knee and let him give them a balloon and a lolly. My husband and I have been talking about this too. Not sure what well do though

[deleted account]

im just going to point this out to you all... i dont know if anyone did... but umm, y'all are talking about jesus this and jesus that.. and no one has ever proved that he really did live. its what YOU BELIEVE but never actually scientifically proven beyond a resonable doubt. im all for believing in a higher power, but dont say you are only gonna teach your kids the truth, and never lie, when you dont know what the truth is about him. you only know what you believe.

Leah - posted on 07/14/2010

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yes my kids life willbe ruined for ever and ever but they will beleive in Vampres and warewolf bcause thats what i beleive in...

Sherri - posted on 07/14/2010

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Leah ruin your kids childhoods if you want, I choose not to do that to them. I will allow my kids to remain young and innocent as long as possible. Have a nice day.

Victoria - posted on 07/14/2010

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I'd not push the issue of there being or not being a Santa, but rather have a mystery gift of "Oh! Where'd this come from?" and let the child make their own conclusions. If your daughter decides to ask you can say you believe Jesus is blessing them for being a good girl. I myself grew up with a Christmas in which Santa wasn't really there because he had so many helpers and one of which was daddy. I fell out of my belief(as most children seem to) of Santa before the teasing began.

Leah - posted on 07/14/2010

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I just watch Twillight....very cool movie by the way...and thats all about Vampires and Warewolf...now thats the truth....they really do exist....lol

Sherri - posted on 07/14/2010

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I have never lied to my kids a day in there lives and they believe in all the childhood magic. I will never take that from them EVER!! I don't have that right.

Leah - posted on 07/14/2010

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THE DEFINITION OF LIES
big lie, the
1. a gross falsification or misrepresentation of
the facts, with constant repetition and
embellishment to lend credibility
2. the propaganda technique, as in politics, of
using this device


lie{2} vi. lied, ly'ing
1. a) to make a statement that one knows is
false, esp. with intent to deceive b) to make
such statements habitually
2. to give a false impression; deceive one

n.
1. a false statement or action, esp. one made
with intent to deceive
2. anything that gives or is meant to give a
false impression

Holly - posted on 07/14/2010

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I agree with Sharon - it is ultimately the parents' decision here. Think about it from the child's point-of-view, though. My cousin raised her son to not believe in Santa. However, he always wanted to go sit on Santa's lap, and do the things that he saw other children doing. You could see it in his face when watching Christmas specials that he wanted to believe. It was hard for him - he was torn between what he saw around him and what his mother told him. He is in his teens now and is perfectly happy. He understands everything now, but it was very hard for him when he was younger and in the midst of it all.

Christina - posted on 07/14/2010

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I don't think you're wrong at all. I made the same decision with my children for religious reasons. Personally, I never believed in Santa Claus as a kid and I grew up just fine. My children are 6, 8, and 9, and I've always told them that there is no such thing as Santa Claus, but that it's a fun thing that some people believe in and that doesn't hurt anything. I do get flack from my in-laws, but they're my children, it's my choice. Your daughter will be fine, I promise!

Linda - posted on 07/14/2010

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others may not agree with me, but I don't think you are wrong. I use to do the whole santa thing and my husband got hurt one year and we could not buy presents for the kids. we had to tell them that there was not santa. I don't know what hurt them more, the fact there was no santa or the fact that we had been telling them a lie for all those years. I knew then that I was wrong, teaching my kids not to lie, and to lie is breaking one of the ten commandments. Then I go and lie my head off to them about santa, the tooth fairy, the easter bunny. What right did I have to tell them not to lie. I confessed all my lies to them and started buying their teeth from them, they liked this,I let them make of list of items they want for christmas and whatever I could afford I would get. I will never lie to my kids again. Some may think this is silly, it is a fun lie or good lie, but a lie is a lie. I have also taught my kids that we have no idea when Jesus was really born and we should not pick one day over another to celebrate his birth. we should live everyday in celebration of his birth. Like I said, some will not agree with this and it may make some angry, but this is my personal opinion.

Sherri - posted on 07/14/2010

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P.S. I NEVER lied to my kids and they still believed in the magic of Santa, Easter Bunny & Tooth Fairy. I am Santa, Easter Bunny & Tooth Fairy so yes they do exist. If they ever came out and directly asked I never once lied to them. By the way my oldest two didn't stop believing in Santa till 11 yrs old. They were sad once we told them but once we explained now they get to be Santa's helpers for the others they were so excited.

Sandy - posted on 07/14/2010

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Thanks Phyllis i was in the wrong.Thank you for pointing that out to everyone.But at least i learned not to lie to my child anymore.

Leah - posted on 07/14/2010

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I know that we as parents and kids thinks its fun to belive in fairy tales and all the magical stuff but i dont believe its OK to teach our kids that its OK to lie for some things and other things we always have to tell the truth...we all have that misconception that white lies are ok bcause its fun or it help to keep it magical....
I say, when it's bull, its bull, no matter what it is...and i dont want them to think that lying a little bit for small fun stuff is OK...
sorry for being really blunt for this, but I think it's mostly the parents who have a real good time with the kids being all amazed or scared (Halloween) for stuff...the parents are the ones wanting to still have that magical happening in their lifes...

Maybe we are getting bored as parents and need that escape for ourselves?!?!

But its all up to you of course and I would'nt judge or make comments at a parent for making the decision to let their kids believe in fairy tales.

Joely - posted on 07/14/2010

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I think it is wrong if you do not allow your child to have an imagination and have fun. I think it is especially wrong to tell them at an early age and he/she spoils it for the rest of the kids they go to school with!!! Don't be that MOM! I completely disagree with Selina! When the time is right you will know when to tell your child about all of the imaginary characters!! You may have been broken hearted but, you had fun believing!! Let your child have fun as well.

Joselyn - posted on 07/14/2010

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I think you should teach your child whatever you feel stronly about, and not give it another thought. My cousins were raised without santa and focused on Jesus at Christmas and are happy wonderful Christian young adults now. I think Christmas can be just as fun without santa since it's still fun to open presents no matter who they are from. I might sugggest that as your child gets older into school age you might want to let her know that it's OK for other children to believe in Santa so that she's not looked at as the "odd kid" during the holidays from other children. Anyway, just a thought.

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