Mixed Girls Hair

Marie - posted on 07/11/2009 ( 3 moms have responded )

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Is there any moms out there with moxed little girls? My daughter is almost 4 and mixed with black, white, and spnish. I know poor baby. But I have been trying for a couple of years now to find something to put in her hair that will calm it down so that she can wear her hair down and to look nice instead of frizzy all the time. Someone help PLEASE!!

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Marie - posted on 07/11/2009

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Quoting Tammy:

I have 3 girls of mixed black/white race. They all have different hair so different products work for each of them. I think the main thing you have to understand about bi-racial hair is that it is SOOOOO DRRRYYYYY! If you are a basic white chick, you have never seen hair that dry and it's hard to believe how much "stuff" you have to put on it. Anything that is washed out is basically useless except to detangle. Their hair needs something very moist put on it EVERY DAY but do not wash it more than once or twice a week. Brush it as little as possible, if ever. Use one of those huge, wide toothed combs on it so you don't break it off. That causes a lot of the frizziness. The goal is to put moisture (water) on the hair and then "trap" it onto the hair strand with something greasy/oily. My girls put a basic curly hair conditioner (one of the ones you can get at any store) in a spray bottle, dilute it with water and they spray this on their hair every day when they get up. It needs to be as thick with conditioner as it can possibly be and still come out of the spray bottle. Once they wet it down with this mixture and comb it out, they then put ANOTHER product on top of that. Depending on their hair texture and how dry their hair is they use different products. My oldest has very "stiff" hair and it's not very curly. It is quite similar to permed (straightened) black hair. She used a shine potion on hers. There is one that we get at the salon called "Aglaze". That one is the best but it's really expensive. There is also one in the line of African American hair products called "Pink". All of their products work well, are readily available and inexpensive. My middle daughter has the driest hair and she will often use an oil on hers. Our favorite is Carrot Oil. There are various brands but one that has all natural oils is best. Another great product is Hair Mayonnaise. Those last two products are found in the African American hair section at Walmart or wherever you shop. You have to find out how much moisture their hair needs. You can "work up" in moisture level by trying these techniques.

Try just putting conditioner on their hair and leaving it in, then put a curly hair type hair GEL on it. That is what my youngest does. Her hair is the least dry. Don't comb it again after you do this. This will give them kind of a crunchy, wet look. If that goes frizzy and dry in a couple of hours, next time they wash their hair try the conditioner then using the shine potion. If that's not enough, use the carrot oil or the hair mayonnaise- leave it in. Start out with a small amount and add more until the hair looks moist and smooth but not greasy. The only reason for shampoo is to wash out built up hair products- their hair doesn't need it at all. Find the mildest most moisturizing one you can find and use it only when the hair has a bad build up of products or smells bad. The less you can shampoo, the better off their hair will be. It really helps to find a good stylist. I've found that black people may or may not be terribly helpful because bi-racial hair varies widely and can be quite different from theirs too. I found a stylist who specializes in naturally curly hair, especially bi-racial hair. The right cut can make all the difference in the world. Usually biracial hair looks best if grown out as long as possible and kept well trimmed. The weight of the long hair helps to weigh down the frizziness and curliness. I could go on all day! If you need more info, just ask.



My daughter's hair is very curly and very dry. Well I guess that is one thing that I have done wrong is shampoo her hair every time I condition it. I did know that I was not suppose to wash it everyday. I guess the other problem I have is styling it. I can't go "white girl" hair style but I dont know how else to style it.

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I have 3 girls of mixed black/white race. They all have different hair so different products work for each of them. I think the main thing you have to understand about bi-racial hair is that it is SOOOOO DRRRYYYYY! If you are a basic white chick, you have never seen hair that dry and it's hard to believe how much "stuff" you have to put on it. Anything that is washed out is basically useless except to detangle. Their hair needs something very moist put on it EVERY DAY but do not wash it more than once or twice a week. Brush it as little as possible, if ever. Use one of those huge, wide toothed combs on it so you don't break it off. That causes a lot of the frizziness. The goal is to put moisture (water) on the hair and then "trap" it onto the hair strand with something greasy/oily. My girls put a basic curly hair conditioner (one of the ones you can get at any store) in a spray bottle, dilute it with water and they spray this on their hair every day when they get up. It needs to be as thick with conditioner as it can possibly be and still come out of the spray bottle. Once they wet it down with this mixture and comb it out, they then put ANOTHER product on top of that. Depending on their hair texture and how dry their hair is they use different products. My oldest has very "stiff" hair and it's not very curly. It is quite similar to permed (straightened) black hair. She used a shine potion on hers. There is one that we get at the salon called "Aglaze". That one is the best but it's really expensive. There is also one in the line of African American hair products called "Pink". All of their products work well, are readily available and inexpensive. My middle daughter has the driest hair and she will often use an oil on hers. Our favorite is Carrot Oil. There are various brands but one that has all natural oils is best. Another great product is Hair Mayonnaise. Those last two products are found in the African American hair section at Walmart or wherever you shop. You have to find out how much moisture their hair needs. You can "work up" in moisture level by trying these techniques.

Try just putting conditioner on their hair and leaving it in, then put a curly hair type hair GEL on it. That is what my youngest does. Her hair is the least dry. Don't comb it again after you do this. This will give them kind of a crunchy, wet look. If that goes frizzy and dry in a couple of hours, next time they wash their hair try the conditioner then using the shine potion. If that's not enough, use the carrot oil or the hair mayonnaise- leave it in. Start out with a small amount and add more until the hair looks moist and smooth but not greasy. The only reason for shampoo is to wash out built up hair products- their hair doesn't need it at all. Find the mildest most moisturizing one you can find and use it only when the hair has a bad build up of products or smells bad. The less you can shampoo, the better off their hair will be. It really helps to find a good stylist. I've found that black people may or may not be terribly helpful because bi-racial hair varies widely and can be quite different from theirs too. I found a stylist who specializes in naturally curly hair, especially bi-racial hair. The right cut can make all the difference in the world. Usually biracial hair looks best if grown out as long as possible and kept well trimmed. The weight of the long hair helps to weigh down the frizziness and curliness. I could go on all day! If you need more info, just ask.

Katrina - posted on 07/11/2009

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Not sure why you said "poor baby" to such a beautiful mixture of ethnicity, but . . . try a product called Curly Puddin' by Ms. Jessie's. The sister's who own this company are part Japanese and African-American and had a lot of trouble finding the right product for their hair. I've tried it and I love it. Unless you're fortunate enough to find a vendor that sells it in your area you'll have to order it on-line. It's a little pricey but sounds like it might be worth it to you. Lol Let me know if you get it and what you think.

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