My daughter is still not talking at 17 months, is it to soon to worry?

Alicia - posted on 08/31/2009 ( 134 moms have responded )

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My daughter is going to be 18 months in about 2 weeks and only says mama and hi every once in a while other then that she doesn't talk. 2 doctors have told me to take her to see a speech therapist and have her hearing tested. The doctor said that a child around 17 months should be able to say at least 6 or more words not including mama and dadda. So I did make an appointment at Childrens Medical Center for mid Oct. However I am not sure if it is to soon to really start worrying?

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Christa - posted on 09/07/2009

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My mother owns a daycare center and I had the privilege of working with children at many different centers. At every center we had children who did not speak many words at that age (18 months). Each one who did not speak well had a speech therapist and by the time they were three years old they were right along side the other children. I wouldn't worry about your 17 month old not talking, I just think she needs a little help along the way. I would take your doctors advice by seeing a speech therapist. Good luck!

Kim - posted on 09/06/2009

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Speaking as a speech therapist, I would get her checked out now--the sooner the better if it turns out there is a problem. If there is not a problem, then no harm done. It has been awhile since I have worked with children, but have 2 of my own and several friends who work with children to remind me of speech and language milestones for that age.

One question I have is: are there any older siblings, cousins or friends children who are around her alot and tend to talk for her? If so, this needs to stop because she has no reason to talk if others are doing it for her.

Also, do you or others anticipate her every need? If so, then again, she has not reason to talk.

Of course, there may (or may not)be an underlying reason for her not talking. Does she have a history of chronic ear infections? My daughter did, but was saying words and was age appropriate; however, once she got tubes and could hear better, her speech and language started to blossom and now at 22 months it is exploding.

Another question to ask yourself is how is she meeting other developmental milestones? Kids often are focused on learning one thing at the detriment of another, but once they have mastered what they are focused on, the other follows quickly (i hope that made sense!)

I'm going to attach some links to child speech and language developmental milestones for you to read. Birth to 1 year and 1-2 years.

I'm not saying you should worry, it may be something as simple as fluid in her ears and this is easily remedied.

I hope I helped! If you have any questions, write me back and if I'm not sure of the answer, I have MANY resourses to pull from to find an answer.

http://www.asha.org/public/speech/develo...

http://www.asha.org/public/speech/develo...

http://www.asha.org/public/speech/develo...

Jennifer - posted on 09/09/2009

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Yes, make those phone calls for a speech therapist and hearing to see why your 17 month old is not talking. My son was not talking and found out that fluid was blocking his hearing. After 6 months of therapy and tubes put in he is about two months behind on his speech development. My son never had a ear infection before just delayed in speech. Don't wait!

Miriam - posted on 09/07/2009

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I agree that you should not panic about your 17 month old not talking. Every child is different in their development. Doctors go by statistics and they refer to the average child. If your daughter for instance was slow on starting to walk, she might simply still be processing that progress. Which can be a reason for why she's not talking yet. If you feel like your child understands you when you talk to her, there is no reason to worry. Patience and encouragement is the key. She will talk when she's ready. Just don't put pressure on her but gently encourage her. Read to her on a regular basis and talk to her a lot. It is the same with bilingual children. They receive so much input, so they try to figure out what word belongs to which language and when to use which that they also tend to take longer than monolingual children. Within the first three years children develop in so many different areas, some simply faster than others. That does not mean that anything is wrong with your child or that your daughter will have problems in the future. When she's ready to talk she might even start with phrases rather than words.

Christine - posted on 09/07/2009

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If your 17 month old is not talking you should definitely get her hearing tested. Additionally, do you have Early Intervention where you are? It's a program that helps kids with delays. Your child would get evaluated and if approved, could get speech therapy at home one hour a week. The therapist works with your child and would give you tips on how to get her talking. They say every child develops on their own, but there is nothing wrong with being proactive to rule things (like a hearing problem) out instead of ignoring a possible issue. Good luck.

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Tameeka - posted on 09/08/2009

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My daughter was the same. She wasn't saying as many words as the doctors thought she should. So she was sent to a speech therapist. The doctors were also concerned about her talking because she had chronic ear infections. But, the therapist helped alot and now the girl won't stop talking and I'm happy about it. So it won't hurt to see what the therapist has to say about your 17 month old not talking.

Julie - posted on 09/07/2009

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hey my little girl is 20 mths and has a few words but understands everythin u say to her,i think part of it is because her older sister taiks for her she just lazy but cleaver.i wouldnt worry about your 17 month old not talking she will do it in her own time.xx

Ava - posted on 09/06/2009

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I think I see both sides of this argument. Honestly, -yes-, your child should be talking more than she is. At a year and a half, she should have started building her vocabulary. To be fair, some kids are just slow learners. Take her history of milestones into account, and how quickly or slowly she reached them compared to the expected markers. But honestly, YES, make an appointment for your child. It's ALWAYS better to play it on the safe side, because there could be something wrong with her hearing and she's just not picking up words you're saying, or she could have other problems that might stunt her ability to learn, and you really want to catch those as early as possible. If her hearing is fine, then it'll just be another stress off of your shoulders, and you can comfortably work with her on your own until she begins to catch up to where she should be.

Christina - posted on 09/06/2009

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My daughter did not even attempt to walk until she was 16-17 months old. Even then it took a while for her to actually get up and go. She also did not talk much until she was 2. She is now almost 7 and is perfectly healthy and talks all the time!!!!!!!

Dawn - posted on 09/06/2009

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Hi There, I work with children with speech problems and my first question to you is do you have other children and if so are they or are you speaking for your child? Always remember to talk to your baby and try to get them to imitate you. If this is your first child I would try and see if your school district has a sld/a program and see if they can test your child although it is probably too early, but they should be able to get you who to who you need to see. I hope everything works out for you and your child.

Leslie - posted on 09/06/2009

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My little brother didn't start talking until age 3ish and then in full sentences. He didn't have to talk because I or my middle brother did all his talking for him lol. If you are concerned, have her tested. Does she respond to noise or her name? Does she have repetative routines that must be done? Does she spin in circles or twirl her toys? Carefully watch her over the next few days and get a feel for what she is capable of so when you go in for tests you can answer the doctors questions to the best of your ability. Hang in there sweetie, it is probably an easy fix.

Dara - posted on 09/06/2009

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My son wasn't talking at 11 months when we first began to worry. We went through an agency called "First Steps" that works with children under 3 who have physical, developmental or speech/hearing problems. They retested him at 13 months and he still wasn't talking. His hearing tested fine so we had therapists working with him every week until he was 3. It turns out he was showing a few signs of autism. Early intervention and therapy was the key! He is now a perfectly normal 7 year old. Your daughter should be saying a few words by now. It may be nothing, but don't just wait around for her to start talking on her own. Have her speech/hearing tested to rule out any physical problems. If nothing is wrong there, then seek out an agency like "First Steps" that can advise you what to do next. There's no need to panic, but do help her any way you can.

User - posted on 09/06/2009

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Way to early to worry about her not speaking. Some children are capable of speaking buit are to shy or just not ready to speak, but that does not mean the can't talk. Give her another 6 months.

Tara - posted on 09/06/2009

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I had the same thing when my son was that age and yes i did worry so i did as you are doing and took him in and it did turn out he did have a hearing problem, cause of ear infections and such, so our county offered a babies cant wait program wtich allowed us to get speech therapist for free or at a reduced rate (every county has some program like this) my son did it for a yr, the lady came to the house once a week talked to me played with my son gave me ideas about diffrent signs to use and games to play to get him to vocalize, then at about 2 1/5 he started talking and by time he was 3 he was all cought up and is no longer behind, he started kindergarten this yr with no problems. Then earlier you get started and get it taken care of the more likely they will grow out of it, so no i wouldn't worry my self sick but i would take her in...good luck

User - posted on 09/06/2009

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The appointment may be well worth it - if nothing else it will put your mind at ease. Good Luck and I'll say a little prayer for you and your daughter.

Jill - posted on 09/05/2009

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MY YOUNGEST DAUGHTER ABBIE DIDNT START TALKING TILL SHE WAS 2 UNTIL WE GOT RID OF HER DUMMY MY OLDEST TALKED AT 10MTHS,EACH CHILD IS DIFFERENT BUT THEY ALL CATCH UP IN THE END

Pilar - posted on 09/05/2009

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The earlier, the better! You are lucky to have good doctors giving you appropriate advice. I am speech therapist, but this time, I will talk to you as mom. I know that the word "worry" conveys a different meaning for us. Now, my advice is worry, but as much as it helps you to do something. I mean, have the evals done, check hearing if the therapist thinks its appropriate. As some moms say, sometimes language just comes in the first months of therapy. But I have heard so many times " my friends told me it was normal" when the child is 4! and already has great problems. And for language development time is important. This is because of the brain development. It has "critical periods", in which neurons are more "prepared" to specialize in language function. A 12 month old should say approximately 1-3 words. But there are so many milestones, that should be assessed!. The therapist will use a standardized test to assess language development, and will tell you if there is a delay. If there is a delay, the therapy would help.

A child with mild language delays does not qualify for services, so you have to be very clear on what your concerns are, so that your child can receive therapy, if she really needs it. I live in Chile now, but I worked for a year in the EIP of NYC. EIP are really good programs and will help your child, if she needs it. I hope that this information is useful for you!

Shea - posted on 09/05/2009

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Yes, an ENT can do a hearing test...however, the majority of their time is not spent testing hearing, let alone with kids. They're surgeons. Find an audiologist (I know, I have my clinical doctorate in audiology) (very often with an ENT, but also in private practice) with pediatric experience, and get a complete evaluation. Before you ever begin speech therapy, be sure the child's hearing is fine. Yes, most babies are screened at birth before they leave the hospital; however, some losses are progressive, and some babies are missed at birth due to error and chance. So be sure the hearing is fine before moving to the next step. If everything is fine--you know and are relieved. If a hearing loss is present, move quickly to address it through whatever communication method your family chooses.

Jackie - posted on 09/05/2009

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my daughter was 3 before she really talked, now i knew she could talk she just did'nt seem to bother, i mentioned it to the health nurse and got her hearing checked. but this all changed when her older brother started school, she started talking and we could not shut her up it was like a verbal dam had burst,she had in fact relied totally on darren to do the talking and asking for her but with him out of the way she had to do it herself .

Veronica - posted on 09/05/2009

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I would definitely follow-up with your drs recommendations, I would also ask about testing for autism if it goes much longer. I do not want to alarm you, however we have some very good friends that have an autistic son and he was originally diagnosed as deaf and later found to be autistic. Children can be taught to sign at a very young age and they can be entered into therapy for autism at a young age also. I hope that your daughter starts talking soon. Also if there are older siblings in the home they may be doing the talking for her. That way she doesn't need to, make sure that she asks for what she wants - no grunting allowed! Best of luck to you!

Nelda - posted on 09/05/2009

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well, my middle daughter is now 25, and she was the same way. She knew what you were talking about, she just wouldn't talk much. I wasn't to worried about it, even though everyone else thought this and that, you know how that is; the bottom line is, when she was around 2 she started talking and wouldn't shut up, so I wouldn't worry about it just right now, give her a while. I'm not trying to give you bad advice, but sometimes some kids go at a slower pace than others. I'll bet is she wanted to she could tell you things, she just hasn't decided that's what she wants to do yet. good luck.

Vickie - posted on 09/05/2009

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Well it could just be ur daughter is a late bloomer, but to be on the safe side have her hearing checked and also checked for autism. If it's nothing, Great. If it is something then the sooner u find out the better to be treated.

Patti - posted on 09/05/2009

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All children have milestones at different ages. Just keep telling your child what you are giving him when it is handed to him so he can relate the two things together in his brain. Kind of the way they worked with Helen Keller. After time, it will all come together. Be patient and consistent.

DONA - posted on 09/05/2009

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Yes - too soon - 20 months is norm - don't rush it before too long you will wish they would be quiet!! LOL

Melissa - posted on 09/05/2009

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you can never be too concerned about your childs developement. my son seemed to be doing ok speach wise till he turned two, then he stopped all together. we had hearing tests done and it was ok, but we later found out he was autistic. he goes to speach therapy now, but at 7 years old still isnt where he needs to be. if it had been taken care of earlier he would be talking better. i dont think you need to be too worried, but i would keep the appointments. its better to find something early.

Raven - posted on 09/05/2009

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My son was deaf until age three and we found that out after taking him to an Ear,Nose and Throat specialist because he was talking at 1 years old...please get her checked now because my son's late detection of his hearing stunted his learning ability...he was classified for years as a Special Education child to learn how to talk and read and catch up to the kids in the normal ways...because of this unability to speak due to a hearing problem, he sometimes has the mentality of a 10 year old and he is going to be 14 in October...Please keep the appointment because these are her formiddable years and please see your local Public Health office because they can sign her up for a speech therapist through ISS systems at no cost to you...

Kimberly - posted on 09/05/2009

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hi my little boy who is 8 now didnt start talking either wen i took him to the doctors they said it was because his older brothers were talking for him anyway it turned out it wasnt hes got oral dyspraxia and had to go to a special school for a year if i had been referred when i had want to that could of possibly been avoided id take her as i always feel its better to be safe than sorry i hope this helps

Laurie - posted on 09/05/2009

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Dear Alicia:
My brother's son did not talk until he was almost three!  You need to take your little one to a eyes, ears and nose SPECIALIST.  They found out that he could not hear.  He had tubes put in, atnoides removed and maybe something else.  When I saw him after all that was done, he was smelling my mom's flowers and said "flowers, smell nice."  I WAS FLOORED!  Go see the specialist!











 

Donna - posted on 09/05/2009

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Can she understand what you are saying? I had the same thing with my son when he was little, and the pediatrician asked if my son could understand what I was saying. When I told him that he could, the doctor did not seemed concerned. If your daughter cannot understand, then I think that a hearing test might be in order.



My son was 21 months old, and he did not say all that many words. Within a short time, he was talking sentences using a very good vocabulary for a 2-year old.

Nicole - posted on 09/04/2009

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Omigosh YES - it is too soon for you to start worrying. My daughter is 5 years old and still not talking . . . . so believe me - 18 months is nothing! My parents always told me that I didn't talk much until I was closer to 3 years old - while my older sister spoke at age 2. Just like us adults, children are all different. When he's motivated enough, he'll do it!

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My son is two and just barely started talking. I took him to run test and had specialist look him over..all of them said children don't really talk until they are 2; that there is nothing wrong with him and just keep repeating words to him. He just started to repeats everything I say but that is his way of learning. One thing I learned from the specialist is to give them options on everything and let them point to it. So like you ask her do you want milk or juice and when she points to the milk say milk, yummy milk, good milk, here's your milk...it helps. Good luck and don't worry she will talk when she is ready.

Sherri - posted on 09/04/2009

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My son is 17 months old and he can say a few things, but not very much. I don't think that it would really be a concern until they are like 2 or 2 and a half.

Trudy - posted on 09/04/2009

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I'm a Grandma now, but my middle son really didn'talk till he was almost 3. He graduated magna cum lauda,and is grad school, so unless your doctor is concerned let her go at her own pace. Good luck!

Bernadette - posted on 09/04/2009

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My best advice would be to go with your gut. Be honest and listen to that little voice inside yourself. If your instincts are telling you that something is wrong, trust that. Even if doctors or therapists tell you your child is fine - when a parent feels like something is wrong, they are usually correct. Keep getting second opinions! If there is an issue, the earlier you can get your little sweetie help with that, the better! On the other hand, If your instincts are telling you everything is okay, trust that, too. Just go to the doctor or therapist for a confirmation. You know your child. You'll do what you know is best for her, no matter what. Please let us know the outcome!

RhiAnnon - posted on 09/04/2009

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my triplet daughters are going to be 22 months and they have a vocab of about 15 regulary used words but they REFUSE to say things when asked. the question you should be asking yourself is, does she hear you when you speak to her? does she respond to you, or does it seem like she's ignoring you? if she's responding to you just fine, then maybe she just doesn't feel talking. if it seems like she's ignoring you or doesn't hear you, then i'd go to the doctor and have her ears checked. i wouldn't worry, soon enough you'll be trying to get her to stay quiet...lol!!!

Amelia (Amy) - posted on 09/04/2009

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Don't worry about her not talking she probably is busy developing/doing other things. My son Isaac didn't talk until he was nearly 4. Now he doesn't shut up. Same with my nephew Dominick walked around observing then one day spoke in full sentences.

Danielle - posted on 09/04/2009

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I have a two year old and she has vocab, but we didn't understand it very well. Did the doctor tell you that you don't exactly have to understand what they are saying in order for it to be talking? My son took a bit, too, but his hearing was fine and I found the more they socialize, the more my two children wanted to speak. I think you getting a second opinion won't hurt, but don't over worry because your child will pick up on your stress. Good luck!

Eloisa - posted on 09/04/2009

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Aloha! 1st if it only that your girl isn't talking and nothing else is of concern then - that is good. Is she reaching all other milestones???

Google: milestones 17/18 months:

http://www.thenewparentsguide.com/baby-d... It isn't just a matter of speech. Best regards. Blessings to you and your family.

Kate - posted on 09/04/2009

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Your gut is telling you this might be a problem. Look for some opinions- authority wise. I think it's better to know than be ignorant, because you can do something...

Linda - posted on 09/04/2009

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My son didn't start talking until he was 3 and a half. Got his hearing checked at 2 and Dr said he was fine so just waited. When he started speaking, he spoke in full sentences and was very eloquent. Strangers would ask me whether he was an early talker because he spoke so clearly. I just laughed.

Andrea - posted on 09/04/2009

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I'm a speech-language pathologist. There could be a number of reasons why she's delayed. Children should be combining 2 words at 18 months. You should definitely contact your local health department to find out about Early Intervention (EI) services which provide evaluation and therapy for children 0-3 yrs of age; the evaluation does not just assess speech/language but gross motor skills as well. Children that receive services early often do not need services when they enter kindergarten. So things that you can do: don't use baby talk (wa-wa for water) as this does not promote the correct speech and language patterns at her age; when playing with her model language her her-talk about what is happening so she can hear and absorb the language (ex- the ball goes in the box; the doll walks up the stairs, etc); don't anticipate her needs but let her make attempts to verbalize-offering a chpice of 2 is good (do you want milk or juice-showing them to her, then she can point and attempt to say the word). Don't worry and good luck!

Cassandra - posted on 09/04/2009

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It's never too soon, the sooner the better. My eldest son goes to speech therapy. When he was 18 mths he didn't talk much either, also he wouldn't look at you when talking which is essential for them to learn to talk. My advice is to listen to the doctors, there is no harm in getting them tested even if you think it's too early. At least then you will know if there is a problem or not and I believe in early intervention. Good luck.

Sarah - posted on 09/03/2009

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Quoting AMALIA:

My son was the same way, he was two and would only point at things. I also made an appointment at Childrens Medical Center but before the appt he started talking. I have a 22 month old baby now and her vocabulary is only 4 words but I'm not worried. I thinkd you should wait until she's about 2 1/2.


As a mother of 2 daughters, and bilingual teacher I'm a chatterbox. Both started saying words very early! BA, DA, etc.



 I think it depends on a variety of thing are they learning 2 languages at home? Have you tried using sign language? This is AWESOME!!!!! There's one in particular I LOVE: SIGNING TIME with Alex and Leah. Check it out at the public library!



 SING SING SING!!! That makes a huge difference in language developement. Both my girls understand and speak in Spanish, although both my husband and I are native English speakers, we want our children to become bilingual. It becomes a game.



ALSO, trust your gut. If you don't like what one doctor says, get a second, third or 4th oppinion. No harm in getting evaluated to find out they are okay, or if they need a little help, to know EARLY and get started right away!



Good luck! ;)

Collette - posted on 09/03/2009

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I had my daughter to the regular doc for her check up about 18 months. He said she should go to a special ed place to get help in talking. They had shown her a pic of a dog she called it 'christopher" I told them she said 'christopher' because our "dog" wasn't a dog he was 'christopher'. She knew what she saw and said. A week later I was later told by an older lady friend that when she had something to say she would, right now she's listening and learning. She's 18 now and always has something to say. Dont fret she's taking it all in.

April - posted on 09/03/2009

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My little girl was always a big talker, and this was something I worked hard on. As I read my "1st Year" book, it said to give her time to speak. Give a lot of pauses and wait for her to reply in whatever way she could. Also, she got a Barney DVD on her 1st birthday and it seemed that most of her words came from Barney. She was intrigued at first, and then the pointed and wanted to talk about it. Many of her words were through singing his songs, so I would try music. If your daughter hears the same song over and over again, she'll probably start singing it herself.
On the other hand, she could just be more reserved. I was a quiet child with nothing to say until 5th grade when I met my best friend.

Janice - posted on 09/03/2009

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My daughter didn't start talking til after 2 years. She hasn't stopped talking since and she's 15yrs now. Be patient. You know what they say, you spend the first few years teaching them to talk and walk and the rest telling them to be quiet and sit down. Ha Ha

Suzanne - posted on 09/03/2009

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Having her hearing tested is the best first step. A speech therapy evaluation is also a good idea at this time. Is your daughter interested in communicating? I had some terrible behavior problems with my son when he wanted to communicate and was unable. Please consider teaching your daughter some basic sign language so she can begin to communicate food, drink, sleep, more, please, etc. This actually helps to encourage speech and really helped me with my son's behavior problems. Good luck

Amy - posted on 09/03/2009

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Hi Alicia. I am a service coordinator for children birth to ages three. Part of my job is to screen babies for any kind of developmental delay. Here are a few questions to ask yourself. Let's start there:

1. Has your baby had chronic ear infections, meaning more than 6 in a 12 month period?
If yes, skip the regular pediatrician and go to an ENT that specializes in pediatrics. If you need a referral from your regular doc, then request/don't leave without one. This question is the number 1 we ask every parent and from personal experience it's key.

Since your baby is 17 months old I am going to use an Ages and Stages Questionnaire for the 16 month old for the next questions.

The answers to these should be Yes (10 pts.) Sometimes (5 pts.) and Not Yet (0 pts.)

1. Does your child point to, pat, or try to pick up pictures in a book?

2. Does your baby say four or more words in addition to MaMa and DaDa?
(You can count what we call approximations, meaning using the same attempts at speech to refer to the same object. ie ba-ba for bottle or bankie for blanket)

3. When your child wants something does she tell you by pointing to it? Listen for those approximations when she points and give her the correct word. "ba-ba, here's the bottle." "Cook, cook, here's the cookie," etc.

4. When you ask her to, does she go into another room to find a familiar object/toy?

5. Does your baby imitate a two-word sentence? (such as Mama eat, Daddy play, or Go home... try to say them and see if she repeats them, even if the words are difficult to understand)

6. Does your child say 8 or more words in addition to Mama and Dada?

If she scores 35 or lower you should be concerned about her speech/language development. There are several agencies that should be able to help you find a place to do so. Most health units have a Speech/Language Pathologist on staff. Your pediatrician should be able to link you to one. The nearest Pediatric Hospital should be able to help. Local school districts should also be able to direct you to a testing agency for children under the age of three. After age 3, children are the responsibility of the local school district for testing.

Here are some milestones that you should look for in communication/language:

2 months-4 months: responds to bell, vocalizes, ooh/ahh, laughs, high pitch squeals

4 months-6 months: turn to rattling sound, turn to voice,

6 months-9 months: single syllable, imitate speech sounds, DaDa/MaMa non-specific

9 months-12 months: combine syllables, jabbers, DaDa/MaMa specific

12 months-15 months: one word, 2 words, 3 words

15 months-18 months: 6 words

18 months-24 months: points to 2 pictures, combine words, name 1 picture

I am a HUGE advocate for the use of simple sign language at this age. Don't worry that they will learn to sign and never talk, talking is easier and when the words come they will sign and talk at the same time, then drop the signing. Start with simple ones like "more" closing fingers on both hands together to make like a bird beak and then tap the ends of the fingertips on both hands together, like kissing bird beaks, while saying the word an giving "more" use inflection to ask the question "more?" while using the sign. If your child can communicate with signs, the words will follow, and she will be less frustrated leading to fewer tantrums/meltdowns, which equals happy baby and happy mommy.

*The guides have been taken from the Denver II Developmental Screening*
*No two children develop the same, these questions are based on the average time of development, there are always exceptions.*

Please don't hesitate to ask anything. I use the Parents As Teachers nationally accredited Birth - 5 years curriculum which I am certified to use, the Ages and Stages Questionnaires for Development and for Social Emotional Development which I am certified to administer, and the Denver II Developmental Screening, which I am certified to use, and a licensed service coordinator in the state of Ohio through the Ohio Department of Health. Always confer with your doctor.

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No worries you are just raising a child prodigy. Albert Einstein didn't speak a word until he was 11 yrs old.

Lori - posted on 09/03/2009

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Hi Alicia,



Being a mom is a never ending worrying job! However, having her looked after is not too soon. A child at 18 months should have 10-20 words in their vocabulary that they regularily use. By the time they are 2, they should have at least 60, but should have closer to 100 words in their vocabulary. I was worried about my son as well. At 18 months he barely had 10 words, but the doctor said hold off a little bit. At 2 years old he only had about 40 words in his vocabulary. I was fortunate to get him into a program to help with speech, and by the time he was 2.5 years, he had almost 150 words! He is still a little behind, but only marginally. It is better to be safe than sorry. Even if they tell you that you are over cautious, I would rather hear that than come first day of school to find out your little one needs a lot of help to catch up to the rest of society. And if it is a hearing concern, then than too can be addressed early enough to make adjustments now. I tend to err on the side of caution. It is a good thing you are so tuned into her developments. Good luck.

Barbara - posted on 09/03/2009

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Sometimes we are to quick to give them what they want or pointing at, let her say the word after you and reward her with it... Also you can test the hearing yourself clap your hands in back of her, call her name..etc..some kids just block you at, but it is good that you are taking her it won't hurt..

Maria Regina - posted on 09/03/2009

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Hello Alicia. I am a childcare provider. I am not professionally trained but have 19 years of daycare experience, caring for over 70 children, in addition to the 31 years of caring for my own 4. All children speak at different times. I am working with a wonderful little boy now who is also 18 mos. old. His father also spoke later than others. I worked with children who spoke when they were three. Checking their hearing is sound advice and this will eliminate one possible cause for the delay. Otherwise, continue to make eye contact with your child and speak words so they can see how you are creating the sounds. I have a whole bunch of other tips but it may be too lengthy for this forum. Let me know if you want to know more. No need to worry.

[deleted account]

My daugher said only some words until after age 2, but once she started talking, she REALLY started talking. She just started talking in sentences and caught up to the other kids who used to be ahead of her. She was probably 2 years and 3 months old. So I say don't worry!

Laura - posted on 09/03/2009

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My son did the same thing. He was the one who looked an smiled that is it. He would say mommy and daddy you know what he wanted but talk "no". This went on till he was 2 1/2 he has surgery for his adnoids and toncles (hope it is spelled right) and not a month later he would not shut up as still to this day lol. Enjoy the quite for now babys have there own way of doing things I think it is to make is easire for us as they grow :). Oh by the way he is 9 now and still does not stop talking.

Kristin - posted on 09/03/2009

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I dont think its ever "too early" to get involved if you think there is something wrong. Its better to check and make sure there is nothing wrong EARLY rather then waiting and hoping something isnt wrong, only to find out your child has a problem. I would definitely go and get your child evaluated and see what a professional thinks. Who knows the therapist may be able to suggest methods to get your little one speaking more or walking. If there is something wrong, theyll be able to get your child on a path to make them the most successful.. how can that be wrong.
Good luck with everything.

Tameeka - posted on 09/08/2009

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My daughter was the same. She wasn't saying as many words as the doctors thought she should. So she was sent to a speech therapist. The doctors were also concerned about her talking because she had chronic ear infections. But, the therapist helped alot and now the girl won't stop talking and I'm happy about it. So it won't hurt to see what the therapist has to say about your 17 month old not talking.

Julie - posted on 09/07/2009

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hey my little girl is 20 mths and has a few words but understands everythin u say to her,i think part of it is because her older sister taiks for her she just lazy but cleaver.i wouldnt worry about your 17 month old not talking she will do it in her own time.xx

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