My kids get up every night and get into everything. I need help!

Kristina - posted on 06/21/2013 ( 127 moms have responded )

2

0

0

Ok so my 5&7 year old get up in the middle of the night and get into everything. They eat food they get in bandages they even try to cook food. They are going to hurt themselves and I don't know what to do anymore I've tried everything. I need help!

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Nichole - posted on 06/25/2013

2

0

0

It sounds to me like it could be one of two issues. Possibility #1 could be that they have night and day mixed up or their room is not dark enough and cold enough. By darkening their room, cooling the room, and trying new bedtimes until you find one that works, you may find relief. (ex. if they are waking before dawn, a later bedtime may keep them sleeping in longer in the morning, and vice versa) The other possibility is (not as likely since there are two of them) night-waking or sleep-walking. Although it does run in families, the fact that they are interacting probably means that it is not that. I don't know if there are any other contributing issues such as health problems or anything else. I have a 4 year old with autism. He gets up a number of times a night, and makes sure I do, too.(I also have a 15 year old daughter with autism and she only needs 4 hours of sleep a night.) I've tried alot of different things to keep him out of trouble (and sleepy). It took a long time, but I was able to train him to go to sleep on the couch when he gets up. Everynight before I go to bed, I make up pillows and blankets on the couch for him. (Having him sleep in bed with me was not an option as he is a rough sleeper. I get punched and kicked and have my hair pulled etc). There are alot of different reasons for a child to have difficulty sleeping through the night. Your best bet would be to seek help through your pediatrician or a child pyschiatrist. There is no shame in seeking help within the medical community. It is better to know what is going on with your child and help them, than to be afraid of a label or diagnosis and avoid or ignore the situation. I am not saying that this is your case, I am saying this as a generality. I hope this helps and good luck to you! Hang in there, I've been through many years of only sporadic sleep, there is light at the end of the tunnel! I survived and you will too! (P.S. If you look to google or any other search engine for help, take it with a grain of salt. The information is meant to help but it can sometimes be scary! It best to follow up with medical professionals.)

Steph - posted on 06/25/2013

11

3

0

I have a child who is a terrible sleepwalker and from a very young age used to be up wandering half the night. I bought a cheap door alarm, one that breaks contacts if the door is opened and sets off a high pitched alarm, and that way we knew when he was leaving his room. This might work for your kids, assuming you dont mind being woken up. When they realise they will be busted they will soon stop.

Jennifer - posted on 06/24/2013

2

0

0

It doesn't sound like they are having trouble getting to sleep, so giving them sleep aids probably isn't the best idea. And locking them in their room probably isn't the safest because it's a fire safety hazard. And locking up the food and "child proofing" things are probably not the best because then they would learn to work around it, or find something else to get in to or decide that it's too boring inside, and wonder outside. So, with that being said... they need to learn that they are to sleep, and sleep only between the hours of * and * (whatever time you've set). If they wake up before their "sleep time" then they should learn to stay in their room and quietly read or play. I've always told my kids, if the sun isn't up, it's not time to be up. I would suggest getting one of those alarms to put on their door that goes off when they open it. They are loud and will definitely wake you up and startle them. Put it high up on the outside of their door (so you can turn it off before you open the door), so they can't take it down and tell them that its there. If you let them hear it, they probably won't even try to open the door at night. Just in case they are ones to push their limits, prepare for sleepless nights and stay consistent and strong. Good luck!!!!

Megan - posted on 06/25/2013

12

11

0

Yeah, I know this is not a trendy opinion, but what they're doing is dangerous and they are in serious need of a spanking. And not one of these stupid love-taps. Whoop. That. Butt. All the lovey-dovey sweet talk and cuddly hugs and time outs and whatever are wonderful, but they're obviously not working. They're not respecting your authority as a parent and they're going to burn your house down and kill themselves and you, eat all your food, and possibly get into something that could make them seriously ill (think: medicine cabinet). They also could unlock the door and wander off down the street before you know what's happening. Time to take it back to old-school. It'll stop them for the same reason touching a hot stove stops a child from doing it again - because nobody wants to experience that twice!

Kristin - posted on 06/25/2013

9

15

0

Did you find something that works? Because some of these moms do not understand what your dealing with. They are so quick to critisize. No offense to anyone, but I have been down this road and I swear I did not sleep for years, which is unfair to my job, and my kids and everything else around me. We started giving my daughter a very low dose of Melatonin so she could sleep. (the doc recommended it) You can get it at any drug store and it is natural. Next, we changed her diet. I didn't think that this would help, and I work full time and have 5 kids so it is difficult to eat healthy all the time, but I noticed the healthier she ate, the better her moods were, and she slept more than an hour a night. She still got into things, but as soon as I got her on a set schedule and was consistant, the nights got better and better. Every child is different, and these suggestions might not work for you. But you can always talk to their doctor and see what they might suggest. Don't give up! I know it is hard.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

127 Comments

View replies by

Patrice - posted on 06/26/2013

4

0

0

I have the same problem with my 12 year son with ADHD. He gets up in the middle of the night and takes food ( usually ice cream, fruit cups, granola bars and beef jerky sticks ). He also will take his brother's tablet and toys ( we charge the tablet in the living room at night ). Then he plays in the middle of the night. He has a tablet but he gets it taken from him a lot because of behavior.

My husband and I made him throw away the rest of the ice cream bars or granola bars ( whatever he "stole" in the middle of the night ). We don't restrict the fruit cups because it's a healthy snack. I just place them on the highest shelf in the cabinet. He would have to pull a chair to the cabinet to get it ( and of course I would hear that ).

Then we have 2 motion alarms. I bought them from Walmart. We set them at night in the hall to his bedroom. They are very loud. If it goes off, it scares him. They are loud enough for my husband and me to hear in our bedroom.

My mother said " you must not be feeding him enough ". Believe me, he eats well. He is a skinny boy but he eats a lot. I don't have a problem with him wanting to eat fruit. But he always steals ice cream and junk. Sometimes the fruit cups.

Also, he takes the food to his room to eat and it attracts ants! I don't allow him or his brother to eat in their room because of ants.

I say get the motion alarms ( at least 2 ). It will scare them and they will stop. Make sure to place them on the floor. We were placing the alarms on a shelf and he was not setting it off. We figured he was sliding and crawling on the floor. Also, try to disguise them so they don't know where they are.

And don't forget to set them every night. On the days we forgot to set them, he knows. Then he takes that opportunity to steal from the kitchen or take the tablet.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 06/26/2013

18,567

9

2924

~~MoD ALERT~~

I have already needed to place a warning on this page concerning personal attacks. I have now had to delete 2!! I am now locking this thread due to people not being able to discuss this issue without personal attacks.

~WtCoM MoD LiTtLe MiSs~

Sjfost - posted on 06/26/2013

7

2

0

Have you tried telling them they they would be spanked the next time this happened and then actually going through with your promise? Are they boys or girls?

Samantha - posted on 06/26/2013

28

0

8

@Crystal Actually I also live in Canada. And Public health Canada Says Locking a child in their room is a form of emotional abuse And the Ministry of Child Protection says the same thing as did several family law lawyers. So I don't know where in Canada you live but in My province you can not do that.

Kari - posted on 06/26/2013

95

17

0

If a landlord or owner of the residence I was living in didn't understand my need to protect my children by installing a lock on the balcony or an alarm on the door, I would move. Simply because my family is just that important to me. Just saying...

Kari - posted on 06/26/2013

95

17

0

I think that it is absurd to think of locking your children in their room(as some have suggested), for very obvious safety reasons. A better idea would be to mount an alarm of some sort that would go off and alert you to them being up and roaming around at night. They also do make safety mechanisms for the stove. Some of the comments have said things about not being able to mount things on the doorway, but they have adhesive that won't damage the walls/doorway. Safety should be your number one concern, and I would also talk to your children about this and make sure they understand the danger of trying to use the stove without an adult present.

Crystal - posted on 06/26/2013

33

0

0

Well. I'm absolutely tired of the carebears in here.

Don't spank them you could permanently damage their psychs!!

Don't lock them in your house will burn down and you'll be unable to get to them, or between the 2 of them they won't be able to get out, or some random person may report you for using a practical means to reteach your children they're not to 'play'
in the middle of the night.

I would like to hope that by 5 & 7 locking them in their rooms would take no more than a week before they start to behave appropriately.

When a mother says she's tried everything, I tend to think she's tried other forms of discipline.. but whatever!

I live in Canada.

You can call me neglectful, abusive, lazy, crazy or anything you bloody well want.

I have limitations in MY HOME set by the OWNERS therefore I need to WORK WITHIN those limitations.

Until any one of you know me or what my situation is to the fullest, get the FUCK off my back! Stop insulting me and labeling me because none of you know 1 god damn thing about me or my parenting skills.

My daughter does not feel abandoned, or trapped, or scared when I put her to bed at night. Routine, children are funny about it, they get used to it. MY daughter goes to bed, if she needs something she calls out to us. I can hear her through both her door and the wall seeing as we're in a small 2 bdrm apt. She is NOT night trained so she's not about to piss her pants and scar her psych in any other way. She is a perfectly happy little girl who every morning greats me with 'good morning mommy', hardly sounds like a nightmare situation to me.

Christ.. the overreacting garbage.

AndyandBelle - posted on 06/26/2013

26

0

0

Am I the only one who think a 5 and 7 year old are WAY to old to be behaving this way? What is being done in terms of DISCIPLINE?? They are not toddlers investigating the house they are old enough to know better (and probably do) but if there aren't any consequences than why would they stop? They are old enough to be accountable for their actions and have a punishment! They are quite capable at their ages to realize the connection between their behavior and the punishment or praise that follows.

Heather - posted on 06/26/2013

6

0

0

How is putting a cage on their door any different than a lock?? Well it's NOT!! BOTH cages and locks are SO wrong. Children are NOT animals and should not be in cages or under lock and key. So disturbing to know some of you are parents!!!

Leslie - posted on 06/26/2013

1

5

0

Put alarms on their doors so that when they get up you know they are up and so are you.

Cindy Marie - posted on 06/25/2013

14

0

0

Locking kids in their rooms is wrong on so many levels, and I don't like the idea of drugging them either (I can't believe that's even been discussed!!) I do like Cecilia's idea of putting a door on the kitchen and locking it. Install door alarms, suck it up and sleep on the couch for a few nights and catch them in the act and bust their little butts!! A good spanking will not hurt their little psyches too much; it will hurt them a lot more if they got into some real trouble during the night! Leave no marks is a good rule to follow!

Michael - posted on 06/25/2013

1

0

0

First off Sonia, that comment was neither helpful or necessary. Secondly Kristina I agree with all those who posted about securing the stove. That is needed to protect them and your home from fire. And door alarms are cheap and very useful, if the alarm doesn't startle them it will at least let you know they are awake and out of their rooms. These are precautionary steps but a physician should definitely be made aware of this behavior, they can then determine if there are underlying causes or have suggestions that can be helpful. In the meantime keep your chin up.

Ray - posted on 06/25/2013

85

0

0

undo the light bulbs. Even more importantly your either letting them sleep durring the day or your sending them to bed to early. I have always felt its best we all sleep at the same time, that way you know they should be tired.

Cecilia - posted on 06/25/2013

1,380

16

425

Has anyone considered putting a door and lock on the kitchen? Seems a bit logical to me. Unless it's a house with an open floor plan I see it as a simple solution to the kitchen issue. I'm sure if you woke up to having no bandaids you would feel great. If you plan on doing this keep all chemicals under the kitchen sink and not the bathroom.

As far as the door handle covers, I don't know if that will work on a 5 and 7 year old. My son it stopped working before he was 3.

Beyond all of that you do need to start setting consequences for both of them if they are leaving their room for things other than potty or water.Lose TV or video games for the day would be a nice start. If there is a planned trip such as the park, they will lose that if they do not follow the rules.

Nichole - posted on 06/25/2013

2

0

0

TO THE OTHER POSTERS WHO ARE ADVOCATING LOCKING CHILDREN IN THEIR ROOMS:

Locking your children in their room at night may be considered LEGALLY NEGLECTFUL. This is not my personal opinion. It doesn't matter whether it is a hook and eye set, or an inside out doorknob. Anything (other than a toddler gate) that prevents the door from being opened from the inside is considered to be neglectful from a legal standpoint. In Fl, for example, it will cause your children to sit in foster care while you take parenting classes and jump through hoops set by your court judge and child protective services (as they call it here). I don't know the laws in your state but I imagine it would be similiar in any state.

Is it really worth the risk?

Jodi - posted on 06/25/2013

12

0

0

Locking kids in a room is not safe in case they need to get out for an emergency

Put lock on fridge and cabinets and cut power on stove


But what happend to punishment for the kids not following house rules

Start taking away fav toy each time they try to eat in middle night

Kendra - posted on 06/25/2013

22

9

0

Try lock on the oven, pantry and fridge. Also tell them if they get up and get into anything (food or the like) they can miss breakfast. I can almost promise you if you do this and follow through it will stop. Tell them if they wake up they may have water and nothing else. Also a lock on the bathroom cabinet would be a good idea.

Samantha - posted on 06/25/2013

28

0

8

First off some of these suggestions wow, drugging to locking them in their rooms. Secondly, I can understand what your going through. Third, here are some more LEGAL and safer ways you can handle it.
* Door alarms they can be held in place with special hooks or putty that does not damage walls or paint.
* Removing knobs off the stove. Or cut the power to the stove through the fuse box.
* Putting snacks out for them to have in their rooms if they get hungry in middle of the night.
* Child safety Locks and gates.

Sal - posted on 06/25/2013

1,816

16

33

One more trick to try, maybe set an alarm and wake them before they do it alone, take them to the toilet give them a drink and put them back to bed still a bit asleep sort of like a preemptive strike, and bring the time forward or back depending on what is better for you and maybe they will get used to you waking them and wait for that instead of waking on their own, I tried this with toilet training my youngest it didn't work for bed wetting but her sleeping is loads better

Sarah - posted on 06/25/2013

5

24

0

I would try hooking up a motion detector to an alarm that would wake you up when the get up

Cindy Marie - posted on 06/25/2013

14

0

0

Here's one bit of advice I haven't seen yet. How about those baby monitors? I'm not too crazy about the idea of locking them up, what if they have to go to the bathroom? But, like another mom pointed out...it's better than them falling off the balcony!

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

How is installing an oversized cage on their door so they have to call out if they want something (for instance out of their room) any different than a "crazy" lock on their door?

I have to apologize and back out of this thread. I'm just being insulted over and over again and it's truly distasteful. Perhaps I will just strike this forum as a lost cause and not return, it hasn't seemed to change.

To the OP, good luck with WHATEVER method you choose. You are the mom, you are the boss and all that matters are the decisions you make. I hope whatever it is works for you and your family!

Suzi - posted on 06/25/2013

2

22

0

Can you remove the knobs on the stove so they can't cook? My girls are also sometimes night owls. They steal candy so I have stopped keeping it in the house. For me this is an irritant not a safety concern (yet). Good luck to you friend.

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Kelly, you should read what I posted, very little force would be required to rip the lock out of both the door and/or the door jam. Actually, I'm fairly confident that if my darling temperamental daughter so chose to hull on the door herself she'd succeed in ripping the lock off.

I live in Canada.

Also, your blanket statement that it's against the law is false. There are extenuating circumstances that people or parents can find their selves in trouble.. but for practical reasons there's no law against it.

It is also stated in my lease that I'm not allowed to mount anything like a security monitor or alarm within my apartment. I had to get permission to install (one little screw) the lock in the first place. I can't even hang pictures. So when it comes to the safety of my child, I will do what is necessary until she is of an age I'm confident she'll understand the restrictions I place against her regarding climbing on furniture, or letting herself out on the balcony etc.

Deainna - posted on 06/25/2013

3

3

0

Hi Kristina I'm sorry you have to deal w this drama and ignorance from these judgmental mothers who haven't put their selves n ur shoes. Now I have a 5yr old who gets up and not into nothing she just hovers over us. But I agree w what Sal and good post are saying maybe you can find a full door cage thing like how they have half ones a full one so if they need to go potty or need something they have to call u. I'm not saying lock em up or anything crazy but I bet they make something like that. To keep them in their room and safe

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Sal, we're very friendly people, everyone on our floor and many elsewhere know we have a young child. If god forbid any fire were to break out in our apt, I'm comfortable with how we currently run our household.

Sue - posted on 06/25/2013

12

0

2

I had the same problem with my foster kids who were raiding the pantry in the early hours of the morning, the only way I have been able to stop this happening was to put a lock on the pantry door and a hook and eye up out of reach on the hall door so they had access only to the bathroom and bedrooms, this worked and they still don't go into the living area of the home until I am out of bed , it is now 6 years down the track and there hasn't been any locks for about 2years. Still the same three kids now 7,9&12 yrs. good luck.

[deleted account]

Late to the discussion, but I thought it would be important to note that in the US, in all 50 states, it is illegal to lock a child in a room. If children are in a room alone (or with other young children and no adult) the door MUST be able to be opened all the way from the inside of the room without a key or heavy force. I doubt CPS would take your kids over it, but if anything happened within the home and the children were found to be locked in their rooms, you could face heavy fines, and in some states jail time. (Also, those door handle guards are supposed to be used only to keep children OUT of certain rooms. That info is printed under the warnings heading on the directions for use)

If you are having trouble with your child coming out of their room at night, consider having your security company add a chime to the motion sensors in the area just outside their room. That way, you will hear when they get up. If your security system does not use internal motion sensors, you can buy a little kit from Home Depot or Lowes for about $35 that will mount on the door frame and chime when anyone breaks the beam. The beam is invisible, and you can mount the chime in your bedroom where you can hear it--you can set the volume about equal to an alarm clock so that you don't wake the others sleeping in your house. Then you can just get up and put them back to bed before they get into any trouble.

In addition, I would recommend locking and securing all doors that lead outside, and all chemical cabinets. If you can put child locks on the cabinets, that might help, but at 5&7 they could probably open them.

Sal - posted on 06/25/2013

1,816

16

33

But once you hear a story like that it really changes your perspective on things

Briany - posted on 06/25/2013

2

8

0

OMG! Never in my (online) life have I heard such nastiness and judgemental comments from other Mothers. Lighten up ladies, this poor Mum is clearly reaching out for help on her situation and all most of you can do is to tell her how much of a bad mother she is in your eyes together with accusing her of laziness!!

Yes ladies what wonderful assistance you have provided, I'm sure the OP feels wonderfully uplifted by all the support and compassion she's been shown on here and will no doubt feel more than comfortable to reach out in the future!

Purely because one parent is or does things differently to you or your supposed perfect ideal standards does in not make them a bad parent in any way, it simply means they have different ideas, problems and lives than you do!

Tolerance, compassion and understanding go a long long way! You never know, maybe one day you too will need it!!

Sal - posted on 06/25/2013

1,816

16

33

I hope not crystal but I have heard of children dying of smoke inhalation while inside a locked room while
parents have died else where before they could get to them, if they'd been able to get out of the room them selves they might of lived,
not what any parent wants to think about but as parents we must think of the consequences how ever remote of the decisions we make..

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Just to add, there actually was a fire outside the building about a week ago, not in my apt, and not in anyone else's thankfully, but just the same my daughter was having her nap and due to my endometriosis I was also lying down.

The alarm woke me, not her, I went in and got her, dressed her and went outside. Still can't see there being an issue.

Sal - posted on 06/25/2013

1,816

16

33

Maybe ask the children to come and wake you so you can get them a drink... Make it a routine until they get over it, maybe if you take the "fun" out if it they'll get bored with it, I feel that punishing yelling and smacking will only suceed in them continuing to try and hide the fact from you, I know it's exhausting to think of trying to get up again during the night but you want them safe and ultimately change the behaviour so maybe a few weeks of this approach might lead to peaceful nights in the future,
Are they waking at the same time, try and see if something is wakiñg them a neighbour finishing or starting work. Garbage truck, with my daughter it was the time my husband finished night shift, but it became her routine even the nights he wasn't working or worked late she still got up then to play.. Do they maybe need a supper before bed, something wholesome like warm milk and toast??
But please don't lock them in, you never know what will happen , fires or if something happens to you they can get out to get help.. Thàt would be a last resort I wouldn't like to take..

Stacie - posted on 06/25/2013

11

5

0

You could try putting an alarm on their bedroom door so that you hear them when they get up. I worry about my son doing this, I still use a handle guard on the inside of his door, but I worry about it being a fire hazard, so I will be trying the alarms, they are cheap and loud! Good Luck!

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Apparently you mommas are absolutely freaked the shit out about locking a child in. I HAVE to laugh. But whatever.

See this;

http://img.ehowcdn.com/article-new/ds-ph...

It's not a handle with a lock ffs, it's a small little lock that serves a very basic purpose.

Keep assuming you know what my methods are without asking. Honestly.. it sure makes me feel better knowing I'm not so quick to judge others without having knowledge of what they speak.

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Joyce, while I appreciate your concern about emergency situations.. the lock -I- use on my daughters door is not a KEY.. it's a simple hook lock, which with any force could be ripped out of both the door and the door jam. No "panic" could ever cause a concern of my using that tiny little hook. Thanks.

Jasmine - posted on 06/25/2013

11

0

1

Wow,Hello! ...I have two boys ages 8 and 3..I usually yell at them when they are not to be in the kitchen especially when im not in there...This is how i've trained both of them to stay out ...And it usually does work.Now with the stove top!! I dont understand why your kids would be doing that ...Usually i would be growling my kids if they were up at night cooking on the stove top! I would be so angry that they could have burnt the house down or better yet themselves! ...What do you mean you dont know what to do anymore...You should you are their mother!..My 8yr old never get's away with anything..I never let my kids walk all over me,because if that continues to go on.This will be hard to undo! ...My 3yearold had problems with listening and he always wanted his way,but i took care of that by ignoring him,now he listens to me now..and i dont give into him tantrums nomore! He's becoming a young man in my eye's.. I think some mother's just really really don't know how to growl their kid's that's why the kid's are how they are .

I never in my world! will ever let my kids at the stove top! one growling will teach them a valuable lesson..and even if you have to give them a growling of their life,It doesn't mean you care any less for them...and dont be so easy on them i say.

Crystal - posted on 06/25/2013

33

0

0

Betty, let me get this right. You think by my locking my young toddler in her room when she goes to bed at night so she has no choice but to wait for myself or her daddy to let her out is child abuse or neglect??? Because I'd like to avoid finding her on top of the fridge at 1am (my nephew at 3), or on our balcony (she knows how to unlock and open EACH door) or worse, fallen over the balcony... no, I HIGHLY disagree.

I think for any parent to keep from avoiding such things is more likely neglectful. See, understand, I KNOW my child. I know how capable she is.. I also know how adventurous and tenacious she is.

Also, tell me how my locking her in at night is any different than the door handle covers most parents are buying these days??? It serves the exact same purpose. When she's a little older, likely within the year, I will keep from locking her in. I actually have kept her door unlocked on a couple occasions and she's still stayed in her room playing in the morning until we've come in to get her. It also helps serve in time outs, or rather when she has a full on tantrum and needs to be in a safe place until she gets passed it. It works VERY well.

I don't -leave- her in her room. I don't want some completely avoidable horrific accident to occur in the middle of the night because she's as advantageous as she is and I left her to her own devises at such a young age. That my dear would be stupid and neglectful of me.

Edit - No my mother did not lock me up until I was a young teen and snuck out at night.. my actions earned me that.. don't assume things, it looks bad on you.

And I'm not teaching her that she's 'bad', that's ridiculous. What I've taught her, which is very apparent those few times she stayed in her room even when not locked is that until mom and dad are awake to get her she's to play in her room. She'll only be turning 3 next month... give me a break, would you seriously allow a little one capable of scaling anything in your house to be practically alone and free to do so? Door alarms would wake the entire floor.. I live in an apartment building and I'm considerate of those living around me. So what works for OTHERS may not work for us. Thanks though, for implying I neglect my child by protecting her in what way I can... for now.

Glenda - posted on 06/25/2013

44

19

4

It sounds like they have no consequences, try telling them the next time it happens, they will lose several favorite toys, or privileges, until it stops, then get back to us, and let us know if it worked, there has to be consequences. Hope this helps.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 06/25/2013

18,567

9

2924

=====MoD WARNING======

I have already had to delete a personal attack. Please keep posts respectful. If I see anymore personal attacks, I will lock this thread to further comments.

WtCoM MoD LiTtLe MiSs

Sal - posted on 06/25/2013

1,816

16

33

My daughter used to do this but she was much younger and I just had to get up too.. As I was looking into causes and ideas I found it is really quiet a common thing it is just that many parents simply don't know about it, one mum didn't now why the fridge door was always open until she found some toys there, it was the only place the child could turn in a light.. She put a clap lamp in his room, he sat there and played problem solved,
My advice is either an alarm like others have said so you know when they are up, but if they are looking for food set a tray in their room tell them it's ok to stay in there and quietly read/play and have a midnight snack , from my reading they simply grow out of it, it is the danger if what they are doing that is the concern, and under no circumstances lock them in... Never never never

Cheryl - posted on 06/25/2013

6

18

0

door alarms and extensive consequences! You need to follow through with what you say you will do. Explain to them that their behavior is dangerous and disrespectful of the house rules, and if they do not comply and stay in their rooms all night, there will be consequences that escalate in severity from early bedtimes to removal of all electronic privileges and further if needed until they comply with staying in their rooms!
Good luck!

Liz - posted on 06/25/2013

14

16

0

Use an alarm on the door. That's what I use. Wakes me up whenever the door is opened.

Susan - posted on 06/25/2013

74

1

4

I also think the sensor alarm idea was a great one. So you can wake up and nip it in the bud. Then tell them if they dont go to be you will take away toys and priveleges.

Joyce - posted on 06/25/2013

87

4

2

All those who lock children into a room at night need to be forewarned: this is a most excellent way of a child being locked-in during a house fire. At that time, in the middle of the night, no has brains enough while panicking to easily find that precious key, find it after dropping it. This must be the CRAZIEST thing ever to do to any child.

If you have young children, you cannot expect them to entertain theselves during any day, especially when it's raining. Kids need a full day of activities to keep them engaged and thinking, discovering, problem-solving, ETC.

I agree with TINA CLEMONS that kids need structured playtimes. Parks, sandboxes, blowing bubbles, beaches, lakes, kiddie pools, swings, toy cars and trucks, and SOMEONE to help them stay engaged during the day. Not some day care that leaves kids to their own devices, not the TV. Let them help make lunch. They can put lunchmeat on sandwiches or spread your mayo or mustard; they can toast the bread, toss the can of soup into the pot and stir it, mix the tuna and spread it and add the lettuce. They can put the dishes in the DW or the paper plates in the trash. They can wipe off the table and all the while receive praise for a job-well-done! Free structured time happens at the Library, where there are read times, puppet plays, etc.Check it out!!! Instead of day care, try a pre-school; the ones at churches are super; they even have graduations. BAND-AIDS: dead-on abt a trip to a hospital or a Dr's ofc. COOKING at night??? Where are really serious cabinet locks??? Or several sets? Lock your fridge too. When mine were small, I put everything harmful to a kid, up high. Pots, pans, knives, all other utensils and locked them up. Boxed and canned food can go in the garage with that door locked, Drill a hole in the top of the jamb and install a slide lock; we did this until we got a pool and then had alarms installed in the doors. If your kids are smart enough to disengage child locks on the cabinets, then get Master Locks with combinations. No one that size is in charge of anything!

Susan - posted on 06/25/2013

74

1

4

The first thing I thought was...are they getting enough physical excercise and mental stimulation throughout the day. Sounds like they have too much energy left over from their day and they need to get lots of sunlight (natural vitamin D) so that their body clock's regulate themselves. If they do not get outside to play enough and then have some indoor time with things that keep their minds active (not playing video games or watching movies/cartoons) this could be why they have too much energy at night.

It is just what came to me, i dont know if it the reason, but I know with my 3.5 year old if he doesnt get a lot of physical activity and other mentally stimulating activities during the day he wakes during the night and then very early in the morning or just wont go to bed until later. Hope that helps/

TealRose - posted on 06/25/2013

215

1

2

I cannot believe what I am reading as 'help' here ! Locking them in ?? And when their is a fire ?? You may well not get there to them quickly enough! It takes only moments. Never mind the mental problems you might cause as Heaven K so clearly explains.

Medicating children to sleep ? That should be a crime if it isn't already - if a child is not prescribed sleeping meds then parents shouldn't be giving them for any reason. That is just so dangerous!

And spanking aka hitting ? THAT old chestnut again? Surely we are past hitting children ? [At least we are in Europe where it's banned for good reason. It's wrong. Period!!]

You need alarms. That are simple enough to install. Sounds like you don't hear them get up - so keep that alarm CLOSE and up loud so you can hear it. Start a chart again as you may have done when they were younger - so many stars ie nights without getting up earns a reward like a visit to the cinema etc. They are young, they still think they are able to do anything they like and will be safe. They need to relearn how to sleep. Do you KNOW how they wake up in the night? Is it hunger/thirst or ... do they have some other way of waking up ie a little 'alarm' of their own?

Good luck ... it's not easy !!

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms