my son hates noises,etc but at the min our biggest battle is getting him in the bath

Sadie - posted on 02/03/2012 ( 117 moms have responded )

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Hi,i have a son of 3yrs 6months,he has alot of issues to do with noises,food,clothing,etc our battle at the min is bath time... when i mention bath time he will say not now mommy 2moro but this is all the time and when i answer him no today he gets really upset infact so upset he is nearly sick,we have tried games,playing his fav music but nothing works we have managed to get him in sometime but he stands and will cry all way through bathimg. He really hates the smell of the soaps etc so i have be so quick and iv stood him on a towel before and washed him down just cause it breaks my heart. He is really fussy eater will eat same every day which tends to be carrot sticks,grapes,savory etc. We have cut labels from clothing,he dont like mowers,drills,hammering,planes,fireworks,my husbands car as its a subaru,people dressed up its affecting our every day life! school say he is settling slowly but he is very quiet and plays alone but did notice he didnt like the hairdryer in schoolbut they dont see any issues just say its the way he is but i have an older son of 10 who is autistic but he was so different that is why iv posted this as i dont know what to think. He is under a peadatrician but iv got go back april as she seen him once and basicly told me iv got hope school report backs me up and says same. He also has this thing at the min with screaming all the time espec when you near him and he dont want this. He loves disney cars and knows most of the names and loves his music on in his room but likes be alone,does anyone have any advice please.

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Lydia - posted on 02/04/2012

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He could be HSP (high sensitive person)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highly_sens...

It's very typical for HSP to be irritated by all sorts of noises, itchy clothing etc., need more quiet and rest, may be very sensitive to others feelings (like start crying when another baby cries etc)

there is a test for children on this website:

http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test_child...



Regarding the bath, we've been through a lot with our daughter... make sure the water is not running while he is in the room or bath already (noise). use soap without a strong smell, maybe newborn bathing milk or something that is pretty neutral. make sure he doesn't feel the water as too hot or cold. this could be very subjective. maybe you think it's perfect temp but he feels it too hot (we have that with hot food. to me it's already cold, my daughter won't touch it if it's a tad to warm) maybe he is insecure because the water is moving or something. try to ask him why he doesn't like bathing maybe there is just one specific thing that could be fixed. try to make sure he knows you are not trying to giving him a bath when asking about it, otherwise he might just freak out and not tell a thing.

Belinda - posted on 02/03/2012

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Hi Sadie,

Get a referral to a pediatric Occupational Therapist. Do not be put off by the doc or the school, It sounds as if your son has some sensory issues that need to be addressed. You and your son can be helped. But he needs to be evaluated and assessed by a professional.



Have you tried showering him? If this does not work then why push the bath if he is that averse to it? Get a little tub of water and sponge bathe him until some of his problems can be addressed by the OT.

[deleted account]

I'm not an expert but I have worked in a group home with 2 autistic boys and your son definitely has some markers of autism. If your pediatrician and school aren't taking it seriously then you should go to another doctor for a second opinion. I'm sure you know from your older son that there are things that can be done to make life easier if your son does have autism.

Indra - posted on 02/29/2012

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Something to keep in mind about SPD. Many children can receive a single diagnosis of SPD and then some children can have SPD because they have Autism and are on the spectrum as well. Many children with this disorder are very gifted! Usually they don't reach their full potential though of giftedness because they aren't diagnosed early. Getting a diagnosis is the key to opening the world for your child to receive intervention and understanding. Your child is very smart in a lot of ways already. He is fussy and irritable and trying to tell you in his own way that he doesn't like what is being done! This is such a blessing! Use his cues to help him uncover how to solve his needs. You are already way ahead of the ballgame because you are identifying his problems verbally and have all the "RIGHT" facts down. You sound like a very proactive mom. Take care and good luck with your three year old and your older child.



P.S. I forgot to mention that you might want to look into a speech pathologist for speech pragmatics. They would help your child work on language skills not phonetics. Pragmatics works on helping a child construct sentences so that he can tell you what it is about the bath he doesn't like or the food etc. I hope this helps...

[deleted account]

With an older brother with autism, it increases his chances to have something on the autism spectrum, but not the exact same disorder as his big brother.

I will say, it sounds like a very textbook case of what my son has; Sensory Processing Disorder, also known as Sensory Integration Disorder.

If he does indeed have this disorder, none of his actions are done on purpose or to be bad, in fact, he has no control over them. I'll give a brief overview, but I strongly recommend you read up on the disorder and have your 3 yr old evaluated by someone who knows what they are doing. Few people actually know anything about this, especially schools and sometimes pediatricians.

The brief explanation is that for a person WITHOUT the disorder, the five senses pick up outside stimulus and that stimulus is instantaneously carried on the neural pathways to the brain to be decoded. Once the brain decodes the stimulus, it sends the answer back out to the part of the body that picked up the original stimulus. For instance, you touch a boiling pot on the stove and within a couple of seconds, the information goes to your brain via your sense of touch and the brain processes the stimulus message and sends back out that you touched a hot object and it hurt your hand.

Keep in mind that this is happening constantly, at all times, every day.

With Sensory Processing Disorder, the message from your senses' input goes to your brain, but once there, the brain does not interpret it correctly and sends out the wrong message to your body. In addition to the five senses being scrambled, these kids have difficulty processing another person's meaning behind facial expressions, tone of voice, etc., often they cannot focus on a conversation fully for more than a few minutes.

The things that you mentioned are very in tune with what other children with SPD exhibit. It sounds like with your son, his sense of touch and hearing are more affected than his other senses, but that doesn't mean all of his senses aren't affected in some way. The smell of the soap for example.

More than likely, even though your bath water is not hot, just the sensation of water might cause him extreme discomfort or even pain. My son actually prefers a hotter shower than others would be comfortable with.

Your son probably eats the same thing all the time because those are "safe" foods that he instinctively knows won't bother him. Sometimes food texture is a huge issue for SPD children. Different noises that we think nothing of can actually cause a sensation of pain on his skin (I know this one, because my 11 yo with the disorder tells me when it happens and what it is like).

Your son may prefer playing alone because he can manage things in a way so he isn't overly uncomfortable. Or, he may have such a hard time figuring out what others want from him, if he has issues processing facial expressions and tone of voice.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that your son isn't "acting out" or spoiled or being naughty. He is probably as confused as you and really upset that so many things bother him.

One thing that helped tremendously with my son was a weighted blanket. Weighted vests are also available. A good occupational therapist would be a very good thing for him. I've managed my 11 yo on my own, because he is homeschooled and I refuse to fight with public schools anymore about getting an IEP to get him OT. They do not understand his disorder and in my own experience, do not have the resources or care enough to learn about it.

So I have researched this already a bunch and I keep learning all I can in order to help him. You can get a head start with different things to try for him from a link I will give you. Hopefully, that will help you and your son while you wait for an actual diagnosis.

Your son may not have this particular autism spectrum disorder, but his behaviors are very like my son's before he was diagnosed (at age 5). It is at least an idea to help his pediatrician with a starting point. Something to keep in mind, there is NO medicine that will help with Sensory Processing Disorder. ADHD medications especially, won't work and will only mask what is really wrong.

Here are a couple of websites for you.



www.sinetwork.org

www.sinetwork.org/about-sensory-processing-disorder.html

http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.c...



I hope this helps! Once you have the answer to what is happening with your son, it gets more manageable. Never easy, but better than it is now!

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Laura - posted on 03/24/2012

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Karen Karen is right on about the school district being required to provide services. However, be prepared to insist they do their job as the process can be long and arduous. Enlist your pediatrician to help you with the school district or a social worker if you are already in contact with one.

Thekmurph - posted on 03/24/2012

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I hope that you have the opportunity to ask your paediatrician about an occupational therapy evaluation to assess sensory integration- it will help your son so much- I know cos I am one!

Karen - posted on 03/24/2012

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I forgot to mention that your public school district offers these services free of charge. Contact your public school district even if your child is in a day care / learning center that is not associated with your public school district. We are required to provide services to all children in the district, even if it is an older child who attends a private school. Again, services are free to you. If your child receives Medicaid then the district can bill Medicaid, but that's all.

Karen - posted on 03/24/2012

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It sounds like your child could have an autism spectrum disorder with the sensory issues you describe. Early intervention can make a huge, huge difference for him so don't take no for an answer. If your son is in public schools contact the Director of Special Services for your school system and request services. I live in SC and am the District Behavior Interventionist for my district. SC offers BabyNet early intervention services for children aged three and up. Our school psychologists test three year olds who display behaviors you described.



The saying, "the squeaky wheel gets the grease" holds true. Call every day if you have to. Make an appointment with the superintendent of your district if needed. Contact your state Department of Education for assistance in meeting your child's needs. Our DOE has organizations to help advocate for parents of special needs kids who can support you through the process. The Protection and Advocacy department even assigns attorneys to attend school district meetings with parents to ensure the child is receiving all services to which he is entitled.



You should look into Applied Behavior Analysis and Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. Both focus on positive, rather than punitive ways to encourage desired behaviors.



An earlier poster mentioned pictures and story boards, an excellent suggestion.



If your pediatrician doesn't listen find a doctor who will. Call/write your child's school every other day if you have to. Be respectful but firm. Everyone has a boss. Your son will benefit from your persistence.





Best of luck to you and your son and I pray you get your answers and early intervention.

Angela - posted on 03/17/2012

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It definately sounds like your son has some sensory issues that need addressing by a professional. Have you tried a board with pictures of what will be expected everyday? Like a visual schedule for him. Let him help pick out what his meals will be and what activities to do that day, Let him pick one, and then mommy picks one. That way you can add in things that have to be done, like bathing and appointments ect. Sometimes if a child with sensory issues knows exactly what to expect it minimizes the anxiety and outbursts. Really talk about the activities that cause the most issues , like bathing. Talk to him about the water , and how it will be wet on his face, and it can be a bit loud, that the soap does have a funny smell, maybe let him pick one out that he likes when shopping ect... Hope that helps a bit. You are not alone, it's a constant struggle to find things that work for little ones with sensory issues of any kind.

Cat - posted on 03/12/2012

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I would suggest that you read a book by Judith Bluestone called The Fabric of Autism. It's here: http://www.amazon.com/Fabric-Autism-Weav...



Judith was autistic herself and hypersensitive as a child. She developed a therapy called HANDLE which is a gentle way to introduce children's senses to things. Her book will teach you how to be a detective and figure out what part of the sense is causing your son most distress. She says that, for example, some children are terrified by how loud chewing is, but she let them listen to her chew and then played games with them to see who could crunch the loudest.



Based on her book, I would try some different things with your son. First off, be very careful of smells. (I won't write too long here). Secondly, instead of baby oil, I would try virgin coconut oil with no scent. Try three different bowls with three different temperatures of water, maybe? Add coconut oil to one? It is probably hurting him in some way, but you can help him condition himself. We're collecting all of this type of advice (things that you can do for sensory) over at BrainParenting but we don't open until mid-April or so, so keep in touch!

Jess - posted on 03/08/2012

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hi ur son sounds like mine was wen he was a between 2 and 5 in almost everyway my son is now 6 and is autistic . with the bath problem we started bathing him with an older child he looked up to he would just sit on her lap as long as the water wasnt over his head or still running he was ok and over time he got better and now shower on his own . he is the top of his class this year but he still doesnt talk to many other kids . i hope that helps good luck i no how u feel

Carrie - posted on 03/06/2012

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Make an appt with an OT as soon as you can. Our friends had wonderful results and now their daughter is a pleasant, calm little girl. Do not panic. Many people have mentioned SPD. Follow their lead.

Sherri - posted on 03/04/2012

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possible autistic. There are different extremes and each case is different. My son at 5 yrs old is starting reading and starts kindergarten in the fall. He hates baths and could live off cereal and salads if I let him he's picky especially when it comes to any kind of meat. He might eat steak with a1 or any meat that resembles steak on sunday dinners with a1 at grandpas house but that's normal for kids to be picky. My 9 yr old hates loud noises she had tubes in ears for chronic ear infections when she was under 5 which is hereditary from her dad and me. The point I'm trying to make is his the feelings he has is perfectly normal but his way of coping with it seems to be a challenge! One of my daughter's best friends since kindergarten so age 5 to current age 9 is autistic and she is able to cope and trusts me to be over almost any day of the wk and shes doing better in school with her mom as her advocate to get her the help and medication she needs. She is also very bright when you take the time to work with her. I'm sure with you already dealing with autism in the home have some way of dealing with it ask the peditrician and any other doctors or therapist your seeing for tips. I'm limited in my experience but love and patience goes a long way and the other educated and friends will be a great help I'm sure!

Heather - posted on 03/04/2012

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Maybe you should talk to an OT directly. Our OT did bath therapy with my son and it did help some, but what was even more useful was that session was the first time the OT really saw the behaviors that I was trying to describe and she wrote a letter to the school and pediatrition. If you find an OT that does sensory therapy, maybe she can tell you how to work with your insurance company and doctor to get a referral. Sometimes the insurance company needs to hear it worded in a certain way to approve it. I hope this helps.

Charlene - posted on 03/04/2012

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We are gong through something similar,apart from i can get my 3 and a half year old in the bath,the battle is having is hair washed??? Whats all that about,he used to love the bath and have great fun.im not aware of anything happening that caused him to 'dislike' mhaving his hair washed,but its getting very frustrating...Ive gone through'u can wash mine if i can wash urs' and different toys,bath caps,towel over the eyes and nothing is working.........HELP???

Anastasiya - posted on 03/03/2012

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Hi, We have similar issues with my son, he will be 3 year in May. He is going through sensory integration program. I was told to read a book "raising a sensory smart child), haven't got it yet. But so far we had an evaluation of OT, PT, and developmental therapist, and they all agreed that my son's issues are primarily sensory. They came up with a very good plan, we are just starting with it. I was under impression that my son has a high functioning autism, maybe Aspergers syndrome. But they think his issues are sensory. Also I heard that gluten free diet helps, just sharing this with you, I haven't tried it yet. Also my son, slips and falls all the time, so they told me that he has low muscle tone, and everything that he does is way harder for him than for a regular child....regarding showering, he wasn't very enthusiastic about it for some time, but since my husband started washing him in the evening he got better, and now showering is fun for all of us.

Amanda - posted on 03/01/2012

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My thoughts are the same as Aleshia - get the Out of Synch Child. My twins have SPD. They are two. We were concerned they might be autistic and they have many of the symptoms you listed above and their OT made it clear that some autisitic children also have SPD but not all kids with SPD have autism. Best of luck with your little guy.

Aleshia - posted on 03/01/2012

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Read The Out Of Sync Child. Get him to an Occupational Therapist. Sounds like sensory processing issues.

[deleted account]

Have they considered aspergers syndrome? It's a milder version of autism. The children I have worked with usually get diagnosed when they are a little older. The symptoms you mentioned above are similar to those of a child with aspberger's syndrome. If the doctor's aren't listening I would suggest u look for another pediatrician and maybe look for an advocacy agency to help you with finding the right help for your son. Good luck!!!

Cathy - posted on 02/29/2012

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See a pediatric chiropractor who works with kids with sensory processing disorders. remarkable results.Check ICPA4kids.org

Chloemoak - posted on 02/29/2012

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As a mother of a son that has sensory processing disorder, what you describe is very typical of a child experiencing this. You are the best advocate for your child. Don't stop until you get the appropriate help for your child. Start with your ped, occupational therapist, child psychologist, your childs schools special ed department ( they should pay for the evaluations to be done). Good Luck. The earlier you get treatment, the better chance of success for your child!

Patricia - posted on 02/29/2012

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Get him assessed ASAP. If he has these kinds of sensory issues, then the sooner you get him help the better.

Sally - posted on 02/29/2012

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I am a pre-K teacher.... have 2 almost grown children. Sounds like your son may have Sensory Integration Disorder which can be treated. Google the disorder and see if you think it fits. Treatment includes lots of Occupational Therapy, but you should get started asap. There is help out there for what you are describing.

Charlee - posted on 02/29/2012

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It sounds to me like a form of autism there are different levels but I'm not a doctor I would seek a medical opion best of luck hun x

Denise - posted on 02/29/2012

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Hi I had similar issues with my son, he has a sensory integration disorder. Lots of info available. As he gets older he is getting so much better. Be careful not to let anyone label your child until you are 100% sure. Drs had mentioned autism & ADHD. Now as he gets older alot of the issues he had have almost diminished completely. He still isn't a big fan of having his hair rinsed but I'm sure in time we'll get there. He is probably the least bathed child on the planet, sponge baths work great.

Things will get better, believe me.

Denise.

[deleted account]

It sounds like her little boy has SPD to me, also, but I would be careful of using words like "he definitely has...". We could be correct, but we could be wrong and it is something else. I do agree, though. Sounds strongly like it is SPD that is making this poor little guy miserable.

[deleted account]

What you mentioned about the trampoline and spinning is even more in line with the Sensory Processing Disorder. My son does the exact same. The movement calms him, as long as he is controlling the movement. He also likes some roller coasters, I am not any kind of medical professional, so I can only say as another mom, what you have mentioned in your posts strongly suggests SPD to me.

Reinette - posted on 02/28/2012

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Hi your son definitly has SPD sencory procesing disorder, My little girl is 5 years and had the same symptoms, she was diagnosed with SPD when she was three years old, occopational therepy is the only answer to help them modulate and cope, you can also try and buy the book " The out of sync child" by Carol Stock Kranowitz, it is like a bible for pearents with kids with SPD.

Kathy - posted on 02/28/2012

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It sounds like he definitely has sensory issues which are closely related to autism. Sometimes if children act out more or have behvioral issue, it can be related to what they're eating. They might not be able to tolerate Glutein or dairy. Sounds like you need to do further testing for him.

Indra - posted on 02/28/2012

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Sadie,

There are three reasons why children have hygiene problems. Puberty changes, fine motor problems or coordination and sensory issues. It sounds like your son has sensory issues. You explain that he hates the smell of soaps etc. You may need to get a referral from your pediatrician for an O.T. evaluation or a behavioral therapist. They can work with your child regarding smells, fussy eating, clothing sensitivities, loud noises, etc. All children on the spectrum have varying degrees of being on the spectrum. Check out Michele Winners characteristics of Aspergers. It will help explain better and you will be able to understand your children better. In the meantime, try to give your child transition time to bath's. Tonight you have a choice to take a bath with this toy or that toy. Bath time will be ? and give a clear time that your child understands (like after dinner). This way your child knows in advance. Even providing your child with a schedule on paper would help transition your child better. Children on the spectrum like routines and need to know in advance what they are doing that day. Make sure the soap doesn't have any smells. Take him to the store and have him smell the shampoos and pick out a shampoo that he can tolerate. I was told that simply giving your child a soft wash cloth mitt might help too. Make sure the environment is quiet and low lights are used. Sometimes using shaving cream as a "fun" product can help. An adult on the spectrum explained to me that water on his skin was like needles hitting him ..So as a parent take this under consideration. A person on the spectrum has skin sensitivities that we typical people can't begin to understand. I hope this helps...

Gerri - posted on 02/28/2012

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Hi Sadie, My grandson was your little guy. He was diagnosed with mild autism at 3 yrs of age. He had OT and speech therapy from then on...his MAIN problem was SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER. With lots of therapies and love, he is now in 2nd grade and has a "helper" with him for part of the day. He is doing great! He was tested this past summer and was no longer in the autism spectrum. He still doesn't eat a variety of foods, but is getting better with that too. There are web sites that have great information on the subject. www.SIFocus.com and www.spdfoundation.net I hope this helps and know that YOU will be his voice and sometimes YOU will have to fight for his treatments. Also, my daughter got him headphones (for the shooting range) to block out loud noises when the family would go places that would be a problem (e.g. football games with the band, he now is on the sidelines in full gear during the games and goes onto the field with the high school players for warm-ups, without the headphones!) Good luck and be a brave WARRIOR!!!

Angel - posted on 02/28/2012

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my son has ALOT of the same troubles and sensitivities, he was diagnosed with Borderline autism disorder , Sensory-Perception disorder. We have been working with a therapist at home and at school to impliment coping strategies for him to use and learning how to change his environment so that he feels more in control, he has improved from a C student to As and Bs. rare meltdowns. He also was diagnosed with ADD (minus the hyper part, yeah!) and is on Vyvance once daily and can focus musch easier without all the noise, lights and smells distracting him!

Tammy - posted on 02/28/2012

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My best friend's daughter has similar anxiety issues! She also has trouble with changes. She is very intelligent, though and was diagnosed with Non Verbal Learning Disorder (www.nldonthweb.org); it's similar to but different from Aspergers syndrome. You have to start with therapy when your child is really young, or it could get worse and worse. Check with your doctor about a referral. Good luck!

Shawnale - posted on 02/28/2012

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It seems to me that he's sensitive to those things. My children responded in the same way to certain things. As far as the sosp try one without scents or dyes, maybe let him pick one out that he likes the smell of. My son usually prefers to be alone, he is 5 and my daughter is 2. He will sometimes include her but is very protective over his favorite toys. Change is going to be the biggest challenge for both of you. Just take it one day at a time. Maybe adding an additional food item to the table (not on his plate) may encourage him to try something new. As far as sounds, they have sound machines for children with auditory sensory issues. Play it in his room while he is sleeping, it may help him to relax. As far as the clothes, it could be a sensitivity to the the detergent, again try a free and clear with no colors or dyes, it could be the material and it also ciuld be the tags

Sadie - posted on 02/28/2012

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Thanks to you all for your comments etc,the support you have all given is fantastic its such a great site. My son did see a peadatrician back in Jan but as i said she just took few notes and said she will she me april once school have done a report etc. The school have noticed he plays alone or he will let children play alongside him and they have mentioned he gets upset when its not calm etc,he will sit in the hall now but with an adult. I tell him as much as i can about what he is going to be doing that day! Going to school later does seem that bit better but we still have tears every morning and i get told he is ok once iv left but i know he hates it and must be holding it all in poor lad cause he never comes home telling me what he has done and why would he have tears every morning as soon as he sees his school uniform is put out ready! I dread telling him its school. He is a very bright lad was early with speech,walking,etc was late at riding his trike etc but he got there. He loves the trampoline as long as he is alone as he likes be in controll,loves spinning but hates it if you lift him to spin him,i feel i have just got wait now till april and the letter for date for o.t as not sure what else i can do for him,i dread red nose day as he hates people dressed up and the easter performance as the xmas one was bad enough...

Debz - posted on 02/27/2012

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Your son may have an inner ear problem, if it gets worse after a bath he may associate the water with the pain. This would also explain swimming and notice issues. He may also have mild asberger syndrome, I don't mean to alarm you by saying this, but a diagnosis can easily be made, and many kids with asberger grow to well functioning adults. I would push your doctor to refer you to a specialist. Good luck, no parent wants their child to be this upset. Let us know how you get on.

Pamela - posted on 02/27/2012

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Have you tried taking a shower with him while holding him in your arms? That might help. He is certainly old enough to shower easily. Since he seems to want to stand that may be a better option. Who knows he may have drowned in a bathtub in a past life experience and that memory has carried over into this lifetime.



As for the noise issues. get him some ear plugs. All of the ear plugs you buy at a drug store merely muffle noise and so he can still here you when you are talking to him with the ear plugs in, or if you need to talk to him, remove the ear plugs to get his full attention.



Since your first child is autistic it is difficult to tell where this one may be headed as you have no other benchmark in your own experience. I do hope you are someone who believes in prayer for I find that turning to the Creator (by whatever name you choose to use) and asking for help and MEANING IT SINCERELY, will work. This is an ASK/RECEIVE Universe and I use that principle all of the time.



As for the clothing issues, you didn't specify, but obviously this child does not like control coming from an outside source. Be loving, gentle and FIRM in your responses to him, even when you are frustrated with his uniqueness. Obviously you have some challenges here, but there are never any too big to surrender to the Higher Source and receive assistance in that manner!



The highest and best to you with your challenges in parenting!

Melinda - posted on 02/27/2012

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My nephew was the same way about bathtime, close, food, noises. They found out when he was younger that he is autisic. So it is possible that your younger son is as well. Good luck and please let us know who things are going.

Jareen - posted on 02/27/2012

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Maybe something is medically wrong with your son, the next time you take him to the doctor you need to bring up these issues with your son's behavior. There was a medical show on TV sometime last year, when these parents found out that their daughter was alergic to water and soap, talk to his doctor and let them find out what is the problem.

Heather - posted on 02/27/2012

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This sounds so much like my son who is 5. He is having a lot of the same problems right now. He sees an occupational therapist who has helped us find methods for helping him cope, but I can only get a full bath with soap and shampoo once a week. My 15 year old also had a lot of sensory issues when she was younger, but has outgrown most of them now, so be optamistic. I would recomend the book "Quirky Kids". It could be a long, frustrating journey, so don't forget to focus on the good things that make your child unique and fascinating.

Leanne - posted on 02/27/2012

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You as his mom knows there is something going on with him.fight fight and demand the help he needs.I'm not saying there is anything at all wrong with him but it would help if dr school etc would screen him and atleast put any doubts or fears you have to rest. Plus all it can do is help him maybe he is just a sensitive child and likes things certain ways..we all like things just rite sometimes...you are doing a good job by loving and being concerned about your child..I hope all goes well.

Tracy - posted on 02/27/2012

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My son (7) has sensory processing disorder - diagnosed when he was 5. Many of the issues you describe are exactly like my son. He has been going to OT for 2 years and that helps a lot. The other things that help are routine, order and being prepared for what is going to happen. Apparently each child with SPD will have different ways of regulating the sensory overload. My son is movement seeking and something rhythmic like bouncing on a trampoline really helps him to calm down and regroup. Find out what your son's self-regulatory thing is and help him with that. A sensory diet also helps - the OT can help you with that.



I agree with Annie that "The Out of Sync Child" is a very helpful book.



Good luck - especially with the people (medical and education professionals included) who do not understand SPD and those that don't believe it exists. You and I both know it is very real.

Annie - posted on 02/27/2012

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Also, a GREAT book to read is "The Out of Sync Child" by Carol Stock Kranowitz.. It helped me immensely!

Annie - posted on 02/27/2012

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Sounds like Sensory Integration Dysfunction, specifically Tactile Dysfunction (Tactile Dysfunction is problem with the "feel" of anything -- tags in clothing, textures of food, the bath water is very common)... You should get a diagnosis from a neurodevelopment pediatric specialist and he/she will most likely refer you to an Occupational Therapist as well.

Don't worry - my son was diagnosed at 3 and now that he's 11 you'd never even know it!

Good Luck!

Sondra - posted on 02/27/2012

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This sounds like your son is Autistic. See your pediatrician as soon as possible and get him some help. Good Luck.

Laura - posted on 02/27/2012

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Lot's of good responses here. Just make sure you understand these are REAL problems and not let the doctor tell you it isn't or that OT won't help. Always when you aren't satisfied get another opinion and then another if you think its warranted. You know your child better than anyone and are in the best position to help him.

Ashley - posted on 02/27/2012

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Try to get soaps that have no smells - or very little - often the natural food stores have better. Also, have you tried a shower instead? Just a thought.

Danice - posted on 02/27/2012

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Just an additional comment after reading these posts. My 16 yr old was tested for autism but that was eliminated as an additional concern. While she does have some additional issues, her sensory disorder sees to be the major contributor to so many of her problems. She couldn't brush her teeth because of the mint toothpaste, which we switched, but also changing to a spin brush really helped. As for the shower, we switched to a bath for awhile because her nervous system was too sensitized to handle the pressure of the shower. We also switched to shower gel ( she must approve the scent) because soap was too sticky. Be the best advocate for your hold that you can be and push for an occupation therapy evaluation. OT changed all of our lives for the better.

Stephanie - posted on 02/27/2012

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My son was diagnosed Sensory Processing Disorder. There is a lot of info online. We had to be referred to a pediatric neurologist for the diagnosis. They also diagnosed ADHD. Life has become an adventure. Listen to your child, see what things are ok for your child! It is the best thing you can do for both of you. If you pay close attention, you can see and read reactions to everything. :)

Danice - posted on 02/27/2012

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I have a daughter , now 16, with similar issues. She was diagnosed with sensory processing disorder. I would speak to your pediatrician about occupational therapy. My daughter went on something which I believe was called a sensory diet which we found to be helpful. We also set up a sensory corner in her room which was a quiet space in her room where she would go a few times a day to give her a little time to regroup. Occupational therapy was a Godsend. Good luck!

Piper - posted on 02/26/2012

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First of all, give him some time. Patience is the most important for child with these issues. I wouldnt assume he is autistic at this point. Get him to an occupational therapist and an ear doctor. I have a kid that had severe ear infections with malfunctioning eustachian tubes and he had all of these symptoms. There is a sensory processing disorder that can have thousands of symptoms. My son had almost everything you mention, but he was much less reacitve making it easier to ignore. At first glance, people mentioned he may have mild autism, but the pediatrician laughed at that notion. He has lots of normal functions that children with autism do not have.



Since he started therapy, he improves weekly and is learning to adjust to new things in general. The OT is essential to his well being and making good progress.



Best Of Luck!

Piper Oostdyk

Stephanie - posted on 02/25/2012

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I bet the thing with what he likes to easy (seems mostly crunchy) is sensory that he likes. Try carrot sticks while he is in there or the gum. Also, maybe Ivory soap doesn't have a strong scent. Also try different things like wash cloth vs. pouf. My son loves the johnson & johnson kids soap that is in the green scrubby thing (bonus: it lasts a long time). Another suggestion to us was having him jump on a trampoline before the bath. Good luck! :)

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