My son is almost 2 years old and he still throws up his food at times, its not a regular thing, but i he cries right after his meal, he will throw up, or if he cough hard. I cant understand why would they do this at this age? Is anyone facing this problem? How do i deal with it? I have checked the doctor, and there seems to be no medical reason to why he still throws up!

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Dianna - posted on 03/30/2012

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My son is 4 years old he throws up aftet almost every meal except little snack and sometimes that even. And when he drimks also, he had.the upper gi.and even the cookie swallow done and no one can figure out.whats goin on . Im so frustrated i dont.know what to do. Any suggestions would b great hes been doin this since he was.18months old.and its not healthy. It worrys me please help!!

Małgorzata - posted on 04/01/2012

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My daughter had the same thing. I was an astma. Go to the allergy department. It is serious.



My kids have food allergies. I have a blog with recipes, and some craft for children.



Idealhousewife.wordpress.com

Amy - posted on 12/25/2008

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Have you checked food allergies? My son has many and that is one of the symptoms! You can get a simple blood test to find out.

Tara - posted on 12/22/2008

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you might want to consider seeing a pediatric gastroenterologist. I am an occupational therapist and have seen some kids with gastric emptying issues...where they are "too full' for too long. Or possibly a milk allergy which is on the rise- especially if the vomitting is accompanied by a history of colic/gas and eczema. Does he feel sick after eating something dairy?

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Carol - posted on 12/26/2008

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Thank you all for the advise. I will check another doctor for the gag reflex. I would like to know the ones that their children suffer from strong gag reflux, are any of them on medication? how have you dealt with it and what do you do to avoid the throwing up?

Stephanie - posted on 12/25/2008

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It sounds as though he has a pretty strong gag reflex. I don't think he needs medical attention unless he is not putting on enough weight. He might be sensitive for the next few years but by 5 or so, he should be a lot better. He might also keep that sensitivity throughout his life span.

Courtney - posted on 12/23/2008

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He's probably just got a really sensitive gag reflex. It's nothing to worry about but he will have to learn how to control it better. Unfortunately for you, that might not happen for another year or two. A lot of times though it does get better with age, so it might not be something he has to live with forever.

Beth - posted on 12/23/2008

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Hi Carol, when my son was an infant he went through the exact same thing & a pediatrian even told us that he would just have to live with it for the rest of his life. I went home crying and told my mom & husband this can't be right and no way to live a life, there has to be something. So I took him to a different pediatrician and my son was diagnosed with bad acid reflux and an allergy to lactose. He was on medicine for the acid reflux for about 1 year then we were able to wean him off of it and it only flares up every blue moon not every meal. But he still has an issue with lactose if he has more than 5 oz of regular milk he will throw up within 10 minutes of eating or crying hard. To solve that issue we give him Lactaid or Soy Milk and he enjoys it just as much. All I can say is don't settle that there is nothing that can be done! If the pediatrician & ENT didn't find anything then try another or a gastroentrologist.

Carol - posted on 12/23/2008

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Hi Rachel, to answer you, no he doesn't cry after eating. He will cry if he fell or something like that. He is not allergic to any food. He only throws up when he cries hard, and starts screaming so loud. Sometimes he'll be jumping around and gag on the bite in his mouth, and he'll throw up the whole meal. He cant seem to control it. I have been to an END doctor, and he told me that there is nothing wrong with him. I haven't checked him out with x-rays. I just dont understand why would he throw up and when he does, he will throw up the whole meal he ate. When he was younger it was worse, he would throw up easily if he was overfed or if he just becomes so active and gags easily. I just thought that he will outgrow it at this age. So what is the solution? The only thing I do is make sure he doesnt cry so much, and that is spoiling him, but I have no other choice.

Michelle - posted on 12/22/2008

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I would for sure go to a gastro doctor and have an upper GI & Swallow Study done. The procedure sounds scary, but it is really not bad. My DD had it done at 6 months. She use to do the same thing. Come to find out she has Grade IV Reflux and just needed a little medication. If it is not sensory (some kids have this problem and work through it with a little Speech and OT) others have reflux. Trust me, for mental sanity of your toddler, I would get it done. Good luck and know it is not a big deal unless you do not treat it. BTW my DD is 7 years old now. Still on Prevacid, but doing well. (((HUG))).

Rachael - posted on 12/22/2008

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Forgot to ask is your son crying after a meal because of an upset tummy or just in general? Our son doesn't cry BECAUSE of the food he usually is throwing a fit because nap time is after lunch or bedtime after dinner. The crying is not in response to the food or stomach ache...crying hard just triggers the gag reflux, does this seem to be the case for you?

TNell - posted on 12/22/2008

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My daughter was allergic to soy and we didn't realize it until we had her tested by an allergist. She too would periodically throw up, or cry because her stomach hurt too much. She is so allergic it can't even be baked in something. Also, my son is the same way with soy and milk. He also had acid reflux and a horrible gag reflex so we didn't find out until he started getting bloody stools. I would suggest that if you are concerned about a certain food item, COMPLETELY REMOVE it from her diet for at least a week. If she shows signs of getting better add one thing a day with that food item. Chart when you gave it to her and if any signs happen, when and what they were. This will help you when you take her to the doctors so they have a better idea of helping you too. Good luck!

Rachael - posted on 12/22/2008

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Wow, I can relate. Our son is 2 1/2 and is a gagger. If he coughs or starts crying for any reason anwhere close to after eating a meal he will throw up. It is occasional that he does it but often enough. We can usually talk him through it without him throwing up we tell him to breathe and take a drink. He has always had a VERY sensitive gag reflex. The throwing up and gagging gets worse when he has a cold from the drainage going down his throat usually he throws up more often when he has a cold but it is only after something has come into contact with his gag reflex i.e. food. He doesn't even necessarily do it after a meal sometimes right when he starts or sometime in the middle...like I said it just takes something triggering that gag reflex (noodles have to be cut up to say the least!). It is getting better as he is getting older and it is not a regular occurance. Our son has no allergies or reflux just a very sensitive gag reflex. So yes we experience this issue occasionally too. I blame my husband it seems to be in the DNA, ha ha!

Leah - posted on 12/21/2008

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Sounds pretty much like my 3 year old up until about 6 months ago! She had such severe reflux, she needing a feeding tube in her small intestine for 5 months to keep anything down the first year, and also needed an epiglottal plasty at 10 wks for laryngomalacia. Kimberly's suggestion below to hook up w/ an ENT or pediatric GI is good b/c for some reason, a vacuum of negative pressure created in his upper airway causes him to vomit after certain behaviors, which could be symptomatic of a narrow upper airway and mild/moderate GERD. I strongly discourage doing a "barium swallow" (aka. Upper GI) as she recommends, though, b/c it will not change how your son is treated...it will only tell docs what they already know -that he is vomitting at certain times of day elicited by certain behaviors- and expose him to large amounts of x-rays. A good pediatric GI will not push this kind of test on you b/c they'll understand this and will follow your child by detailing every aspect of their behavior before and after the vomitting. I wouldn't suggest adding more liquids, b/c those come up much more easily than solids. Less volume of food more frequently is the key w/ any kind of non-illness related vomitting. Katrina's suggestion to a gluten allergy related issue is pretty possible too... a simple skin test will reveal if you have anything additional to worry about. An allergist/immunologist can help w/ that and it only takes 15 minutes...the skin isn't exactly pricked, as they say, either, so don't worry about it hurting. It feels like the end of a toothpick poking your skin for half a second. The most painful part is feeling the allergic reaction to any of the tests. Besides checking w/ the docs (GI and ENT), your best bet is to try limiting any crying or coughing post-meal by doing something fun that he really likes to do, at the same time keeping him in a seated or standing upright position for at least 30 minutes after a meal.

Karen - posted on 12/21/2008

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My son had problems with his tonsils. They had to be removed at that age. The only way we could get him to keep anything down was putting him back onto a bottle, for liquid, intake only. The sucking action would open his throat up enough for liquid to pass and stay down, with out him throwing it back up. When they removed his tonsils they were so big they said they were the size of a large adults. After they were removed our problem was solved.

Katrina - posted on 12/21/2008

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Well, 2 possible reasons come to mind.
1: mabey he is eating to much food at one time. Try giving him smaller portions and see if it helps. It may be that he has a weaker stomach and can not carry as much food.
2: mabey he is intolerant or allergic to certain foods. it might be good to go non-dairy/eggs/peanuts for a while and see if that makes a difference. Or it could be that he is intolerant to Gluten -the protein in Wheat, Oats Rye, Barley. These allergies are becoming more known and there are alot of foods on the market that are "Gluten free" and will state that on labels. I am sure that a pediatric nutritionist should be able to help you find a healthy diet of foods that will do well with your child.
My daughter had a similar thing happening when she was about 2. She would throw up at odd times and have very bad constipation. This went on for some time until my mom said mabey we should go gluten free with her. We did for about 2 years and then slowly gave a little wheat bread and oatmeal to her. She still prefers the non gluten stuff but does ok now with the gluten products. We have always been non dairy/eggs because of allergies. I hope this helps you out. There is a solution out there for you. God bless you!

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This problem could be caused by undiagnosed reflux or even just a strong gag reflex. A primary care physician/pediatrician would not be able to diagnose the reason for this problem. You may want to consult with a gastroenterologist or ENT (Ear/Nose/Throat) doctor (also called an otolaryngologist.) My son had this problem and we tested him by using a "barium swallow" where they drink a thick liquid that an x-ray type machine can detect and note whether or not they are swallowing properly/completely.

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