Night terrors. Any suggestions.....

Monica - posted on 05/26/2009 ( 16 moms have responded )

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Any suggestions on how to stop/prevent them??

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Kirstin - posted on 05/29/2009

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My son had them also when he was a toddler and what I remember is that poor naps and/or overstimulation during the day seemed to trigger them. (It would be worth ruling out GERD if the terrors are happening routinely) I would to not pick him up right away at night when crying, but would first try to figure if it was a terror instead. If it was a terror I would just repeat OVER and OVER that, "Mommy is here. You are Ok. You are a good boy." Sometimes I would have to say it loudly but I tried to sound comforting, if he was fussing for too long I would just leave to room. If he was wanting to be picked-up I would and then sometimes he would freak and then I would put him again. You just have to keep trying different things, (just what you want to do in the middle of the night). Anyway eventually they stopped, now he has nightmares and sleepwalks occasionally. There's always something new to look forward to. Good Luck!

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blue or green lights send peace, orange or red send intensity and anxiety... try recording your heartbeat for the baby to listen to, put some lavender in the room... and a warm bath or meditate with the baby before bed.......uuuuuuuuuuuuuuummmmmmmmmmmm is very peaceful...

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My son had them for about a year, I gave him benadryl about an hour before he went to bed. He outgrew them pretty quickly. The benadryl helps them get a good night sleep. Also one other way is to wake them up an hour after they go to sleep, make sure they wake up all the way.

Kathleen - posted on 05/28/2009

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Mine was having them. He is 1 yr old now. We didn't have any idea what was going on..though he was just having nightmares. Learned very fast not to jar him awake. We'd go in and he'd be screaming, we'd pick him up. He'd look like he was awake with his eyes open but he was not. We started putting his music back on when he sleeps, I am very careful in what he watches and views on tv. Hubby sometimes watching war movies or plays some pretty violent video games. We took those out of the picture, made sure he ate a snack right before bed and he's been a lot better.
I searched and searched for an answer online and all I found out and also talking to the pediatrician was that there's nothing to do. As others have said just comfort him when he does wake. Also, if they seem to have just begun...as in he hasn't had them before, check his gums....Doctor told us, our son's sleep had changed because of teething pain and now that he has a few teeth he tend to bite himself sometimes at night.....just a thought.

I know it's scary, and you as the mother just want to hold your baby and fix it all. I wish I could say that that was the remedy but as others have said they have to grow out of it. Just be there to comfort your child when they do wake.

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My son had them for the past 4 months and then they just stopped out of nowhere...we would just put him back to bed and wait until he fell back asleep. He would not remember anything the next day.

Catina - posted on 05/28/2009

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My suggestion is to pray. The devil comes and tries to steal our peace no matter how old we are. My daughter has had this issue, we pray before she goes to sleep and if for some reason we missed that nights prayer. When she has one, she wakes up and prays over them. She always tells me she is comforted.

~Jennifer - posted on 05/28/2009

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When my son was having them, they always happened at about the same time each night. Our pedi suggested going in and moving him (turn him on his side, rub his back a little) just enough to rouse him slightly, but not completely wake him up about 15 minutes before the time that they usually happened. It seemed to stop the cycle and prevent the terror. He's 4 now, and hasn't had one at all in over a year.

I was also told not to try to wake him up in the middle of one, but to make sure that he wasn't around anything with which he could hurt himself.
They should go away on their own in time. Kids rarely remember having the night terrors at all the next morning, but it's hard on us as parents to watch them go through it and feel so helpless. I hope they end quickly.
All the best to you & your little man.
=)

Andrea - posted on 05/28/2009

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Monica i'm sorry to hear that you are going through this tough i have been lucky with my 3 boys that they never had night terrors but try giving a warm soothing bath with the Johnson's bedtime baby wash that always seem to make my boys sleep better. I hope you find an answer and i hope this helps.

Monica - posted on 05/28/2009

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Thank you for all of your suggestions!! I truly appreciate them. My husband was out of town for work on Monday night and I just let Aeron cry through them and he fell right back to sleep and didn't wake the rest of the night. I believe it's due to lack of sleep. He's not much of a napper. I'm going to try and encourage more napping and maybe get more fresh air during the day. He used to sleep really well until these night terrors. Hopefully they pass soon. Thanks again!

Darlene - posted on 05/27/2009

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Hi Monica, My 8 year old had them for several years. One thing that I began to do was to research and study up on night terrors on the internet, which helped. I learned not to become impatient with her, but to just be there for her until she woke up from it. She never remembered the hysteria and screaming the next day. If it is nightmares, they remember. Also, I began to do spiritual warfare over her, binding any demonic spirits that would attach themselves to her dreams, her mind, her thoughts, and her imaginations. As I began to do this each night after she fell asleep, the night terrors began to cease.

Esther - posted on 05/27/2009

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Hi Monica! So sorry about the night terrors - our first daughter went through them so often... she never slept enough and then would wake at 11 or 12 screaming! It's almost like sleepwalking for them. We used to take her screaming into the car and drive around for a bit and she would put herself back to sleep. If you don't have that option, get their lovey, whatever it is and just sit with them. They DO outgrow it! hang in there!

Ariana - posted on 05/27/2009

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Quoting Monica:

Night terrors. Any suggestions.....

Any suggestions on how to stop/prevent them??



Hello, my son who is now 15 years old has been having Night Terrors since he was a baby. They have slacked up now. I was told by the doctor that he would eventually grow out of them. There is no cure for them, they put my son on medication when he was small;however, the meds did not stop them. Hopefully, your child will out grow them before they get too bad. When my son would have them, I learned to try and let him come out of it without trying to wake him up. Also, if I felt that he would danger hisself and I needed to get too him, I learned not to stand in front of him. If you stand in front of them, whatever is after them in their sleep, they will think it is you. My son actaully became violent. I pray that your child out grows it soon, let me know if I can be of anymore help.

Jodi - posted on 05/27/2009

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Hi Monica,

My oldest son had night terrors. He is now 20 years old...

The best advice I can give you is to let your child go through it. Don't try to wake them. Even when all your instincts tell you to pick him up and console them. If the little one wakes, then you can console them.

Our ped doctor told us that our son would outgrow it... and he did by the time he was about 3 1/2.

It was such a frightening thing for us to watch.

Monique - posted on 05/27/2009

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In kids, the anecdotal evidence is that they grow out of them--adults with this sleep disorder usually have it come on in teens and disappear in later years. This is what helps for adults with night terrors--perhaps it would be useful for children as well: LOTS of sleep--the more tired a person is the more likely they are to have night terrors (the average baby should be getting 13 -14 hours of sleep in a 24 hour period); a low night light on; soothing noises when they wake up with a night terror--often times holding them or restraining them in some way will just upset them more; let them come out of it on their own but stay close to make sure they don't hurt themselves. Once they start walking, make sure the environment is really safe should they have one that makes them leave their bed (especially stair gates if your child is upstairs). Good luck to you and just know that as scary as it is to watch these things, usually the child can't remember a thing about it the next day. Take care.

Kylie - posted on 05/26/2009

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it is sooo hard but youve got to be firm, if your child is really upset just reassure them but make sure they dont play on it as youll be suprised from what age children do this, all i can say is be persistant and never give into them like letting them in your own bed because things will get harder, good luck x

Allie - posted on 05/26/2009

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HI Monica, I'm afraid I don't have a solution fr you but wanted to offer my support. My son who is now 18 months old has has night terrors since he was a tiny baby and still has them now. The best advice i've been given is not to wake him unless he wakes naturally and then just to offer cuddles and reassurance. My mum says I had them too and eventually grew out of them about 3 1/2 years old.

I'm here if you want someone to talk to about it.

Best of luck

Allie

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