No breastmilk

Thembi - posted on 12/05/2008 ( 12 moms have responded )

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Hi Great Moms, my 3month old baby girl does'nt want my breast milk anymore, she was vomitting for sometime so i stopped breast feeding for a week and gave her a rehydrant, after the rehydrant satchets she was fine but did'nt want my milk. Now the funniest part is that at night i breastfeed her & she does'nt have a problem but during the day she does'nt want she cries & looks away everytime i try to latch her. Could i be the cause! maybe my milk is not healthy or i've contracted some infection, is it normal for a baby to behave like this?

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Jen - posted on 12/05/2008

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Your baby might be more aware of the world around her. My baby has had those phases. Right now (at 8 months), I can't feed her with ANY activity around. I have to go into a dark room, with no noise, lights, etc. Then she will focus on eating. You could try recreating the mood when you feed her at night and see if that helps!

Debbie - posted on 12/05/2008

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Just remember bottles are easier to get milk from and some babies will get lazy after they have had one. So just be patient and keep trying. If she taking the breast at night and not having any problems then, it is not you. I would try to nurse her when she is sleepy. Good for you for giving your baby the best! If you continue to have problems please seek help. I have 3 children and gave up on nursing my first because of a problem. I was able to sucessfully nurse my other two children and it was the best thing I ever did. My oldest is almost 22 years old and I am still sad that I gave up so easy. The nursing relationship is worth the troubles you may have to overcome.

[deleted account]

They do start to notice the world a lot more at that age. The suggestions for a nice quiet dark room might be helpful to get you through this challenging time. I think the fact that she still night-feeds should give you confidence that it's not you or your milk.

Michelle - posted on 12/05/2008

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My daughter and I went through a difficult nursing "phase". I hesitate to call it a strike because it went on for many weeks. She too never had an issue during middle of the night feedings. Here's what helped in our experience: Nursed her immediately after a nap when she was still groggy and room was still dim; spent a weekend in bed with her, kept her close & napped with her - as much skin to skin as possible - played music we listened to when she was first born; took baths with her; sometimes walked around and sang to her in position to get her started nursing; used the carrier a lot. BUT here's what I realized about myself...I was becoming obsessed with her nursing. I would watch the clock and figure she should be hungry so I would offer and offer and offer the breast. Then one day when I didn't offer at a time she wouldn't usually nurse she got fussy, I offered and she nursed without a problem. I then tried to ease up on the clock watching and let her define the new routine. Also I tried to use the bottle with breast milk as an absolute last resort but when I did give it to her I gave it with a slow flow nipple - not the age appropriate nipple - so that she didn't get too attached to the bottle. Pumping to maintain supply was a huge drag but worth it! (Also realized my own mental state was a huge factor. Sometimes couldn't get the let down then would have a good cry and would then pump 6 ozs. or more.) Oh, the difficulty first began at 3 months with my daughter. She was always alert and aware but became much more so and more easily distracted at that age and interested in doing much more than being still and nursing. But the "strike" happened around 5 months. I guess what's important is to relax and try to be aware of what it all brings up for you. And from what I understand infections like mastitis effect the breast tissue and not the milk. I don't believe milk can be infected. Could be as simple as your diet but could just be a developmental stage. Maybe baby just wants more control. Reaching out to a lactation consultant / La Leche League might help too. Good luck!

Cindy - posted on 12/05/2008

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...another thing, when my daughter was about 3or 4 months, my milk would just take a little longer to drop. I would start to feed her, and the milk wouldnt come right away. This was VERY frustrating for her and for me. Then I would have to let her try and suckle, to get things going, and then wait a few minutes, and then I would feel the milk drop, and then she would drink fine, but for those few minutes in between, she was quite upset. I had to just stick with it, and eventually my milk would come quicker, and it was ok again.

Cindy - posted on 12/05/2008

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I think that if you are feeding her at night and she doesnt have a reaction then, then it's not about your milk. I had it a few times with my daughter that she would just get so upset when I would try and breastfeed her, and I think it was my milk supply that was the problem. Try feeding her more often, and if she doesnt take it, dont try and force her, she will just get more upset. Try again a little while later, when she is hungry enough she will most likely take it. If that doesnt work, for sure I would try pumping, because indeed breast milk is best. If that STILL doesnt work. I guess you would have to try formula. I had heard of a trick to increase milk supply... Eat plain yogurt mixed with buttermilk. It tastes prett good, and it should help your supply right away. (it didnt work that great for me, but had an instant effect for my sis-in-law.)...Hope this helps.

Amy - posted on 12/05/2008

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You are doing a great job by sticking with it and not giving up just yet. Hang in there. There isn't anything that you are doing that is wrong or 'bad'. Try and get yourself relaxed before you try to latch her on. babies are soooo smart and pick up on our mood. If you are anxious she will know and will refuse...if you are tense if will be harder for your milk to come down.

At about 2 months my baby went on a nursing strike. I studied and contacted my laleche league coach. I found many suggestions but the first I tried worked like a charm. You lay in a warm bath with your baby at your lower tummy. Let her work her way to your breast. it is called a rebirthing process. The warm water resembles the womb and when babies are first delivered it is natural for them to work their way to find food. That is why the first hour after birth they are usually alert. Try this process. I can't make any promises but for us, it worked. you may want to google it and find out more details that I may be leaving out.

Hang in there. The breast is best and you are an amazing momma for hanging in there that long. Stay encouraged and don't give up!!!!!

Jennifer - posted on 12/05/2008

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I would also check for anything that could be pain related...I've experienced nursing issues related to all of the following: early teething, thrush, ear aches, sore throat, stomach bugs. Also, you said she nurses at night--which I assume means she is lying down. During the day have you tried lying down? My youngest, for some reason, refused to nurse sitting in my lap. I always had to lay on the bed with him. I think he was just more comfortable that way. Good luck!!

Joanna - posted on 12/05/2008

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Hi Thembakazi...your milk is the most healthy food she could possibly be eating. It could be that your milk supply is a little low, or that she is going through a growing spurt. The best way to remedy both of those problems is to just offer her the breast very often... just keep at it as much as you can. I've had situations when my baby acted like that, and usually it was when they were going through a growing spurt. The other thought that comes to mind is that babies act like that when their nose is stuffed up from a cold and they can't breath clearly through their nose and nurse at the same time. That is a very frustrating thing, because you don't think of that right away, and then you tend to think that the baby doesn't like your milk. If that is the case, helping to clear the baby's nose will help her to nurse more comfortably. Be encouraged. Successfully nursing your baby takes great commitment, and stick-to-it-ivness, but it is so worth it. ~ Joanna

Sara - posted on 12/05/2008

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It is normal for a baby to go through a "nursing strike". Continue to try to nurse her, especially when she is tired. Keep the stimulation to a minimum. Try the same place, position and atmosphere that she has when she is nursing at night. Pump to keep up your supply. Supplement with your milk only. Good Luck! Oh, and IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT!

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I have a child that refused to nurse, but not wanting to use formula, I pumped and she was fine with breast milk from a bottle. For some unexplainable reason she did not want to nurse. So we settled. Pumping all the time take alot of comitment, and gets tiresome, but you are still able to give the baby what she needs. Good luck, and do not worry. You are not at fault. All children are different, and some just prefer the bottle over breast.

Laura - posted on 12/05/2008

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are you drinking dairy? What are you eating? Have you eaten anything that could've changed the taste of your milk?



Keep on trying to nurse...I wouldn't advise going to formula.

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