ODD/ ADHD?

Sami - posted on 11/03/2009 ( 287 moms have responded )

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My six year old is showing definete signs of ADHD and/or ODD. There is so much info out there, but I was was wondering if any of you moms out there have a child with one of these two? I am making an apt with the dr and all, I just want to hear personal experiences and stories, if that makes since. How did your children act- how did you know it was time to evaluate? Was there a trigger that you can think of? How are you handling the situations at home? etc. Anything you can tell me would help. I know I am not alone, but I think I need to hear from people who are in similar boats... thanks

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Bekki - posted on 11/03/2009

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Quoting Elizabeth:

Being a teacher, I really have first hand contact with ADD/ADHD...it's really easy to give kids meds...but poor little ones, they change into 'someone' else ... zombielike! Read up on research that suggests diet changes to 'manage' these disorders! Kids are being 'diagnosed' way toooooo early in life, and given meds to remedy the problem. If I can deal with my students for 8 hours (and more than 3 at a time), believe me, they don't need to be on meds. In my case, if I keep them busy, they stay out of trouble. Good luck, I know it's not easy.


 



 



Your students may in fact be on medications, just because your not administering them in class doesn't mean they arent on them.



 



Not all medications make children "zombielike", it all depends on the medications. A childs diet really has no effect on ADHD, ADD, or any other neurological psychological disorder. Food doesn't affect your neurotransmitters enough to have that kind of an effect.



Many of the studies on diet are showing that in most cases the diet change has little to no effect on the underlying problem, some parents try this with autism as well which is sad because all in all its your children that have to deal with the repurcussion of their parents not properly treating their disorder medically and that is really really sad. Watching children that grow up with emotional disorders, violence issues and it all traces back to not receiving proper medical care to sort out the chemical imbalances in their brains. It's sad... Studies have shown early diagnosis and medical treatment for these disorders has come a long way, and a large number of children with these disorders that are diagnosed and treated early on end up off medications by their teen years and on the road to a bright future. Those that go without proper care tend to have learning disabilites throughout the rest of their lives.

Lyndsay - posted on 11/04/2009

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I strongly suspect my son has ADHD, but then again he's only 2 so it could just be the age. I don't have tons of experience with this, but I'm currently taking a course in abnormal psychology and we just covered ADHD and ODD, so I will share some information with you from that.

The main difference between the two is that ADHD kids are not being defiant on purpose... they are not trying to push your buttons or piss you off, they are just struggling with whatever it is you are asking of them. In most cases they simply cannot do it. ODD kids, on the other hand, are purposely defiant. They may (or may not) be able to do whatever you're asking of them, but choose not to for whatever reason.

MOST CASES of oppositional defiant disorder begin with ADHD, and it all depends on how you handle the situation. One of the worst things you can do is tell the child to "try harder". Often they are trying harder than everybody else (particularly in a school situation), and yet they are still failing. If they are trying and trying and trying, and failing, eventually they are going to give up. This is when it becomes more of an ODD situation... such as when a teacher tells them to "try harder", they tell the teacher to fuck off.

Basically the best way to manage ADHD is to break everything down into very small parts, and reward every step of the way. This is the example that my professor used, it pertains more to group work but it can relate to individual kids as well. If you are planning to build a bird house with an ADHD child, you don't give them all the materials and tell them to build it and come back to you when you're done. You give them the roof and tell them to paint it, then reward them for that. Then you give them the body and have them attach it, and reward them for that. Then you paint the house, and reward them for that. etc etc etc.

Hope this helps. :)

Bekki - posted on 11/03/2009

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Quoting Vanesa:

My son is only three so I can't tell you if he's as crazy as I am yet...but I am OCD and ADD and my brother is ADHD and a perinoid skitzophrenic. It's hard to tell someone else how to deal with someone with a "disorder" like that since it's all differant. I like to count things, I have to make sure everything is even, and sometimes it took me FOREVER to walk somewhere because if I steped over a crack with one foot, I had to do it with the next foot on the next step. My mom just ignored it though. It just ment I was always orginized and she didn't have to clean up after me. Besides, she had her hands full with my brother.
I watched her struggle and I watched her brake down and cry so many times because of him. They had to find special schools for him to go to since he kept getting kicked out.
She said she knew he was ADHD from the time he was 4. He was playing with toys and the converstations he had with them were soooo speratic that there was no way his brain was thinking about one thing at a time. They would go something like, "How are you today? I'm 5. No wait, I have to go potty, is this blue thing yours? I have to clean my room, but I can't go potty in here, cats are fun, bye, I have to go potty," And by then he would have peed his pants because he couldn't remember that he had to go long enough to get up and do it.


 



 



Not all OCD'ers are organized lol.. Common misconception about OCD. Some people with OCD are neat freaks while others are messy as hell and hoarders. I was diagnosed with OCD by my mental health psychologist last year.. Which was like dumb because i already knew i had it.. It all depends on your personal "ticks". My ticks are hoarding magazines (which my husband secretly throws away) because i think someday i might need them.. i still have all of my pants from high school and im now 26, just in case i .. i dunno drop a ton of weight and suddently need size 0 pants?? lol.. I can't eat foods that touch each other. If i tap one finger im tapping for hours to make all the rest of my fingers feel .....equally tapped.. I do it with my toes as well.. I don't even realize im doing it most of the time.. but neat and organized?? SO not me lol.. I can't find anything in my house cuz i never remember where i put it lol..

Kim - posted on 11/04/2009

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I have a 16 year old that was diagnosed when he was 5. I knew it was time to be tested when he was standing in line to be picked up from school and allthe other little kids could stand and wait, they'd figit, kids do that, but he was the one that was literally bouncing himself off the walls...I mean, there he was - boing, boing... he also would finish his work and would try to finish other and then sit in his chair up side down playing StarWars. My mom suggested that I have him tested, so he was tested and placed on medication...it was like I had a new child! It was great! He was the same kid, but waas able to actually sit and do his work and he was nice and slept well (finally, he didn't sleep throught the night until we were able to get him on the meds. It was like night and day - in a good way... Fast forward 7 years...I have another son, he is now 8 but they (the teachers) said that he might have ADD...without the hyperactivity, he just can't concentrate, is unorganized, the whole gambit...I took him to a Dr. to be evaluated and after a year, we still had not found a drug that didn't make him lethargic and zombie like and he still had not been tested. It's like he was a lab rat for all the new meds on the market. I asked several times about when someone would actually test him and they siad they wanted to get this right first...but the complaints changed to he sleeps in class and he can't stay awake...the point of this is to say that if the medication doesn't work, the child doesn't have ADHD or ADD...there could be a learning disability, there could be depression (yes, in children as young as 5) and ODD is often coupled with ADHD (my eldest son had it as well but that was mild). Don't let them (the Dr's push meds on your child until they test the child and make sure that that is the problem and that nothing else could be as well. Chin up though, give your child the opportunity for conversation in this matter...when the Dr's arent' around he can tell you how he really feels because its you and him together. Things to do in the interim are lots of structure, time tables if you have to, ADD, ADHD and ODD kids, well, all kids in general like to know what's next, it gives them security and makes them feel comfortable in their surroundings. So just make sure there is a structured plan in place. Make sure homework time has breaks planned in, the shorter bursts of activity are how thier brains are put together and they respond better to this and there is a lot less fighting about it. just tell the child, we'll do this and then take a quick break (no more than 10 minutes) and then we'll do the next. It sounds like it will take awhile to get thorough homework, but it actually takes less time.

Good Luck! Chin up!

Janice - posted on 11/03/2009

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Hi, my son had all the signs but my husband didn't believe he actually had ADHD. Once we got him diagnosed and on meds, he was a completely different child. Meds aren't always the answer, but from what I've experienced, I think it is cruel to not allow them to be the best that they can be.

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Judi - posted on 11/23/2009

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Hi Sami, My now 20 year old was 3 when I noticed a big change in his behaviour. He was an active, happy and contented child until he turned 3 and then it was like someone flicked a switch and he got heaps more active, much, much louder, naughty and putting himself in dangerous situations. he seemed to have no fear and the safe practices he had been taught and had been demonstrating up until then, were gone. It was a difficult time that I put down to the breakup of my marriage, sought counselling etc. When he was 7 I saw an article on ADHD and it perfectly described my son. I got hold of the test profile and filled in all the questions which of course all pointed to ADHD. I then took him to a specialist in this area who confirmed my suspicians. I didn't medicate immediately. I chose behaviour modification programmes, speech therapy, but they made no difference. At 9, I agreed to a trial on meds to see if there was a difference in his behaviour. The effect was immediate. instant. He spoke in logical sentences, his teacher said he could read his writing, the teacher reported a huge change in his behaviour, and that was after only one tablet. We were blessed with a good Doctor, good support from his teacher at that time and a committment to work hard to help him learn. He also had learning difficulties. I read heaps of books, applied the advice and saw good results. Life was not perfect, we still had problems, but nothing that he hasn't overcome with hard work. Music, lots of physical activity and structured routine with heaps of encoragement have been the keys for us. He is going to do a B Music at Uni, working hard and singing professionally. Yes, he still has problems, he still shows signs of ADHD, but he is no longer on meds. He decided at 18, that he no longer wanted them once he finished school. He may recommence them once he starts Uni, but that will be his choice. He is doing well, he is a beautiful young man who will be a good supportive husband and father one day, and isn't that what we all want for our kids. Success is individual to each person, and he is already a huge success. He is an overcomer. There is hope for kids with these problems..

Judi - posted on 11/23/2009

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Hi Sami, My now 20 year old was 3 when I noticed a big change in his behaviour. He was an active, happy and contented child until he turned 3 and then it was like someone flicked a switch and he got heaps more active, much, much louder, naughty and putting himself in dangerous situations. he seemed to have no fear and the safe practices he had been taught and had been demonstrating up until then, were gone. It was a difficult time that I put down to the breakup of my marriage, sought counselling etc. When he was 7 I saw an article on ADHD and it perfectly described my son. I got hold of the test profile and filled in all the questions which of course all pointed to ADHD. I then took him to a specialist in this area who confirmed my suspicians. I didn't medicate immediately. I chose behaviour modification programmes, speech therapy, but they made no difference. At 9, I agreed to a trial on meds to see if there was a difference in his behaviour. The effect was immediate. instant. He spoke in logical sentences, his teacher said he could read his writing, the teacher reported a huge change in his behaviour, and that was after only one tablet. We were blessed with a good Doctor, good support from his teacher at that time and a committment to work hard to help him learn. He also had learning difficulties. I read heaps of books, applied the advice and saw good results. Life was not perfect, we still had problems, but nothing that he hasn't overcome with hard work. Music, lots of physical activity and structured routine with heaps of encoragement have been the keys for us. He is going to do a B Music at Uni, working hard and singing professionally. Yes, he still has problems, he still shows signs of ADHD, but he is no longer on meds. He decided at 18, that he no longer wanted them once he finished school. He may recommence them once he starts Uni, but that will be his choice. He is doing well, he is a beautiful young man who will be a good supportive husband and father one day, and isn't that what we all want for our kids. Success is individual to each person, and he is already a huge success. He is an overcomer. There is hope for kids with these problems..

Audra - posted on 11/22/2009

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Oh my goodness - Magic 1-2-3 is such a wonderful way to parent for anyone not only with ADHD. I just can't say enough ... it's quite old, I've been using it for the past 10 years but the concept is so simple. Once the kids get through the defiant stage it's a piece of cake. There's no more yelling at our house and to this day when my 17yr, 19yr and 20yr are getting a little out of control, I will count with holding up my hand and not saying a word 1-2 and they know I'm serious at that point.

Audra - posted on 11/22/2009

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This is inaccurate info ... caffeine will actually aid someone with ADD to connect those neurotransmitters to help them focus. I would not recommend this on a daily basis but it's a tool to be used when it's spur of moment.

Marilyn - posted on 11/15/2009

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Our 6 yo grandaughter has ADHD and was diagnosed this summer before school started. She was also put on ridalin, unsure of the medication because there appear to be alot of side effects. She has been a very busy girl & her emotions go up & down at the drop of a hat. She was never able to stay on task & was wishy washy here & there all over the place. Could not sit thru a movie DVD or theater. Relatives got very uneasy when she was around because she was so flighty and loud and carried away. Now that she is on the meds there is a drastic change in her school work & behavior. She does not take the meds except at school where she really needs the structured time.

Mj - posted on 11/15/2009

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www.feingold.org/



Please don't fall into the ritalin / pharmaceutical trap. At least not until you have explored all of your (logical) options that we in our culture have drifted away from. (Mothers tap into your intuitiveness, and trust it).

It is easy to diagnose children with something from the alphabet (ODD, ADD, ADHD, XYZ, Etc.) and start them on a lifetime of chemical dependency, only to face other issues that pop up later on because the underlying, true issue was never addressed or buried under a confusing haze. (Even though your child is no longer rocking the boat, he or she is still in there, catatonic or not, give a listen).

I do, in fact believe that there are cases of ADD, etc. but not a zillion of them. My son (now in his twenties) started to exhibit hyper active behavior when he was three years old.

Of course it is trendy to jump on the ritalin train and that was where I thought that I would end up, or at least ponder. My neighbor (a highly educated woman, not a mother) suggested that I read the "Feingold Diet" book that she had come across in the library.

I did. And I am eternally grateful for her infinite wisdom. The book (and internet site) is a comprehensive resource for exploring and discovering which foods, chemicals and additives in our children's daily diets cause (hyper, etc.) reactions. It is astonishing. It takes a certain amount of patience, but as the responsible parent, with careful observation, will discover what affects your child.

I have always been health conscious, so imagine my shock when I found out that apples, almonds, (BHA, BHT, FD & C colors, not a surprise) raisins, anything with tomato sauce, etc. was making my son hyper. After applying the results from this diet, my son calmed down, was able to focus and he actually thrived like never before.

I was mindful of what he ate. My other two children didn't have food allergies, but benefitted from my awareness of artificial additives.

We don't think of it, but everything is so hypersensitive for marketing purposes. Vitamins, toothpaste, medicine, etc. all has to be over the top with color and blasts of flavor. Well, it is destroying our children.

I suggest to all of you Moms (and Dads) out there to google this and look into it before your numb your kid on drugs and line the pharmaceutical / medical facilities pockets.

By the way, my successful son (now 24) eats whatever he feels like, but when we're visiting and he eats an apple or pizza or something that used to cause him to sky rocket, he still jiggles his leg, etc...my point is that many of these allergies can be outgrown, managed, or maybe not. But at least you are giving your child a chance to live a clear headed, non labeled life. I promise.

If this (Feingold Diet) doesn't work, and there are no behavior issues because of: stress in the house difficult divorce, abuse, financial strain, blending family issues, sending your child into daycare for too many hours too soon (infants and toddlers can suffer from attachment disorders and separation anxiety causing significant behavior issues)...if you can rule all of that out, then talk to your pediatrician, and perhaps your child has a genuine alphabet disorder.

I am simply appalled at the number of children who are on prescription drugs for these ADD, ADHD, ODD diagnosis.

We need to wail on the brakes and figure out why such a staggering number of kids are falling into this category.

A great deal of professionals in the traditional medical world will scoff at this (usually because of the corruption of the whole field and the intention to keep people hooked and the money flowing)...I am telling you (from my heart) that the price is too high. Check out your options, and remember this...time flies by quickly, pay attention and love your kids as much as possible now. Before you know it, they up and disappear, and when that time comes, they need this well of love, patience, wisdom and MOTHERING / NURTURING to sustain when they embark on their adult journey.

In Peace



www.feingold.org/

Mj - posted on 11/15/2009

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Quoting Sami:

ODD/ ADHD?

My six year old is showing definete signs of ADHD and/or ODD. There is so much info out there, but I was was wondering if any of you moms out there have a child with one of these two? I am making an apt with the dr and all, I just want to hear personal experiences and stories, if that makes since. How did your children act- how did you know it was time to evaluate? Was there a trigger that you can think of? How are you handling the situations at home? etc. Anything you can tell me would help. I know I am not alone, but I think I need to hear from people who are in similar boats... thanks


 

Mj - posted on 11/15/2009

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Quoting Sami:

ODD/ ADHD?

My six year old is showing definete signs of ADHD and/or ODD. There is so much info out there, but I was was wondering if any of you moms out there have a child with one of these two? I am making an apt with the dr and all, I just want to hear personal experiences and stories, if that makes since. How did your children act- how did you know it was time to evaluate? Was there a trigger that you can think of? How are you handling the situations at home? etc. Anything you can tell me would help. I know I am not alone, but I think I need to hear from people who are in similar boats... thanks


 

Jodie - posted on 11/15/2009

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I am a mum with a 9 year old who had ADHD. He has certain triggers with food. I have him on Ritalin but with him on this medication he does not eat a lot of food. I have changed his diet to non dairy and have seen some improvement. The main thing in them is that they are lacking in certain vitamins and a good multi vitamin and fish oil tablets do have some effect but if you would like to know more from me then please dont hesitate to email me on jodie240802@hotmail.com and i will try 2 answer some more of your questions. I also have an older son with Aspergers Syndrome.

Kathy - posted on 11/14/2009

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Quoting SUSIE:

YOU MUST HAVE IT PROPERLY DIAGNOISED, WITH TESTING..I HAD A CHILD WHO ACTUALLY WAS SUFFERING FROM A PROCESSING DEFCIENCY SENDING THE SIGNAL TO THE BRAIN WITH A LAPSE. NOT SPECIAL ED MATERIAL, THESE KIDS ARE USUALLY SMARTER THAN THE AVERAGE BEAR. HE WAS JUST SLOW WITH RESPONCE. IN A CLASSROOM THEY ARE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP WITH THIS WAY TOO.... FAST PACE OUR KIDS HAVE TO LEARN.   






Susie,



Is this diagnosis called a "processing defciency"?  I personally was diagnosed with borderline ADD at 30 and have been on Concerta ever since- 35 now.  Does it help?  For a while I've been thinking NO!!!  What you've written above is exactally HOW i feel & have all through high school & college!!!  I did not know there was an actual diagnosis for it though!!  I am also on 2 anti-depressants with no help!  I have talked to therapists, and my medical dr - no one has mentioned this.  Completely makes sense!!!!!  

Lana - posted on 11/13/2009

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some meds are ok but if you don't research them then you run they risk of giving the wrong meds for the wrong reason beleive me i know i have two boys one with Adhd and the other one has alittle of Add and ADHD and he takes meds but it is none narcotics
he takes satera i think thats how you spell it not sure but he does really well on this

Amy - posted on 11/13/2009

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ADHD is a real disorder. These little ones are wired different and learn different and this all needs to be taken into consideration. Meds don't make them zombie like if given the right one and the right dose which sometimes takes some time to figure out. My son missed a lot of important learning in kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade because he couldn't attend. He had difficulty with reading spelling and comprehension for some time. You can't learn if you can't maintain your attention. It isn't far to the children because they do start feeling stupid and they are so far from stupid. So just letting you know my what side I am on with the whole medication thing. Meds are good.

Lana - posted on 11/12/2009

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i have two boys which when they was younger they both had adhd and put on meds like that you should really look into the side affects of drugs on a childs growth and mental ability some meds stunt a childs growth there are better ways to control adhd and other conditions like that healthier choices

Kia - posted on 11/12/2009

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my son was diagnosed with adhd in 2nd grade. we started noticing signs of something at the age of 5 but we thought it was just normal boy things. At home he would juggle more than 1 task like watching tv playing with toys asking 50 million questions also jumping and leaping off of things head first. He has always been in a school environment since the age of three but what was normal then isn't normal as they began to grow. So he started acting out in anger and being very aggresive with the other classmates and sometimes with his teacher which we thought it was a behavior problem too. Until one day his teacher sent home an evaluation paper for us to fill out which she had already filled out her portion of the evaluation. So we had recieve a letter from the school that we needed to take him to the doctor with the evaluation sheet and they did several different task with him and low and behold he would just do what ever came to his mind. it was hard for him to keep still , he would be messing with his fingers are looking in other places everything but paying attention. So the psychiatrist evaluated him and he came to the decision that he did have adhd. He started him at a low dose of concerta which it didn't have him zoned out but he did kind of loose his appetite. He was able to focus a little bit more than he was before the meds adhd is kind of like they cant control there impulse to do things or they don't think about things clearly before they do it, because they are moving too fast. So after a couple of years of being on the concerta he switch to vyvanse which evened everything out his eating,his being able to focus in class and his behavior. He is now in the seventh grade and eventhough the meds can only do so much gradually as they get older they learned to try to control those things it is called self control. Don't close your eyes to meds because everybody story is different we as parent have to stop being ashamed of what is the problem and try to correct the problem before it's too late.

Stephanie - posted on 11/12/2009

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You have to be careful with Concerta. It does every child different. My 8 year old son was on it and one of the side effects is stomach aches. He complained with his stomach the entire time he was on Concerta.

Angie - posted on 11/12/2009

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Hi Sami my name is Angie and I have a son who has been diagnosed with both ODD/ADHD and is Bipolar. Honey this is not going to be easy and you will be told by your childs doctor that they want to do other tests before they want to do those kinda tests on your child. It is going to be long road. I know from experience it took me three years before someone would even consider looking into it. Man the signs are very different for every child. Mine was he was like firework even in his sleep there was nothing that would help him stop moving. But mine also had the bipolar outbursts and even then the doctors did not want to look into doing those test on him either.

Give me a little bit to find my sons journal that I kept on him and that way I can help you out more k

Tessa - posted on 11/12/2009

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Quoting Christina:

My 12 yr old was diagnosd with ADHD 4 yrs ago and is on concerta xl during day, melatonin for nite time. My son was tested by a connors questionnaire and gets seen every 6 months by his consultant. i am currently going through ADHD testing for my youngest son having already filled in the forms for him but they said he never had it. He has special needs, behaviour issues and is 3 and half yrs behind at school.



Hi there, my son is 12 and is on concerta 18mgs,  I used to find it very effective but now he is getting bigger and older I am not finding it as effective!



I am seeing his consultant tomorrow and wondered what else they would give him!



What does the Melatonin do?



I do still notice a difference between no med and concerta. But feel it is not lasting that long now!



He goes to a main stream school but is finding secondary school very difficult!



 

Nicola - posted on 11/12/2009

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Quoting Sami:

ODD/ ADHD?

My six year old is showing definete signs of ADHD and/or ODD. There is so much info out there, but I was was wondering if any of you moms out there have a child with one of these two? I am making an apt with the dr and all, I just want to hear personal experiences and stories, if that makes since. How did your children act- how did you know it was time to evaluate? Was there a trigger that you can think of? How are you handling the situations at home? etc. Anything you can tell me would help. I know I am not alone, but I think I need to hear from people who are in similar boats... thanks


Hi my name is Nicola Clark i have a girl of 7 years old who has a lot of Energy and doesn't sit still when she is told off i sit her on the stairs she wont sit still and when i went to see her teacher she said she is a bit loud in class and her writing is terrible and she is not good at retaining things does anyone know what is wronge with my daughter and how to help me please .She doesn't seem to care if i ground her she think's this is great.

Maria - posted on 11/11/2009

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i will tell you what i went through just briefley my son started at 3 i couldnt have him walk without being restrained with his rains or else hed be gone we couldnt go any where shoping with him that was a nightmare all items on selves would end up on the floor or in the trolly at home as he got older and able to climb i had to hide all sharp things he would go from one shelf to another throwing every thing he would climb out of windows and dissapear he was basicly a nightmare i hate saying that but he was its only when he started school we could finaly get some help he was diagnosed with adhd and asd at the age of 6 he is on concerta xl it helps but he can still be hard work at times we take every day as it comes but i do love him to peices and allways will takecare hope you sort things

Angel - posted on 11/10/2009

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Hi Sami

My son is an ADHDer, diagnosed at 6 years old. He's 18 now and on Concerta.

I have a blog where I blog about my son and his ADHD and such... if you'd like to read it?

Good luck!

Ciao

Angel

Louise - posted on 11/10/2009

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I had 4 children, each one totally different!!! I personally think that the diet is the problem, there is so much junk in food these days, be very careful of tinned foods, fast foods etc. try and give him organically grown veges, meat etc. etc. Just try it for 3 weeks....... Make a star chart.... everytime he listens he is rewarded with a star... he may have something special after receiving 5 stars.... As difficult as what it sounds, love your kids to death.... dont say nasty things (easier said than done!!!) Keep them little as long as possible, they grow up fast enough and then they are gone, (only lent to you in any case!!).... I hope your problem will soon be something of the past...

Kitty - posted on 11/10/2009

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not me but i have F A S

Alcohol fetal Syndrome.. so yea im here for anyone who wants to talk..

Rosie - posted on 11/10/2009

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Get the Diagnose and take it to the school. They will have to adapt because it is a learning disability. She has rights. Get her system out of sugar and junk food. Introduce lots of whole grain, veggies and heathy eating habits. Sugars are toxic to an ADHD brain. Give her Omega and DHA. Monitor her sleep. They can stay awake all night. Be consistent and lots of rewards for the good behavior. Remember if she has 7 bad days and the next week she only has 3, That is a reward. Remind them in the morining that it is a new day and a new begining. When you see the aggretion building, stop at a park and tell she to run and play until you call her. It helps. Yes, my son is ADHD and he is now an A+ student. We are at about 2 bad days a month. All good.

Jacqueline Jovan - posted on 11/10/2009

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some say it's all about the effect of immunizations. to handle them bec. i am an occupational therapist, have time to really get their attention. give or initiate activities that develops attention and focus, in order to manage them let them do routine jobs and keep reminding in case they forgot to divert them into activities not worthwhile.

Pam - posted on 11/10/2009

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My son has ODD and ADHD also. My husband was totally against the meds but once he saw how he acted on them compared to not he was ok with them. He too take Focaline when he was younger and he did really well on it. The ODD is a whole extra challenge, no meds for that. Just like the other girl says pick your battles. His therapist says the ODD causes him to want to get you made so the best thing you can do is not let it bother you when he tries to make you made. Also the schedule is key, if he goes to bed at the same time each night he is much better to deal with. My son is 11 now and it is getting a little better. Good luck!

Melissa - posted on 11/10/2009

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My son has ADHD. The teachers in preschool first told me they thought there might be something there but couldn't tell me exactly what. I had him tested and they told me he was a typical little boy. By the time he got to grade 1 it was mentioned again and in grade 2 he was officially diagnosed with it. He is on medication (adderall) and it really helps him stay focused and sit still in school. It does not tire him out or drain him of who he is. He can still be his rambunctious self at night but I told myself as long as he can stay focused at school I can handle him at night.

Barbara - posted on 11/10/2009

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Quoting Elizabeth:

Being a teacher, I really have first hand contact with ADD/ADHD...it's really easy to give kids meds...but poor little ones, they change into 'someone' else ... zombielike! Read up on research that suggests diet changes to 'manage' these disorders! Kids are being 'diagnosed' way toooooo early in life, and given meds to remedy the problem. If I can deal with my students for 8 hours (and more than 3 at a time), believe me, they don't need to be on meds. In my case, if I keep them busy, they stay out of trouble. Good luck, I know it's not easy.



Wow, a teacher that actually suggests that kids are diagnosed too early and can handle kids with ADD/ADHD !!!  Where were you when my son's kindergarten teacher and every other school staff member insisted that he be tested ??   It's too bad we can't clone you and have understanding, compassionate teachers for all students that don't fit in the little box.



Thanks for your comment and good luck !

Christine - posted on 11/10/2009

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my son was diagonse with adhd and odd about 9 years ago and just recently diagoned with tics we were having problems finding the right medication. we had him on dexidrine but recently changed to strattera and have noticed a big change in his work at school and at home. we really didnt want to use mediciation but it was getting so bad. once we put him on strattera everything calmed down even his tics. the school says he can sit and do his school work without distraction he even go his first A in school he was so proud and happy. he told me that since being put on the new medication he feels better.

Jessica - posted on 11/10/2009

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my son who is now 41/2yrs has ADHD. I seen signs as early as a year old. I remember taking him to a doctor and crying my eyes out because my son reminded me more of a animal then a human. As he got older I became more and more depressed because his behaviors and agressive outbursts evolved with his age. i finally got him into a Daycare where they had close ties with five Counties workers. Within a month I got a phone call about Trey and they made the referrals for him. I have been with five Counties for two years and although Trey is still agressive and violent when he does not get his way, he is working in different therapy groups to help him build up all of they skills that he lacks in due to his focusing problems. he is also taking meds at bedtime to help slow him down so he can finally sleep.(he would be up at all hrs. of the night). I have really learned that with Trey everything has to be routined and I constantly have to keep repeating things over and over for him so that he can understand. it has been a very long two years, and believe me there were days when I thought I was cracking at the seams, but Iam so greatful for all of the help I have recieved for him and myself and I have come to realize that it is not my fault or his. If people want to stop and stare because my son is over stimulated and can't function( and having a meltdown) in a busy place well go right ahead. I think to myself " Walk a day in my shoes" and then you would understand.

Katie - posted on 11/10/2009

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I too have a child who is extremely difficult and shows signs of ADHD and/or ODD. We are in the process of having him clinically evaluated with a behaviorist at the moment and are awaiting another opinion from a child psychologist. I too was overwhelmed with grief trying to understand what is going on with him and why he can't be controlled. Believe me. My life was fight after fight. Disrespect toward adults. Hyperactivity. Impulse control issues. Rage. It seemed hopeless to control him and his explosive behavior. I share this with you because I have found relief. Unbelievable relief in how to help my child deal with his and our frustrations.Go online right now and look up the book "The Explosive Child" by Dr. Ross Greene. This book has become my savior and has helped me help my child. Dr. Ross also has a website called www.livesinthebalance.org. His collaborative problem solving approach truly was the answers we had been searching for on how to deal with him and I would strongly encourage you to look it up. We are 3 weeks into practicing his model plan and we are tantrum free. He is a completely different kid. I know its in the early stages but my life & his is sooo much better! If I could scream from the roof tops to every parent who has a child who has been diagnosed with an explosive behavior to read this book and research dr. greene theories I would. He has also written a book called "Lost at School" which speaks to how teachers, principals and school administrations should deal with these children. Check them out now! Hope this helps.

Judi - posted on 11/10/2009

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My ADHD son is now 20. He was always active, but at age 3 it was like someone turned up the speed and volume button and then broke it off. he was diagnosed at age 7. No meds at that point. We moved to the county at age 9 and began a meds trial. The change was immediate from the first tablet. His teacher rang at recess and told me the differences in behaviour, writing, speech. meds has given him the opportuntiy to learn. Music has been his saviour more than anything else. He sings in a regional choir and the choral exercises have been the best thing for him He also has Dyslexia, Auditory processing Disorder, Communication Dispraxia, Irlens Syndrome. He got a band 6 for Music, Band 5 for Drama, high band 4 for Englsih. He has just been accepted at Uni for B Music. I am reading a book called Upside Down Brilliance. It is a book about gifted children, but there is a large section on learning disorders which is fabulous and gives the type of exercises that help. I also have 3 profoundly gifted in my family and they can sometimes present as problem kids becasue of their frustration level becasue ppl treat them like other kids and they aren't. Schol was useless. I couldn't afford constant medical help, continuing assessments privately and the public health system out here is non existant. Fight your school all the way for extra time in exams, a reader, a write if necessary, but they will want proof. I got that before I left Sydney, but couldn't afford it once we moved here. At 18, there is a hormone that kicks in and they start to settle down. My son has never been violent and I have spent a lot of time with behaviour modification, heaps of encouragement by focusing on what he is good at, and not blaming him when he can't get it right. Just wish his brothers would do the same. Read all you can, constantly. I keep all the articles from mags and re-read thema year apart for fresh revelaltion. Hope this has helped.

Dawn - posted on 11/10/2009

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I have a 10 year old son who a few people at his school said to have him checked out for ADHD and his doctor says he does not have it. Now, we switched schools and his new teacher is suggesting it again. What signs does your child show so that I can compare with my child. Also, do you have a good internet source you can refer me to?
Thanks.

Dawn - posted on 11/10/2009

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Quoting Ledrena:

You are not alone. My child has PDD-NOS (I'll explain later) but in her class there was a little girl with ADD,ADHD & ODD. I started babysitting her for a while. Her mother didn't tell me what her diagnosis was until I was pushed to the limit.
She was on a lot of meds and they didn't always work but the mother told me that you really have to trust your doctor. You may have to shop for the right one (doctors and medicine).
She (girl) never did what I asked her to do. She would always do the opposite of what I told her to do. So I started telling her what I didn't want her to do and she would do it. It was very stressful because I always was thinking backwards all the time.
One night the mom was late picking her up (the mom didn't tell me that one med needed to be given right at 9pm so she could sleep). The little girl called my name and I went into my living room and she was swinging on my light fixture (9:20p).
You know that something is wrong with your child so always talk to your doctor. If your dr doesn't listen GO TO ANOTHER DOCTOR.
You have to learn what triggers your own child. You have to listen and learn ever day.
As far as the school goes, go ahead and do an IBP (Individual Behavioral Plan). It is a must with kids/adults. They need to know what will happen when they don't do the right thing. You need to call an advocate every time you go to your case conference. I know of a mother that didn't and they took her child away. They said he was a danger to the community. You don't want that BUT sometimes it is best for them to spend time away to work through medicines (not all the time). YOU NEED TO INVESTIGATE EVERYTHING.


 

Rachelle - posted on 11/10/2009

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I would suggest you check out the American Academy of Pediatrics. I got a lot of information from the book that they put out. My son just got diagnosed so if you want to chat I'm here. I hope this helps.

Christina - posted on 11/10/2009

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Quoting Bekki:

My son has Aspergers and ADHD. He's now 5 and was diagnosed with mild autism at 3 and a half. As he went through the cognitive development stages we started to notice a pattern of delay and skipping certain ones completely. When he hit 3 he started having explosive outbursts of violence. We took him in and got the GARS done and some other tests and discovered he was in the autistic spectrum. In the last 3 weeks they have discovered he may be more serious autism and less aspergers than they thought. And they diagnosed him 100 percent positive ADHD. It's a struggle just getting him going in the morning, he gets kicked out of kindergarten constantly for violence and screaming really high pitched which is common in autism. It's a fight i tell ya that. His doctors aren't medicating him for the ADHD yet, they are upping his autism meds and seeing if that works first but when they do give the ADHD meds i want Concerta. Ritalin causes growth delays and stunting. I have heard nothing but amazing things about Concerta. My psych professor has told me her son was on concerta for awhile and it was like night and day, if he missed a dose you could EASILY tell..



I suspect my little one is autistic, adhd or something. He screams high-pitched like that all the time. I have had a really hard time with him even when he was a baby he screamed all the time...I thought it was colic but it wasnt.I wont even go to the store by myself with him and my other baby boy....he fights with me. His biological father also was extreme ADHD even as a adult. He took special classes all through school just because of his behaviorI am afraid he is too young to tell but I will have his doctor check him out the next  time I go.. thanks for your input.

[deleted account]

Quoting Melissa:

My son has ADHD. He is 4 1/2. He was always hyper and impulsive, but since he turned 4 he became aggressive. He makes kids on the bus cry by calling them names and hitting them with seatbelts. Small things like wanting the figurines at school arranged differently might send him on half hour long screaming rages. He has thrown bookbags and even kicked and hit teachers and bus aides. I can deal with the hyperactivity and the impulsivity, but the aggression is much harder to deal with. He has trouble making friends. He is starting to become ostricized from friendly groups. I dont want others to be harmed because of his inability to control his actions.

We are considering putting him on meds. My question is does the neurologist or psychiatrist handle and manage that? Also my son has always been a good sleeper and eater for that matter. He is out cold in 5 minutes. He eats like a machine. I know from teaching, that some meds cause the children to have trouble falling asleep or cause them to have small appetites. I would hate for that to be a problem. Can those of you whose kids are on meds tell me which ones cause insomnia and which ones let you sleep? Also which ones mess with the appetite?

My son is bright eyed and a smart cookie. I dont want that sparkle to go out of him. I hope it doesnt take long to find the right med and the right dosage. I have had a couple of kids in my class become "zombies", but I just think they hadnt found the right coctail yet. HELP!!


Melissa,



Have your pediatrician refer you to a qualified pediatric psychiatrist. Pediatricians are limited to what type of meds they can prescribe for these disorders and a psychiatrist can work with better combinations of meds to find the right thing for your son.



Many of these children are borderline genius when it comes to IQ tests. My own daughter tested in the high 120's at age 12, with reading comprehension at college level. She is full of life and "sparkle". Just do not give up! Keep working with your child's doctors and teachers to make sure he has every opportunity available. Good luck to you both!



 

[deleted account]

Quoting Bekki:



Quoting Vanesa:

My son is only three so I can't tell you if he's as crazy as I am yet...but I am OCD and ADD and my brother is ADHD and a perinoid skitzophrenic. It's hard to tell someone else how to deal with someone with a "disorder" like that since it's all differant. I like to count things, I have to make sure everything is even, and sometimes it took me FOREVER to walk somewhere because if I steped over a crack with one foot, I had to do it with the next foot on the next step. My mom just ignored it though. It just ment I was always orginized and she didn't have to clean up after me. Besides, she had her hands full with my brother.
I watched her struggle and I watched her brake down and cry so many times because of him. They had to find special schools for him to go to since he kept getting kicked out.
She said she knew he was ADHD from the time he was 4. He was playing with toys and the converstations he had with them were soooo speratic that there was no way his brain was thinking about one thing at a time. They would go something like, "How are you today? I'm 5. No wait, I have to go potty, is this blue thing yours? I have to clean my room, but I can't go potty in here, cats are fun, bye, I have to go potty," And by then he would have peed his pants because he couldn't remember that he had to go long enough to get up and do it.





 






 






Not all OCD'ers are organized lol.. Common misconception about OCD. Some people with OCD are neat freaks while others are messy as hell and hoarders. I was diagnosed with OCD by my mental health psychologist last year.. Which was like dumb because i already knew i had it.. It all depends on your personal "ticks". My ticks are hoarding magazines (which my husband secretly throws away) because i think someday i might need them.. i still have all of my pants from high school and im now 26, just in case i .. i dunno drop a ton of weight and suddently need size 0 pants?? lol.. I can't eat foods that touch each other. If i tap one finger im tapping for hours to make all the rest of my fingers feel .....equally tapped.. I do it with my toes as well.. I don't even realize im doing it most of the time.. but neat and organized?? SO not me lol.. I can't find anything in my house cuz i never remember where i put it lol..





My 16 year old daughter is Bipolar/OCD/ADHD/ODD, and she is one of the "messy as hell and hoarders" types. She's been that way all her life. Her OCD manifests as having to have a specific pencil to do her school work, doing certain tasks in a specific order EVERY time or her world crashes, etc.



 



As far as the original poster's questions....



At age 7 my daughter was originally diagnosed with severe ADHD and treated as such until age 10. We had to go through MANY med changes and dosages, over these years, to make sure she had the proper dosages to control her problems without "making her a zombie". At age 10, her psychiatrist began prescribing meds that are used for bipolar disorder because this disease is very hard to diagnose in children. It is often masked as ADHD because the symptoms are very similar in children. Unlike adult bipolar which cycles once over many days/weeks, child and adolescent bipolar cycles many time in a single day. At age 11, my daughter became physically violent both at school and at home and had to be hospitalized for three weeks in a psychiatric facility. This is when she got the full, official bipolar diagnosis and the proper meds to help her.



I know it all sounds scary, but we go through all this and learn to deal with our children one day at a time because they NEED us and we are their NUMBER ONE advocates.



 



Now... for the mom who took her son off his meds because she "didn't like what they did to him."



You are doing your son a great disservice by not providing him the medications he needs to help him deal with a very real and emotionally dibilitating disease. These issues our children face are a chemical malfunction in their brains. Without the proper meds to balance these chemicals, our kids suffer.



In school he will be singled out by teachers as the "problem child who can't sit still and pay attention", made fun of my peers because he's always in trouble with teachers and has difficulties staying focused on studies and gets bad grades.



As an teen and adult, he will have problems staying focused and doing well in high school, college (IF he goes to college), and also keeping jobs. Because of these feelings of inadequacy, many teens and young adults with these untreated disorders become dropouts from life and often sucicidal.



Be your son's NUMBER ONE ADVOCATE, if a med is making him into a zombie, or doesn't seem to be working, GO to his doctor and insist they listen to your concerns. Medications are not the only treatment... your son should also see a qualified pediatric psychologist/councellor to help him learn to work with his disease, as well.  Please, please..... do not give up! Read, research and learn... your child NEEDS AND DEPENDS on you to help him deal with this and succeed in life!



I'm sorry this is so long, but I felt I just HAD to respond to these.



Dee (a mom dealing with Bipolar/OCD/ADHD/ODD for nearly 10 years)

Robyn - posted on 11/10/2009

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My son has ODD. They have put him on meidicaiton and that seems to be helping. What also helps is having routines. Everything that I have read says that routines are the key to keeping them "in line" so that they dont act out. Also try to figure out what the triggers are for the outbreaks. That really helps. When I know that the rountine is going to change I let him know a could days in advance and keep reminding him of the change. That really helps. He started acting out when he was 2 but my husband and I both said it was the terrible two's. he seemed to never get out of the stage to the point where we did what he wanted as to not upset him. I found this website FLYlady.net , that has helped me with getting the routines down and keeping the clutter down to. He seems to react more when there is a lot of clutter around. The main thing that I can tell you is to find routines and stick to them It will help a whole bunch.

Bernadette - posted on 11/10/2009

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your not in the same boat because my son suffers from ADHD and believe it is hard work i noticed it at three years of age he is very wild and he can say some very hurtful things if he dont get his own way

Melissa - posted on 11/10/2009

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My middle son was (finally) diagnosed earlier this year with ODD&ADHD. I've known since he was about 7 months old that he was not like others - he never crawled, he started climbing things like baby gates at 7 months, then got up and started running, not walking at 9 months. At the ripe old age of 12 months he scaled the chain link fence at the back of our property and let himself out to the park that was behind our home. Academically, he's brilliant...however his JK teacher had called him a 'social neanderthal'. We've struggled for years in school with him being suspended multiple times in every grade (including kindegarten) - however, doctor's do not typically diagnose things like ADHD and ODD until at least age 8 - but maybe that's just here in Canada. There were no triggers and yes, for nearly two years we tried removing all sorts of food from his diet after having his allergies tested through a Naturopath before demading our GP refer us to a peadiatrician. My son just turned 10, is in grade 5 and now with the help of Biphentin, doing great!

Gina - posted on 11/10/2009

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My son wasn't diagnosed until his Sophomore year in High School--Do it Now--insist on the testing. Each year (6th grade-through 9th grade at Two different schools) I would ask the teacher if maybe he should be tested and they would say "Oh, No it's not that--He just needs to apply himself." Well, finally I got someone to listen to me and Now he is on Vyvanse and doing MUCH Better--Get her the Help she needs--She will Thank You for it--Work with the Dr. to get the strength of the meds right and you will see a different child.

Gina - posted on 11/10/2009

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My son is 9 and he was just diagnosed a couple of weeks ago. I always had a feeling but I thought is was due to lack of sleep. He had his tonsils and adenoids removed in Feb, 2009. It helped for a little bit but not for long. When he started the school year this year it didn't go well @ all. I love my son it just brakes my heart to see him struggle. I was getting calls every week about him from school. Just being defiant to his teachers, mean to kids. I would just cry @ work. I finally filled out the Vanderbelt form and the teachers and I had the same answers, which I already knew. So he has been on it for 2 weeks and he is doing much better in school. We have conference on 11/12, I will let you know what happens.

Melissa - posted on 11/10/2009

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I too have a 3 yr old with mild autism, I am a firm believer in the proper suppliments to help their bodies balance. I am a distributor for an incredible nutrition company, and he has been so easy to work with because he can focus, he can control his anger, and learn because he has the nutrition in his body and his brain to allow him to do that. Be careful what you use, not all suppliments are created equal, and not all of them will help. I would be happy to discuss with anyone what I have done with my son.

Dee - posted on 11/10/2009

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Everone has their own story, their own experience, and their own opinions. The couple of things that I can say forsure is 1) EARLY dx and tx 2) tx-what works for one might not work for another, however that does not make one right and one wrong. Do what is BEST for your child.

Ellen - posted on 11/10/2009

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I have a son, 7 years old and has ADHD and mild ODD. He was very hard to diagnose as he is considered to be on the milder end. We did several other things before turning to medication. (I was a big non-believer) Between 5 and 7 years we tried things such as food elimination, different eating habits, behaviour therapy and other things. Eventually our paediatrician (who is fantastic!) who is definately not one to go straight for the medication, suggested with give medication a trial. If it didnt work, or made things worse then he was off it straight away. As it turns out, he has just gone so well. He is on low dose, having one dose in the morning, one dose at lunchtime, and none on weekends or school holidays. There was talk about his academic progress, (which was terrible) In grade 2, he couldnt sit as his desk, could get NO spelling words correct and there were only 6 of them for him, couldnt pay attention, would shout out for no reason and had next to no friends to play with. Now, 7 months after starting meds, he is close to top of his class, getting 15/15 for his spelling words and has plenty of friends. He is much happier. Even excited to do homeowrk! It isnt easy giving medication. I cried for the first week doubting the decision and wondering if i was a bad parent. He has had no side effects at all to the meds, kids can quite often get sleepy if over dosed and loose their appetite. He is still energetic, but just not "over the top". He was always a very loving child and has a beautiful personality. None of this changed and this was the most important thing to me...I didnt want his little personality to change. Its hard to come to terms with it all, and people often bad mouth medication. I was one of them, but until you have to live with it, as a parent, you just dont understand. Im glad that we did it, he is much happier. If it helps your child gain self esteem and be educated and fit into the world a bit better socially, then its worth it. Only you know your child the best though, and you have to do what is the best for you, them and any other children in the family. Ifyou do decde to go the medication way, make sure that you have a Paed that monitors them. Its not just a matter of heres the meds and off you go. Each child needs a different dose, and you only know the dose from trial and error. They should start at a low dose and depending on th changes up it a little at a time until its right.

Good luck with it all....I think that there alot of people on here that know how you feel. Its nice to know that you arent the only one...take care

Nicole - posted on 11/10/2009

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i was diagnosed in the third grade with add and congenital hearing loss. and have been medicated for since...i am not on the medication now but i can tell you i fought my parents taking the pills left and right as a child because i didnt want to be differnt cause i had to leave class in the middle of the day to see the nurse and it was embarrasing to me. so i was made a deal by the doctor if i take it during the school year i could go off it during the summer when school was out of session. non the less my parents dreaded those times the most XD.



i got teased alot and i will say that when i got older to 6th grade i had my meds switched to time release concerta from ritlin which at the time (1999) did not have a time release( ritilin now has a time release form of the origional) but when i got to the 6th grade i saw how much of a difference it really made taking it all the time in stead of hiding my pills. i actually made merit roll and maitained it for the majority of the year. not only that my parents had me in therapy sessions and a tutor till my sophmore yr of highschool....



to this day i can control my add and actually sit still and pay attention ..but i will be honest its harder wiht out the help of the pills. once i go back to school i may go back on my meds. meds are a choice the parent should make but wiht out the extra help from you with out the meds it will be alot harder if you try to self solve. meds will make your part a hell of alot easier with alot less angry arguments because of mis communications to misunderstandings



and ill admit its very hard for me to understand or get along wiht people that have not been taught to control the effects of being ADD/ADHD



compared to my step brother that has it i say leaving an add child alone wiht no much need parental guidence is the worst. even children in day care i noticed the ones with parents that did nothign acted out the worst and some even kicked out.



one parent went as far as to tell me that and i qutoe" My child is ADD i cant help how he acts its a condition that he has so you and the staff will have to deal wiht it." My reply was I Am ADD as well and never in my life have i ever acted like he has when he enters this building had i, i would have been grounded for life and ADD is not an excuse for behavioral problems, temperment issues and or hyperactivity. you need to work wiht your son to change this behavior of his before he can come back to my class room. ( i know that was harsh to say to her but he was getting suspended for a week from our facility due to his actions .and we knew his mother didnt care an ounce about it or how he was treating the other students in the room)



key sign include but not limited to

short attention span

hyperactivity

behavior problems from bordem

behavior problems due to hyper activity

no concentration to do school work

very little weight gain

increased weight gain

being ADD is highly confused wiht being BI polar because they have the same likeness in symptoms. only a peditrition can diagnose or a psychologst. the child will get evaluated every 6 months under 18 and every 3 over 18 because the pills used to medicate ARE narcotics. the state controls exactly how much one person is given. you can not get more then a month supply at one time. because on the street these can be crushed down and snorted or taken in large amounts.

RX pills that are out there include but not limited to

ritilin

concerta time release

aderall

aderall time release



Lastly being that I myself am ADD and my boyfriend ( the father) is ADHD we our getting our child tested at first signs. we both grew up with medications and the care from our parents that is needed to teach over the add to be able to handle it so that we know exactly what we are looking for and hopfully stay one step ahead of our daughter.

i suggest going to a local library and reading as much as you can and talk to your childs doctor about it.

Robyn - posted on 11/09/2009

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My daughter (now 8) started to show signs of her ADHD in Kindergarten. Her biggest issue was her impulse control and ability to focus. I spent her first two years insisting that medication was not needed. Kindergarten was a mess, first grade was no better, and it wasn't until 2nd grade that I really decided that it was time to take her to the doctor to have her evaluated. I really didn't want to have her medicated since I had heard so many stories of how medication negatively effected kids but I trusted my pediatrician. We talked at length on what was really best for her and I decided to try putting her on Concerta. The change was unbelievable.



For the first time I saw my daughter focus on something for more than just a few minutes. She really started to thrive in school, was able to make and keep her friends because she could control her impulses and not be over clingy. She was able to stop herself from talking back and really became invested in making correct choices in school and at home. I agree that medication is not for everyone but there are kids out there (like mine) who see the difference and want to feel the calm that their medication brings.



In the summers I give her a "medication vacation" so we can see how she reacts off her medication and also to allow her body the chance to not get use to the dosage. My hope is that as she matures she will gain the developmental ability to control her focus and impulse issues but for now she just needs the extra help in school. She is making all A's and B's.

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