Teachers who care?

Sarah - posted on 07/10/2012 ( 38 moms have responded )

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Last year during the winter I went to my kids elementary school to pick them up early. This was one of those days with wind and it was only 40 degrees outside (I checked when I got home). At least half a dozen kids were running for P.E. outside with no coats, jackets, or sweaters. One kid was even in shorts with no socks or shoes. Of course, the teachers outside were all wearing coats (heavy ones at that). When I confronted the teachers about the kids being outside in such inappropriate attire, they all said the same thing: 'it's up to the kids whether they wear one or not'. I even called the state school board and they said the same thing. Believe it or not, I actually called a lawyer to see if I could charge the school with child endangerment. And no, you can't charge an entity with an individual charge, or so the lawyer told me. My question is, why is it that the one choice that children should not have our schools give them? Let's face it, they tell kids: where to sit, what to eat, when to play, what teacher they have, what pace they can use when going through the schools, and what they learn, among many-many other things. They can't tell them when there is snow outside that they should have a jacket or coat? This was also during 'Health Week'. That's a good thing to teach them, 'it is healthy to be outside in such whether without protecting yourself'. Call me crazy, but, if I send a coat or jacket to school with my kid, I want them to wear it. I went back to the school to voice my concerns to the principle and he laughed at me and then said 'we don't get paid enough to put up that kind of fight everyday', Long story short, if you want your kids to wear their coats or jackets during the winter months, you have to call your school and request that they do not let YOUR child(ren) outside without one. They will make sure they don't if you make a request, but not under any other circumstances are they willing to do so for the benefit of the child, they do it so that the parents have no reason to complain about the school. How much do they really care? Our kids get sick because of this, bring it home for everyone else, and then people are out of work, and all they can think about is that it is too big of a fight to put up for our kids to be safe. This is very concerning! Teachers should care a lot more about the kids than what they do. And yes, I agree that they do not get paid as much as they should. If I were a doctor and had to do a surgery on a patient that I knew would not be able to pay me, would you say I was a good doctor to refuse doing the responsible thing (the surgery) and let the patient die, or would you say I was a good doctor because money does not matter, lives do? Any decent person would choose the second one. Why should it be any different with teachers? They get paid to protect and teach our kids (and not just when it is convenient). It's up to them whether they do a good job by caring enough about our kids to not care about the money. Here is a simple solution, the kids either wear the appropriate attire when it is time for them to go outside or they stay inside until they are wearing the appropriate attire. No fighting is necessary, just good old fashion common sense to know that kids are not familiar with the bodies ideal temperatures and cannot feel when they are getting colder. Adults, like teachers and parents (who are smarter - hopefully), are the ones who should teach them that, unless they are no longer considering themselves teachers when that time comes. Where are the teachers who really care? P.S. Don't forget to call your school and let them know if this is just as concerning for you and ask them to make sure your kids are wearing appropriate clothes when they are playing and sweating outside in temperatures just above literally freezing. I don't know about you guys, but this is worth the fight to me in order to keep all kids a little safer at school.

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To the original poster, Sarah, I have to say it is parents like you who who bitch, moan, and complain, make blanket statements like "Teachers don't care" or "Teachers don't do their jobs" a living nightmare for teachers who DO care, who DO give a shit, and educate YOUR children. As a veteran teacher going into my 17th year in education (elementary, middle and high school), I can tell you this: PARENTS are equally to blame for not sending their child dressed appropriately! If a child is COLD, he will tell the teacher! But when you make the asusmption based on a visual observation that kids aren't wearing jackets and aren't properly dressed, and complain to the principal, then start to attack the character of the teachers-well guess what? You've become the "trouble-making parent". The parent that no one wants to deal with because you are blowing all this out of proportion.

My 7 year is the kid that hates to wear a jacket! But if he's cold, he will put one on. Give kids more credit and stop babying them! This goes back to pre-school and let's face it- a teacher needs to pick his/her battles with students. When an entire class is ready to line up for recess,, a teacher is not going to pick battles over who the hell is wearing a jacket or not!

If can do a better job, then by all means, acquire your teaching credentials and get yourself in the classroom.

But you have no business attacking educators for "not requiring their students to wear proper outside attire."

Patti - posted on 07/11/2012

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Many children come to school without appropriate clothing, no coat or hat or gloves. I have all my students wear their coats when they go outside and they throw them down on the playground. When I'm on duty I send children to go and get their coats. The kids get mad and say my mom didn't let me bring one or she doesn't make me wear one. Please don't lay all the blame on the teachers, we do try.

Jodi - posted on 07/10/2012

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If my kids want to run around outside in shorts and t-shirt in that weather, can I be honest? It's their choice......does that make me a bad parent?

Christie - posted on 07/12/2012

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Sarah - I think you may need to reread your initial post. You title it "Teachers who care?", detail a very lengthy attempt to get the school to agree to make all children wear coats (including calling the school district board and a lawyer!) and then talk extensively about how the teachers are not showing good judgement and that they do not care about the welfare and safety of the children. You state the school did agree to make your children wear their coats outside per your request. So it actually sounds like they are complying with your "one simple request" very well. What people are responding to (and disagreeing with) is your origional assertion that the school should require all children to wear their coats and that to do otherwise is neglectful or uncaring.

Regarding the recent hypothermia discussion. You state above:
" I did not accuse the school of doing anything wrong until I checked the facts about hypothermia"

However your origional post says:
"When I confronted the teachers about the kids being outside in such inappropriate attire..."

Sounds to me like you actually addressed it immediately, not after checking facts. Also if you were checking facts and primarily concerned about hypothermia you would have seen on all of the links you provided that the primary symptoms include: being lathargic, loss of coordination and shivering. Did you observe any of these signs in the kids running during their PE class? You should also see from the facts that hypothermia does not develop quickly, unless someone is submerged in very cold water. So again, being outside for recess for 15-20 minutes with out a coat does not carry a high risk for hypothermia.

I believe the people taking offense to the tone of your replys are concerned with phrases like:
"You must be magic" - (unless you do in fact believe in magic)
"Just because the kids are uncomfortable wearing coats, that does not justify being an irresponsible parent and allow them to do it." - basically stating everyone who disagrees with you is an irresponsible parent.

I agree that this is a great place for discussion and discourse. And sharing opinions is a great way for us all to develop as parents and to better ourselves. But to do that we need to be respectful of each other and provide ideas and encouragement instead of criticism and judements.

Obviously you feel strongly that your children should be required to wear their coats when they play outside to keep them healthy. Others on this thread feel just as strongly that giving children the choice whether to wear a coat or not depending on how cold they feel builds their problem solving abilities and is the best way to handle this. But in the end both methods are coming from a desire to help our children develop and learn. So really I don't think there is a "wrong" answer here. As with all parenting there is no "right" way to do it that fits all children and all families. If there was there wouldn't be so many books on the subject!

Hillary - posted on 07/12/2012

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Even asking a question, as you said you did, is still rude when phrased the way you did. It really shouldn't matter if she is a consistent parent to this conversation. And i do expext a response when i am replying, in fact, I look forward to it. This is the most adult interaction ive had in months. I am also perfectly fine with you disagreeing as i do not parent my children to please people but to help them become decent members of society. I do not disagree with children getting sick being in the cold, or the dangers of hypothermia. I disagree with creating a mountain out of what is really a mole hill. You called a lawyer because children werent wearing jackets, to me, that is excessive in this case. Like I said, I applaud you for caring enough about other peoples children to want to change the schools policy, but I disagree that it requires the fight you are wanting to fight.

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Hillary - posted on 07/12/2012

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Shoot, I wrote a reply on my phone and it seems to have not worked. As a quick re-cap of it (since admittedly today is a lazy day for me) I don't disagree with children getting sick being out in the cold (although its not really being cold that makes you sick, we get sick more in the winter as we spend more time indoors closer to people) and I don't disagree with the dangers of hypothermia; I disagree with calling a lawyer over this matter, I disagree with assuming teachers don't care due to this, and I disagree that this is a fight really worth fighting. If you want to let other parents know, since you seem to actually care about the children, let them know, but know that not all of the parents will see this as an issue. Most parents probably already know their children were outdoors in those clothes. As for the rest of it, I was going to argue semantics, but have decided against it, since I see Christie has actually done a much better job of it than I could have. Also, I enjoy reading the responses since, honestly, this is the most adult interaction I've had in months..lol. Oh, and it doesn't bother me when people disagree with me, I don't live or raise my children to please people, I live for me and am raising my children in the way I have deemed works for my family.

Hillary - posted on 07/12/2012

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I am fairly confindent no one is saying hypothermia doesn't or can't happen at that temperature. I know I for one am not, I am disagreeing with the need to enforce a jacket as deciding whether teachers care or not. I would not force my child to wear a jacket if he chose not to, but I would have one on hand in case he got cold. Same as school, I won't force him to wear it for gym outside, but it will be at the school for him if he needs it. He can make the decision himself, and as the children were running, I am sure hypothermia had not set in as they were not disoriented or functioning in a "drunk like" state. Your question was whether teachers cared anymore since they did not enforce the kids putting on jackets, that is what is being disagreed upon here. So go ahead and continue to put us who disagree down (yes you did personally put one parent down already asking if she is even a consistent mother) and then putting out facts and saying here are the facts you are disagreeing with, read them so you can be better parents (insinuating that since we disagree with you we are poor parents). I am a good parent, I have well behaved children who know what is expected of them and follow the rules, they act out sometimes but so do all children learning their place in the world. I know all about hypothermia, I lived in Northen Canada for most of my life and spent my winters in -60C weather, I still will not start a fight over whether a teacher cares because they did not force students to wear a coat in 5C weather when they were most likely only outside for a short stretch of time. Also, in your original post, you never spoke of hypothermia, you spoke of getting sick and passing in to other members of the household, hypothermia is not contagious. So you did have a problem prior to checking the facts about hypothermia, you got upset when you were not 100% agreed with, and then started to dig deeper as to why we all should force our children to wear jackets. I do understand your concerns, and if you are concerned about your children not wearing a jacket you sent to the school, get the request in. If you are concerned about the other parents not knowing they need a request to enforce that rule, tell them, write a letter and have it published in the school newsletter (if there is one), then let the childrens parents make an informed decision as to whether or not they want to put the request in.

Sarah - posted on 07/12/2012

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It's not me you are disagreeing with. If you don't like what a persons opinion is that is one thing. Not knowing what you are talking about is another. For those who read these FACTS about hypothermia, you will notice that it can happen anytime and anywhere under 50 degrees F and can lead to death.

Facts: http://library.state.or.us/repository/20...

https://canadasafetycouncil.org/node/724

http://www.baltimorehealth.org/info/emer...

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/a...

for those who care to know more.

Disagree with the facts if you must but here is proof that you are not disagreeing with me in any way.

Dove - posted on 07/12/2012

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Don't worry about it, Erin. Me thinks that Sarah is off on a rant and anyone that disagrees with her must be a horrible, human being that doesn't care about the well being of any kids.... @@

Erin - posted on 07/12/2012

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You don't know anything about me and I wasn't making this personal. Snacking all day and two snacks are two completely different things. I am a very good parent. My kids can make good choices, just because I give them choices doesn't mean I think they are ready to live on their own. You are taking my points and making an extreme argument out of it.

Really, shock from recess. Recess is about 10 minutes long. Lunch and PE are maybe 30 minutes. If there was real danger than teachers would do something about it. Most teachers care very much about their students, they aren't in it for the money or the abuse that parents want to throw at them. Even the lousy teachers care about their students. The teachers that are a danger to kids are few and far between, luckily. Fortunately, I've yet to meet one.


Teachers are losing their jobs because of the economy, not because mass students are exiting the public school system. And the parents that I know who homeschool have great respect for the teachers and homeschool for other reasons (overcrowded schools, choice of curriculum).

I'm done responding. Good luck to you. Fight the good fight, but I don't think this is one of them.

Dove - posted on 07/12/2012

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I just read to the top of page two. I don't force my kid to eat when they are hungry. It's THEIR belly, not mine. I don't force my kid to use the bathroom when they say they don't have to (other than my 4 year old at bedtime... and I don't actually force him, just remind him). It's THEIR body, not mine. I don't force my kid to wear a jacket when I am cold and they insist they are not. Because... yep, it's their body, not mine. I hate it when people try to make decisions in my life based on their feelings and totally disrespecting the fact that I am NOT them, so why the heck would I do that to my kid simply because they are a child?!

Hillary - posted on 07/12/2012

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Understanding that your kids will not do what you tell them and justifying it is another way of saying 'I don't want to do I need to do in order to ensure that they know that I am the one in charge'



This is not true. I understand my children will fight with each other, even though it is against the rules in my house. It does not mean I don't want to do what I need to do to ensure they know I am the one in charge. It means I understand that children will test boundaries and try to gain some independence by defying the rules. They want to know how far they will be able to get with each new stage of development, it's understanding the way a child's brain develops. I would make my toddler wear her jacket if it was cold, because she has not developed enough to understand the natural consequences of not wearing a jacket or old enough to make an informed decision. My 10 year old on the other hand is developed enough and old enough to understand the natural consequence and make an imformed decision. My job is to prepare him for the real world where he has to make these decisions without mommy, daddy or a teacher making those decisions for him. If I don't allow him the freedom to make those choices, then he will never survive in the real world when he is out on his own. And yes, my kids know who is in charge in my house, and it most definitely is not them, even if they do defy me sometimes. These are 12 year olds, plenty old enough to make some of their own decisions. At this age they are old enough to get red cross certified and start babysitting, if they can do that, I am pretty sure they can choose to wear a jacket or not. Again, if you feel this is a fight worth fighting, go for it, it is your choice.

Christie - posted on 07/12/2012

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I agree that is is a parent's job to teach their children how to make good decisions, live responsibly and be a productive part of society. I also believe that ones of life's greatest teachers is experience. It is a big part of why we, as adults, continue to develop and become "wiser" as we get older.

I think the primary difference that people are discussing here is whether or not wearing a jacket is something that needs to be "enforced". I don't think anyone would dispute that teachers should teach our kids, help them learn, keep them safe and model good behavior while they are at school. I also know many schools use the (very well known and accepted) "love and logic" philosophy of child raising, which emphasizes learning through natural consequences, as long as it is not a safety issue. So while I won't let my child learn that a knife can cut you by "trying one out" or that the stove is hot by touching it, I will let them discover that if you choose not to wear your coat you might be cold. And if you choose not to eat dinner because it's not your favorite you might be hungry later in the evening. Those lessons help children to learn about natural consequences and how the decisions they make will have an effect on them. It's important for them to learn these things when the stakes are small (being cold for 30 minutes at recess, being hungry one evening, etc) so that they understand how to anticipate and think about the effect of their decisions when they get older and they stakes are much higher (drinking, peer pressure, dating, etc).

Bottom line I think the people who are saying that they disagree aren't people who think we don't need to guide our children, set limits and rules and teach them to be responsible people. They don't believe teachers don't need to keep kids safe and teach them. They believe that letting an elementry school aged kid choose not to wear a coat (and possibly be cold for 30 minutes) is not a bad thing. It actually is a teaching moment. I bet if the kids come in and say they are cold the teacher's response would be "yes it is cold outside. next time you should wear your coat so you can stay warm at recess". To me that IS teaching.

On a personal note both my boys run "warm" as do I. When my son was a toddler he actually spiked a fever a few times when my mom insisted he wear a coat while playing outside in moderate weather. He was way to warm! Everyone is different and children are people. Small people with questionable decision making skills, but still individual people. So again while I won't let my child play with a knife or learn about fire by letting him decide that he wants to look at matches, I will let him decide if he is cold, hungry, etc.

Connie - posted on 07/12/2012

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Now, if I were to observe a child huddled in a corner shivering uncontrollably with her teeth chattering away with no adult responding to that, then YES, I would have a huge issue with that. But not kids out playing happily. These children are not in the arctic tundra unsupervised making their own decisions, warmth is only a few feet away and the teachers are trained to notice the warning signs that call for intervention. One of the best teachers available is natural consequence, and this is it. Our job is to raise responsible adults, and that means letting them make as many decisions as possible, even bad ones, in a safe and accepting environment from which to learn. While I understand that you have very specific views on the issues you present, a public school represents as many parental views as there are children, actually double that, because most mothers and fathers are not on the exact same page regarding child rearing, even between different children. While advocating for other children is noble, I do not think think this issue warrants it, but there are plenty of others out there that do.

Hillary - posted on 07/12/2012

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There are still lots of teachers that care, they can just be hard to find. But, in society now a days, we jump up and blame everyone else for something that went wrong. Reading this post I could just imagine a news story about some parent suing the school for forcing their child to wear a jacket while outside and the child got sick. Overbundling and excessive sweat in cold weather can cause illness, my asthmatic son will attest to that. I don't agree with the principal laughing at you, and I agree maybe talk at a school board meeting and try and get it set up in a manner so parents are aware of the need to request making children wear jackets outside. But look at the headlines, many schools are getting sued for following procedure, sued for going against procedure to help a child. So how is a school to know when they are going to be applauded for doing what they feel is right or being sued because it upset someone. And yes, children do need parents to help them make informed decisions, but if you have done your job and made sure that by sixth grade (around 12) that they know why they need a jacket, they should be able to make an informed decision on their own. My oldest son is 10, he knows why he needs a jacket, he understand the importance, but somedays, he is hot and doesn't want to wear it. And ill admit, maybe its because I'm Canadian, but 40 degrees (which is roughly 5 above in celcius) is warm enough to run outside without a jacket. We don't even pull the jackets out until we reach closer to 15 degrees (which is -10 in celcius), before then, its sweater weather. That is just us though and to each their own. But, I do applaud you caring enough to want to make people aware of rules you were unaware of before, and caring enough about children who aren't your own, which is a rarity. I hope you can find a way to get the school to take you seriously and get something in place to allow the parents to make informed decisions regarding their children when sending them to school.

Connie - posted on 07/12/2012

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I would also add that humans have built-in, instinctual, responses to respond to excessive cold. Children will wrap themselves in their arms or huddle with other children if they really get too cold. Unless you saw children doing these behaviors, then they weren't cold to the point of concern. There is no way they can get "sick" from being out without a coat, but they can get hypothermia, but it is doubtful that would ever occur in the short amount of time they are outside and active in the weather conditions school districts allow them to experience.

Sarah - posted on 07/12/2012

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That is one point that I have had to defend. Kids would not need their parents if they don't need them to make responsible decisions for them. Unfortunately, the only way to ensure that children do follow through is to be the parent, or have someone watching them who will make sure that their children follow the rules. That is what the point here is. The teachers are not responsible enough to ensure that one simple wish is granted.

Sarah - posted on 07/12/2012

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Thank you. I would run in the street to save someone else's kid if I had to. Society is all about working together for the common good. I think many times people miss that point about what a society is. I bet there are some good islands that people can buy if they really don't care how other's, their feelings and concerns.

Erin - posted on 07/12/2012

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And no, I don't force my kids to eat if they aren't hungry. If it's dinnertime, they are hungry because they haven't been snacking all day long. They know the routine here, they know they have breakfast and a midmorning snack. They have lunch and an afternoon snack. Then dinner. If they are hungry at anytime other than those times, they can eat all the fresh fruit and vegetables they want. Usually they wait for dinner. And if they don't eat dinner, I remind them that this is it, if they don't eat, they may get hungry. That's really their choice. Kids learn by making choices, not because Mom and Dad told them to. (If they aren't eating it's because they don't like it, not because they aren't hungry!)

Erin - posted on 07/12/2012

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Sarah,

A key part of your argument is that you think kids get sick from being cold and that's not true. Wearing jackets does not make the kids safe at school (unless there was a danger of frost bite, which I'm guessing there isn't).

Sarah - posted on 07/12/2012

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Do you make your children eat when they are not hungry because it is dinner time? They will just get the food when they are hungry, right? Why force them to eat when they are not hungry? Because they need the nutrition, right? How about making them go to bed when they are not tired? Same thing here. They need to be taught how important if is for the body to maintain a certain temperature range, even if they are uncomfortable and learn that 'you don't get everything you want'.

Sarah - posted on 07/12/2012

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Junior high is old enough. They can take care of themselves at that point, and it doesn't keep the parents from going to work. Who here would leave their child in elementary home sick and go to work? Do you think that your child is responsible enough to take care of themselves and make themselves get well? Again, what good are you if your kids don't need you to teach them? That's why they are children and not adults. That is also why they are not legal adults (to make their own decisions) until they are 18. Before that, they need responsible adults to teach them to be responsible adults.

Connie - posted on 07/12/2012

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I have to say, elementary age is old enough for them to make their own decision and have the natural consequences of their choice in this matter. As with others, if I'm running, it can be VERY cold outside and I'm still sweating in just a top and pants. If they get uncomfortable, they will let someone know and take care of it. Everyone has a different temperature comfort zone and it's not at all fair to once again apply herd mentality to individuals. I also agree that it's a waste of instruction time for teachers to be forcing children to comply with this. I'm more concerned about parents who don't send the appropriate clothing with the children so that they HAVE the choice to put it on.

April - posted on 07/12/2012

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I do believe it is the kid's choice. I know my kids don't really feel the cold and i have to fight with them to even put on a light jacket when they are playing outside in the cold. A lot of people think that you can get sick from being too cold or from playing in the rain. This is not true. I use to do all that stuff when I was a kid and not once did I get sick and neither do my kids. Kids are tough and unless they are just sick all the time I say let them be kids.

Erin - posted on 07/11/2012

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Sorry, I don't agree. I was a teacher and have a 6 year old and a four year old. It is my responsibility as a parent to remind them to take their jackets and to wear them if they get cold. Teachers have so little time in the classroom, I'd rather them say "Get your jackets if you want them and line up for recess," not sit there and waste valuable time because little Johnny doesn't want to put his on.

Kids do not get sick from being cold at recess. They get uncomfortable (and maybe that will remind them to get their jackets next time). On this web md page about preventing pneumonia it does not say "put a jacket on." Germs called bacteria or viruses usually cause pneumonia.
http://www.webmd.com/lung/tc/pneumonia-p...

Although, I am a little concerned that the principal laughed at you. He should have taken your concern seriously. Also, the kid without shoes should have been a no-no. Some schools have dress codes and will send kids home if they were open toed shoes. And the kid wearing shorts, well obviously, his parent saw him (hopefully) before he went to school and they weren't concerned. I wouldn't go to the PTA with this, this isn't really their area. If you do have concerns though, talk to the other parents and politely ask the teacher to remind your child to put his jacket on. Although, did I read he was in the sixth grade? If so, that might embarrass him, especially if other parents/children aren't concerned. When I was a teacher, the one thing that usually ended up in the lost and found were sweaters and jackets. Kids would take them off because they got warm from running and then forget about them.




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Stifler's - posted on 07/10/2012

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I agree with Jodi a kid will get cold and put on their jacket on their own accord. My 2.5 year old brings me a jumper if he's cold. I exercise in the middle of winter at night in a singlet in my garage.

Jenn - posted on 07/10/2012

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Well, I know that my own child is hot natured and would run around naked in PE if it meant she'd be cool! In all seriousness, PE and even recess is very active and gets the blood flowing where bundling up isn't as necessary. If the school says they leave it to the child to put their coat on or not, I am more ok with that than forcing my children to bundle up and overheat during play or PE.

I am always up at my children's school and more times than not, there are piles of coats strewn across the playground. Kids don't generally freeze like adults, they are far more active than the teachers standing around supervising. As a runner, I will run in 40 degree weather with shorts and tank top because I will get too hot otherwise.

kids aren't stupid. If they are cold, they will tell the teacher or put their Coat back on. If my child was showing signs of weak immune system, I would merely request that the teacher make sure she wore her jacket. Have a relationship with the teacher. And explain to your child the importance of a coat if they really need to wear one. Many schools do not even go outside if the weather is below 40 or above 95. Ours doesn't.

Amy - posted on 07/10/2012

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Maybe because my son was in kindergarten this year but they did make them put their coats on, hats, and winter boots. If there was snow on the ground and he didn't have his winter boots he had to stay on the sidewalk, and this was even after I told the teacher that I would be ok with him playing without his winter boots. I'm pretty sure I had to turn around one day because he didn't have a coat with him, so I guess I'm on the same page as Jodi.

If your kid is cold or uncomfortable I'm sure they would speak up and say they wanted a coat, hat, or boots (at least mine would) and being cold is not what causes a child to become sick.

Jodi - posted on 07/10/2012

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But how is it up to the OP to impose HER views about this on everyone else's children? I know many parents who wouldn't take issue with their kids doing PE in shorts and t-shirt in the middle of winter. Honestly, I'd be pissed off if the school turned around and told my children they MUST be rugged up in warm clothing to do PE and they may not strip their jackets off. So why should the OP's views take precedence over the views of the parents who think it is necessary to have the option. Even in 40F temperatures, you get hot doing exercise. I know I've been out in short sleeves and light clothing in that weather if I am physically active, why shouldn't the children have that option?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/10/2012

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I think it is great that she is showing concern for other peoples children, and her own. That is a rare thing now a days. People usually turn the other cheek.

Jodi, you know as well as I do, even if your children know exactly what you expect from them as a parent, they don't always follow through. For various reasons. If that was a valid point, children would be out on their own at 5 and never need to be reminded about anything.

Jodi - posted on 07/10/2012

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Besides, the OP didn't say it was HER kids that were running around with inappropriate clothes on. It was other people's children. Maybe their parents have the same view as me, that I don't care if my kids have jackets on outside, that I actually strongly believe that once they reach a certain age, this is their choice. So basically, the OP is imposing HER views on other people's children. I just don't see this as an issue of teachers not caring.

Jodi - posted on 07/10/2012

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Well, then, you, as a parent, need to make sure your children know what YOU expect of them. Even a 5 year old is old enough to know that.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/10/2012

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Here is the thing. If your child is in YOUR care as the parent, I don't care what you do. But when other people are taking care of your/my children, they need to be looking out for the best interest of all the children and make sure they are protected from the cold. Cause if your child comes down with pneumonia for being outside in the winter without a coat or even a sweater on, the blame will fall on the school for not providing simple protection from the weather. No jacket, no outside.

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I'm with Jodie. My kids don't feel the cold like I do so if I think they should be wearing a coat and I force them to, chances are, they would get too hot.
BUT, if you feel very strongly about it then write out a "speech" and present it at the next meeting. You will soon find out if other Parents feel the same as you do and then you can work together to change things.
Personally, I wouldn't want to be forced to wear extra clothes if I didn't feel I needed them. Shoes and socks maybe (for safety), but not jumpers and coats.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/10/2012

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No, you should not have to present an idea like that. You walk up to the podium, state your story and concern and ask WHY they would need parents to request something like that? That it should already be in place.

Sarah - posted on 07/10/2012

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Thanks. I could try that and see if they would allow a permission slip like process, so that more people do know. I have a sixth grader and just found out about this behavior at schools last year. I just hope that in making waves, more kids will be safe.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/10/2012

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The next school board meeting for your district, GO! SPEAK! Let them know your concerns in front of the school board, other parents, teachers, principals. Sometimes they are even brodcasted on your local stations. Get your voice out there and be heard! I am sure there are many MANY parents that have no clue this is happening. Join your pta and discuss it there. Make ripples into waves!

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