Teaching My Daughter To Read

Connie - posted on 08/07/2013 ( 127 moms have responded )

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Hi! My 5 year-old daughter is starting Kindergarten in September, but she is asking me to learn how to read before then. Do you have any advice on how I can help her? Thanks!

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Carol - posted on 08/09/2013

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I just started going over my son's favorites or letting him pick out a new one and they learn by remembering so read them over and over until your eyes bleed lol. As long as she is enjoying it she will absorb it all. Hands on experience is the best way so make sure she points to the words herself and after she gets thema few times let her take over the word don't say it. Leap pad 2 ebooks are what got my guy (4 yo) reading and loving it

Shirley - posted on 08/13/2013

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did you try going to walmart or toysr us stores they should have tablets for kids leapfrog or tag they help kids to learn to read there numbers etc.or you read to her and teach her to say the words herself

Jory - posted on 08/11/2013

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Hi Connie,

I'm a teacher and former literacy consultant on family leave to care for my toddler. I heard this question a lot from families and here are some suggestions. Read to her daily and let her see you read, too. It doesn't matter what you (or other family members) are reading whether it be the newspaper, a magazine, a novel, a cable bill etc. Just let her see the ways in which you read every day. Another thing you can do is to read and reread her favorite books to her and encourage her to chime in at the parts she's memorized. Especially if it is a book with a refrain or phrase that repeats-encourage her to say it with you. Even if she doesn't get it "right." You can also point to all parts of the pictures and pages and talk about what is happening i.e.: "Here the caterpillar is eating the leaf and he feels much better."

I hope those ideas get you off to a good start. Please feel free to reach out if you want some more ideas or suggestions. Good luck!

Jory :)

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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I think some people are missing the part where I state that phonics is still taught at schools, including my kids', and should be taught. Learning to recognize words though is how kids who are not in school yet begin learning to read.

There are millions of 2 and 3 year old's that can read their own names, stop signs, the title of favorite books, games and movies - all of my kids could read Disney movie titles when they were 2 - because they recognize words, they don't sound them out at this age.

Of course they will need to learn this skill. I certainly never said phonics shouldn't be taught. If you read my first response, you will see what I actually said.

C - posted on 08/11/2013

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Oh! I love this one... I am having a nervous breakdown with an 18 yr old, but this age is fun :)
When my son was 4, he was getting worried because he was going to start school, and he was just positive that everyone was going to know how to read before him. I found some fun flash card word games online that he could learn some words with, and we just lay together at nighttime and read, he would point out words that he remembered with flash cards.
When he started school, he saw right away that everyone was on a similar level, and he was reading fluently after kindergarten.
He was my last child and I put probably more time in with him than I did with my other kids (yes, I feel bad saying that). I stopped working and became a sahm after my last child was born so I read to him every night... still do! He is 9 now and his reading is out of this world. He is a top reader in his class and was reading at a 6th grade level in 3rd grade.
It totally convinced me that all of the reading I did with my son was so beneficial. I wish I had taken that kind of time with all of my other children, but they are all great kids... it's just that... one of them reads better ;)

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Amanda - posted on 06/15/2014

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Try reading with her or just getting an app for your phone or tablet! I use Best Kids Songs and Stories and my 5 year old absolutely loves the app!

Eden - posted on 06/02/2014

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Phonics and sight words. My blog, www.howitaughtmykidstoread.wordpress.com covers my step-by-step approach that worked with my kids, and also has tips and insights. My personal recommendation is that you don't have to use expensive systems, and teaching her can start with just 15 minutes (or less) a day. Get the phonetic sounds down, then progress to reading leveled readers. We used the BOB books and then Modern Curriculum Press. It's more than just what readers you use, and helping your kid learn sight words. The approach should be ordered so that they can use the lessons in all future reading, and can decipher words by themselves. Happy reading!

Kim - posted on 02/24/2014

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I used plastic toy alphabet in the bathtub. Introduce only one or two letters at first, then add more as she learns to recognize and pronounce them.

K - posted on 02/23/2014

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Well as far as learning letters I just used a peice of construction paper and wrote a letter on each and taped it to her bedroom wall and when she could remember the letter I wolud tape a new one up next to it. I also used flash cards with easy words like a it the

Pamela - posted on 08/16/2013

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There are so many different programs to teach young ones how to read. A popular one in the past was Hooked on Phonics. I believe there may be even newer ones now. Start with your local library and ask a librarian in the children's room/section. Undoubtedly she can point you to all that is available!

If you are good at sounding out words phonetically you can go to one of her favorite story books, take her hand in yours and have her point to the words as you sound them out for her. Then have her repeat the word for you. Often when a child already loves a story it is easier to start there.

As a past classroom teacher I am pleased that you are aware of your daughter' desires and wish to go forward with her. Many parents would be fearful and simply tell the child to wait until she goes to school! I am happy you are wanting to get her started because she is ready!

The highest and best to the both of you!

Laura - posted on 08/14/2013

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Are there any Teacher Supply or Enchanted Learning stores in your area? They have some great educational games involving syllables etc. that my daughter used. But don't worry, she will be reading most likely by December in Kindergarten.

Rowena - posted on 08/14/2013

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That's awesome that she wants to read on her own!Try www.readingeggs.com. My daughter learned to read by 3 doing this. Plus I used flash cards sight words every day with her.

Melissa - posted on 08/13/2013

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Hi! Homeschooling mom here. "How to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" is awesome. My 3 year old is reading with this and I have used it on all three of my kids. It does not teach with sight words, it teaches by sounding out the words. The book (yes just one book) is $20 at Barnes or Books a Million and about 15 minutes a day. By days 3 and 4 they're already reading words. I swear by this book! Good luck!!

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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Thank you, Margarita! She used to love "Super Why". It's been a while since the last time she watched it but I'll put it again for her.
Thanks!

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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Thanks! Just bought the book. I'm waiting for it to arrive by mail tomorrow. Thank you for the advice!

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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Thank you! I will definitely try to match words that you find around with a shopping list, for example... I think it's a great idea.
Thanks again!

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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Hi Melissa! Thanks! I will try it.
Yes, she can write her name and she can write a few of her friends' names, too. Also, when she wants to write something, she asks me to spell it for her and she can write it without a problem.
Thank you!
Connie

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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Thanks! I just bought the books, I'm waiting for them to arrive by mail!
Looking forward to it!

Venus - posted on 08/12/2013

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Local library...teach your child how to read in 100 lesson. 15mintues a day pretty basic guide. Good Luck!

Holly - posted on 08/12/2013

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Weird suggestion but this is a great book for starting readers http://www.amazon.com/McGuffeys-Eclectic... My son learned to read at 4 yrs out of this book & my daughter is working at it. You could also do the Leapfrog Letter Factory to teach basic phonic sounds. Kolbe academy has phonics flashcards. I just teach the "one sound letters" to very little kids. As they get advanced you can go into the multiple sounds letters make. These will provide a good foundation. You will want to do letter sounds before you go into the reader. Good luck!!

Patricia - posted on 08/12/2013

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www.starfall.com is a great website and free. My son started using this at the age of 3, now he is off to kindergarten reading already.

Theresa - posted on 08/12/2013

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Teach her the alphabets and what they sound like with a visual of the letter. (ie. Aa sounds like "ah") the basics that all little ones should know. Than associate it with something (ie. Aa is for apple) so she understands the "ah" sound is for "Aa". When she catches on to the alohabet and the sounds get a small book with simple words and get her to sound them out with what she learned by associating the sounds from the alphabet and let her know that reading is just like talking. You can use leap frog and technology to help her understand more but it she will sometimes rely on it with reading. I find it best that a parent is equipped with the basic knowledge for that stuff anywho and when it comes to going back to school, a teacher will probably help her with that also by doing what you did. But that's entirely up to you what you want to do when it comes to teaching methods.

Dana - posted on 08/12/2013

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leap pad make products that help with it too... help her with simple things such as her name

Marta - posted on 08/12/2013

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Go to your local library. they will have reading program instruction books that help you get started. They will also have beginning readers which have fun stories at various reading levels including beginning readers. The words are easy to sound out and repeated several times each throughout the book so the child can learn them easily. Also keep reading to her, especially books she has learned through repetition and it will help her learn familiar words. My daughter-in-law takes turns with my grand-daughter in reading her books, they each read an alternating page.
Basically though, your local library is your best resource for any beginning reader.
Another great tool is the Leapfrog DVD's just a few are: Leapfrog: The Letter Factory, Leapfrog: The Amazing Alphabet and Leapfrog: The Word Caper. I'm pretty sure there are others & they are not at all expensive-only about $10-$15 each. And they are available at many public libraries which means FREE!

Connie - posted on 08/12/2013

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I am a big reader myself, so started reading to mine when she was about two weeks old, and as she got older, just got her to start sounding out words with me. All of my kids learned by sounding out the letters. Patience is key, no matter which method you use. Of course, they will teach them something entirely different when they start school, but having the basics will help. She has the willingness to learn. That's key. Good luck, and enjoy. Kindergarten is loads of fun, no sarcasm intended.

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sounding out letters and sounding out words slowly as you read she will pick up on it very quickly and keep practicing my five year old learned fast, it's the time spent that is valuable. good luck!

Toni - posted on 08/12/2013

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I think your probably right about the reading. As long as they learn the words. Teachers hate it when parents interject their own methods I noticed though. Now math.......THAT'S a whole other story!!! Lol. My middle school age daughters teacher told her, she had points knocked off her test for incorrect method! The answer was the same, but they HAD to show work and MY old school way wasn't good enough. She said it will matter during SAT's and standardized testing........this is why i'm always on you tube looking for vid's of the NEW way to teach the kids, lol.

Diane - posted on 08/12/2013

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I had a four year old who read at that age. I would continue to read to her, and sound out the words phonetically. Go through each letter, each phrase, let her repeat it, and go on. Not for the whole book, unless she wants to. Just for a few letters and phrases. Frequently local school librarians will update the library, and get rid of many books. You could call your school and see if any changes are being made, and any books being discarded or donated. But by and large, and one of my husband's Master's degrees is in reading, the very best thing you can do is to read to your child, as much as you possibly can, and ask her to identify words after doing the above exercises for a while. My early reader turned out to have an I.Q. of a genius.

Cassie - posted on 08/12/2013

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You can always go to your local library for books, reading classes, and to teach her how to use the library. If she loves books she'll love learning about the library too :-)

Sally - posted on 08/12/2013

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Progressive phonics is a free set of phonics books available online. My daughter loves it.

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I taught my daughter to read using the ReadWell curriculum. It's GREAT but it is a regular teaching curriculum so it is spendy and hard to come by used ($99 on ebay). A more affordable options would be Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons by Siegfried Engelmann. It's a proven approach very similar to ReadWell, more direct, less cute pictures, unless it's been updated a bit. I been a 2nd grade teacher for 19 years, so I can tell you that if you use these are proven, effective methods for all learners. Best of luck!

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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There's a Dr. Seuss website that is great for preschool and kindergarten kids. I don't know if I can post the url but it's seussville.com

Julia - posted on 08/11/2013

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We use the Letterland books and CD's they are a great way to start learning sounds and letters. Once she knows her sounds and you show her how to blend them together to make words she will be able to read simple consonant vowel consonant words and then challenge her further with blends.

cat, bit, sat, etc using CVC words
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Blends - fl-at ch-ip, sh- ip , bl, cr, etc .

Give it a go. Letter land is British and can be purchased online.

They have flashcards, workbooks and CD's and DVD's .

Good Luck !

Colleen - posted on 08/11/2013

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Read to her! Sound out the words, ask her to sound them out too, run your finger under the words as you read them. I started reading to my son literally from day one and I can count on one hand the nights I didn't read. We read every night before bed and then some. He is 4 and a half and wont be starting K until 2014 because of his birthday but he pulled out a book and read the whole thing to me the other night...it was a first grade level book and we had never read it so I know it wasn't from memory! I just take the time and read to him! We also go on outings to the library...he loves it!

Maureen - posted on 08/11/2013

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Sound to letter awareness. She needs to know the sound each letter (symbol) makes. And rhyming books are good starters. Hop on Pop was a favorite of my kids. I don't remember it exactly but it would have a word like up then pup, then pup in cup with corresponding pictures. Once they know the letter sounds the rhymes make it easier to read each page.

Tara - posted on 08/11/2013

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My 5 year old is actually reading...I started him off with basic letter sounds..once he mastered his letter sounds reading came easy. There is the letter factory dvd from leap frog that was also pretty helpful as reinforcement. hope this was helpful :)

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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One of my boys use to sit for hours using the Leap Frog that had a pen where he pointed to the words and it read them to him. He's also picked up a lot of words from watching us write letters to each other.
The art of letter writing is a thing of the past to our children. My husband has to think for a minute when asked to write something down anymore.

I like to write letters once a month to each of my kids telling them what I love about them and why they are special to me. And I write differently depending on their age at the time.
I have been thinking that I should mail the letters to them, at least the 6 and 10 year old. I know they would enjoy that. They are the only ones who live here and don't get any mail.

Sorry, a little off topic but I was sent on a trip down memory lane.

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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Oh kids love being read to by parents, grandparents and aunts and uncles. It's a great way to bond with a kid too.
I have a nephew that is very shy. He won't talk to most people, even his grandparents. He'll spend the night with both sets of his grandparent's once a week - with his parents gone - and won't say a word. But if you read to him he points out the trucks and tractors and tells you what they are. He even uses the words heavy machinery lol. It is so great.
The other night my sister in law stayed here with him and he actually listened to The Big Book of Knowledge for almost an hour before he fell asleep. I love that book.
I wish the book mobile still came around. I loved that when I was a kid. Getting to walk a block ourselves and pick out the books we wanted for the week.
Does the book mobile even exist anywhere anymore?
Anyway, great post!

Denise - posted on 08/11/2013

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I would recommend getting anything leap frog. & you yourself the parent sit down & teach her. Start with 10 mins or jus simply reading her a bedtime story. They learn better from us. Old saying monkey see monkey do.

Frances - posted on 08/11/2013

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You're welcome to disagree Shonda and I think its great that your children have made such great progress. You're obviously involved and committed to their education. Nevertheless I know what I'm talking about when it comes to phonics after teaching them for 17 yrs. Flashcards are good and can help a lot but the children need to understand the 'mechanics ' of reading and not just memorization of isolated words.

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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I'm in Indiana. My kids go to Daleville school. There's only one elementary one Jr./Sr. High with less then 900 kids in both schools. We specifically moved back here (my husband went to the same school) for the school system.
We are right between Anderson and Muncie basically. And Daleville school's curriculum is a year ahead of both cities and all of the schools in them.

They teach sight words and phonics, both in Kindergarten. The kids begin an AR program in the second semester of Kindergarten, where they chose books from the school library that they read and are then tested on the book. They are tested before the program begins and every semester to see what their reading level is and then they are given a goal to reach with the number of books they are to read throughout the year.
That's when they start bringing home books to read. They have spelling words I think that they bring home about the same time. So they leave Kindergarten fully able to read. The AR program lasts through 6th grade.

I don't see how teaching sight words would be a problem for any kids. It's like how they learn to read stop signs, signs for stores, titles and words in favorite books, instructions for computer games and their own name - by recognition.

C - posted on 08/11/2013

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The only problem here is many of the schools teach the sight words... it won't matter if that is a part of the school's curriculum.

Debz - posted on 08/11/2013

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My kids both loved to read before 5. I bought simple books and read with them. A favourite was "I'm going in a bear hunt" I also made flash cards of simple day to day words and let then copy them

Alicia - posted on 08/11/2013

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Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is the best/easiest/cheapest way to teach your child. I bought it for my oldest (now 24) when he was 5. There's no prep work or extras to buy or make. It was $18 new. I used the same book for all 4 of my kids. They are all good readers. There is a handwriting component of each lesson, but I never had my kids do that. It might be great for yours, however. I have recommended this book to many folks but I have no vested interest in the product.

Frances - posted on 08/11/2013

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Children traditionally never went to pre-school in our day but started at grade 1. I started school in 1962. Formal lessons began immediately on the Vowels and Consonants and reading. Most children were reading the simple Basal readers by year 1. By the late1960's kindergartens were becoming more common and by the 80's most children started at pre-school here in Australia but it wasn't compulsory until later. Now children often go to a 3 yr old program and most children go to a four year old program ( 4 yr old pre-school which is 4 half days a week but has just become 4 full days a week, 2003). Some children attend daycare and the daycare centres incorporate a learning program for the 4 yr olds though it is nowhere near an in depth proper four year old program. So by the time a child reaches pre-school here in Australia they have had a full year nearly of instruction depending on what form they have received. They are not given formal reading lessons though in pre-school but are taught in a good preschool all the sounds of the letters and counting up to 20. By Year or Grade 1 a lot of the preparatory work usually covered in the frist 6 months of grade 1 are covered in a year in 5 yr old pre-school if the pre-school is a good one. They will never get confused if you teach them phonics as you will be teaching the truth about how language is structured .

Toni - posted on 08/11/2013

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I have to ask what region of the country your from. I'm from NJ, and will tell you. Both of my kids who have already been through those early school years left kindergarten reading rather fluently. Now, I DID read to them everyday and do the homework with them that was sent home (they got homework in kindergarten) but the credit really goes to their teachers. You definitely need to be involved, but the schools in THIS area are excellent when it comes to academics. Curious if your down south. I know my sisters live in Az and their kids schools seem to be a year or two (@ least) behind my children's.

Toni - posted on 08/11/2013

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It seems that they change methods every few years anymore, but I think your best bet is simply reading to her every day and see how its approached by her teacher. Kids these days leave kindergarten reading much better than WE did, lol. If you teach her one way, and the curriculum has a different approach, she may get confused and it will affect the rest if her young school years. My opinion anyway. Good luck to your little one this school year. I'm sure she'll be reading in no time 😊

Shonda - posted on 08/11/2013

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While I respect your opinion, I extremely disagree. My children, all four of them, learned to read in Kindergarten beginning with sight words. They were also taught phonics, as I said, but sight words was where they began.
My kids all attend/attended a 4 star elementary and Jr./Sr. High and my oldest, who is beginning college in a couple of weeks, is a brilliant writer with a grasp of the English language that most 40 year old adults do not have.
They all learned to read the same way - beginning with sight words. I'm certainly not saying that phonics should not be taught. That would be, well, dumb. But for a 5 year old getting ready to start school, sight words are the best way to begin learning to read.

Frances - posted on 08/11/2013

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I wouldn't recommend 'sight words' or any curriculums not based on phonics. English is a phonetic language and sight words do not empower a child to decipher the phonetic code but only dumbs the child down and confuses them. This is why we are having such a high rate of failure to read across the western nations particularly in America and Australia. We do not give children enough credit for their intelligence. Start them on phonics and you will be amazed at how they literally take off in their reading skills.

Susan - posted on 08/11/2013

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Hi, don't worry in 1st grade my son just started to read all on his own from school. I had my son ready for kindergarten when he was 3yrs old according to his daycare providers. Believe me don't worry let the first grade teacher do their thing:)

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