US breastfeeding versus other countries?

Sherri - posted on 06/01/2010 ( 212 moms have responded )

9,593

15

387

I am curious after a recent thread as to how many Americans breastfeed longer than 2 yrs versus how many breastfeed from other countries longer than the age of 2. I am curious in the difference in what is the norm from country to country.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Minnie - posted on 06/02/2010

7,076

9

786

I think it's important to note that most mothers responding here are from countries that espouse western culture parenting practices.



If you want a run-down anthropologically-speaking of the normative age of weaning in humans read Kathy Dettwyler's Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives or Our Babies Ourselves by Meredith Small.



Weaning at 12 months is what you experience because that's what's surrounding you. But it's not normal. It's not what our species is biologically programmed to need. Nursing for several years is common and accepted in traditional cultures.

Marabeth - posted on 06/01/2010

394

7

39

actually, the milk is full of vitamins, antibodies and proper nourishment for a human baby for as long as they breastfeed. whether it's five weeks or five years. i'm still nursing my 14 month old and to my family and i it's not really 'freakish.' just because you say 'i am not judging' before you say something judgemental and overly harsh doesn't make it okay! i will continue to nurse until my daughter decides to wean (hopefully past two). there are currently *no* studies indicating that extended breastfeeding is harmful to the child in any way and on the contrary there are several studies revealing how beneficial it is to baby and mom's overall health!

Joanna - posted on 06/02/2010

2,096

19

134

Oh wow, yet another topic about breastfeeding/formula feeding that has turned into a bitchfest. Surprise Surprise. Do we as women have no respect for each other and our choices? Such a shame some grown women have to act this way.

[deleted account]

I happily nursed my son for 3.5 years. No, the milk doesn't magically lose its nutritional value at some arbitrary date. No, there is no single developmental marker (whether it's teething, talking, walking, or potty training) that marks an individual child as too old to nurse. Nursing, even well into childhood, is a natural and loving act, and it's up to the mother and child to determine when to stop.

For what it's worth, I'm originally from the Pacific Northwest, where breastfeeding and extended breastfeeding are widely encouraged. However, I have lived on the east coast for years, raised my son here, and have plenty of friends here who breastfed to 2 years and beyond - so perhaps it is not "the culture" so much as people can sense when they are being judged negatively for their parenting choices. For my part, I find myself strangely less willing to talk about extended breastfeeding with people who open the conversation with things like, "That's so freaky! I can't fathom it! It's just for babies! Not judging, though!" Go figure.

Jodi - posted on 06/03/2010

26,294

36

3891

I totally agree with Sherri. I think for many women, it is an absolute privilege to be able to continue breastfeeding, but circumstances may not allow it. No woman should ever be condemned or put down for the "choices' she has had to make, because I am pretty sure (in 99% of situations) that the choice made is in the best interests of the baby. And amazingly, not every mammal on the planet has to hold down a job and exclusively breastfeed at the same time, so I would hardly consider it comparable. And I don't know about you, I am not open to the lifestyle of a lot of mammals in that they have multiple partners, giving you the time and space to raise your young and he has the option of attention elsewhere as needed. That just doesn't suit me personally, but each to their own.



My point? Let's not make anyone feel badly about their choices and what worked for them.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

212 Comments

View replies by

Ileana - posted on 06/05/2010

9

29

0

I'm from Mexico and breastfeeding timing goes along with income and education. Lower income and less educated breastfeed longer than 2 years since moms don't have money to buy formula or to provide with any other healthy foods for their children. Moms that are more educated and have better finances tend to breastfeed for only 6 months since they believe that breast milk starts losing it's health benefits after that age when babies start solids. Some will breastfeed up to 12 months just for bonding but after that babies are weaned gradually. The ability of buying healthy foods compensates for the lack of use of breast milk.

Families in Mexico have very close family units and it's not uncommon to live with your parents when you're 30 or live with wife and kids and all your immediate family in the same house. So although children don't get the long bonding period of breastfeeding as in the US, they seem to be unaffected and still have very strong bonds to their family and grow up very healthy too. Children that were breastfed for 2 years or more were not necessarily healthy since their mothers weren't. I think this just shows the other side of the coin :) It's great that moms in the US can be healthy and choose to breastfeed as long as they want!

Christina - posted on 06/04/2010

17

38

0

I live in Pennsylvania and my son weaned himself around 13 months. I was willing to breastfeed him longer but he stopped showing interest so that was the end of it.

Pam - posted on 06/04/2010

9

8

0

I have 2 children. I tried to bf but I had nothing...and when I say I had nothing, I literally didn't have enough milk to feed my child the first time OR the second time. I waited the 2-3 days hoping that I would feel engorged like they said I would in lamaze class but I didn't. I felt like a failure but got over it and fed them both formula. Every woman has to figure out when to wean but I don't agree that it should be up to the child to decide that time. That is why there are moms to make those decisions for the children. In some cases of when the kids are several years old and still bfing, I think that it no longer is about what is good for the child, but it becomes psychologically comforting to the mom. Part of child development is gradually becoming more independent beings. Parents gradually "work themselves out of a job". We all know the benefits of breastfeeding especially the antibodies passed to the baby in the first few weeks of life...but after that, the baby starts to develop his/her own immune system. Vitamins and minerals can be obtained by other food sources just as readily as breast milk. As far as I know, vitamin C is the same in breast milk as it is in an orange so it is a foreign concept for me to understand what benefit the child is receiving when he/she can verbally tell their mom that they want some milk and start lifting up her shirt. It creates a dependence on the mom beyond a point that most would consider healthy. It's sort of like keeping the child in diapers until 4 or 5 because the child decided that was what he/she wanted to do. I realize that is an extreme example, I think you can understand my point and it may give others some understanding why people react the way they do to those who bf a lot longer than the "norm". (whatever that is...LOL)

[deleted account]

I'm from the UK and I breastfed for 4 months, I only stopped as I broke my hand and the pain was unbareable and the tablets affected my milk. I wanted to do it for a year.

Elda-Leah - posted on 06/04/2010

2

20

0

Im in the US and breastfed both of my sons for a year. my oldest was weaned at about 16 months and my youngest at 13. My friends all thought i was nuts most of them only did it for 3 months and some didnt even try! i dont regret it!

Cheryl - posted on 06/04/2010

135

1

18

I breastfed my firstborn til he was 3, mostly as a morning and evening ritual of time together and weaned him using story time and cuddling as a help..my other 2 boys were around a year and they just lost interest, weaned themselves..maybe because they thot they might be missing out on some fun their other brother(s) were having, (more interested in hanging wi them) tho our story time ritual before nap and before bed continued for years to come where we all piled on our bed together to read..(we didn't have a TV) I am in the US, BTW.

Nikki - posted on 06/04/2010

4

11

0

I personally love breastfeeding, to a point. With my first I was advised to stop immediately due to a medical condition (something which I feel was mis-advise now) I am still breast feeding my second at 11 months and plan to play it by ear. I do think that every scenario is different - every women is different and every relationship between mother and child different.

After reading most of the posts, one thing does strike me, people that judge and dictate have obviously been very lucky in the breast feeding stakes (i.e that the baby latched on, had enough milk etc etc.) It's very easy to gloat and judge when this all happens naturally. (If it were as easy as 'attach baby to boob' there would be no discussions, lactation consultants, formula, vitimin supplements ... bla bla

Some poverty stricken African area's are subsidised Forumula, due to the mothers being too frail, undernorished and exhausted to breast feed.

Although I think breast feeding is natural and a wonderful thing, I do respect that in this day and age it can also be a luxury. Sick mothers and babies, single and working mothers, and many females do not have the privalidge (be it financial, circumstancial, or health wise) to breast feed extensively or at all. In The UK most mothers are expected to return to work exhausted at 6 months.

In cultures where females are still expected to 'stay at home' you do find a longer breast feeding span naturally - as do you in poorer countries where women have less means to obtain formula.

That being said, Health officials that suggest formula do so for a reason - in examples where mother is exhausted it is more beneficial for her to recover than spiral further.

I do not judge, It's nobodies place to dictate whats right thats ridiculous. We all have enough savy to know breast is most probably best (in most cases) however thankfully there is a good alternative should it be needed.

As for timelines, the UK recommends a 6 month period (I assume thats due to most mothers returning to work). I live in Turkey where it is not un-common for breast feeding to go past a year - until somtimes 3*4. Thats fine if both parent and child are comfortable.

I do pose the question though, that when eating enough solids to sustaine healthy growth - is breast really best? or does it become a pacifier???

With love and best wishes x
.

Candi - posted on 06/04/2010

2

0

0

Thank you for setting it straight! Breastmilk is so much better for the baby. Formula is man made how can that be better? There has been recalls on formula. I plan to bf my LO past 2 years. I love the bond that I have with her and she loves it too. I live in the West Coast and surprisingly at the women's hospital they are encouraging breastfeeding and no supplements unless necessary so I think attitudes are changing in Cali. I'm originally from Honduras and they breastfeed till 2 years and its so NORMAL seeing moms bfing anywhere. Here people stare, how rude! Power to you if you breastfeed!

[deleted account]

I breastfed my first for 2 years (until I got pregnant again). I breasted my second for 4 years (she REALLY loved nursing and continued until she started "forgetting" on some days and I dried up). I LOVED BREASTFEEDING!!!

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

73

32

8

See, I only BF my daughter for a month, then stopped. Now with my son he's going on 8 months of BFing. BUT I'm getting pressure from my mom and some other people that are older school of thinking that BFing is odd. I'm not sure how long I'm going to continue with my son, but I don't have any plans to quit ATM. I'm from the midwest US

Nikki - posted on 06/04/2010

4

11

0

The oldest recorded breastfeeding mother and child. Child 17 years old - food for thought!!! ;)

Amanda - posted on 06/04/2010

180

18

6

Chandra I never said past the first few days... The dr.'s that taked on the radio show said after the first year. as for the benefits yes there are many but you can also get those even if you don't breast feed. I was unable to breast feed past the first week or so with both of my kids but they are still both extremely close to me regardless. My daughter i had to stop cause i wasn't producing enough milk and my son was preemie and in a hospital that was an hour drive away and i wasn't able to be there every feeding but did pump for 2 weeks for him.

Chandra - posted on 06/04/2010

14

7

0

Thank you Jodi! I agree. And in terms of health effects of breastfeeding, we should also look past the straightforward physical benefits (which are many - to both mother and child) and think also about the many psychological benefits. There are many studies that support breastfeeding as an ideal means of providing bonding between mother and child, a sense of security in the in the infant and child, and several other benefits. I am not sure enough emphasis is put on the benefits of a close mother/infant or child bond in terms of long term effects. I understand that not everyone wants to breastfeed their child for an extended period of time (or at all), and I do believe that is the choice of the parents. That being said, I find it very disturbing and a little upsetting to hear that health professionals are being taught that there are no benefits to breastfeeding past the first few days (colostrum). Marlena, I would encourage you, as a future physician's assistant, to always research and question what you hear and see in your career. That is what will make you great at your job! It is all of our responsibility to use evidence-based practice when caring for our families or for others. (I am an RN and I strongly feel that it is important for ALL health professionals to keep up on what research is telling us as it changes frequently. All it takes is to look back even 10 years at some of the health care practices that took place to see how quickly the medical field changes it's 'facts').

Heather - posted on 06/04/2010

39

11

0

I am currently breast feeding in Indiana. My daughter will be 11 months tomorrow. I really intend on breastfeding until 2 when the need for formula diminishes if we stop. Mostly I'll go my daughter's desire if she wants to wean earlier.
My mom only BF my sister and I a couple months, and my sister's MIL thinks I'm crazy still doing it now.

Hannah - posted on 06/04/2010

5

14

0

I am prone to believe that one uterus means one child at a time however we do have two nipples. I bet if you devoted one side to the toddler and one side to the infant, our bodies could accommodate two that way (lopsidedness would contradict the sex symbol associated with our culture though :)). Once lactation sufficiently drops off and ovulation has started again, then your body has the resources to support another fetus. I think physiologically its hard on the body to nurse 2 (from separate births) at the same time but there are many behavioral reasons why we do so.

Krista - posted on 06/04/2010

12,562

16

842

Actually, I've read something about that, Hannah -- that our milk will change according to the needs of our child. I've always wondered, though, how it works if one is nursing a newborn AND a toddler -- surely the milk can't adapt from feed to feed? If it does, though, that's pretty wild stuff!

Hannah - posted on 06/04/2010

5

14

0

Cool studies done with the Wallaby showing how drastically lactating female's milk changes given the age of the offspring ~ amazing. The research is not there for humans but I would bet that we are similar.

Kimberly - posted on 06/04/2010

1

20

0

I nursed my daughter until she was 3 (really, at that point it was just at bedtime) and my son weaned himself at around 2 years. I live in New England. There is nothing "freakish" about nursing your child and the relationship between mama and child will guide the weaning process.

Amanda - posted on 06/04/2010

180

18

6

like i said to each their own. i was just stating what i have heard didn't mean to piss anyone off. and it was some pediatricians that said it on a radio show they were doing a thing on it. so again to each there own that is just what i heard.

Jane - posted on 06/04/2010

36

24

3

Even though I believe this original post was about comparing rates of BFing after one year in various countries, I feel compelled to say that I researched the claims posted above that breast milk has no nutritional value after one year and that immunities are only passed on through colostrum, not through regular breast milk. Just conducting a simple google search, I found absolutely no support for either of those claims and, contrarily, I found extensive documentation of the opposite, that the nutritional value of breast milk does change as lactation continues, but it never becomes devoid of nutritional value and that immunity benefits continue as long as breast feeding continues.

[deleted account]

It makes absolutely no sense for me for anyone to say that breastmilk no longer has nutritional value after X amount of days, weeks, months, or years. Even if it doesn't change w/ your baby/toddler (which I do believe)... if it doesn't change than it would STILL have SOME nutritional value regardless of the child's age. Otherwise there would be a whole lot more cases of failure to thrive and malnutrition than there already are....

Elicia - posted on 06/04/2010

46

5

5

Like I said, it's for comfort...if you are accurate with saying there is no nutritional value. Both mom and baby can still enjoy the "bonding time" long after the food need expires.

Amanda - posted on 06/04/2010

180

18

6

Both of my kids only got breast freed for the first week or so but that was cause of different reasons. I also have heard of people breast feeding past the age of 3. Even though there is a lot of research that shows that breast milk doesn't have any nutritional value after a child reaches a year or so old. So in truth i don't get it. but hey to each their own...

Jenn - posted on 06/04/2010

2,683

36

93

Actually Lucy, all mammals DO nurse their young - which is why they are called mammals - because of the mammary glands which are intended for nursing young ;)

Elicia - posted on 06/04/2010

46

5

5

Oh and about doing it in public, for the first while I was concerned about people and then my boobs became less as boobs and more of breasts...meaning less of a man's play things for his and or my pleasure and more of an outlet to provide the best nutritious food for my baby. Then I no longer cared what people would think, I just tuned them out and if thet caught a quick glimpse, oh well, they're just boobs. And actually here in Ontario Canada women can walk around in public topless, if they choose...the law was passed back in the mid-90's, although I have never witnessed it. Only in public though, just like men can't go in a restaurant topless/shirtless, neither can a woman.

Anyone who would choose to make a comment to me, it never happened, I would just ignore it.

Elicia - posted on 06/04/2010

46

5

5

I am still nursing my girl, she's 14 months...I think it's more of a comfort to her as I'm not sure how much she's actually drinking anymore, besides first thing in the morning and going to sleep at night. I don't mind that she uses them for comfort, she's still a baby and still wants the closeness---one day she won't and I'll probably miss it, so I'll take it while I can.

Lucy - posted on 06/04/2010

7

3

0

I think your post is a little rude. Doctors encourage breastfeeding for AT LEAST 12 mos. Breastfeeding is a natural way to bond, and that is what God intended us to do for our children. All mammels breastfeed (almost...) and they do it for as long as necassary. Children can eat food and get the breast, it is all the better for them. I myself am still nursing a 10.5 mo. little girl and i intend to continue until I feel she is ready to stop, or until I dry up, whichever comes first.

Priscilla - posted on 06/04/2010

3

0

0

so true you defenitley dont have to prepare bottles, wash them and pack a huge diaper bag with bottles formula and water. Never mind having to choose which water is best for your baby! I love breastfeeding, it is more convenient than bottle feeding, I think our culture just has trouble accepting this fact, mainly because its not convenient when you work outside of the home. Even when i did work I began pumping and I gave her breastmilk and when I tried formulas I had a huge problem because she didnt like the taste, until I found the right one. Of course the most expensive one, lol! Later I left my job, yes you heard right, I left my job to be with my family, and being a person of faith God provided me with a work from home opportunity that wasnt commission based and didnt require you to be an excellent sales person, thank God cause I wouldnt have passed that test. And I kept breastfeeding my 1 yr old at the time. Now she is two and still breastfeeding.

Priscilla - posted on 06/04/2010

3

0

0

I believe that in countries where moms have professions and have to go back to work right away the percentage of breastfeeding after 2 yrs is lower than in countries where moms are cuturally required to stay home with there children or keep them close as they work during the day. I still breastfeed my wo year old because I stay home and I can do it with no interruptions. I also breastfeed my newborn at the same time. those are the best moments of my day with my two little babies bonding with me.

Tracey - posted on 06/04/2010

8

20

0

@ Monica

that is breastfeeding. Your efforts and diligence are very very comendable.

Monica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

1

0

my son was born at 28 weeks and spent three months in the NICU. He had MANY issues and feeding by mouth was one of them. I spent 6 months trying to bf, pumping and bottle feeding expressed milk and then gave up trying to bf, due to exhaustion. I pumped for almost 15 months and then had a 4 month supply in the freezer. I wanted desperately to bf him, but he had a very weak suck and other problems and at some point I made the concession to protect my health. The fact is, he got my breast milk. Even if it was from a bottle. Many moms I know do not consider that breast feeding, but I do. I'm so glad that I was able to give my very fragile baby what he needed so badly. The delivery system was less important to me than the fact that he was getting the milk. I would have happily breast fed him for at least two years.....

Renelle - posted on 06/04/2010

6

12

0

From the latest policy statement of the AAP on breastfeeding & the use of human milk: The AAP still recommends that 'breastfeeding should be continued for at least the first year of life and beyond for as long as mutually desired for mother and child'. 'There is no upper limit to the duration of breastfeeding & no evidence of psychologic or developmental harm from breastfeeding into the 3rd year of life or longer'.
Also stated 'all health professionals should 'promote, support & protect breastfeeding enthusiastically'.
Years ago, the AAP didn't say 'at LEAST the first year & beyond if mutually desired...'. This led to everyone thinking that you were supposed to stop on PRECISELY the 365th day of your child's life. One year is just a good breastfeeding goal. It does not mean that if you're nursing after one year, that you are weird! Good grief! I once had a woman tell me that once a baby can talk, that's it! It's time to stop. I then said 'so I should punish my baby for speaking & stop nursing. What a fabulous idea!'. :)
Anyway, mommies, I think that mothers should do what works for mother & child. If breastfeeding is an unpleasant experience for you or your baby, or is difficult to do because of work, etc., then you shouldn't do it, and don't feel guilty. Being a mother is hard enough at times, and we should all support each other.
Peace.

[deleted account]

I'm British & live in the Northeast US.
I BF my son (now 5) for 3 months and then gradually switched him to formula. My job made it very difficult to continue as there was no opportunity to pump during the day. Apart from ear infections, he has been very healthy so far. I did the same with my daughter, now 3, for the same reason. She has had no health issues at all except fo one ear infection 2 months ago.
I didn't really want to BF until they were past a year. I would have liked to have gone longer than I did but it wasn't possible in my situation. It's a personal choice. I never felt influenced by anyone. And I don't believe it's affected their health. Children can be perfectly healthy if they're not BF until they're a year old or older. I understand that people and the medical profession recommend it to improve chances of good health, but I also believe that if there is good health in the parents genes and family history, they have a good chance if being healthy anyway. Had my husband and I been in poor health generally, genetically, or our families had been, perhaps I'd have taken more stock in it? I'm not sure. I'm thankful for having two healthy, happy, secure and loving children, despite not having BF them beyond 3 months. Oh, and we sleep trained them when they were weeks old too. Insecure children? Nope! Definitely not!

Jodi - posted on 06/04/2010

26,294

36

3891

Ladies, one more attack or argument that includes disrespectful language or personal references and this thread will be locked (no offence to the OP). So if those who are arguing rather than debating, please keep it out of this thread.

Thank you
Jodi Adams
WtCoM Moderator

Jill - posted on 06/04/2010

2

1

0

I'm in the US and breastfed my son until he was 13 months. I plan on breast feeding my second, when he arrives, until he is around a year. My son never used a bottle. I was lucky enough to be able to stay at home with him. I choose to breastfeed because of the health benefits and the cost. It's ridiculous how expensive formula is. Most of my friends have breastfed, most until their kids were a year. I don't know anyone who breastfed until 2. I also have friends who only did formula. There is nothing wrong with either choice. I think I would have had to go back to work to pay for the formula.
My sister breastfed her son until he was one. She had to go back to work when he was 3 months. I am amazed at how she was able to pump everyday so her son could have her milk. I don’t think I would have been able to do that. She was very dedicated.

Jenn - posted on 06/04/2010

2,683

36

93

I live in Canada and stopped bf'ing my son at 15 months and my twin girls at 12 months. With my son we stopped because I returned to work and with the girls I stopped because bf'ing 2 of them was hard to deal with sometimes with personal space (having not 1 but 2 babies hanging off of me was getting to me). And Sharon Grey - my boobs were for sexual pleasure and for feeding my babies - why can't they be both? ;) And Marlana, where did you get your info? This is not meant to be an attack or anything, I really am curious. If there's info out there that none of us seem to know, could you please share? It was always my understanding that your breast milk DOES change as far as fat content etc. And if I eat pizza my baby didn't get pizza - they take the vitamins and mineral from your body so if I don't eat properly my baby won't suffer, I will because if can deplete your stores.

Renelle - posted on 06/04/2010

6

12

0

Marlana,

I am shocked that your school is teaching such erroneous information. No health benefit to breastfeeding after the cholostrum??? Your teachers need to do their homework. They are ignoring such widely known benefits of breast milk as helping to protect against ear infections, allergies,and helping to boost the babies' immune system. What about the fatty acids in breast milk - do they think that Omega 3 Fatty Acids are not beneficial to a babies' brain grown (as long as the breastfeeding mother is eating a healthy diet)? Your teachers need to contact the World Health Org. & The Academy of Pediatrics to get some enlightenment on the subject of breastfeeding. No offense to you at all. I'm just quite concerned that there are people in the medical world promoting such untruths about breastfeeding.

Sherri - posted on 06/04/2010

9,593

15

387

I am not attacking I am backing everything I say up with information form the CDC or licensed Dtr's. I never attacked your intelligence either by the way I am strictly disputing what you are saying.

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

10

0

This is rather insane isnt it? I have no idea why the need to attack me. I have an opinion and Im expressing it. If someone doesnt agree with it offer a rebuttal without the attack on someones intelligence. I will think whatever I want to think afterwards anyway so why try to back up your debate with WEBMD? I know my daughter could have benefited from longer time breastfeeding as she also had chronic ear infections. I have read lots of studies also. For those of you who are doing so "Please stop attacking me for my opinion is based upon experience."

Sherri - posted on 06/04/2010

9,593

15

387

Another poster said her son was very tall from bf'ing and her daughter had asthma because she was formula fed and not bf longer.

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

22

0

wow i thought this was about breastfeeding, how did it turn to a bitch fight and asthma?

Sherri - posted on 06/04/2010

9,593

15

387

Jessica asthma has NOTHING to do with bf'ing or formula feeding either!!!!

From Web MD So why do you have asthma and your friend doesn't? No one really knows for sure. We do know that allergies play a role in many people with asthma but not in all. As with allergy, you can blame your family history, as there is a strong genetic component for asthma.

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

22

0

I'm In Chicago, My son is 10 months old and i am still breastfeeding him and plan to do so until he doesn't need Milk as his main source of food. But will continue to nurse him at night until he is at least 2 or 3.My mother breastfeed my sisters and myself all till we were 3.

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

10

0

How do you know what I want out of life differs from what your life is? I do not have it posted? I still have contact with adults. I still have furthered my education. I was able to do all three. And as for your attack on my intelligence or lack there of you are way off base. That is why it was perceived as jealousy. Do not make assumptions based upon what you deem as fact. My personal experience versus your book read knowledge is no match. Sorry if I seem offensive but walk a mile in others shoes before criticizing.

Jodi - posted on 06/04/2010

26,294

36

3891

And Marlana, for the record, your post is borderline personal attack, so please be more respectful. I almost deleted it.



Ladies, lets keep the debate nice, rather than taking it personally.



Thank you

Jodi Adams

WtCoM Moderator

Jodi - posted on 06/04/2010

26,294

36

3891

"Everyone should really educate themselves about something before posting it all over the internet because it doesnt look good for themselves. "

I agree Marlana, so perhaps being able to provide research to backup your comment that "breastmilk actually does nothing health wise for your child once the cholostrum is gone" would be good, because that goes against all of the Breastfeeding Associations worldwide, and also against the WHO. And I'd take that any day over someone at school to be a Physician's Assistant.

I agree that there has been some research to show that perhaps the benefits over formula feeding aren't as large as initially thought, but it is still more beneficial.

And yes, it does depend how the mother is looking after herself, that goes without saying. But ultimately, you have made a statement that contradicts the WHO recommendations. Surely you questioned that, and you have a source for that information. I'd certainly be asking questions if it were me, and requesting some sort of validation for such a controversial opinion.

Sherri - posted on 06/04/2010

9,593

15

387

I think that is great. I don't scoff that you breastfeed that is wonderful that he is still going strong, but he isn't any taller because of it. I am so happy you have a healthy little boy as do I and mine had to be formula fed as my milk dried up due to medication I was on. As I said I am not scoffing at your bf'ing I am thrilled it is so good for your baby.

Marlana - posted on 06/04/2010

56

13

5

Seriously some people on here are just not very smart. While breastfeeding is a better choice over formula there is just something wrong by your child lifting up your shirt saying hungry. Children need other foods at 6 months of age, your milk does not change to your childs needs it stays the same and the nutrients that you put into your body are put into your milk, so if you eat pizza those are the nutrients you give your child if you have an alcoholic drink you pass that to your baby, if you take advil your baby gets aspirin. The only immune system benefits from breastfeeding come from the colostrum which is only in the first couple of days of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding has nothing to do with a toddler being tall for his age, it has nothing with a child being advanced, or a child being healthy. Everyone should really educate themselves about something before posting it all over the internet because it doesnt look good for themselves.
After saying this I am pro breastfeeding, I breastfed my own child until returning to school and I wasnt able to pump and then switched to formula this was when she was 6 weeks old. Saying this my daughter is in the 98th percentile in her height and is very advanced for her age at 17 months. However, I know that she is tall because I am 5'11 and her dad is 6ft and I read and talk with her all of the time so thats why her vocabulary is so advanced.

Jessica - posted on 06/04/2010

6

10

0

My son is 34 and 1/4 inches tall. Scoff or laugh if you want but I am very proud of the fact that my breastmilk contributes to his growth. And not to mention the fact that in his life he has only been sick twice. TWICE. I dont care what anyone says my son will be breastfed until hes at least 2 years of age.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms