What could cause a person to not get a period for almost a year

Jessica - posted on 10/25/2009 ( 17 moms have responded )

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okay after my first son was born no problems. after my second son i had no problems till later. my period went back to normal after he was born and and i got my periods normal every month. till september i missed mine. was hoping we was pregnant but nope. than 2007. i got my period from may-august. than my periods quit agine was hopeing we was pregnant but nope agine. than 2008. may-august got my period. 2009. got my period may june and july. and none since. this is weired. we are wanting more kids. but dont look like its happening. do not have insurance to go to a doc does anyone know y this could be happening any home remidys that might help? really wanna know why this is happening. or has anyone had this happen to them?

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Brandy - posted on 10/25/2009

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As Sharon showed you, there are alot of really scary reasons why this could happen and you need to see a doctor ASAP. Maybe you should move to Canada, we don't pay for doctors. lol. But seriously, get on this. If it's already been going on this long and it is something serious, then who knows how much it has progressed already. Good luck and best wishes.

Sandi - posted on 10/25/2009

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You said you can't see someone without symptoms- well, not having a period IS a symptom! I am looking at your profile pic, and forgive me for saying, but you look a bit on the heavy side (I am obese, so I'm not a skinny minny saying that!). My first thought is PCOS, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. You do need to find out if that is what you have. It can make getting pregnant difficult, and if not treated, if you get pregnant your chance of miscarriage is huge.



Also, if your husband only makes $191 a week, where do you live that you can afford two kids and hope for more? Because I need to move there!

Heather - posted on 10/25/2009

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Well OK I am a bit old for more children, but I thought I was going through perimenopause. Had all the tests done then found out it was an under active thyroid. Apparentley that can also stop a period. I know this is probably not your cause, but is something to think about and maybe ask your doctor. Hope all goes well for you in the future.

Tamara - posted on 10/25/2009

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also public health departments/government run clinics are not just for "mexicans" like you answered above. they are for everyone. maybe you just don't want to go to that clinic for those reasons and for the money your husband is making there is no reason you do not qualify for any services from that clinic or not be able to get some kind of medical assistance . sometimes you just need to 'suck it up and do what you have to do'.. sorry if i sound harsh i was very low income single parent with 2 small kids years ago when i was 23. There is a way to get what ever it is you need for your self or your kids, no excuses not to. its a matter of priorities your kids having a health parent to take care of them being top. You gotta do what you gotta do. even if it makes you "uncomfortable'.. sorry i guess the "mexican' comment just irritated me. Married to a mexican who took care of my other children from a previous marriage for the past 18 yrs.

Tamara - posted on 10/25/2009

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if you have no insurance you can go to planned parenthood and also the public health department.They do provide services for people with a sliding scale and also a 0-$20 fee.. Go see someone if not for yourself do it for your kids.
T

Jessica - posted on 10/25/2009

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otto bean clinic is the one i was talking about eairlyer. we make to much for them. the Scheidler Family Clinic and Armas Clinic never heard of them.dont know if thay even existe in this area any more. but i will call them when thay are open and see. alot of docs come and go in this town

Mandi - posted on 10/25/2009

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go to a free clinic or you can at least call and get advice... talk to a nurse and explain what is going on

if you and your husband dont make that much you should be able to get onto a government program that will prodive insurance and other needs for your family

Armas, Linda - Armas Clinic

(573) 888-5890

1231 1st St, #2, Kennett, MO 63857 Get directions

Cross Streets: Near the intersection of 1st St and US-412



Otto Bean Medical Center

509 South Bypass

Kennett MO 63857

573-717-1332

Web Site Uninsured, Underinsured, Insurance, Medicare, Medicaid

Low Income

Sliding scale based on income

Services: Medical Services

Hours: Call for hours

Residency: Dunklin County



Scheidler Family Clinic

304 Teaco Road F

Kennett MO 63857

573-888-0900

Web Site Uninsured, Underinsured, Insurance, Medicare, Medicaid

All income levels

Call clinic for fee information

Services: Women's Health, Primary Care

Hours: Monday - Wednesday 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Thursday 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM

Friday 8:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Residency: Kennet Area

Jessica - posted on 10/25/2009

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my kids are now 3yrs old and 4 yrs only. my 4 yr old was only breast fed till he was 6mo. my 3 yr old was not. he would not latch. and i did not prduce much milk. i am not on any contraception. never have been

Melanie - posted on 10/25/2009

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I haven't had a period in nearly 8 months. Went to doctor as I too thought I was pregnant. I wasn't (thankfully) but they couldn't figure out what was wrong. I was too young for menopause yet nothing came to mind. The best they could come up with was stress was causing me not to come on. I am opposite to you I don't want to get pregnant but i would suggest you come off any contraception you are using for at least 3 months. When you have children your hormones go haywire. It was suggested i come off my pill but I can't risk getting pregnant. xx

Adina - posted on 10/25/2009

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did u breastfeed cause when u are breastfeeding or if u stop it takes awhile for your bodys hormones to get back to how they should be. thats what happened with me i stopped breastfeeding my daughter when she was 4 months and didnt have a period till she was six months

Jessica - posted on 10/25/2009

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thanks. unfortunatly here in are little town we dont have free or reduced clinic. there is only one clinic in are town and its for mexican's thay can not get help anywhere elts thay do help others but u have to tell them how much u make how much ur bills are how many ppl r in the fmaily and stuff but we make to much money. and all my husband makes is 191 dollars a week.

Jessica - posted on 10/25/2009

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well where i live if u have no insurance. u can not see a doctor. so thats kinda hard. i have read with some things there are symptoms. exceot for me i have no symptoms at all just no period. witch was making it hard for me to try to figure it out. thanks for everyones help. i have also heard from some ppl that flax seed and fish oil can sometimes help

Debby - posted on 10/25/2009

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It could be any number of things causing the problem. I suggest you find a free or reduced clinic ASAP. If you want more children don't mess around with things like that. It Could be nothing or it could be more serious.

Sharon - posted on 10/25/2009

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Obesity & various cancers as well as....

■Stress. Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result. Regular menstrual periods usually resume after your stress decreases.

■Medication. Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.

■Hormonal imbalance. A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy, uterine bleeding; acne; and sometimes excess facial hair.

■Low body weight. Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.

■Excessive exercise. Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.

■Thyroid malfunction. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) commonly causes menstrual irregularities, including amenorrhea. Thyroid disorders can also cause an increase or decrease in the production of prolactin — a reproductive hormone generated by your pituitary gland. An altered prolactin level can affect your hypothalamus and disrupt your menstrual cycle.

■Pituitary tumor. A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation. This type of tumor is treatable with medication, but on rare occasions, it requires surgery.

■Uterine scarring. Asherman's syndrome, a condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), cesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.

■Primary ovarian insufficiency. Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. In some women, the ovarian supply of eggs diminishes before age 40, a condition known as primary ovarian insufficiency. The lack of ovarian function associated with this condition decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also referred to as premature menopause, may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.

Primary amenorrhea

Primary amenorrhea affects less than 1 percent of adolescent girls in the United States. The most common causes of primary amenorrhea include:



■Chromosomal abnormalities. Certain chromosomal abnormalities can cause a premature depletion of the eggs and follicles involved in ovulation and menstruation.

■Problems with the hypothalamus. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is a disorder of the hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a control center for your body and regulates your menstrual cycle. Excessive exercise, eating disorders, such as anorexia, and physical or psychological stress can all contribute to a disruption in the normal function of the hypothalamus. Less commonly, a tumor may prevent your hypothalamus from functioning normally.

■Pituitary disease. The pituitary is another gland in the brain that's involved in regulating the menstrual cycle. A tumor or other invasive growth may disrupt the pituitary gland's ability to perform this function.

■Lack of reproductive organs. Sometimes problems arise during fetal development that lead to a girl being born without some major part of her reproductive system, such as her uterus, cervix or vagina. Because her reproductive system didn't develop normally, she won't have menstrual cycles.

■Structural abnormality of the vagina. An obstruction of the vagina may prevent visible menstrual bleeding. A membrane or wall may be present in the vagina that blocks the outflow of blood from the uterus and cervix.

Cambrey - posted on 10/25/2009

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without a doctor you won't be able to figure it out for sure. Stress can cause them to be missed or late, no longer ovulating each month, thyroid issues could cause that too. Sorry, but I don't think you will be able to figure it out without consulting a doctor.

Theresa - posted on 10/25/2009

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Wondering if you can get a perscription to birth control pills? Going on the pill could restart your system. You really do need to see a dr. though. From what I understand it could be many things from stress to a cyst.

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