what questions does one ask when you go view the daycare your child?

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Becky - posted on 11/09/2009

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There are so many questions and it depends upon what you are most worried about to leave your child. I wanted my children to feel and to be safe. Below are a couple of quesitons I asked: What is your policy on discipline? How do you handle children who misbehave? How do you make the children feel safe?

Bonita - posted on 11/07/2009

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I run a home daycare and love it when parents just come and check it out with their child. I also suggest a 1 hour playtime for the child ( while they get groceries) to see if the child is happy or not..no charge...I would also ask about backup arrangements if the main daycare person is ill. what is the daycare's policy on sickness with the child.

Charlie - posted on 11/07/2009

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Ask for a copy of their Policy handbook too , it should cover absolutely everything !

Brittany - posted on 11/07/2009

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All good qustions one more thing though make your apointment go look around n ask your questions then maybe 3 or 4 weeks later just drop in see what is happening on a random day!I recomend you do this once you have chosen a daycare and your child is atending on a regular bases just to see what is going on !

Kate - posted on 11/07/2009

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Quoting Leisa:

a lot of the questions i would of asked are listed here but also anoher question i asked when i enrolled my step son was what is the procedure if ur child is a special needs child can they get in a special teacher to help them and how much extra will that cost if that is needed and will you be involved in the picking of the teacher. my step son is a special needs child and picks who he likes nd who he doesn't we found that if his teacher was away sick he would play up for the other teacher so this is a good question to ask if this is ur case.



Our center works with the early intervention team and allows the specialists to come to our center to do OT, PT, speech or other activities.  We see them as a positive not only for the child but the children around them. Plus for working parents, who has extra hours to drive to and from specialists throughout the week.





Also, in Illinois, if the child qualifies for early intervention, I believe it is paid for by the state? I could be wrong, but when my youngest son needed speech it was provided without costs. After three you have to go thorugh your school district to receive services

Leisa - posted on 11/07/2009

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a lot of the questions i would of asked are listed here but also anoher question i asked when i enrolled my step son was what is the procedure if ur child is a special needs child can they get in a special teacher to help them and how much extra will that cost if that is needed and will you be involved in the picking of the teacher. my step son is a special needs child and picks who he likes nd who he doesn't we found that if his teacher was away sick he would play up for the other teacher so this is a good question to ask if this is ur case.

Charlie - posted on 11/07/2009

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I am an early childhood educator by profession and i was going to add my two cents BUT everyone here has said what i was already going to say !!

Great advice ladies .

Angie - posted on 11/07/2009

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I am a childcare provider, in home daycare. The provider should have a contract/policy statement that should answer most of your questions.You should ask about their education, what their goals are for your child,how many kids they have in care, hours they are open and if outside hours can be arranged and if so how much,What annual training do they need/have. What meals are served and when. What about formula.For home daycares, are there pets in the home? Do they come in contact with the children? What is their policy concerning children who are ill?What about back up care , when the provider is sick?What vacations do they take? Are the paid or unpaid? Do they transport your child? Toilet training policies? Behavior guidance? Do they go outside everyday? Extra clothing/diapers/sunscreen/bug spray? Rates? How often they increase rates? When is payment due? What is the schedule of activities in the day? How often are toys cleaned? Who else is in the home on a regular basis that would be coming into contact with your child?What if someone else is picking up your child?

I am sure there are some that I missed, but this should help! GOod luck!

Paula - posted on 11/07/2009

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Ask for references and call them!!!!!! Find out how the references found out about the day care provider (you don't want to inverview someone's sister or cousin who are biased!).

[deleted account]

We asked the following questions:



1. How many children per caretaker is there in a group?

2. Which language would you primarily use with our child? Spanish or English (

(Our daycare is bilingual and spanish is the main language due to our area)

3. What is your policy on a child who is sick or needs medication?

4. What do you provide for the child? (Wipes, sippies, diapers, etc.)

5. Do I pay monthly or weekly and what happens if my child will only be coming three days a week payment wise?

6. Do you check ID of the person picking up my child if they are not on my approval list? Do you call me if they are not on list?

7. What is your discipline rules/actions?

8. What is your standard method of communication with the parents?



Those were my main questions but the daycare kind of answered a lot of questions I wanted to ask just in their general overview of what they do and the tour of the facility.

Kate - posted on 11/07/2009

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I own two child care centers, ask as many questions as you can, bring checklists or questionnaires to help. No one should be uncomfortable about answering them, and they should be proud of their school in answering them.

Before you enroll it is really impotant that you view the all the classrooms in the school during their activities. Bring your child with you so you can see how she/he interacts with the environment and the teachers. You need to feel the environment and see if it fits with your child and your family and your philosophy of early childhood.

Read the parenthandbook thoroughly.

How does the school communicate about your child's day?

How is your child's development monitored?

What opportunities do parents have in the school?

What is the curriculum?

What are the teachers qualifications and how often do the head teachers change?

What are the transition procedures: first days of new school and from class to class.



If I think of other good questions I will let you know. Child care is a partnership between the school and the families enrolled.

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Hi i know its hard work, and scary leaving the most important things in your life with someone else, i saw loads of nurserys and child minders, i done it by taking my girls with me and seeing where we all felt comfortable and relaxed, my main concern was checking that they would never be at risk of harm so made sure they were never alone with one person for too long so no harm could come to them, good luck!!

Jodi - posted on 11/05/2009

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Some great suggestions. In addition, do NOT make an appointment to go and see the centre. Just turn up, because that way, they will not be prepared for a potential client, and you will see them exactly as they would normally be operating. Otherwise, what you will get is to see them on their best behaviour. You kind of want to catch them out if they have anything to hide.

Nicole - posted on 11/05/2009

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One question you need to ask is whether the centre is private, company, or council owned. Private = budgets - which could mean if they run out of something as simple as paper or paints the kids go without. Company = budgets and more often than not they outsource a lot of things like food, it'll come prepackaged once a day and there's not a lot of it. Council = yes they do have budgets but if they run out of something it's not really a big deal because they can ask for extra money to get what they need. And they always have inhouse cooks and kitchens which can cater a lot easier for kids with allergies and food intolerances.

Julie - posted on 11/05/2009

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i would ask what are the age groups they are in like if the kids 6 months are in the same group as the 2 or 3 year olds , what formula do they use ie you mind use a different formula , pick up & drop off times ? inital upfrotn fees ? what activities do they do ? food they eat ? are some of the questions i would start off with , i would laos check there back & front yard ? i would watch the staff are they friendly ? did they make a effort to talk to you & child ? are unahhpy / crying child there and are they attendting to them ? are the staff playing with them and teaching them or just watching the kids not interacting with them ?

[deleted account]

Depending on how old the child is. You might want to ask, WHAT IS THE NAP SCHEDULE? DO THEY NEED TO BE POTTY TRAINED OR NOT? WHAT ARE THE AGE REQUIREMENTS? WHAT DO I NEED TO BRING WITH THE CHILD? HOW LONG CAN A CHILD BE @ DAYCARE?(there is a limit), ASK HOW MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE THE TEACHER HAS HAD IN CHILDCARE, HOW MUCH THROUGHOUT THE YEAR IS THE FACILITY OPEN?,HOW MUCH DO THEY CHARGE?I (f you have more than one kid some places offer discounts when siblings are at the came facility),. If your child(ren) are school age ask to get a look around the classrooms to see what kind of work they are teaching. etc. That's all I can think of at this moment but I hope that helped you out some. lol

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