What to do for a lactose sensitive one year old?

Deanna - posted on 11/29/2011 ( 208 moms have responded )

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My daughter just turned one on the 18th and we started her on whole milk. Since then she's super fussy and not sleeping at night. I don't know if it's cause of the milk or if she's just going through a growth spurt or teething. And if it is lactose intolerance or sensitivity what can I do for her? What else is out there? Thanks moms!

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Minnie - posted on 11/30/2011

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Sure cow milk is for cows but if you want to really think about it, we're designed to breastfeed our children for several years. A baby of only one year should be still getting human milk, and if not, some sort of animal milk is necessary. The average 12 month old is not going to get sufficient nutrients from solids still. They aren't even producing the full range of digestive enzymes at that age yet.

Vickie - posted on 11/30/2011

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Cows milk is for cows. Goats milk is the closest to human milk. and we are the only society to continue to give our children milk after they are weaned. There really is not that much benefit as the dairy council would have you believe. We get calcium from dark green leafy vegetables. If your daughter will not eat these. Try orange juice plus calcium and rice milk or a lactose free milk. Papaya has the missing enzyme of those lactose intolerant. Those lactose intolerant will sometimes outgrow it.

Minnie - posted on 11/30/2011

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Sherri there are two big reasons why people shouldn't consume soy, doubly so for children

1. Soy is full of endocrine-disruptors- it prevents the production and function of many different hormones that are important for physical development and function of the organ systems.

2. It contains chemicals that prevent the absorption and utilization of certain minerals and nutrients.

The amount of isoflavones found in soy formula are the equivalent to an infant, by body weight, receiving three to five birth control pills each day.

Susan - posted on 12/06/2011

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Deanna, I had two sons that WERE lactose intolerant. I know it sounds odd, but I had to stay away from dairy while nursing them, and one of them, I had to stop nursing entirely because of it. We started Soy milk with my first after transistioning off formula, and then moved to lactose free milk like "Lactaid". He had very similar symptoms to your daughter when we started them on regular cows milk. With my second son we just the the Lactaid, and he was fine. Over time, they grew out of it and were able to transition to regular milk - one at 2 1/2, and one a little after three. I would try lactose free milk and see if that helps. If it clears up within a few days after starting it, you will have your answer. It can't hurt to try. :)

Minnie - posted on 11/29/2011

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Was she recently weaned at all?

It's highly unlikely she's lactose intolerant at her age. But she may be sensitive to bovine proteins found in cow's milk.

If you can't go back to breastfeeding or never did you can still use formula. Whatever you do though, run far, far away from anything soy-based.

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Cassandra - posted on 12/06/2011

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Also my husband cannot tolerate lots if milk. He can have a bowl of cereal but thats about it. Although he is fine with cheeses yogurts and other dairy products. His mom is tge same way. There are lots of alternatives out there loaded with vitamins. Everyone's system is different.

Cassandra - posted on 12/06/2011

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When my daughter turned one we starte whole milk as well. She took to it okay after a while. Only get poop started to become white. I took her to the pediatrician. She ran a bunch of tests on her. White poop can mean liver problems. Anyway she is fine other than she cannot digest the protiens in milk. So we put her back on formula. She was on that until about 20 months. We tried silk soy milk. She got horrible tummy aches and gas. We went back to formula forget it. Then we tried almond milk a few months later. She got horribly constipated. Now she is 26 months and thank goodness coconut milk was the ticket! She does great on it. Oh somewhere in there we tried milk 2 percent instead of the whole. She had white BM's again. So I suggest trying your alternatives. If it is that she seems to be having tummy aches. Not just grouchy about the change. Good luck!

Tracy - posted on 12/06/2011

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In all likely hood its not lactose intolerance if she was on formula or breastfed and you ate milk products. That said, if she does end up with a lactose intolerance of it there is anyone else reading this that is dealing with that, its really not a big deal. There is lactose-free milk (expensive) but my son who is 10 has been having that for 6 years. Its good and everyone in the house can use it. And since lactose intolerance is becoming more common there are many other things made lactose free now, such as yogurt and cheese.
I saw that someone said they have never heard anything bad about soy and that their dietician recommends it. The problem with soy is that it mimics estrogen. I know that there is more of a problem with it too but that is my number 1 reason for avoiding it for myself, husband, and my children.

Tracey - posted on 12/06/2011

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Deanna I am a mum of a lactose intolerant 9 yr old,she was diagnosed when she was 2 as being allergic to cow's milk,firstly I advise that you take her to your local doctor for a referral to the children's hospital to the immunology dept or to an immunology specialist and have her tested for lactose or cow's milk,it is a simple and only mildly painful little scrape of the skin on her arm with a very small dose of cow's milk or lactose applied to the area and a small waiting time to watch for a reaction,either on the skin or with her stomach or irritabilty etc,if there is a reaction either gresat or mild they will most probably recommend an alternative milk product,usually lactose free milk or soy milk or rice milk,any one of them is not all that difficult to get your child to learn to like,my daughter took to the soy milk rather quickly,and i also use lactose free milk which looks like regular milk and has absolutely no noticeable differerence in flavour to the child or even to adults,as i also use it in all cooking and even in my own food,eg cereal and cuppa's,soy milk however has a little difference in taste and colour BUT,it is easily disguised when flavoured if the child has a little indifference to adjusting at first to the introduction into their diet,and rice milk is also easy to adjust to,so see the doctor as soon as possible with her,and good luck,with the transition process if this is the case....i hope i have helped...let me know how it all went if you like...regards Tracey Clifford

Nancy - posted on 12/06/2011

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My grandson was lactose intolerant and the Dr. had us give him Tums or Rolaids everyday. They have tons of Calcium. He is 15 now, 5ft 5 and 130lbs.

Brenda - posted on 12/06/2011

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First and foremost talk to her PED he/she knows her better than any of us here ........

My youngest grand-daughter (22 months) had to be on a soy based formula early on b/c of such problems... at 1 year she was put on whole milk and began being very fussy ... her ped said to try soy-milk , we could see a difference within the first day.........she's back to her happy little self....Don't be affraid of SOY-MILK, if your affraid of her not getting enough vitiamns and such there are other ways...

I also have a almost 3 y/o grand-son that is also on soy, before him going on that he was the fussiest most unhappy baby I have ever seen.....words can't even describe.

So again talk to her ped, hope you both get relief soon...

Grammy of 3

Sarah - posted on 12/06/2011

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all 3 of mine were sensitive, but in an odd way. it was ONLY whole milk. they love yougurt, cheese, ice cream... just not whole milk. Again 2/ all 3, our answer was/is lactaid. The one in a red milk carton. It is a bit expensive, but give it a try and see how she does. It won't hurt her if it's not a sensitivity. With my twins, i changed over overnight. With 15 month old, we're still weening. (He's a fussbucket, and I don't care what WIC and other moms say, I'm doing what i need to to make sure my guy is happy and healthy) GL



PS, the twins grew out of it about 2. we're waiting on 15 mo

Patti - posted on 12/06/2011

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You can try a little experiment. Remove all dairy from her diet for 3 days. On the 4th day, add the dairy back. If she's allergic, you'll be able to tell. . .the symptoms will be more pronounced after clearing the dairy from her system.

Gene Ann - posted on 12/05/2011

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I wouldn't give a child soymilk today. Almost all, if not all soy in the US is GM-genetically modified. Lactaid milk or rice milk would be a safe substitute, but just be sure that she is getting enough calcium while her bones are growing.

Desiree - posted on 12/05/2011

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When my daughter started whole milk it gave her explosive diarrhea! So we switched to 2% milk, which her doctor said was just fine. That fixed the problem.



Be sure to discuss with your doctor what is going on though!

Heather - posted on 12/05/2011

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My child is now two and when she turned one she had the same problem so the doctor told me that she was sensitive to just milk so she drinks the brand lactaid it is just like milk but it is with out lactose she can eat all other dairy just not milk she loves cheese and ice cream and can eat the normal versions of those just not the milk

Jessicah - posted on 12/05/2011

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My son showed no signs of latose when I was feeding him the regular infamil formula. Ever since he turned 1 year old. He's 2 now. I noticed that when I feed him the whole milk and he would get really constipated. The best milk to feed your baby for sensitivity to whole milk. Is SILK soy milk. That's the best brand. Every other soy milk still makes my son constipated. Hopefully this helps you!

Helen - posted on 12/05/2011

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you know,when my boys were taking whole milk/I would put about 1 tsp. of corn syrup in an 8 oz bottle at least twice a day,They slept better and had regular bowel movements.It really worked.

Nikki - posted on 12/05/2011

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my son is lactose intolerant and has been since birth. The doctor prescribed "colief" suitable for newborns and infants. It is brilliant and has helped us enjoy milk and ice cream now we are almost 2 years old! look it up :)

Donna - posted on 12/05/2011

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My daughter is allergic to all other milks hence we are still breastfeeding at 2.5 yrs. She can tolerate sheeps milk yoghurt which I make into a banana smoothie with water. She can also tolerate ghee (just the fat left after dairy heated & removed from butter). Its tricky, but I think she will be healthy long term with extended breastfeeding & maybe outgrow some allergies.

Manulani - posted on 12/05/2011

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I have been allergic to milk sense birth. Now days their is special formulas and milk alternatives such as coconut, almond,and rice fortified milks. Take your concerns to your pediatrician. Find out for sure.

Jill - posted on 12/05/2011

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exactly what sheila said: wean her slowly onto cow's milk. if she's still having a hard time, talk to your doctor b/c they will be able to determine for sure if it's lactose intolerance. you could try rice milk, too. a friend of mine had to give both her sons rice milk b/c they had some kind of an allergy to the milk. they eventually grew out of it and they are 4 and 7. good luck!

Katie - posted on 12/05/2011

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I had a similar problem with my youngest son. He did fine on the formulas but when it was time for real milk he could not tolerate it or any other milk products. We tried the soy milk and that worked well for a while as long as we did not give him to much. We switched again to the almond milk and have not had another problem. I would talk to her doctor about what the Dr thinks you should do first. However I think you should try to slowly wean her from the formula and introduce the new milk, soy, or almond based milks a little at a time.

Sheila - posted on 12/05/2011

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My guess is that it is not lactose intolerance since there is lactose in breast milk and in all formulas. It could be just an adjustment to the whole milk. It might be helpful to "wean" her from whatever she was eating slowly. For instance, if she was on formula, mix 3/4 formula with 1/4 whole milk until she adjusts to that. Then move to half formula/half whole milk, etc. If it is teething, then Tylenol should help with the fussiness. Good luck!

Simone - posted on 12/05/2011

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I suspected that since I was lactose intolerant I would past that onto my son, and sure enough I did. Once I was done breast feeding I found a soy based formula instead of a milk based. I was able to find it at Wal-mart. I had noticed more spitting up when I used a milk based formula. Now that my son is three, he only uses soy milk. I was 27 before I realized I was lactose intolerant. After that I did some research and found that many foods we eat have milk(potato chips, balony) and I just had to learn how much milk my body will take. Your daughter, if she is lactose intolerant, will just have to learn that some foods need to be avoided so she won't have a tummy ache. Consider having soy ice cream on hand for those times when others are eating regular ice cream.

Elizabeth - posted on 12/05/2011

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I would be cautious with soy products, especially with a 1 year old. Rice milk and raw milk have worked great with my kids. We have found that its not a dairy issue as much as it is a pasteurization/homogenization issue. Good luck!

Melissa - posted on 12/05/2011

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Actually, it's possible to be lactose-sensitive at this age, especially if one parent has issues with that. I am lactose-sensitive and my daughter does better on lactaid milk. We also give her almond milk and/or soy milk because the doctor said that too much cow's milk was making her produce too much mucus. She's responded well. Good luck! (Lactaid is easy to find at most grocery stores. You can do 100% lactose free whole milk or 2%.)

Kristin - posted on 12/05/2011

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There are lots of alternatives Lactose Free milk, Soy milk, and as she gets older supplements she can take to aid in the digestion if she so desires.I wasn't Lactose intolerant until my 30's, which is quite common to develop over time as our bodies can not process gluten and lactose as we age. Try looking into some powdered milk for her age and there is probably some lactose free formula options as this is more and more common every day.

Betsy - posted on 12/05/2011

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I bf my daughter for over 18 months and her transition to whole milk took about 4 months (from 14 to 18mo of age). Since she was used to sweet breast milk we found that she loved SO Delicious organic sweetened coconut milk. Once she was taking that we added a little bit of whole milk to the mix until she was finally on all whole milk. I've heard rice milk is also a good substitute too. Good luck!!!

Stephanie - posted on 12/05/2011

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If your baby is lactose intollerant, then I would give her soymilk. before she goes to bed. I had to give it to my youngest, he didnt mind the taste and it helped him sleep better.

Linda - posted on 12/05/2011

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my son was not lactose intolerant but had the same difficulty. the peditrician said for me to mix half formula and half milk together. then to start doing 60% milk, 40% formula, and so on to phase the formula out. 2% milk is perfectly fine to use also. it took about 2 months to make the full transition

Antwoinette - posted on 12/05/2011

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There's nothing bad about soy or almond milk, but toddlers and babies need the milkfat that is in regular milk for brain development. So I would suggest trying Lactaid before switching to a non-dairy alternative. Or even try goats milk, it's supposed to be easier to digest than cows milk. My son was sensitive to lactose until just a few months ago and we had to give him the Lactaid. It's pricy, but it's worth it to not have your little one miserable from an achy belly. They also have Lactaid that has extra calcium added, that's the one I used for my son.

Alberta - posted on 12/05/2011

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thats how my son was he is now 12 and still cant drink milk we use lactose free milk from kroger

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I had a baby who couldn't take cow's milk ... goat's milk seems to work wonderful ... and if you can't get raw from a farmer which is BEST ... store bought goat's milk still seems to work good. My 2nd son I had to put on goat's milk as a new born baby (raw), and he loved it & never had a problem ever with it

Josefina - posted on 12/05/2011

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I am a mother of 5 and did exactly what Kate Smith suggested. Started with 90% formula and 10% milk until they adjusted to it. Then I slowly increased the milk and reduced the formula. That is what my Pediatrician instructed me to do with the first one and it worked for me with all five and my nieces and nephews.

Jennie - posted on 12/05/2011

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Deanna - I have a 2yr old daughter who is allergic to the dairy protein casein, so we've had her on dairy-free alternatives since day one. There are lots of options... soy milk, rice milk, almond milk and coconut milk will all work. Depending upon it's use (drinking, cooking, etc.) some are better than others. I would recommend doing some research on them all so you can determine what best suits your family and household. Also, you can find ice cream, yogurt, cheese, cream cheese and "butter" all made from either soy, rice or coconut. The milk subs I've been able to find at Walmart, Reasor's, etc. Unfortunately, the only place I've found the other subs is Whole Foods. I LOVE Whole Foods, but they're not as geographically or financially convenient as Walmart and the like. Also, margerine has minimal to no dairy, so you can use that as a butter replacement.

Gina - posted on 12/05/2011

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Hi Missy,

How did she get tested? The best way to test for sensitivities is via a blood sample. "US Biotek" is the best company to use for the testing. They can test for other foods as well. Be careful, though, about feeding her dairy if she has problems. You could actually cause nutrition malabsorption and additional sensitivities.

Gina - posted on 12/05/2011

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Keep in mind that cow's milk (whether the lactose is removed or not) is FAR from it's original form. It's not really even milk anymore. There's not even any natural nutrition in it. It's all destroyed in the manufacturing process and nutrients are added back in. So, you're better off taking a vitamin versus trying to get your "nutrition" from cow's milk. Believe me, it's far more detrimental than you think...even to those who are not lactose intolerant.

Missie - posted on 12/05/2011

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i beg to differ with some of you, my daughter has a sensitivity and still can consume, yogurt, icecream, pudding. We just have to do it in modeation, but she can certainly have a yogurt and pudding in the same day and be fine. She had several issues with formulas and breastmilk as a baby and was put on alimentum, we tried whole milk with no luck, she was then tested for a milk allegry and was not allergic, but still had issues with milk. So she's on lactaid and does great, in the begenning she would get gassy if she had yogurt or pudding, but that went away, but was never uncomfortable so her specialist said it was fine, to do what we felt was right he said just trial and error. She 3 1/2 now and we hoped she would of grown out of it by now, we gave her regular milk to try( we try every 6 months to re introduce it) and she ends up puking a couple hrs later. So she might never get to drink regular milk, but can still tolerate milk products. I would try lactaid, it's the closest taste to reg milk in case one day you can transition her. Just my thoughts and opinions.

Kate - posted on 12/05/2011

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My son was the same. He was on formula by then. I then introduced cows whole milk slowly - ie formula milk 90%, whole milk 10%, then slowly increased whole milk and reduced formula - if I ended up going a little too fast, I would take it a step back for a week or so then start again. It took me about 6weeks but after that he seemed fine. Hope this helps.

Gina - posted on 12/05/2011

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Hi Deanna,

I can related and have had many clients with the same issue. Children until about age 5 need the extra fat found in breast milk. Most women stop breastfeeding long before that and, therefore, go to cows milk, which is very different than human milk. Goat's milk is closer to human milk than cow's milk; but tastes very different. You can try it and see if it works. You can also try almond milk, which is higher in fat than rice milk. You can also make your own nut milk (as long as she's not allergic). Coconut milk is also higher in fat. You can add a little Stevia or Xylitol to sweeten it. Good luck! :)

Nadiyah - posted on 12/05/2011

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Unfortunately we are told untruths about milk. After a child is weaned from their mother's milk there no longer is need for anymore. We are told we need all of this calcium but that is the very culprit that tears holes into our bones. The truth is all the calcium we need is in the vegetables we eat. We also should take care and not eat of the genetically modified foods which encourage sickness into our bodies. Our bodies usually reject what isn't good for it, we just need to listen to it more carefully.

Danika - posted on 12/05/2011

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When I moved my son to whole milk I done it in one go and that was a huge mistake on my part! So we went back to formula and over a month I started introducing warm whole milk into his diet, first in cereal, then 1/2 a cup with small meals, then 1/2 bottles 30minutes before 1/2 a formula bottle before bed time, then reduced the formula quantities and increased the whole milk quantities. He's now 34 months and drinks whole milk warm or cold. Hope this helps! xx

Nova - posted on 12/05/2011

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Breast feed or express your breast milk. It's the only milk worth drinking. Failing that, water and calcium rich foods such as: spinach, broccoli, kale, almonds or almond milk, yogurt, etc. Good luck.

Dayna - posted on 12/05/2011

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It doesn't sound like a it's related to milk at all to me. It may be coincidental she's having sleep issues at night and has just started on milk. Did she breast feed or bottle-feed before? Maybe she just misses the routine or night-time bottle if she was still getting it? Maybe she's going through a grow spurt or teething? Has there been any other changes to her routine especially at night? Maybe she's just needing some extra love at night? I'd watch and wait before I'd make anymore drastic changes. If your suspect it's the milk just remove it from her diet for a while and see if it goes away. If not, it's something else probably. Hope things get better soon!

Michelle - posted on 12/05/2011

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My daughter has been drinking Vanilla flavored Silk Soy since she was 1 yr. She's now 4&1/2. It was an easy transition from formula. She, too, is lactose intolerant. I also give her gummy vitamins to ensure she is getting enough vitamins. Good luck.

Jessica - posted on 12/05/2011

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I had to switch my daughter to Lactaid around that time because she was doing the same thing. It worked like a miracle!!

Stephanie - posted on 12/05/2011

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My son was lactose intolerant but recently grew out of it, for that time we had him on lactose free milk :)

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