When to start cereal and fruit?

Heather - posted on 12/19/2009 ( 26 moms have responded )

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Just wondering how old your baby was when you started feeding them cereal and then fruits. My doctor wanted me to start my daughter on cereal at 2 months, but I thought that was pretty early. We tried it once anyway and it was a crying disaster, so we haven't tried it since. She's 4 months now and he wants her to start the cereal again and also start fruit. Any thoughts, advice? What was your experience? Thanks!

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Krista - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.


That was the common wisdom back when I was a baby -- my mom started us on cereal at 2 weeks. Most parents did. 



However, it's now highly recommended that parents wait until the baby is at the VERY least, 4 months old, and preferably 6 months old. Their little digestive systems just really aren't equipped to handle anything other than milk or formula. 



As far as the OP's question, I find that funny that your doctor is pushing solids so much. I would consider asking him why he's so darned eager for her to start solids. But honestly, if she's still perfectly satisfied with milk/formula, then I wouldn't be in any rush to start her on solids. 

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Melissa - posted on 12/21/2009

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Health experts and breastfeeding experts agree that it's best to wait until your baby is around six months old before offering solid foods. There has been a large amount of research on this in the recent past, and most health organizations have updated their recommendations to agree with current research.Unfortunately, many health care providers are not up to date in what they're telling parents, and many, many books are not up to date.





The following organizations recommend that all babies be exclusively breastfed (no cereal, juice or any other foods) or formula fed if need be for the first 6 months of life (notthe first 4-6 months):

World Health Organization

UNICEF

US Department of Health & Human Services

American Academy of Pediatrics

American Academy of Family Physicians

American Dietetic Association

Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

Health Canada



(all the above links can be clicked to take you to the corresponding info from that organization)



Most babies will become developmentally and physiologically ready to eat solids by 6-9 months of age. For some babies, delaying solids longer than six months can be a good thing; for example, some doctors may recommend delaying solids for 12 months if there is a family history of allergies.





*REASONS FOR DELAYING SOLIDS*

Although some of the reasons listed here assume that your baby is breastfed or fed breastmilk only,experts recommend that solids be delayed for formula fed babies also.

Delaying solids gives baby greater protection from illness.

Although babies continue to receive many immunities from breastmilk for as long as they nurse, thegreatestimmunity occurs while a baby isexclusively breastfed. Breastmilk contains50+ known immune factors, and probably many more that are still unknown. One study has shown that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 4+ months had 40% fewer ear infections than breastfed babies whose diets were supplemented with other foods. The probability of respiratory illness occurring at any time during childhood is significantly reduced if the child is fed exclusively breast milk for at least 15 weeks and no solid foods are introduced during this time. (Wilson, 1998) Many other studies have also linked the degree of exclusivity of breastfeeding to enhanced health benefits (seeImmune factors in human milkandRisks of Artificial Feeding).



Delaying solids gives baby's digestive system time to mature.

If solids are started before a baby's system is ready to handle them, they are poorly digested and may cause unpleasant reactions (digestive upset, gas, constipation, etc.). Protein digestion is incomplete in infancy. Gastric acid and pepsin are secreted at birth and increase toward adult values over the following 3 to 4 months. The pancreatic enzyme amylase does not reach adequate levels for digestion of starches until around 6 months, and carbohydrate enzymes such as maltase, isomaltase, and sucrase do not reach adult levels until around 7 months. Young infants also have low levels of lipase and bile salts, so fat digestion does not reach adult levels until 6-9 months.





Delaying solids decreases the risk of food allergies.

It is well documented that prolonged exclusive breastfeeding results in a lower incidence of food allergies (seeAllergy ReferencesandRisks of Artificial Feeding). From birth until somewhere between four and six months of age, babies possess what is often referred to as an"open gut."This means that the spaces between the cells of the small intestines will readily allow intact macromolecules, including whole proteins and pathogens, to pass directly into the bloodstream.This is great for your breastfed baby as it allows beneficial antibodies in breastmilk to pass more directly into baby's bloodstream, but it also means that large proteins fromotherfoods (which may predispose baby to allergies) and disease-causing pathogens can pass right through, too. During baby's first 4-6 months, while the gut is still "open," antibodies (sIgA) from breastmilk coat baby's digestive tract and providepassiveimmunity, reducing the likelihood of illness and allergic reactions before gut closure occurs. Baby starts producing these antibodies on his own at around 6 months, and gut closure should have occurred by this time also. SeeHow Breast Milk Protects NewbornsandThe Case for the Virgin Gutfor more on this subject.





Delaying solids helps to protect baby from iron-deficiency anemia.

The introduction of iron supplements and iron-fortified foods, particularly during the first six months, reduces the efficiency of baby's iron absorption. Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one study (Pisacane, 1995), the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers foundnocases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia. SeeIs Iron-Supplementation Necessary?for more information.





Delaying solids helps to protect baby from future obesity.

The early introduction of solids is associated with increased body fat and weight in childhood. (for example, seeWilson 1998,von Kries 1999,Kalies 2005)



Delaying solids helps mom to maintain her milk supply.

Studies have shown that for a young baby solidsreplacemilk in a baby's diet - they do not add to baby's total intake. The more solids that baby eats, the less milk he takes from mom, and less milk taken from mom means less milk production. Babies who eat lots of solids or who start solids early tend to wean prematurely.



Delaying solids helps to space babies.

Breastfeeding is most effective inpreventing pregnancywhen your baby is exclusively breastfed and all of his nutritional and sucking needs are satisfied at the breast.



Delaying solids makes starting solids easier.

Babies who start solids later can feed themselves and are not as likely to have allergic reactions to foods.





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Signs that indicate baby is developmentally ready for solids (baby should have most if not all):



*Baby can sit up well without support.

*Baby has lost the tongue-thrust reflex and does not automatically push solids out of his mouth with his tongue.

*Baby is ready and willing to chew.

*Baby is developing a “pincer” grasp, where he picks up food or other objects between thumb and forefinger. Using the fingers and scraping the food into the palm of the hand (palmar grasp) does not substitute for pincer grasp development.

*Baby is eager to participate in mealtime and may try to grab food and put it in his mouth.





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What if my 4-5 month old seems developmentally ready for solids?





Four- to five-month-old babies are sometimes very eager to participate at mealtime, but it doesn't necessarily mean that they are ready to eat solids - more often it's just the normal developmental urge to do what everyone else is doing. Research studies tell us that there are many health advantages to delaying solids for about 6 months for all babies, not just the babies who are not yet interested in mealtime.



There are a number of things you can do to let baby participate in mealtimes without starting solids:



*Let baby sit with the family at mealtime - in a lap, booster seat or high chair.

*Give baby a cup of water or expressed milk. Your baby can entertain himself at mealtime while learning to use a cup. 1-3 ounces of water in the cup should be plenty (often for the entire day). Many moms choose to use only water or a small amount of breastmilk to avoid wasting the "liquid gold" while baby learns to use the cup.

*Offer baby sips of water from your cup or straw. Even if baby hasn't figured out how to use a straw yet, you can put your straw in water, block the top end of the straw with your finger to trap a little water in the straw, then let baby drink the water from the lower end of the straw (unblock the top end once it's in baby's mouth).

*Offer baby spoons, cups, bowls and other baby-safe eating utensils to play with during mealtime.

*Give baby an ice cube (if it's a baby-safe size & shape) or ice chips to play with.

*Offer baby a momsicle (popsicle made from breastmilk) or slushy frozen breastmilk to eat with a spoon.



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Myths about solids readiness



There are many myths and outdated information regarding how to tell if baby is ready for solids.



MYTH: Baby's weight has reached a "magic" number

Just because your baby achieves "x" number of pounds, or has doubled birth weight, (or however much your baby weighs) does not mean that she is automatically ready for solids - particularly if she is under 6 months.

The American Academy of Pediatrics/World Health Organization recommendations for starting solids at 6 months or later has no exceptions for babies who weigh more. The research that I've seen on the health benefits of starting solids at 6 months and later holds for all babies, no matter what their weight.

It's the maturity of the digestive tract and baby's developmental readiness that makes the difference, not baby's weight.

It's rather interesting to note that moms are told to start solids for both big and small babies. It's not even uncommon to hear opposite arguments for both sides from the same person!



MYTH: "Your baby is big so you need to start solids."

Moms might be told to start solids for differing reasons when they have a large baby.

Some are told that since baby is big, they won't be able to produce enough milk to satisfy baby. This is quite untrue - almost all mothers have the ability to produce enough milk to exclusively breastfeed twins and even triplets. If you allow your baby to nurse on cue, your body will make enough milk for your baby.

Other moms are told that baby is eating too much, so mom should reduce baby's intake by limiting nursing and/or starting solids. There is absolutely NO evidence that a large breastfed baby will become a large child or adult, and limiting nursing can be quite dangerous for a baby.



MYTH: "Your baby is small so you need to start solids."

Another reason often given for starting solids is because baby is small . I really don't see the sense in this. Ounce for ounce, breastmilk has more calories than most baby-safe solid foods and significantly more nutrients than any type of solid food that you can feed your baby. In addition, starting solids will quite possibly reduce the amount of milk that your baby is getting overall, rather than increase overall intake. One of the first recommendations for a baby who genuinely has slow weight gain is to decrease or eliminate solid foods and nurse more often.



MYTH: Baby needs to start solids because there is not enough iron in breastmilk.

An additional reason given for starting solids is the "lack of iron in breastmilk." Breastmilk does have lower iron levels than formula, but the iron in breastmilk is more readily absorbed by the baby's gut than the iron in formula. Also, formula-fed babies tend to lose iron through fissures that develop in their intestines as a result of damage from cow's milk. Breastfed babies do not lose this iron. Sometime after the first 6 months (much later for a lot of babies), most babies will require an additional source of iron other than mother's milk. This can most often be obtained through small amounts of solid food. Read more on iron and the breastfed baby here: Is Iron Supplementation Necessary?.



MYTH: Baby needs solids so he will sleep longer at night.

The popular belief that feeding solids at night will help baby sleep through the night has no basis in fact. See Will giving formula or solids at night help baby to sleep better?



MYTH: If you don't start solids by "x" months, then baby will have problems with solid foods

This is another myth that is not supported by research for normally developing, healthy babies.

There is certainly a "window of opportunity" for starting solids, but this varies widely from baby to baby. At some point (usually around 6-8 months) baby will become developmentally ready to eat solid foods (able to sit up, chew, pick up food, etc.). At around the same age, the gastrointestinal tract is physiologically mature enough to handle a diversity of foods. At this point, most healthy babies will be ready and willing to eat (even if it's only occasionally and in tiny amounts).

Occasionally, parents will be told that baby must start solids by 6 months (or 8 months, or 10 months) or baby will have problems learning to accept and eat foods that require chewing. This "limited window of opportunity" idea is widely believed, but unproven.

I've not been able to find any research data to support the idea that there is a limited window of opportunity for introducing solids in normally developing, healthy children. There does appear to be some limited evidence that babies who have been tube-fed long-term or have serious developmental delays may have problems learning to eat if they don't get a chance to practice eating solids between 6 & 10 months. A small study involving case studies of several mentally retarded children was done back in 1964 (Illingworth RS, Lister J. The critical or sensitive period, with special reference to certain feeding problems in infants and children. J Pediatr 1964;65(6) part 1:839-48.). This study suggested that there may be a "critical and/or sensitive" period for introducing chewable textures to these children, and if solids are not introduced during this time, an important developmental milestone may be missed (possibly leading to rejection of solids later on). This study is the only one I've found referenced with regard to the "limited window of opportunity" claims regarding the normal development of children.

I asked a speech & language pathologist I know about her experiences with this. She has worked with many young children who have feeding problems, including developmental delays and problems with chewing and oral texture aversion. She said that she could not think of any reason that delaying solids would cause feeding problems, and said that the the problems in the children she had worked with had generally started at birth or relatively soon after. None of these children had a feeding problem caused by a delayed start to solid foods.

Crystal - posted on 12/21/2009

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Yes now would be the time definitely by 5-6 months! If she has issues with it start with dissolvable foods like certain infant cookies disolve in the mouth so no choaking. Soft cereal bars the mushy kind are good and just take a tiny piece off and put it in her mouth as a snack. It's a beginning not a diet it shows them how to chew small things instead of putting a spoon in. Once they get the idea of mashing it around in the mouths with their tongue they over time days n weeks figure it out and you use just a smidge on a spoon then take it from there. Rice cereal and mashed up cooked pureed bananas go well together.

Rebecca - posted on 12/20/2009

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Well cereal yes, but try a bit on the tip of your finger and if she pushes it out her reflex is still there so she's not ready. For fruit...well you should never start with fruit. It should be veggies. If you start with fruit you will be in for a long life of not wanting veggies. Both of my kids have veggies first and i had a hard time getting them to like fruit which iw as fine with at the young age. My son is now 2yrs and he loves eveyrthing! My daughter is only 5 months but she doens't like applesauce but loves sweet potatoes, carrots, peas and waved beans. Meat should be introduced between 7-8 months and make sure you buy everything starter for her age of 4 motnhs. If you end up with 6 month it will be too thick and she'll probably gag. Also remember when you introduce something new wait 3-4 days before adding something new. So lets say on monday you give her peas, don't offer antoher new veggie until thrus or fri. This will make sure there are no alleriges. If sings of allergies happen stop feeding what caused it and wait 5-7 days before starting another one. For the cereal, start with rice and start in the morning with just a tiny bit and it has to be really runny. Do the cereal for 3 mornings to make sure there is no alleriges and then ad night feeding, right before bed with a bottle.

Good luck!

Teerea - posted on 12/20/2009

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Its safe to feed your baby single grain cereal at 2 months ( rice) then gradually add fruit one at time, this process helps weed out food allergies. When introducing food via spoon you want to do it when your baby is calm and not starving just keep trying she 'll do fine. Good Luck

Mary Lynn - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting Melissa:



Quoting Mary Lynn:




Quoting Melissa:







Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.



 













Wow! I joined this site just to tell you what a complete and total idiot you are. Do you have ANY idea the damage you have done to that poor baby? No baby needs food that early, they can not even digest it!!! I am absolutely amazed at the things some parents do to their babies without researching it. He is now at risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and severe food allergies because his gut was not closed yet. Parent of the year award!








 








 








you really need to keep hurtful and unnecasary comments to yourself..you are most likely not a doctor yourself..dont quote what you dont know! and not all doctors know exactly wats best for another womans baby! get over yourself












 








I am trying to stop the spread of stupid, please do not hinder me in my quest!


So do you think giving a two week old solids was a smart decision??? No pedi on the planet is going to tell someone to give their 2 week old solids. Not all doctors will know exactly what is best for someones baby but when it is fact that a baby's digestive system is physically not ready to digest foods, how can you argue with that? It is not an opinion that it is harmful, like some parents let their little ones cry it out and some disagree (that is different parenting styles), it is FACT!






Oh and I suppose this one mom knows more than the AAP, the WHO and countless other health organizations that have been studying baby development for decades??????? I think freakin not. You Fail!



 



 



i think you are very imature and need to mind your buisness, you are not god so dont play his role that being sai d you are not that baby's parent.. stick to your own parenting m and leave others alone unless you have something constructive to say! i will not furthur this as it is up to me obviously to be the mature one and end this.



 



 





 

Melissa - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting Mary Lynn:



Quoting Melissa:




Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.








Wow! I joined this site just to tell you what a complete and total idiot you are. Do you have ANY idea the damage you have done to that poor baby? No baby needs food that early, they can not even digest it!!! I am absolutely amazed at the things some parents do to their babies without researching it. He is now at risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and severe food allergies because his gut was not closed yet. Parent of the year award!






 






 






you really need to keep hurtful and unnecasary comments to yourself..you are most likely not a doctor yourself..dont quote what you dont know! and not all doctors know exactly wats best for another womans baby! get over yourself









 







I am trying to stop the spread of stupid, please do not hinder me in my quest!

So do you think giving a two week old solids was a smart decision??? No pedi on the planet is going to tell someone to give their 2 week old solids. Not all doctors will know exactly what is best for someones baby but when it is fact that a baby's digestive system is physically not ready to digest foods, how can you argue with that? It is not an opinion that it is harmful, like some parents let their little ones cry it out and some disagree (that is different parenting styles), it is FACT!



Oh and I suppose this one mom knows more than the AAP, the WHO and countless other health organizations that have been studying baby development for decades??????? I think freakin not. You Fail!

Layla - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting Mary Lynn:



Quoting Melissa:




Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.








Wow! I joined this site just to tell you what a complete and total idiot you are. Do you have ANY idea the damage you have done to that poor baby? No baby needs food that early, they can not even digest it!!! I am absolutely amazed at the things some parents do to their babies without researching it. He is now at risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and severe food allergies because his gut was not closed yet. Parent of the year award!






 






 






you really need to keep hurtful and unnecasary comments to yourself..you are most likely not a doctor yourself..dont quote what you dont know! and not all doctors know exactly wats best for another womans baby! get over yourself









 Good point! I've met peds who are clueless about proper nutrition for babies and then the moms are given poor information and then babies suffer for it.





 

Layla - posted on 12/20/2009

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you should wait until your daughter is at least 6 months old. Before that, babies don't have the proper enzymes or gut lining to digest foods other then breastmilk (or formula). I was told this by 2 different doctors. I was also told NOT to start with cereal as this can cause constipation and make it difficult for babies to pass stools. Start with steamed, puree'd, fresh, seasonal vegatables that are known to be hypoallergenic (most people do not have allergic reactions to them) peas, yams, sweet potatoes, potatoes, carrots, squash etc. and the seasonal fruits. Introduce one new food per week so you can see how well your baby tolerates it. Avoid bananas as these are also constipating and also can create alot of mucous in a baby. (runny nose, wet lungs). Then you can move on to whole grains such as oatmeal, barley, etc.
The American Academy of Pediatrics states: "Nothing but breastmilk (or formula) for the first 6 months"
Good luck!

[deleted account]

Quoting Alyssa:



Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.





You know you're putting your son at risk for being obese, and you don't look too fit yourself so obviously it's herditary, way to make him a statistic. -claps-






ahhh ok didn't need a rude response I was just giving my opinion and my son who is 17 now is just fine and not obese at all.

Mary Lynn - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting Melissa:



Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.






Wow! I joined this site just to tell you what a complete and total idiot you are. Do you have ANY idea the damage you have done to that poor baby? No baby needs food that early, they can not even digest it!!! I am absolutely amazed at the things some parents do to their babies without researching it. He is now at risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and severe food allergies because his gut was not closed yet. Parent of the year award!



 



 



you really need to keep hurtful and unnecasary comments to yourself..you are most likely not a doctor yourself..dont quote what you dont know! and not all doctors know exactly wats best for another womans baby! get over yourself





 

Christine - posted on 12/20/2009

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I've followed the "start between 4 and 6 months" guideline that I've been given with both of my kids. Both seemed ready at right about 5 months. My son was not picky at all with any food (cereal, fruit, veggies - he seemed to have a hollow leg) but my daughter is definitely more interested in fruit than anything else. In my opinion, if the child isn't ready, you'll know because you won't be able to get the food into them - it will get spit right back out!

Mary Lynn - posted on 12/20/2009

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I PUT A SMALL PEASIZED AMOUNT OF RICE CEREAL IN MY DAUGHTERS WARM 10 0Z FORMULA TOO IT KEPT HER NICE AND FULL! AND THE DOCTORS BELEIVED THAT WAS A GOOD DECISION BECAUSE SHE WAS SO UPSET BECAUSE SHE WAS SO HUNGRY! ALL MOTHERS HAVE THEIR OWN WAY OF DEALING WITH THEIR CHILD!

Mary Lynn - posted on 12/20/2009

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MY DAUGHTER STARTED CEREAL AT 3 MONTHS JUST A LITTLE MIXED WITH FORMULA OR BREAST MILK UNTIL GRADUALLY SHE ATE MORE.. THEN AT 4 MONTHS I STARTED FRUIT ( MUSHY) I WAS TOLD TO ALWAYS NEVER INTRODUCE A NEW FOOD FOR 2-3 WEEKS TO WATCH FOR A REACTION:)

Stefanie - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting gayle:

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.


2 weeks?? Poor baby... My son nursed every 30 minutes when he was that age. So I nursed him every 30 minutes. I didn't want to start cereal or anything because according to the research I've done, all that will do is give them empty calories, take up the room in their belly for breast milk or formula so they lose nutrition, and will cause them to lose the sense of being full so they end up overeating for the rest of their lives. From what you're saying about how much your son eats, it sounds like that's exactly what happened (losing sense of being full).



 



The AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) reccomends waiting until 6 months old AT LEAST to start solids. This is because the baby's intestines aren't finished, and solid foods will cause a lot of issues. They also say that a baby needs nothing but breast milk or formula for the first year.

[deleted account]

I had to start my son at 2 weeks old.. he was not being satisfied with milk at all.. was feeding him every hour almost, I know it was because my milk was not in all the way,, but I put a small amount of cereal in a bottle with milk and it satisfied him (very small amount) he was eating a bowl of cereal around 1 month old... and it escalated from there, ,, lets just say he ate alot, even as he got older he never ate one jar of baby food... :).. I thnk it depends on the child and what their body needs at the time.

Rukshana - posted on 12/20/2009

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Dear Heather,

Four months is a good start for fruits and cereals, try feeding one spoon of fruit first and see if it agrees with the baby, then you can start feeding more. Start with fruits like apple & pears. Wash and grate them or make a pulp. Avoid fruits like Mango & Kiwi as they are hard to digest and would cause tummy ache.

Take Care

Danielle - posted on 12/19/2009

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I started cereal at 2 months because he was hungry. i dont go by books or anything i go by my instinct he sucks it right off the spoon and eats it every single night i mix it with breast milk he LOVES IT. he is now almost 5 months and last week i started veggies. i havent started any fruits yet i wanna make sure he is okay with stuff that isnt sweet. because they say not to do fruits right away(youll make the baby a sweet tooth) but they come out with a sweet tooth... breast milk is sweet!! haha. just keep trying and if you breast feed try mixing it with that.. i do rice cereal with apples in it so it is a little bit sweeter :D i dont know if it works for you or not but let me know!!

Nicolle - posted on 12/19/2009

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I started both of mine on cereal around 3 to 4 months, but only rice cereal. I waited until 6 months to start any of the other cereals or fruits. My doctor had actually recommended that I start easy-to-digest vegetables like squash before fruit.

Heidi - posted on 12/19/2009

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I started my daughter and 2 boys when they were about 3 to 4 months. I bought the gerber rice cereal and made it really watery. I did vegtables before fruit though. Start with stage one foods. Start them though on one food a week in cause the have an allergic reaction to one. Bananas is a good fruit though to mix with the cereal.

Saveena - posted on 12/19/2009

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Quoting Heather:

When to start cereal and fruit?

Just wondering how old your baby was when you started feeding them cereal and then fruits. My doctor wanted me to start my daughter on cereal at 2 months, but I thought that was pretty early. We tried it once anyway and it was a crying disaster, so we haven't tried it since. She's 4 months now and he wants her to start the cereal again and also start fruit. Any thoughts, advice? What was your experience? Thanks!


If the doctor is talking about the Gerber or BeechNut tod cereals, then that is fine.  But if you meant the ones that regular kids eat then no.  Start with mild tasting fruits like pears or peel the skin off of grapes, check it for seeds and then you can feed it to her.  I did that with my kids from about 4months also.  My kids never liked the cereal but the fruits they ate with no problem.  Sometime it worked if I sweeten with brown sugar, not too much but enough to give it sort of a sweet flavor. 
God bless and happy holidays.
Saveena

Serena - posted on 12/19/2009

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My son's doctor had me wait until 4 months at the earliest. I started at 4 1/2 months in the bottle with formula once or twice a day and slowly I am trying to get him to start spoon feeding (a month later)...so far no luck. Its really up to you and your daughter.

Kate - posted on 12/19/2009

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36

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My son is two months old and my pediatrician told me not to start my son on cereal until he was four months old becuase given earlier could cause food allergies.

Erin - posted on 12/19/2009

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0

139

I started my son on cereals at 2 months and he did well, I gave him 2 Tbsp of cereal to start with and mixed it with formula. Sometimes I would mix fruit with it also, bananas, peaches. It's a fun but messy time, have fun with it and good luck!!

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