Woman pregnant with duodecaplets

Rebecca - posted on 08/17/2009 ( 26 moms have responded )

157

44

22

What the?? http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/-/world/58339... I'm not sure if this is a false news story or what but if it's true are these people nuts? I don't see how a person could carry this many babies let alone deliever them healthily. I know it's not our right to decide for people if they have to selectively reduce their multiple pregnancies but sureley this can be considered child abuse? I don't see how they could ever acheive a good outcome with 12 healthy children? What are your thoughts?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jennie - posted on 08/17/2009

9

5

1

OMG....... It's a litter... they are doing it for the money not for the children because they are risking to many lives. If the are truely doing for the children then they would do what would be safe. It will be a mircle if Mother and all the babies survire

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

26 Comments

View replies by

Rachel - posted on 08/24/2009

1

0

0

Quoting Karen:

What a wonderful blessing! Children truly are a gift from God.

How can it be considered child abuse though, I do not understand that. They can most certainly be born healthy, God can do anything.


Yes, he can do anything. Will he when  human will completely took Him out of the equation and attempted to play God themselves? I don't know. He may be tired of cleaning up the messes when  us humans realize we are in way over our heads.He is bound to be getting more and more intolerant of our selfish ways.

Danielle - posted on 08/21/2009

2

0

0

I didn't even know that was possible. 12, OMG!!! I'm sure if this is true, we'll be hearing LOTS about it.



Obviously there is a LOT of risk involved, and none of the babies would be born at a saft birth weight. We can only pray that if they do make it, they are born healthly enough to survive and live a healthy, happy life.

Rebecca - posted on 08/21/2009

157

44

22

yeah we know, Tara found the story about the hoax two days ago. I guess for most people now it's more of a chance to express their opinions about IVF mega multiples...

~Jennifer - posted on 08/20/2009

4,164

61

365

Quoting Maureen:

This just wrong. If someone is willing to undertake the fertility treatments to up their chance of having a viable live birth, they also need to be prepared to undergo selective abortion. If the babies survive or if the mother even survives it will be a miracle.
There was a show on this week on the Octomom. Nuff said !



...it was a hoax.....made up story.

Maureen - posted on 08/20/2009

230

7

15

This just wrong. If someone is willing to undertake the fertility treatments to up their chance of having a viable live birth, they also need to be prepared to undergo selective abortion. If the babies survive or if the mother even survives it will be a miracle.

There was a show on this week on the Octomom. Nuff said !

[deleted account]

dont know if anyone knows yet but she made it all up. it was all a lie.. she is not pregnant at all so said the news!

[deleted account]

There seems to be a lot of people responding to this article that these children will be a gift from God, I beg to differ. God has nothing to do with women impregnating themselves with this many babies. I doubt if there is a lot of weight to this story, but really, what would be the point of risking all of the babies lives and the mothers. I don't condone selective birthing, but I do think that just because science has certain capabilities does not mean that we should take full advantage of them. have we learned nothing from Octomom???? .

Sharon - posted on 08/19/2009

11,585

12

1314

This is why you don't have 6, 8 or 12 babies at once.... and the reason why I consider it to be child abuse.



Common Health Problems of Preemies

Premature infants are prone to a number of problems, mostly because their internal organs aren't completely ready to function on their own. In general, the more premature the infant, the higher the risk of complications.

Dangers for premature babies



Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)

Most premature infants have to be fed slowly because of the risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), an intestinal infection unique to preemies. Breast milk can be pumped by the mother and fed to the premature baby through a tube that goes from the baby's nose or mouth into the stomach

Hyperbilirubinemia

A common treatable condition of premature babies is hyperbilirubinemia, which affects 80% of premature infants. Infants with hyperbilirubinemia have high levels of bilirubin, a compound that results from the natural breakdown of blood. This high level of bilirubin causes them to develop jaundice, a yellow discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes. Although mild jaundice is fairly common in full-term babies (about 60%), it's much more common in premature babies. Extremely high levels of bilirubin can cause brain damage, so premature infants are monitored for jaundice and treated quickly, before bilirubin reaches dangerous levels. Jaundiced infants are placed under special lights that help the body eliminate bilirubin. Rarely, blood exchange transfusions are used to treat severe jaundice.

Apnea

Apnea is another common health problem among premature babies. During an apnea spell, a baby stops breathing, the heart rate may decrease, and the skin may turn pale, purplish, or blue. Apnea is usually caused by immaturity in the area of the brain that controls the drive to breathe. Almost all babies born at 30 weeks or less will experience apnea. Apnea spells become less frequent with age.

In the NICU, all premature babies are monitored for apnea spells. Treating apnea can be as simple as gently stimulating the infant to restart breathing. However, when apnea occurs frequently, the infant may require medication (most commonly caffeine or theophylline) and/or a special nasal device that blows a steady stream of air into the airways to keep them open.

Anemia

Many premature infants lack the number of red blood cells necessary to carry adequate oxygen to the body. This complication, called anemia, is easily diagnosed using laboratory tests. These tests can determine the severity of the anemia and the number of new red blood cells being produced.

Premature infants may develop anemia for a number of reasons. In the first few weeks of life, infants don't make many new red blood cells. Also, an infant's red blood cells have a shorter life than an adult's. And the frequent blood samples that must be taken for laboratory testing make it difficult for red blood cells to replenish. Some premature infants, especially those who weigh less than 1,000 grams, require red blood cell transfusions.

Low Blood Pressure

Low blood pressure is a relatively common complication that may occur shortly after birth. It can be due to infection, blood loss, fluid loss, or medications given to the mother before delivery. Low blood pressure is treated by increasing fluid intake or prescribing medications. Infants who have low blood pressure due to blood loss may need a blood transfusion.

Respiratory Distress Syndrome

One of the most common and immediate problems facing premature infants is difficulty breathing. Although there are many causes of breathing difficulties in premature infants, the most common is called respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In RDS, the infant's immature lungs don't produce enough of an important substance called surfactant. Surfactant allows the inner surface of the lungs to expand properly when the infant makes the change from the womb to breathing air after birth. Fortunately, RDS is treatable and many infants do quite well. When premature delivery can't be stopped, most pregnant women can be given medication just before delivery to hasten the production of surfactant in the infant's lungs and help prevent RDS. Then, immediately after birth and several times later, artificial surfactant can be given to the infant if needed. Although most premature babies who lack surfactant will require a breathing machine, or ventilator, for a while, the use of artificial surfactant has greatly decreased the amount of time that infants spend on the ventilator.

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common lung problem among premature infants, especially those less than 1,000 grams (2.2 pounds) at birth. The exact mechanism for this disease is still unclear, but extreme prematurity, severe RDS, infections before and after birth, and the prolonged use of oxygen and/or a ventilator needed to treat a lung disease all play a major role in the development of BPD. Preemies are often treated with medication and oxygen for this condition.

Infection

Infection is a big threat to premature infants because they're less able than full-term infants to fight germs that can cause serious illness. Infections can come from the mother before birth, during the process of birth, or after birth. Practically any body part can become infected. Reducing the risk of infection is why frequent hand washing is necessary in the NICU. Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics. Other medications are prescribed to treat viral and fungal infections.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus

The ductus arteriosus is a short blood vessel that connects the main blood vessel supplying the lungs to the aorta, the main blood vessel that leaves the heart. Its function in the unborn baby is to allow blood to bypass the lungs, because oxygen for the blood comes from the mother and not from breathing air. In full-term babies, the ductus arteriosus closes shortly after birth, but it frequently stays open in premature babies. When this happens, excess blood flows into the lungs and can cause breathing difficulties and sometimes heart failure. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is often treated with a medication called indomethacin or ibuprofen, which is successful in closing the ductus arteriosus in more than 80% of infants requiring these medications. However, if medical therapy fails, then surgery may be required to close the ductus.

Retinopathy of Prematurity

The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. About 7% of babies weighing 1,250 grams (2.75 pounds) or less at birth develop ROP, and the resulting damage may range from mild (the need for glasses) to severe (blindness). The cause of ROP in premature infants is unknown. Although it was previously thought that too much oxygen was the primary problem, further research has shown that oxygen levels (either too low or too high) play only a contributing factor in the development of ROP. Premature babies receive eye exams in the NICU to check for ROP





After the NICU

Premature infants often require special care after leaving the NICU, sometimes in a high-risk newborn clinic or early intervention program. In addition to the regular well-child visits and immunizations that all infants receive, premature infants receive periodic hearing and eye examinations.

Careful attention is paid to the development of the nervous system, including the achievement of motor skills like smiling, sitting, and walking, as well as the positioning and tone of the muscles.

Speech and behavioral development are also important areas during follow-up. Some premature infants may require speech therapy or physical therapy as they grow up. Infants who have experienced complications in the NICU may need additional care by medical specialists



Premature babies are more prone than most to face complications — both short- and long-term. Learn about which long-term complications might arise, according to the University of Wisconsin Center for Perinatal Care, and what you can do about them.

Learning Problems of Preemies

Former preemies are more likely than full-term babies to suffer from learning deficits or learning disabilities at school. Up to 45 percent of infants weighing less than 3 1/4 pounds at birth have one or more abnormalities on testing at school age. It's usually not possible to predict at the time of discharge or during early development who might develop these difficulties. Common problems include:

Coordination problems: Difficulty writing, drawing, or doing jigsaw puzzles

Language problems: Difficulty following directions, learning to read, or remembering words

Thinking problems: Difficulty with memory, spatial relationships, or abstract concepts

Behavioral Problems of Preemies

According to the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, behavioral problems are in many ways intertwined with learning problems. Both are more likely to occur in former preemies. Sometimes parents of preemies have a tendency to be overprotective of their child and avoid discipline. This can lead to or worsen any behavioral problems that may arise. These issues usually start before school age and often include:

Overly aggressive play

Temper tantrums

Refusal to comply

Excessive loudness

Inability to stay still for any period of time

Difficulty paying attention

Extreme shyness

Some parents of preemies are reluctant to set limits or enforce rules because of the difficulties that the child had to go through in the early months of life. However, providing structure and defined limits can often lessen or eliminate some of these behavioral problems.

If behavior problems persist or get worse, discuss them with your child's doctor or teacher.

Vision Problems of Preemies

Former preemies can have any of a number of vision problems. These include:

Amblyopia (lazy eye due to unequal vision)

Decreased color vision

Nystagmus (frequent jerking movements of the eye)

Poor vision

Smaller field of vision

Strabismus (inward or outward turning of one or both eyes)

Symptoms can include:

Constant movement of eyes

Frequent crossing of eyes, beyond 3 months of age

Appearance of a cloudy or white texture on the surface of the pupil

Abnormal head tilt

Inability to fix his eyes on an object or a face

Drooping eyelid

Oversensitivity to light

Contact your doctor if you suspect that your baby suffers from any of these vision difficulties. Most of these problems can usually be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or eye patches.

Hearing Problems of Preemies

Preemies are considered at high risk for hearing problems. Watch out for these symptoms as your baby gets older:

3 months: Baby doesn't recognize mother's voice or turn his head toward the direction of a sound.

6 months: Baby doesn't enjoy vocal play or make noise in numerous tones.

9 months: Baby doesn't turn his head when you call.

12 months: Baby doesn't babble or isn't able to say "mama."

18 months: Baby doesn't respond to requests or move to the rhythm of music.

24 months: Baby's speech is difficult to understand, and he can't follow simple directions.

Speech and hearing therapists can help improve communication with a child who has hearing problems. Most hearing difficulties can be treated by hearing aids. If the loss is severe, children can be taught other forms of communication such as sign language or lip reading.

Dental Problems of Preemies

Preemies have a greater tendency than other babies to suffer from dental problems. This may be a result of delayed tooth formation or gums that are altered by breathing tubes.

The dental problems a preemie is susceptible to include:

Abnormal enamel formation

Slow or delayed teething

High arch or groove to the palate

Abnormal bite

Often small abnormalities in enamel formation aren't visible. More severe abnormalities are noticeable, such as a gray or brownish color or an uneven surface and abnormal shape. The baby teeth are most often affected with enamel problems. Sometimes the first permanent teeth are affected, but usually to a lesser degree.

A high arched palate, often the result of breathing tubes, can affect a child's speech and bite. Most children seem to adapt to the shape of their palate. However, a preemie may be more likely to need braces when she's older.

Often dental problems look worse than they actually are. Teeth with enamel problems tend to be prone to cavities, but dental care and regular brushing can prevent this problem. Here are several ways to prevent tooth decay:

Bring your baby for a dentist's appointment around her first birthday, recommends The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

Develop good toothbrushing habits as soon as the teeth break through the gums. The teeth should be cleaned two times a day — first thing in the morning and before bedtime.

Avoid the habit of letting your child sleep at night or nap with a bottle. It can cause decay so severe that it destroys the teeth.

Sharon - posted on 08/19/2009

11,585

12

1314

Thank god its a hoax.



To the post'er who wondered how it could be hoax... If I read it right a while back Octomoms' babies are set up for brain damage due to a variety of reasons. Severe premature delivery can almost guarantee some if not most of the babies will have lifelong health issues.



I can't find anything about octowhores' babies health. I do know at least two of her kids are "handicapped". I'm having a hard time believing that all 8 are going to be perfectly healthy but for their sake I hope they are. Its going to be hard enough raised by that idiot in a freakshow setting, living on welfare and public handouts.



But 12 babies? Most moms with 6 barely make it to 30 weeks, thats their goal!!! 30 lousy weeks!!! Here, everyone whines and snivels about making it to 40 and beyond without medical intervention and god forbid should you be hot, fat & tired and ready for the baby to be born 'cause then you're an idiot.



But these women are aiming for TEN FRIGGEN WEEKS PREMATURE!!! How sad!

Rebecca - posted on 08/19/2009

157

44

22

first part of my question: "I know it's not our right to decide for people if they have to selectively reduce their multiple pregnancies" so completely aware that we cannot make that decsion for another. I don't believe in abortion - for MYSELF. However I comletely understand why someone else would go down this path.

I had a healthy 9 pound baby who aspirated his micconium. I watched him suffer to breath in the NICU for 3 days. Yeah, big woop? It was horrendous. I could never imagine knowingly putting a baby through this, let alone 12. Live, born babies feel pain.

Karen - posted on 08/19/2009

39

12

2

Rebecca,
First, the story is a hoax. Lets just suppose for a moment that it were true....
Nothing is impossible for God. 12 babies can be born to the same woman at the same time and end up being perfectly healthy. If that were His choice.
I do not know if I agree with IVF. Religiously, God gave us technology for these things, but still Children are special to God, if he wants you to have some, you will. The issue is disposing of embryos [Babies] or allowing God to do the choosing. 2, 6, 8 or 12, it is all best left up to God.

What I do not understand is how could it be considered child abuse to choose to carry those babies, rather than dispose of them? Wouldn't both actions be considered child abuse? Shouldn't people be up in arms about the babies that are disposed of in the process of IVF, and shouldn't we, in fact, be praising this woman for allowing God to choose which ones live?
And if you believe in abortion, and the "tissue" in the uterus is not human, then what's all the hub-bub about? They are not human, it is the mother's body, her choice to carry as many as she wants. If she wants to get rid of them or carry them it should always be HER choice, should it not? Our only concern, in this instance should be her health, not the health of non-human tissue.

We can not have it both ways.

Rebecca - posted on 08/19/2009

157

44

22

Karen, have you seen any documentaries about women giving birth to multiples 5+? All of the babies are born premature and spend considerable time struggling for life in the NICU. It is almost guaranteed that one or more will have serious ongoing medical problems. Now I know that there is a risk of that with every pregnancy, but with 12 baies fighting for limited nutrients, even God wouldn't be able to make that work. These people made a choice to do this knowing full well that the babies would more than likely suffer. If it is true, I too pray that they're all ok. I really don't get the religious reasons either, if it's not ok to dispose of the unsed embryo's or to selectively reduce the pregnancy - why is ok to get IVF in the first place? It wasn't God's plan... hmmm... just a though. (I am religious, and do believe in IVF, definately not picking on people that have it, I'd got it if I had to)

Michelle - posted on 08/19/2009

1

19

0

I just don't think that it is safe. If it true I hope the chidren come out ok.

Tara - posted on 08/19/2009

1,289

24

206

From what I can find the story is a hoax - here's the link to the story I found today:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnew...

As for it being child abuse, I do think that children are a gift, but trying to carry that many children would have serious medical repercussions, both for mother and babies, and the odds of either the woman or most of the babies dying in a case like this if it were true are extremely high.

Karen - posted on 08/19/2009

39

12

2

What a wonderful blessing! Children truly are a gift from God.

How can it be considered child abuse though, I do not understand that. They can most certainly be born healthy, God can do anything.

Stina - posted on 08/18/2009

1,055

19

108

Ok. My opinion on these pregnancies that with the aid of a doctor result in litters of children.



-it is irresponsible. On the doctor and the Mom/Dads part. It puts everyone at risk in so so many ways.



-I too do not believe abortion is right, however, if these doctors cannot keep the number of fertilized eggs down to a reasonable number- I'll give you 3 or 4 as a potential reasonable number since while rare, women do have four at a time sometimes- then maybe couples who want a baby so bad but find they are haveing issues getting pregnant should consider adopting so they aren't faced with the moral dilema of "8+ eggs successfully took up residence in my uterus and I don't want to kill any of them." I completely agree with this sentiment once the babies are there but I don't think anyone should put themselves in this position to begin with. Especially if at home they already have children. It's irresponsible on all sides.

Kim - posted on 08/18/2009

33

8

1

Its completely insane. There should be guidelines for the fertility clinics as far as the amount of eggs they can implant. Although I have to say at least this one has a dad to help out.

~Jennifer - posted on 08/18/2009

4,164

61

365

Quoting DAWN:

wow! stop the judgment. some people for religious reasons and personal beliefs do not believe in abortion. this is their right and it is not abusive. and not every multiple pregnancy is looking for fame, not every one is KATE GOSSELIN.



.....pretty harsh there....saying 'don't judge' then judging Gosselin for her reasons for having the children.  Now, don't get me wrong, I think the whole show was ridiculous from the beginning, but  I also dont think that too many people spend thousands and thousands  on IVF thinking that they'll make money off of their children.  



 

DAWN - posted on 08/18/2009

90

0

1

wow! stop the judgment. some people for religious reasons and personal beliefs do not believe in abortion. this is their right and it is not abusive. and not every multiple pregnancy is looking for fame, not every one is KATE GOSSELIN.

Stephanie - posted on 08/17/2009

8

10

1

I understand from the article that the woman has suffered from miscarriages in the past and I really feel for her that she would have a strong yearning to be a mother, but come on.... this is just ludicrous!! How are those poor babies supposed to develop properly in that tiny space, and yes the pressure on the mother is enormous. It is just too much and just wrong! As for breaking records, this is one that should not even exist! Where is it all going to end?? Have they learnt nothing from "Octomum" ???

Rebecca - posted on 08/17/2009

157

44

22

Yeah I've watched a few docos and it's a mircale if Mum can make it to 30 weeks before delievery... and even then she takes so much medication and cannot move because the weight is so much, she has to eat so much and her heart can't take it all.

Stephanie - posted on 08/17/2009

8

10

1

It is just wrong. And the doctors who played a part in this happening should be held accountable. Women are not built or meant to have litters of children. There is only heartbreak for all involved.

Rebecca - posted on 08/17/2009

127

16

11

I read that earlier as well - so surprised and confused. I questioned its validity too since it said that she was happy and healthy at nine months now. Seemed unbeleivable since I usually hear that anything over six babies, the mom is too big to move and has many problems and the babes come prematurely.

Christa - posted on 08/17/2009

583

80

45

if it is true....they are looking for fame not doing what is best for all 12 children or the mother herself.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms