Your Baby Can Read?

Erica - posted on 07/14/2010 ( 17 moms have responded )

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I have been thinking about ordering it for my son. I was just wondering if anyone else has tried it and how it was going.

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Lisa - posted on 07/16/2010

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I have not tried it, but a friend has. According to my friend, the tapes do help children recognize words but they can not associate the words/understand their meanings. I am a teacher and I have done a lot of studying on academically gifted children. From what I have experienced, kids that are early readers are not always the gifted children. By the time they reach 3rd or 4th grade, their peers have caught up with them academically.

Deborah - posted on 07/14/2010

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@ effie.

Without the playing with older sisters as mine is an only child you just described my daughter, who DIDN'T have the book. Forgetting the potty training, but I moved house when my daughter was 18 months and didn't think that it was a good time to start, when I did decide to potty train her she picked it up in about a week, from peeing on the floor to saying need to pee pee when we were in the shop.

She's very smart, has a vague ideas what letters look like due to shape sorting and things, her speech is excellent for her age which even amazes the doctors, she has "read" books on her own from she was able to turn the pages, she has had her household "chores" from she was about 2 which involves taking the laundry basked off the shelf, opening the washing machine door and taking all the clothes out, she then pushes it up to the dryer so I can sort through it.

I have taught her just through play and expanations, ie look at the lovely green trees, or when she was playing with her sorting blocks saying red square, or blue triange etc.

Not saying that this book doesn't work, or that it didn't help your child. But from what I have read it does not give any benefit to a child. They are either smart, or they aren't.

My daughter has had jack and the beanstalk read to her that many times that she "reads" it to her teddys, she will actually say that, "i want to read it to froggy" as I'm going down the stairs I can hear her receit it nearly word for word... is she reading it? Hell no.... She knows what the pictures in the book are describing, and knows the story pratically off by heart.

Like others say, just because a child knows C A T means cat doesn't mean they can read, its just teaching what it looks like, the same way they know that a cat is a cat, all you are teaching is that CAT is a cat which is cat. Sure it will help when they go to school and know that C A T spells cat, but as mentioned they don't know or understand the breakdown, just because you teach a child the alphabet doesn't mean she can spell...

Amanda - posted on 07/14/2010

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Do not buy this for your child, studys are now coming out, proving children who learned to "read" with programs like this, are actually behide when school starts. Memorizing is not reading, like another mother said, just because she knows CAT spells cat, doesnt mean she knows act spells ACT. Children need to learn sounds, leapfrog has great little toys, that teach children what the letter looks like, and the sound it makes. Plus they are cheap compared to programs that will actually only put your child behide in the reading process.

Kate - posted on 07/14/2010

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As a speech-language pathologist and a doctoral student in developmental psychology (studying how infants/toddlers develop language (including reading), cognition (thinking skills), etc.), I am a strong advocate AGAINST the Your Baby Can Read product.. Your baby CANNOT read. What your baby CAN do is make "associations" with the symbols/pictures/gestures and the words that go with them. So when you tell your baby, "here's your milk!" and hand the baby a bottle or offer the breast, the baby makes an association that the "milk" means "feeding/bottle/breast/etc"...that's exactly what the baby is doing when looking at the flash card. It's a normal process, and you don't need flash cards to encourage these associations. The BEST teaching tool for your baby is to play with the baby, interact with him, read stories, sing songs and nursery rhymes. Babies are social creatures and mommies are the best teaching tool -- not a flash card and especially not a television screen! Babies learn from contingency -- which means, "cause and effect" essentially. When your baby does something well and you respond, the baby learns that your response is contingent (or dependent) on what the baby did...so they do it again and again! The television screen cannot do this for your baby. Much research has been done that tells us babies under the age of 2 (or even 3 years) do NOT learn words/language/READING from the television. Some research has shown that babies actually have WORSE language skills when they are placed in front of the television compared to babies who don't watch TV. Please, do your baby a favor and play with him or her...avoid TV under the age of 2 (longer if you can stand it!), as the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests. Don't buy into the claims of the money-making Your Baby Can Read. If you do your research on the man who created the program, he has NO published evidence that the program works. He has a PhD but not in the correct field (not developmental psychology, not even education, I believe...). Another thing to consider -- why do you want your baby to read now? I don't believe there is any solid evidence that a child who reads earlier will have better reading skills or better grades later on. Enjoy your baby as he/she is now.. or your toddler. The best language help you can give your baby is to read often to your baby -- but don't teach your baby to read!

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Linda - posted on 07/23/2010

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Does a baby need to read? I never thought so, her needs are much simpler than that. Everything is new to a baby, there is no end to the things they can learn and explore. They love things that are tactile(have you ever let your baby fingerpaint with chocolate and butterscotch and vanilla pudding) and they love when you show them things that are new to them and talk to them about it. Besides, if they can read to themselves, you take away the interaction of reading a book TO them. I decided to just say no.

Melissa - posted on 07/20/2010

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It really depends on the child too. In our case, I am a stay at home mom fully devoted to our children's care and even with in home speech therapy, my son wasn't talking like he should have been. We now know that he is disabled, but my point in the previous post was that the program works in the same way that average-aged parents of toddlers and preschoolers (30's and 40's) probably learned to read when they were children. For some kids, learning whole words as opposed to phonics first is a better way of learning.



As a mother of several children, all with differing needs, I think it's pretty silly to assume that one way will or will not work for all children. Think of it as the polar opposite to Hooked on Phonics if that helps at all. Some kids learn easily by piecing small bits of information together to form a whole picture while others get bogged down in the details to the point where it makes much more sense to recognize the words first and break them down into details later. If your child starts speaking in the typical way of babbling, then slowly building on those sounds to form words, you may want to wait and do a phonics program. If your child doesn't speak at all, then starts using whole words or phrases, this might be the better way.

Jessica - posted on 07/19/2010

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well i dont have this program but at 15mos old my little girl could put complete sentcene together talk better than any 15mos old baby i have ever seen.... but all i did was read to her get educational toys and play them with her and most important i talked to her like a regular person not like a baby i mean say words to her that you would say to an adult... not cute little words like moo moo for milk or bite bite for food and such and such.. karlie will be two in august and when we go to burger king she orders herself like she will say "chesseburger and french fries please".... You as a parent is the best teaching they will ever get... If you work with them to teach them you dont need a program to do it for you it just takes a little time out of each day just you and your child... if i can make time to do anyone can i am a 20 year. not married full time jod parent and i tought karlie everything she knows and she is a very very smart girl..

Melissa - posted on 07/19/2010

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We used the program with my son to try to get him to talk more. We only went through the first few steps of it when he was starting to read a few months before he turned 3. When he turned 4, he tested in reading at the mid 2nd grade level with the ability to comprehend what he's reading, as well as being able to sound out words and recognize many vowel and consonant blends.

The program works by getting the child to recognize the shapes of the words and building on them through the levels (play --> plays, or play ---> playing). Before phonics became popular, this idea of repitition was the premise of many early readers.

Iris Hanna - posted on 07/19/2010

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We ordered Your Baby Can Read and my baby girl loves the books, flash cards and videos. She is now 13 months and knows at least 20 words. She also identifies objects like 'cup', 'shoes', and 'hat' on a daily basis. My husband and I are very satisfied with the program.

Deborah - posted on 07/14/2010

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I haven't got it, so I don't know exactly what is involved, I know that a single first time mum I done a lot of research of what I thought I should be doing to give my child the best chance in life, especially since she was premature and the doctors were expecting problems due to pressure on the brain.

I made my decision based on peoples opinions and comments, the costs of such books etc and decided against it.

If it works then great, but personaly I think a lot of these things are just gimmicks. There was a day when kids would have been happy playing with shoe laces and cardboard boxes, and since these are our doctors, surgeons and lawyers it didn't do them any harm. These days toys and educational things all seem to be based on companies money, I will admit I have bought her things to play with etc, but I don't consider any of them a necessity (especially when she opens up a lovely big toy and ops to play with the box!)

Effie - posted on 07/14/2010

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my other two are extremely smart for there ages too! I was fine w/ their development and ready to continue the same pattern w/ my son but mostly wanted to see how it worked. It is more then what you may think it is. It captures the same part of the developing brain that causes babies to understand different languages and develops it. It also teaches them about rhyming, putting words in similar categories and it has never been somthing my son (kids) have been forced to do. Rather than turning on various tv programs, I just turn this series of 20-30min videos on. My son loves the songs mostly! The books and slide cards are nice for one on one time reading. They are the same as any other books on our book shelf. I think that you are putting way to much emphasis on what you think are negatives in this program. I only know what I've experienced and I have not seen anything negative w/ my son/ kids. He is the only one who started on it as a baby but we use it for our 5yr old for reading conditioning of words/sentences she already knows and for our 3yrs old as a part of a preschool curriculum. They loved to participate in the questions/answers and games. It really is a well developed program.

Effie - posted on 07/14/2010

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I bought this program for my little guy when he was 10mos. old. and he loves it! We have not been consistant w/ it so I wouldn't say he can read but, his language is much more developmed than my two older girls at his age. He learns songs very quickly. He loves flipping through books on his own and it has not interfered w/ any other aspect of his development. At 21mos. he is completely potty trained and can carry on and play w/ his older sisters and cousins w/ great ease. Everytime I bring him into the Dr. they are extremely impressed w/ every area of development including cognitive, language, social and motor. They are also impressed w/ how well he able to follow an instruction. I'm not going to attribute it completely to the program but I do know that his language is amazing for a child his age. It does not hurt them~ I was nervous at first too, as I come from a background of teaching preschool and even have my certification in ECE and teaching kids w/ special needs. I decided to try the 30 day money back guarantee and he liked it so much I couldn't send it back. A year later, I'm glad I kept it!

Sarah - posted on 07/14/2010

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Most early years teachers would say that children learn best through play and exploration. Spoken communication is much more important at this age. They are as likely to learn to read just as well by sharing a book with you or singing rhyming songs. Knowing words and letters by rote is not reading.

Johnny - posted on 07/14/2010

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Read him books, tell him stories, buy him some alphabet letters to play with, get him some cheap flash cards to play with himself. Don't push your son to do an activity which is not developmentally appropriate and could harm his reading success in the long run. Focus on things like walking, talking, using the potty, etc that kids should be doing when they are little. This program is controversial and disliked by educators for good reason.

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Hi Erica! I considered buying it (used on amazon because it's RIDICULOUSLY expensive) but I decided not to. Personally, I don't really think it's reading. You teach a child to know it's the word "cat" because they see the letters. They don't know what the c, the a, and the t sound like. I wonder, if they saw the word "act", could they say cat? I think getting your child familiar with the alphabet first would be wise. I'll start that with my Sofie when she's 12 months or so (she's 9 mo now). I'd also rather have her point to my actual cat and say cat! Also, I really do think the program is for they type of parent who wants their baby to look more advanced than others. They are all cute beautiful and smart! Let's all just be happy for each other!

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