Breastfeeding??

Nicole - posted on 12/29/2009 ( 195 moms have responded )

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ive heard alot of ppl complain about breastfeeding and saying its not worth it but i would like to know from experienced breastfeeders how its benefited you and if its really as hard as people put on??

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Lisa - posted on 12/31/2009

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Everyone has a different experience & each baby can be a different experience also. The positives are: it's perfect nutrition for your baby, it's ready whenever & wherever, it promotes a strong bond between mom & baby, it's free, it's easily digestible, & it has health benefits for you & baby. The only bad things are usually from experiences women may have, such as a baby not latching on properly or not having support & encouragement. I tell the moms I work with that you need to be wholeheartedly into it as if you are not & you hit the hump that most women experience, you will easily go to a bottle. Most women experience a hump, but once they get over it it is bliss.

Danielle - posted on 12/31/2009

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I have been breastfeeding my son for nearly 9 months. I started with the goal of getting to 6 months. I obviously met that goal, but it wasn't always easy. I had to work with a lactation consultant because my son woulddn't latch. I ended up having to use nipple sheilds.
My son was four months old when I started back to work. So I had a good amount of time to devote to breastfeeding, without having to worry about pumping. For future babies, I will definitely pump anf freeze milk sooner. I made it to 6 months solely feeding my son breastmilk (either bottle or nursing) but I had to suppliment because pumping at work, was not workign for me. (Although I did pump for 2 months--stressful!) Personally, I would say give it a try. If it doesn't work for you and your child you can always stop.

Petra - posted on 12/30/2009

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nobody mentioned anything about the transition from breast to bottle feeding. I had a very difficult time to get my baby to drink from a bottle. I followed books i read to wait for 6 weeks before introducing a bottle (to avoid nipple confusion) and then it was too late! He liked booby too much to want anything else. Now he drinks only from a sippy cup (6 months old now) for 2 feeds a day but it was very frustrating to get to this stage. Also he still wants boob when wakes at night and so if I need to be out in the evening and he wakes he will not sleep unless I'm there or cry himself to sleep. I start working 5 hours a day in a months time and worried because he will not have me to feed him to sleep for his morning nap! Had I known this would have happened I would have mixed bottle and breast feeding earlier!!!

Anita - posted on 12/29/2009

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Go for it girl! I breastfed four children - the bonding is just beautiful and it is your special time together. It also saves money, washing/sterilising bottles etc. And it is so beneficial to your baby. When I first started feeding my first, I had about six different midwives show me six different ways to feed. Take in their advice along with mum and mum-in-law, then just do what is comfortable for you and your baby - a banana shaped pillow is an essential asset, you wrap it around your body whilst sitting comfortably and baby lies on it, giving a comfortably feeding position. Most important is to make sure baby is sucking properly otherwise you will get cracked nipples - most painful. The easiest way is to clamp the breast in one hand, get the milk flowing, and with your pointer finger that is holding the breast gently pry baby's mouth open so that he/she clamps on properly. You will get the hang of it quick enough and you will know when he/she is feeding as it feels comfortable for you too. Good luck.

[deleted account]

Because this issue can be controversial and sensitive, I think a lot of people-don't give women enough information to make a fully informed choice. Not wanting women who formula-feed to feel bad, they minimize the benefits of breast feeding. But I think if the benefits of breast milk were fully disclosed, as well as the side effects of formula, more women would obviously choose to breastfeed. But, unfortunately, many do not know the benefits. The truth is, that formula fed infants are NOT as healthy as breastfed infants, and there is a lot of research to show this.

Some things to inform your decision: The longer you breastfeed, the more protection you receive from all the feminine cancers. Breastfed babies tend to have higher IQs. They have fewer colds, ear infections, and the like because they receive immunities from these things from you. For my first child, the first year of her life, she had a little bit of a runny nose for one day, and all the other babies that I knew who were formula fed always had all these colds and ear infections and stuff. Also, babies who are breast fed have lower chance of being obese later in life. They also receive protection from heart disease as an adult! They tend to have fewer allergies and are less likely to have asthma. They also have softer skin. And, for me, very importantly, breast milk is perfectly suited for their immature digestive tracts. Formula is actually harmful to newborn GI tracts. Here is a site: http://pregnancychildbirth.suite101.com/...

My experience is that it seems to me to be easier than bottle feeding. I never have to buy formula, sterilize all these bottles, and make bottles. I lift my shirt and feed my baby. Of course when I was working then I had to pump, but that's okay. That ensures that I get a break in the middle of the day. (Did you know that breastfeeding releases stress-reducing chemicals into your body?) With my second child I did have the problem of her not latching properly and a very sore, bleeding nipple. However, once I spoke with a lactation consultant from the public health department, the problem was corrected very quickly. I would recommend going to La Leche meetings for support. A lot of breast feeding issues are really easily dealt with if you know what to do, but if you don't have any support and don't know what to do, then it can become a big, painful, and frustrating problem.

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Shanika - posted on 03/07/2013

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it was hard at first but it get it be so easy it free and you dont have to carely anything around with you but pampers and wipes really i love doing it i am a working mom you will love looking into your baby eyes and you know that he or she is getting what they need also if you want to breast feed to help you get though the night sleep wise nurse laying down that is the only way i am getting sleep at night

Lana - posted on 02/26/2013

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` She digests my breast milk easily. (tried 3 supplement formulas and stopped due to gas and constipation)
` She falls asleep at the boobie and she naps on average 1 to 2 hrs.(fuss less nap time)
` Fewer illnesses
` GREAT bonding
` GREAT BONDING
` I do not have to get up OR even be awake to feed her. Just put her on the boob and go back to sleep
` I don't wash ANY DAMN BOTTLE( they harbor bacteria IF cleaned improperly, and need replacing
` I don't carry any bottles either. ( less for the baby bag)
My choice to breastfeed was for the bonding and the prime nutrition she gets. I find breast feeding to be totally worth it. I would never judge a woman for not breastfeeding as we are all different. I work part time and my milk supply is more than substantial. I understand that is not common to all mothers.

Michelle - posted on 02/07/2010

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Personally, I wanted nothing to do with breastfeeding. I originally was planning on pumping and using breastmilk in a bottle so I would still have the benefit of the breastmilk without having to actually nurse. The stars must have aligned just right, because he latched perfectly for me in the hospital and even though I had to use a bottle within the first week, he transitions fine from one to the other.



As much as nursing is a pain because I lost a little bit of freedom and have to pump at work to keep up on my supply, I love it. It is a quiet bonding time that I get to sit where rock my son. I can't possibly describe how enjoyable it is for me. My suggestion for you would be to try it (and stick with it for at least a week to 2 weeks if you can since that's how long it will take your milk supply to come in and for you to get the hang of it). You'll know pretty quick if you like it or not, and if it doesn't work for you, you've still given your baby the benefit of some of your antibodies and nutrients through those first few weeks.

Sophia - posted on 02/07/2010

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It's fantastic. You have to put a little work into it, especially if you work, but when you go out, you never have to worry about carrying formula, water, bottles, etc. You're equipped with all you'll need. Baby has a special bond with mommy and baby hardly ever gets sick. It helps you lose all the baby weight quick ( I lost all the weight I gained in pregnancy by my 6 week check-up).

[deleted account]

I breastfed both my kids, and I worked full time and with the second I worked nights even. I found it just as easy as anything else. you just get used to a routine and go with it. i found it to be very relaxing at work, cuz I could actually take a break and think about my kids and even call them on the phone to talk with them - which does not happen on a normal work day now!

Heather - posted on 02/04/2010

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For me the 1st 6 weeks were hard, but I expected it to be hard, so I was prepared. My son is tongue tied so he couldn't latch. My nipples blistered and bled. I saw my LC (who I LOVE) and she helped me so much! I think I would have given up if it wasn't for all her help. I'm so happy I did not give up! I have been breastfeeding for 14 weeks now and love it. I pump while I am at work and then nurse when I am at home. My son really loves breastfeeding too. Its always the first thing he wants when I get home.

Chaquon - posted on 02/04/2010

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It is very much worth breastfeeding your child. I have 3 sons and for various reasons I did not stick to breastfeeding my older sons. My son is now 6 mos old and I am still nursing him and I love it. I work full time and go to school and have internship on the weekends, so nursing is my bonding time with him. My husband and kids keep asking me how long I plan to nurse and I tell them I'm not sure, I may try until he is a yr old. I am so not willing to give up my special time with him and wish I had had the same experience with my older boys. Is it hard, yes. I takes dedication, especially after you return to work. However if you are committed to it, it can be a beautiful & enjoyable experience. When you feel discouraged read some stories online or speak with your childs pediatrician for encouragement. No matter what you choose I'm sure you will be a fantastic mom! I hope this was helpful!

Christy - posted on 02/04/2010

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I would definately recommend trying it at least!!!! I was a little frustrating at first b/c my son had a hard time latching on good, but with the help of a lactation nurse at the hospital a/f he was born, we figured it out!! It soooo much healthier for your baby, and they don't get sick as much when you have a breastfed baby!! Although, breast milk is not as filling, so my son was feeding almost every hour to hour 1/2. I breastfed for about 3 months, and when I went back to work I only would do it at night b/f bedtime. It is such a wonderful way to bond with your baby too! Hope this has helped!! Good luck!

Moana - posted on 02/04/2010

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For me my daughter took a little bit of time for her to be able to latch on, my son on the other hand took to it from the first time. I breast fed my daughter for a year and my son for 10 months. Went back to work when they were both about 4 months old and still continued to breast feed. Just had to pump every few hours but it was very well worth it!! But sometimes it just doesnt work for some people so don't be hard on yourself, and don't stress about it because your baby will feel your stress and sometimes that can affect him or her breastfeeding.

Shelli - posted on 02/04/2010

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Hi Nicole,

I'm a very experienced BF mom. I BF my first 2 children for 26 months each, I'm currently BF my 8 month old. The first few weeks can be a little painful if your not getting the baby to latch on correctly, but if you can get through that, your golden! I think its the best for you and the baby! Most insurance companies will give you a free medela pump, and they're AWESOME! And when you go back to work, take a 15 min break in the AM and the afternoon and pump! But I guess it's a preference, I would highly recommend at least trying it! If you ever have questions, shoot me an email! Good luck!! Shelli

Chandra - posted on 02/04/2010

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Breastfeeding has been one of the best parts of having a baby for me. The first couple of weeks is difficult, especially for me because I had a breast reduction about 6 years ago, and wasn't sure if I would even make milk. But, once my supply was established and both my son and I figured it out, it has been a blessing. It creates a bond that is so special. There are times when I am on the go that I think a bottle might be easier, but I know I am doing what is best for him. I pump now that I am back at work also. There is nothing like coming home in the evenings and him wanting to nurse as soon as I walk in the door, no matter how long ago his last meal was. It's his way of saying, I missed you mommy and I want to be with you. I think you will find that it is very rewarding. But, I know it isn't for everyone. If you aren't totally committed to it, then you probably won't enjoy it as much or stick with it. So, you just have to go with what works best for you.

Carrie - posted on 02/03/2010

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Its challenging, yes but worth every drop! I would say always give it a try. You can always stop if its not for you, but you can't go back and start a few months later. The breast fed babies get important antibodies that formula cannot replicate. Especially that first few weeks. Good luck on making a decision.

Carrie - posted on 02/03/2010

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Its challenging, yes but worth every drop! I would say always give it a try. You can always stop if its not for you, but you can't go back and start a few months later. The breast fed babies get important antibodies that formula cannot replicate. Especially that first few weeks. Good luck on making a decision.

[deleted account]

It can be frustrating at times but I believe it is the best thing for you and baby. Oxytocin is released when you breastfeed, which helps shrink your uterus back to its pre-prepreggo size. Plus you need more calories, which is great for losing weight after having the baby. But the best thing is the bonding with your baby. We had so many guests visiting the baby in the first month that it was nice every few hours to have some alone time with him when we were feeding. My mom always said, why can't you breastfeed out here with a shawl over you- because I enjoy the one on one time- you can't get that with a bottle.

But don't think it is all rainbows- the first week my nipples hurt so bad... Use Lanolin preventively (make sure it says HPA grade lanolin). Apply the lanolin right after you breastfeed (it doesn't need to be removed before feeding) and utilize the hospitals lactation consultants to ensure you have a good latch. The weak latch is what causes the nipple pain. Once you and baby learn how to do it right, it will be most enjoyable and not painful at all.

Laurie - posted on 02/02/2010

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I was 40 and breastfeed my daughter untill 11 mths., It was hard at first but once she latched on properly It's fantastic. You can go anywhere and there's always food available. But seriously, I feel it was the best start i could give my daughter. My son was born when i was 45, and I also breastfeed him, he latched on no problem ( its a male thing) but he was very greedy and I could not provide enough after 4 mths, sadly I had to start bottle feeding. But the same feeling hold true, I honestly believe it's one of the most important and best starts you can give to your new Baby, You can listen to 1000 stories and you will still be confused. Give it your best shot and when it gets tough look at that beautiful baby,wipe the tears and start again. Best of Luck.

Lisa - posted on 02/02/2010

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Breastfeeding is a fabulous experience! It can be difficult at times but it is soooo worth every moment of difficulty. With my first child, I relished the weight loss pleasures. Being older with my second child, it was all about the closeness. Do whatever you can and be gratified with it. There's nothing in this world like it!

Lynn - posted on 02/01/2010

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I was glad to see that Nicole has decided to at least give it a try. I wish her the best experience. I breastfed all three of my boys. It was easy once I got the hang of it. Going back to school then work I had to pump, but we picked the bottle with the nipple "most like mom's" and never had a problem. Dad got to help out with feedings during the day this way. In the summer we barely warmed up the frozen milk and the boys enjoyed the cool drink. I breastfed each of them at least to 18mths. My first I had to ween him, but the younger 2 weaned themselves between 18mths and 2yrs. They never had earaches and rarely had a cold. My middle one scored the highest on the state math test for 8th grade last year and the others do well also. I missed the closeness and felt that it was one of steps in letting them go as they grow when they gave up breastfeeding. Also after the 1st year it gets to be just for bedtime and comfort. Just do what works best for your situation and dont feel guilty if it doesnt work out. At least you tried and gave your little one a great start.

Annie - posted on 01/19/2010

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Breastfeeding is a blessing and not as hard as it sounds, but it can take a little work in the beginning. Although there can be more to it than just latching on. I was in contact with someone in the local Le Leache League and she gave me lots of information on books to read, etc. Only wish I would have thought to contact them sooner! It was a blessing. My son ended up only taking 1 bottle a day at the babysitter because he did not like bottles. It worried me at first, but he was fine during the day and wasn't acting up or anything - he just preferred to have his milk right from the breast. He was not interested in solid food until 9 months. I probably nursed too long, but nursed until he was 3. I pumped at work until he was 1 1/2 and quit pumping and he just was wanting it basically at night and in the morning. I probably had more of a problem with quitting than he did. Besides the health benefits, it is a wonderful way to bond with your baby (ies).

Julie - posted on 01/17/2010

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Breast fed both my children for 16 months. Went back to work after 8 weeks with both. As everyone else has already commented, I wouldn't have changed a thing. I loved every minute of it, There's a little bit of figuring it out in the beginning, but then it all just starts to "click". Best part was bonding with your kids in a way that bottle feeding just doesn't do.

Sharon - posted on 01/17/2010

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I thought it was totally worth it. I have three kids and have breastfed them all - Breastfeeding was really important for bonding (for me) with my kids. I invested in a really nice electric breast pump so I could pump when needed, i.e. for work. The first kid is really hard though - there really is a learning curve!

Having said that - if it's not for you then you should NOT feel guilty!!! Formula is pretty fabulous these days, and there are many ways to bond with your baby! Whatever you decide is the right decision!

Leah - posted on 01/17/2010

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Breastfeeding was challenging at first, but once we both got the hang of it, it was great. A very rewarding experience. Along with all the health benefits to the baby, I lost a ton of weight without having to work out really hard, so that in itself is a major benefit. Plus the money we saved not having to buy formula.

Lori - posted on 01/16/2010

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I think breastfeeding is very beneficial to the baby's health, for you as a Mom. I think it can be difficult for some people. You have to learn to relax, not worry, and not get frustrated. I breastfed my first son until he was almost 7 months. The last fourmonths as a working Mom. As a working Mom you just learn to pump on breaks and/or lunch. My work was very supportive. I am currently breastfeeding my 2 week old that was born at 36 weeks (preterm)! She is doing great! We started at the hospital with breastfeeding and supplementing with formula before my milk came in and I also pumped after each feeding to help milk come in faster. There are plenty of resources on the internet to help with your research. Good luck with making this decision and God Bless!

Shannon - posted on 01/16/2010

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It isn't easy but it is worth it even if it is a couple of weeks. My second son didn't latch on right and it hurt like a son of a gun so we didn't last very long on breastfeeding. With my first born we made it 3 mos(I had to go back to work and pumping wasn't an easy option) I say try it.

Beverly - posted on 01/16/2010

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I think every woman should try to breastfeed there children as much and as long as possible. You need to expect that your breasts/nipples will be tender for the first few days and there may be a few feedings that even border on being painful. I promise you, if you are consistent and keep with it this will pass. The benefits to you and your child are worth a few uncomfortable moments.

From watching my children I truly believe it is highly beneficial to the child and their developing immune systems. I'll give one example: both of my children were born with some allergy problems. I was able to nurse my oldest child almost exclusively the first 5 weeks (few bottle feedings) and at least once a couple of times a day until she was around 9 months. She has very few problems with her allergies now. My youngest, however, was only nursed for the first 3 weeks. At four weeks she began to get more bottle feedings than breast feedings. By 9 weeks she was completely on the bottle. (Extinuating circumstances, not choice!) She still has allergy problems that flare with every change of the weather. They say that we pass many things to our children that our body produces thru our milk. Tolerence to allergens is only one example.

Myrah - posted on 01/15/2010

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i went straight back to wrk when my son was 4 weeks old i breast fed for 6 months while working 2 jobs, so it was hard at first and we had to supplement every once in a while so that i could store more milk for the sitter, but it worked for me. i loved it. my son and i have a close relationship even though i only see him maybe 2 hours a day.. it hurts me to be away so much, but its neccessary... he knows who i am no problem, and the timewe spend together is splendid!

Kelly - posted on 01/15/2010

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The first 4-6 weeks are difficult, but if you can get through that it is SO worth it. The best part of my day is coming home to nurse my 3 month old. I also feel good that I am giving her the best start I possibly can!

I also don't feel completely comfortable nursing in public so I carry a manual pump in the diaper bag for when we are out in public.

Maria - posted on 01/15/2010

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It is tough for the first 3 weeks then my little man and I got into a rhythm. I am a single working mom who went back to work at 8 weeks. I breastfeed until 27 months. Starting solids at 7-8 months. It was so much easier than lugging all that crap around that you need for formula fed babies. I never had to warm anything up, I just latched him on. If he wanted to nurse and I wanted to sleep-I just laid on my side, latched him on and went back to sleep. I

I pumped in my office every 3 hours. Usually 2 times in an eight hour period producing about 10-12 oz of milk at a sitting. I have an awesome electric pump it took me 20 minutes including clean up at each pumping session in my office. This was more milk than he usually drank at daycare.

Breastmilk does not stain when it spills and it greatly reduces the mess with both ends of the baby.

On weekends we breastfeed about every 2-3 hours I really think that he wanted the snuggle time more than the milk.. He is six now and still sneaks into my bed every morning.

I would try it and I would get some supportive friends or lactation consultant to help you. I used to babysit bottle fed kids and I think it is much easier to breast feed. you can do both if you want to.

If you do not have a good place to pump at work you can formula during the day and breast at home. After he was on solids and drinking some cows milk at around 16 months I reduced to just nursing at bedtime and first thing in the morning.

Lena - posted on 01/15/2010

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Hi Nicole. I have two daughters who are now 9 and 17. My oldest was 6 weeks premature so breastfeeding was difficult in the beginning. For me, there was no choice, breastmilk is the best nourshment for our babies. I am not saying that those who chose NOT to breastfeed are not giving them everything they need, just that we are mammals and we are created to take care of our young. It was extremely difficult the first 6 -8 weeks of breastfeeding, I won't lie. But if you can make it through latch-on problems (my breast was twice the size of my oldest daughter's head - and I am NOT well endowed - when she was born and she did not have the suck-breathe-swallow reflex yet) therefore I had to pump and bottle feed her with special preemie bottles. She was 2 weeks old before I could actually try to "breast" feed her. We had to learn together because it was a whole new world for me as well as her. But after about 4-5 weeks, we really started getting the hang of it and then the sore nipples hit. It is not pleasant, but it is not the worst thing in the world. After we finally figured out what we were doing, it came natural. She learned how to latch on, and I learned what positions worked best for her to be able to do it. On my right side, I had to hold her like a football, with her feet under my arm. On my left side, it worked best if we could lay in the bed and she lay on her side facing me on my side. But if we weren't at home, I held her in the cradle position (head in elbow, body across the front of me). After that, no more sore nipples, no more latching problems, it just clicked. Best advice I can give you is to pay attention to your baby. They will let you know if it is not working, and so will your nipples. When you get it right, both are happy. And it is well worth it. When my second daughter came along 8 years later, I took what I had learned the first time and applied it to her. That didn't work so well, no two kids are ever alike. So we had to work through sore nipples (and I mean I had sores on my nipples) to find the best fit for her. It worked out great. Not to mention the good it does for your body by following nature.

Robin - posted on 01/15/2010

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it is very hard in the beginning...it HURTS!!! Also, some babies have more trouble than others with latching on, which can make the experience miserable for both mom and baby. I would never judge any mother who tried it and decided to stop. However, in my experience (I have four, and a fifth on the way), if you can get through the first few weeks, it is incredibly convenient and becomes a nice snuggling time. It's cheaper, you can do the middle-of-the-night feedings while still half-asleep instead of staggering down to the kitchen, you don't have to worry about carrying formula and water everywhere you go, and you drop the baby weight fast. When I went back to work, I only pumped for as long as it took my body to get used to it, and gradually switched the babies to formula during the day, breast during mornings, evenings, and weekends, which worked well for everyone. I recommend it if you can. But like I said, it's not for everyone!!! Don't make yourself or your child miserable if it's not clicking. NOTE! They will tell you that in the first couple of days, before your milk really comes in, that the colostrum is enough for the babies. This was true for my first three, but NOT my fourth. There is nothing wrong with supplementing if you need to!

Jennifer - posted on 01/15/2010

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Breastfeeding is the best gift you can give your child. I breastfed my first child till she was a year old. Let me tell you she is never sick. My husband and his brother were never breastfed and they have the worst allergies and get sick regularly. I agree it is a pain, especially when they bite! But when my daughter started to bite at 4 months old I just went to pumping. I made it till she was one year old. Now my son is 2 months and I plan to do the same thing. You should at least try to do it as long as you can. The benifits are huge and the bonding skin to skin is your special reward on top of it!

Melissa - posted on 01/15/2010

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I breastfeed til my daughter was 17 months old. Wouldn't have changed my decision for the world. If you are well informed, have a good support system and are willing to commit to it, it is truly rewarding. Good luck.

Stephanie - posted on 01/15/2010

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If it is your 1st child it is difficult. I fed mine for 3months, and he was always sick later after i quit. My 2nd child i fed for 10months and was so easy, he was never sick as ababy and also now his older brother has add and he does not so if i could take it back i would have fed booth till at least a year if not more.

Diane - posted on 01/15/2010

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The benefits to your child is beyond what anyone can tell you. Many doctors don't even get it right because it can effect how much you might need them as it promotes health for infants that can't be obtained any other way. It is, for some, maybe a little difficult but the best advice for breatfeeding is that you need to not stress about it and maybe find a mom in your area that has successfully breastfed to help mentor you through the first time. Also, if you are a working mom and plan to go back to work, you can still breastfeed at night and in the morning to keep all the wonderful benefits of breastmilk going into you child. The first few days after you drop a feeding you will still feel like you might need to nurse at that time and may even have a little leakage but it only takes a day or two for your body to adjust and you are amazingly and uniquely designed for this. God had it all figured out when He created you and set this provision in place. Please note, occassionally, there are some women who just can't nurse for reasons beyond their control. If you are one of those, don't feel bad about that your love and care will still provide and promote health for your baby. It simply wasn't in the plan for you. BUT I would never have a baby without trying to nurse them. It is very beneficial for your baby and also for you as it helps with that bonding process and physically it is also good for you since that is how your body is designed to work. Good luck and may you cherish the moments that you have in motherhood!

Diane - posted on 01/15/2010

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The benefits to your child is beyond what anyone can tell you. Many doctors don't even get it right because it can effect how much you might need them as it promotes health for infants that can't be obtained any other way. It is, for some, maybe a little difficult but the best advice for breatfeeding is that you need to not stress about it and maybe find a mom in your area that has successfully breastfed to help mentor you through the first time. Also, if you are a working mom and plan to go back to work, you can still breastfeed at night and in the morning to keep all the wonderful benefits of breastmilk going into you child. The first few days after you drop a feeding you will still feel like you might need to nurse at that time and may even have a little leakage but it only takes a day or two for your body to adjust and you are amazingly and uniquely designed for this. God had it all figured out when He created you and set this provision in place. Please note, occassionally, there are some women who just can't nurse for reasons beyond their control. If you are one of those, don't feel bad about that your love and care will still provide and promote health for your baby. It simply wasn't in the plan for you. BUT I would never have a baby without trying to nurse them. It is very beneficial for your baby and also for you as it helps with that bonding process and physically it is also good for you since that is how your body is designed to work. Good luck and may you cherish the moments that you have in motherhood!

Shawna - posted on 01/14/2010

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I had four children and loved breastfeeding them all. The toughest part is for you and the baby to get the hang of it. As a lot of other mom's have mentioned, there's a ton of benefits. Get a consultant at the hospital. That makes it so much easier.

Eleanor - posted on 01/14/2010

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I think you should believe in yourself and give it a go. I did it for the first three weeks and regret not sticking to it. Invest in a good breast pump NOW so that you are all set for when you want a break. I was not prepaired and felt there was no way out. Organisation is key.

It was so wonderful being that close to your baby in a way nobody else is. Be strong and don't feel presured to interupt feeds just because a visitor wants to hold the new baby. I was very tired and looking back on it was bullied into interupting feeds. Not a good idea.

I wish you all the best. You will do great.

Sally - posted on 01/14/2010

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If you have the right nurse to show you how to properly nurse it is well worth it.My first son I quite at four months because it was painful only to find out he wasn't latching properly and gettin enough.My daughter i nursed to two years and don't regret it at all.It is not hard and it is well worth the effort.The bonding you will have with your child is amazing

Kylie - posted on 01/14/2010

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Hi my name is Kylie and my daughters name is Abbey ,she is now 8mths old.I tried to breastfeed as i wanted Abbey to have the best but for me it was a nightmare,as Abbey was only 6lb 13oz born i had to hold her in the football style with 2 pillows under her,a cloth nappy rolled up under my breast as im quiet large then also use a nipple shield as for some reason she would not take my breast.So due to all the stress and upset i only lasted 5wks.But i tell you what if it works for you go for it,it is a great bonding process.But if you cant dont stress as your baby will be fine Abbey is powering olong.Cheers Kylie.

Tara - posted on 01/14/2010

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I have two children and one on the way. I breast fed both of my boys and plan on the same with the new baby. It has been great for us! I will admit, with my first I almost gave up because my milk took forever to come in. Fortunately where I live we have a couple of clinics that help with breastfeeding. Once my milk came in it was great and my boys never had formula! I thought it would be hard to get them off of the breast when I was ready, but it wasn't bad at all. If it doesn't work, dont stress. For some it just may not work out.

Thyra - posted on 01/14/2010

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I was unsure of what I wanted to do, I know I wanted to try breastfeeding, but wasn't sure how long I wanted to do it! It was a little difficult at first, I had to use a nipple shield, this helps if your nipples are flat or inverted, and after two weeks, we were pros! I kept on until 17 months! I also went back to school when my sweetest was only 4 months old and I pumped 75% of his milk and fed him when I was home, usually at night! Anyway, my advice? Try it for about two or three weeks and then if you decide its not for you, then at least you gave your baby the healthy colostrum and the first few weeks of milk, which is a great gift to give!

Diane - posted on 01/13/2010

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I have 5 children ages 29-12 and I have breastfed each one including my twins. Yes breastfeeding takes time and learn and everyone has the misconception that babies are born knowing how to breastfeed. They need to learn just as much as the mother needs to learn. It truly helps if the hospital has a nursing expert to help the mother learn how to nurse. Breastfeeding requires a sacrifice on the mothers part at first but in my opinion that is what being a mother is all about, sacrificing for our children.

Wendy - posted on 01/13/2010

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From what I've read, your uterus will return to normal size faster when you breastfeed. You have a reduced risk of some types of cancer. There in a longer delay on the return of your monthly period. But beyond all that, the time you spend with your child is inmeasurable. It's great bonding time and something you will treasure.

Kristine - posted on 01/12/2010

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I thought the first month was the hardest just because I was emotional, it was new, and there is so many other changes happening. But after the first month to 6 weeks, it was so easy and a wonderful experience for me and my son!! I was very lucky not to get infections or have problems with my milk, I know some find it harder. I think you should give it a try for at least 8 weeks and then make a decision, but like some other posts say, don't feel guilty. If you are happy and relaxed, so will your baby.



I also pumped 3x a day at work. That was difficult for about 3 days until I figured out how I could set up my equipment and still get some things done. Good luck!

Leanne - posted on 01/11/2010

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My son is almost 11 months old and is still breastfeeding. I went back to work when he was 17 weeks, and starting pumping twice a day. It's a committment, but it's so worth it. The bonding, the health benefits, etc. It can be difficult at first. I got some good advice from lactation consultants and read some books on the subject. But when it came down to it, I forgot all about the schedules, charts, etc and just relaxed about the whole thing. I think that's what made my experience successful. Learn what you can beforehand, but dont obsess about it. It's the most natural thing in the world. Keep in mind that as the baby gets older (6+ months) growth charts are mostly based on formula-fed babies. Breastfed babies tend to grow slower than formula fed babies after those first few months. A good resource is www.askdrsears.com. Any concerns I had were addressed there. When things got difficult I always reminded myself that I was doing the best thing possible for him. Breastfed babies have less problems with obesity as they get older, have more protection against ear infections, swine and seasonal flu, and less gastric problems as well. One thing to check with your doctor is to supplement with Vitamin D, as that is the only nutrient not passed on through breastmilk. We shield our babies' skin so much, they dont get enough of it from sunlight. Vitamin D is essential to protect against the flu and other illnesses. I use TriViSol my Enfamil. Hope this helps and best of luck. P.S. I lost most of my pregnancy weight through breastfeeding alone, and you still get to eat like you're pregnant! :-)

Stacie - posted on 01/10/2010

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It's not easy, but it's worth it. I nursed both of mine, the first only for 6 months and the second for 2 years (and 1 month, but who's counting, right?). After having to carry bottles and formula around for #1 for several months, I found nursing to be much more convienient. Not to mention the money factor. Formula is ridiculously expensive. Even if you buy an expensive pump - which I'd recommend if you are going to work, it'll pay for itself in just a few weeks. The first few weeks are hard, you just seem to sit around nursing the baby ALL the time, but it isn't like that for long. DO IT, DO IT, DO IT!!!

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Hard would be getting up in the middle of the night preparing bottles!! The meaning of hard to me would be giving your baby another mammals milk, knowing that formula milk is not the best start in terms of health for either yourself or your baby and missing out on the closeness involved in feeding your baby. I have two boys and fed them both. My youngest fed until he was 2.5 years. They both naturally weaned. No major problems. Get the positioning right, relax and enjoy. This opportunity comes once in your childs life so make a real difference.

Evelyn - posted on 01/10/2010

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No it is not as hard as people put on...Latching correctly is the key. It does take the baby a bit to figure things out but once they do it is easier and more convenient than preparing and lugging formula around. Much better for the baby and you as well!



Getting on a schedule is key. The beginning is tough and quite frequent. You can train your body eventually to go longer. Pumping worked really well for me. Had lots to spare for when I couldn't be there.

Elizabeth - posted on 01/10/2010

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Breastfeeding is wonderful. Let me tell you what I know about breastfeeding as a working mom. It takes time and effort. It provides everything that your baby needs. Your body works in some mysterious way to know how much of everything your child needs. The composition of your breastmilk changes with the changes that you baby goes through. If your baby is having a growth spurt somehow your body knows and provides more calories. I don't know of any formula that can do that. You baby has a better knowledge of when he is full so he will stop eating without over eating. Formula fed babies are often encouraged to continue eating because there is still an ounce of formula left, this leads to overweight babies.

Don't pay any attention to those nay sayers if you want a healthy baby from breastfeeding. They will never understand the pride you will feel from breastfeeding your baby and providing everything that he needs to grow and be healthy. God gave us what we needed to provide for our babies, why not use it?

Lauren - posted on 01/10/2010

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It can be frustrating, especially the first month. But it is definitely worth it. It saves lots of money, it is convenient not needing the supplies, there is less to clean, my kids stayed healthy, it gets easier, and it gets less frequent. My kids are now 8 and 11 and they continue to have ear infections less than all of their friends and classmates.

Cheryl. - posted on 01/10/2010

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I breastfed all six of my children, though it was always a bit challenging the first few weeks. I think it is a wonderful experience of bonding, great for the baby as far as quality of milk and I never had to get up to fix bottles :)

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