DayCare Vs. In-Home Care

Maureen - posted on 07/22/2010 ( 7 moms have responded )

11

0

0

Hello fellow working moms. I'm asking for your opinion on the following...

Daycare vs. in-home care

I have a spot for our daughter in a great day-care here in town. Very reasonably priced, and it has a great preschool program that she'll benefit from--(in three years when she's old enough).

I also have a neighbor who is looking to take in 2 children to watch during the school year (I'm a teacher) while her kiddos go to school.

I see pro/cons for both situations. What are your experiences thoughts? Thank you!

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

7 Comments

View replies by

Connie - posted on 09/30/2014

1

0

0

I would never never put my infant in a commercial facility. I had my kids in a Home Day Care and was so pleased beyond words. Infants had plenty of quiet time and because there was only six children the provider could keep the babies on their schedule. The educational program was fantastic. I had a friend who had their child in Montessori and she was way behind what our provider was teaching. Kids will be in school for at least 20 years of their lives so why would a parent want a baby or young toddler in a institutional setting. Bonding is important especially in the early years. I would prefer one provider handling my child vs multiple people I don't know. I felt I left my kids with mom and both kids did fantastic in school. Check around folks.

Victoria - posted on 03/29/2012

9

0

0

My son has gone to both. Daycare are okay because they allow me to get more work done. But, when it comes to their attention span to children it is something else. I also like the in home day cares because if your child is younger it gives them a more home like feel. Also, the providers tend to be more attentive because there is not a lot of children.

Ali - posted on 03/28/2012

1

0

0

I have many, many years working in both and there are pros and cons with both. There is just as many regulations on licensed inhome care as there are for daycare centers. The same agency regulates both. Both have to have fingerprints on everyone over 18 living in the home. It is the community's and parents' responisiblity to report centers and inhome daycares if something is not right. Both centers and inhomes don't always operate as they should. Not every center has cameras, and just because there are cameras, doesn't mean that "things" don't happen. More often than not, the cameras are not recording anything, but a way for you to look in on your children while you are in the waiting room. It is very important to realize that centers may post "lesson plans" and follow "curriculums" but how do you know that they follow those? The key word is "plan." That is all they have to do, plan. Same with inhome care. The question to ask your inhome person is, "What is the plan when you or your child are sick are you want a day off?" "Who lives in this home besides yourself?" The redflags for inhome care or centers is someone who doesn't want you just dropping in or doesn't want physical therapists (also illegal) to come and work with your child when they have a IFSP in place. The fact of the matter is that illnesses happen. In inhome and daycare. The only difference between the severity and frequency is that you have one provider taking care of your child rather than mulitple caregivers taking care of multiple children with mulitple germs. There is more turnover in centers. This is because, usually, centers are corporations and the workers are not paid well, or they are not paid based on their education in which there is no room for advancement hence forcing the workers to leave. Centers, more likely than not, have younger, more inexperienced care providers, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but with inhome, you usally have a parent which isn't always a good thing. Some other things to ask your inhome and center if it applies : "what is your media policy (regarding tv, video games, computer, etc.), what is your daily routine, where is the menus, where will you be going with my child, how can I best reach you, how do you handle discipline, what is the emergency plan -- how often to you practice it, are you licensed-- what is the experation date, are you continuing your education (in most cases, they have to be to keep their license active). It is the parent's responsibility to get all of this information at the interview. And it is the parent's job to make sure the care is meeting the expectations. A formal contract with both (inhome and center) is the best thing to have regarding all of the expectations. You should be given a parental rights form outlining your right to call have them reported if something is going on. But most of all, what does your "gut" tell you about the place? You know your child best and the care has to work with your family's needs no matter what :)

Elizabeth - posted on 07/25/2010

126

21

24

I prefer daycare settings. There never isn't care because of being sick or a vacation. There are firm rules and regulations that have to be followed and cameras to look on if something happens. There are lots of kids to interact with and the right resources to keep them entertained.

Sheryl - posted on 07/24/2010

11

0

0

I had the same issue when my daughter was born. Around the same time there seemed to be a few stories about how a home daycare provider had shook some babies. That actually made my decision for me. In her daycare there are many teachers and always an extra pair of hands and an extra dose of patience when needed. Reese has learned a ton in the daycare and always looks forward to going. She is 3 now and I am happy about my decision to put her in a center. I am not saying that home daycare is bad by any means but it just scared me and I didnt' have any friends who could watch her.

Julie - posted on 07/23/2010

2

17

0

Maureen,
I have worked for both Day Care Centers and I now run a home based child care. It realy depends on what you are looking for.
At centers their is a much larger group of kids. and many teachers. so they can engage in play and learn to socialize while having fun in a larger setting. However, like any daycare their can be a sick child or many sick children in the center at once. the chances of injury goes up depending if they are understaffed. and so on.
With private in home day care their is one provider to 6 kids MAX. and they also have a learning program that they should have put together for you. Prices are diffrent often times cheaper, and your child has the chance to do the same things as they would in a center in a smalller more intement enviorment. I love haveing a home based daycare. I love having cirlce time, craft time, and play time. what makes it rewarding is seeing the children learn it because they are in a SMALLER setting. Its easyer to teach a class of six fine motor skills and so then it is a class of 15 all at diffrent levels.
Good luck

Maria - posted on 07/22/2010

84

10

9

My daughter started daycare when she was 8wks b/c I had to work. At a daycare they have set hours and if her teacher is sick there is a sub. They are regulated by the state and monitored closely by the health department and other agencies. Everyone working there has a FBI fingerprinted back ground check and is CPR and 1st aid certified. Once she started eating table food she had healthy meals. Home centers are not as well monitored and you really have to trust that you won't get stuck out w/ no one to watch your child if your neighbor can't watch her. Go to your states department of health and human services to find out if that center has any recent violations and check out other in home licensed centers. (Your neigbor should also be licensed if she's watching kids other than family or friends kids) But that depends on the state you live in.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms