Does anyone else have a child or children with ADHD or ADD?

Brandy - posted on 02/08/2010 ( 64 moms have responded )

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I have a 11 year with mild ADHD. Don't have him on medicine, but love to hear about others suggestions and problems we may to deal with together.

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Christina - posted on 12/01/2012

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i have 2 sons age 12 & 7 both have been diganoised with adhd and i dont agree with it for my youngest son. both my sons are on adderal oldest is on 20mg and doing well so i am told and my youngest just started and i dont see where or how my 7yr old needs this med can someone help or give a suggestion as to how to get my son off this med as i so not agree with it they both live with their father and i do not seem to have a problem with my youngest when he is with me and i dont see how he needs this med nor does anyone around him

Threenorns - posted on 10/16/2012

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all three of my daughters have ADHD - oldest also has asperger's, which manifests as OCD, tourette's, sleep disorder, and anorexia syndrome (she's not anorexic - she just looks and acts like it). middle daughter also has bipolar disorder and central auditory processing disorder (which may be put on the autism spectrum). youngest daughter was diagnosed tentatively at 9 months with ADHD, diagnosed again when she was 20 months old, and again when she was 3 (dr wanted her on rispardal at 3!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!). this past june, she was diagnosed with asperger's.



they say ASD doesn't have a strong genetic link - well, i call bs because the only thing those three girls have in common genetically is me, and i have asperger's.



anyway, the best thing i can suggest for you is to not view ADHD as a "problem" or a "disability". it really isn't - i copies and pasted from a website the following:



Question(s):

Written by: Martin Winkler

First version: 22 Jul 2008. Latest revision: 22 Jul 2008.

What are the advantages of ADHD? What are positive aspects of ADHD?



Answer:

While diagnostic criteria and treatment plans focus on negative aspects of hyperactivity, impulsive problems or attention deficits, there are a lot of positive aspects of ADHD children, adolescents or adults. Not all ADHD people will have all these positive traits or qualities but usually you will find a broad variety of strengths.

This is one of the reasons why many parents do not want their children to be changed by psychopharmacotherapy or behavioural treatment. Some positive aspects of ADHD can be:



creativity

charming personality, warmheartedness

good judge of character

sense of humour

quick to grasp essentials

flexibility

intuitiveness

sensitive to surrounding environment

enthusiastic, passionate

forgives mistakes

tries to do better next time

willing to take risks







in short, work with your kid's strengths and develop ways to compensate for where he's weak.



an example: the high school was rattling on about how nik (oldest daughter) was doing so poorly in math, her marks in math were nowhere related to her marks in english and art. i asked if she was failing and no, she's not *failing*, as such.... but she's barely passing. "you want to see a well-rounded report card".



i thought about that and then i asked "why?"



oh, they said, because it reflects a more balanced education.



so, i replied... it's not actually about her, then, but about you. she hates math, she loves english and art. if she's not actually failing math, then i see no problem and i'm not going to do anything about it.

Jill - posted on 10/09/2012

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Lucy,



I was one of the first to respond to Randy's post a couple of years ago. Hang in there... It will all work out. First of all nutrition is sooooo important. Sugar is in everything and it doesn't help with children who are chemically energetic. The school lunch is a joke and if the school offers alternatives the kids are tossing them in the garbage. The drinks the snacks and the carbs all add to sugar consumption. I am not perfect and I certainly get tired of planning meals and suggesting to my husband to please stop by sugary food items.



Also, think about nuerotoxins. We are adding to neurological disorders illnesses without understanding how. Most of the products we purchase are loaded with chemicals that affect the nervous system. Why is there such a huge leap in ADHD diagnosis? Look in your cabinets and check out the ingredients on some of your favorite cleaning products, skin care products, cosmetics etc. Even if the children are not using specific items ie. cleaning etc. All of these products create outgasing. Not sure if I spelled that right. Remember a little effort goes a long way. My motto, when I am on my game, is to control what I can ...mainly what I purchase. My 15 year old was diagnosed with ADD in 3rd grade.

Lucy - posted on 10/09/2012

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I have 3 boys all medicated ADHD. With lots of patience, guidance and sometimes tears and frustration we're getting through high school. Without medication these boys can't sit still long enough to even write their name. Tried elimination diets etc, they helped ok at home but they needed something more for school. The oldest and youngest were diagnosed age 8. The other 1 was 11. Another ingredient to watch out for is Caramel, not good, unless you're ready for spring cleaning, load them up and throw a damp cloth in their hands.

Hold your head up Mum's because unless you live it every day, you can't possibly know what it's like for families.

Cheryl - posted on 03/01/2010

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yes i have 2 sons with adhd and1of them also has obd. they are a real hand full. i only gave my 2 medication for school to help with there school work i tried not to give it to them on weekends and school holidays

Brandy - posted on 02/28/2010

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Thank you all for your comments. They are greatly appreciated. The Family needs to go out and burn some energy time off. Talk to all of you later.

Cherry - posted on 02/26/2010

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Hi all moms
A friend of mine's son has ADHD, and I heard that apparently the soy sauce & Oyster sauce it triggers the ADHD symtom. Just keep them out of it.

Nina - posted on 02/25/2010

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I think you have to go with what your gut tells you. I knew my son was ADD at 3.
I knew he needed medicine. But that is because if I am off my medicine I basically
can't function. Then there's our Bipolar on top of that. I think we just needed to go
with the med's and a really good Dr.

Margaret - posted on 02/25/2010

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If you aren't keen on meds, Omega 3's can give the nerve endings a little calming factor. This has worked well for some of my students, others, not so much. My son took meds until he was in high school - they changed his life. I started him just to 'try' and couldn't believe the difference in his ability to focus and follow directions. For us, it was the best choice.

Denise - posted on 02/25/2010

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My son has been diagnosed with this and after reading about the meds, I simply could not give them to him. I approaced the child psychiatrist with some information that I had found on the internet about using Omega supplements in slightly higher doses than normally used. She had heard of this before and agreed it was worth a try. In addition we make sure that he eats well and regularly, gets enough sleep and we limit things that overstimulate. For my son video games and computer overstimulate, so his time on these is controlled. We are having decent success with this. It is not a miracle cure, but he is doing better and we have avoided using meds.

Anne - posted on 02/25/2010

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I have also an 11 yr old she was on med for about 2 yrs and now that she is in puberty has decided not to take them anymore.they made her mood swings worse.she is doing much better in school and playing soccer and basketball has help also.but she still starts crying if critizied.we,re working on that

Catina - posted on 02/25/2010

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My son is 8 with ADHD He visit a Psychiatrist every week who does focus exercises with him. This is helping him with his grades and behavior have improved. The psychiatrit also suggested a schedule and a list of rules that are explained to him. He is rewarded if he does well and punished if he breaks the rules. I have also minimized his sugar and caffine intake and red drinks.

Liane - posted on 02/24/2010

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Can anyone tell me exactly what I need to take out of my sons diet. He is in kindergarden and been diagnosed with ADD. He does not have the hyperness though unless on the medicine! While on medicine he would not eat or drink and in the matter of 2 weeks lost 5 pounds and is already underweight. We want him to succeed but without medicine.

Nina - posted on 02/24/2010

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Yes, My 11 yr. old is ADD/Bipolar as am I. What do you want to know?
I've dealt with it for years now. Medications and change in diet. Especially no cinnamon.
That excites them.
NINA JO Bitton HOOK

Angela - posted on 02/24/2010

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I have two children with ADHD. Both of my children are on medication. We tried everything we could before we put them on medication. Basically, our almost 7 year old has the most problems. She started having issues with school this year (1st grade), mostly staying on task, getting work done and disrupting the class. Her teacher and school tried various things to help her, but it was evident that she needed more than that. We have put her on medication and it has helped. She has been on Adderall since December and has seen great improvement. While she still struggles, the teacher and school are working with her to help her try to work things out on her own. The psychiatrist said she may not need to be on medication forever, but she needs it to help her get her brain in order.

My 4 year old has been on medication since she was 3. We tried everything prior to medication as well. We were working with a behavioral health office and had a case worker coming to the house a couple of times of a week. They suggested ways to help with her and her behavior (her ADHD is more behavior issues than my other daughter).

Both children are doing much better on the medication and are improving at school. We are still using the techniques that we have learned with both of them. We are fortunate to have them in great schools, with great teachers. Every day is a struggle for them, but it's not as bad as it used to be. We have been educating ourselves and have been trying to understand ADHD and how it affects them.

Good luck.

Margaret - posted on 02/24/2010

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I have 2 boys that were diagnosed with ADD and one with ADHD. My oldest didnt like the way the medication made him feel so he just had to go thru school without medication. It took him a couple of months more to graduate, but he did it and I'm so proud of him. My middle boy was also diagnosed with bipolar disorder and he is on medication for both. He brought Ds and Fs up to A,B,and Cs and is also in ROTC. He is doing great. My youngest(15) has just decided he did not like the way the medicene made him feel so I gave him the option to go off of his meds as long he keeps his grades up. It hasnt been long enough for us to tell if this was a mistake or not but I will continue to keep him under a Drs.care.

April - posted on 02/24/2010

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While in preschool the director of the school thought my son may have adhd (she has a daughter with it). I took him to the pediatrician who always suspected the same. He had trouble sitting down, paying attention and got frustrated easily. We put him on a non-stimulant medication and it only made him really tired and he quit eating and lost a lot of weight. We then tried a stimulant drug and it sent him to the ER with a racing heart, dialated pupils and a 2 second or less attention span. He was bouncing off walls, furniture, everything. We then sent him to a specialist. Come to find out he had food allergies and was not absorbing vitamins and minerals needed to make his body function properly. And he had been sick A LOT and had been on a lot of antibiotics recently (due to the undiagnosed food allergies that affects your immune system). And because of the antibiotics he developed a yeast overgrowth called candibacim. It will cause behavior problems. We removed ALL sugar and yeast from his diet (it is what feeds this yeast) and within a few days his behavior was 100% different. The food allergies were making him sick and were contributing to his behavior, but the overgrowth of the yeast was really affecting his behavior. His Kindergarten teacher says he's a changed kid and is just like the other students she has now. He can focus for hours now. This is just my story and I know all kids are different with their genetic makeup. He does have an aunt and grandmother that has ADD, but they also have food allergies. Good luck!

Sandra - posted on 02/24/2010

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hi Brandy, my youngest son has ADD which is the milder form of ADHD , he's not hyperactive but concentrating is very difficult for him and on top of all that he's also has dyslexia, he was on medication for 3 years for his ADD but he has to come off is because he was having trouble sleeping en eating and he was also gaining a lot of weight, he has learned some tricks for his concentrationproblems and the school he goes to helps him a lot,

Yolanda - posted on 02/22/2010

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i was also going to mention if he's beendiagnosed you can do a 504 plan with the school that helps to have the teachers on the same page as you are at home.

Tanya - posted on 02/22/2010

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Loving discipline, consistent rules and home habits, consistent rules and discipline at school and having a stable home an dstable parenting help alot.

Yolanda - posted on 02/22/2010

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I have a 10 year old and we just put him on adderall. I can honestly say the difference is night and day. My husband and i have been at our wits end for about 8 years trying to figure out what was going on with ur son. The key is having a good doctor. we tried evry method of discipline and counseling that you could think of. he has been on adderall since december. his grades have imporved, his behavior in school has improved 110% we still have our moments and we see our doc about once a month to make sure he's improving and to adjust meds accordingly. like taking his meds at certain times are better than others. there is a lot of benefit. i was against it at first but i had to come to terms with the fact that i couldn't help him by myself. I couldn't fix him without meds. it's a tough call but its working.

Christina - posted on 02/21/2010

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Hi Brandy, My son was diagnosed with ADD when he was 7 or 2nd grade. He had a hard time focusing in and out of school. I had no idea until his teacher talked to me about her concerns that she would have to remind him where they were in their books and so forth. However, my son was a straight A student. I realized that sitting at the dinning room table for hours pointing at where he needed to be in his homework wasn't normal. When they wanted to put him on medication, I cried. I debated about it The medication worked very well, but the older he got the more I could tell the medication was making him more like zombie. We eventually weaned him off of them by the time he was in the 5th grade. He is now a freshman in highschool and still has troubles, but he is aware of them and we make sure if he's slacking in anything, that he's to straighten it out right away. Having good rapore with his teachers also help. Good luck with what you decide.

Donna - posted on 02/21/2010

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I have read most of these replies and they are all very insightful. The bottom line is that you know your child and you in your heart know what is best for him. There are numerous treatments for ADHD from homeopathic, dietary to medical intervention. Some may work, some may not. All children are different just by Gods design and ADHD affects them all differently as evident in all these stories. Let me just say up front I am a nurse and I tend to look at things more methodically and results are my goal.

I have a wonderful son. As an infant he was the easy going one, he would go anywhere and do anything and never complain. He has 2 older sisters and as a child was always being told what he could and couldn’t do, in other words he had 3 mothers. He is very loving and smart as a whip. He is a great athlete and he enjoys art. He has good friends, mostly acquaintances from sports. He is beginning to think that girls are more than just having cooties. Structure has always been his friend, but as kids get older and do more activities structures crumble. So he is just now learning how to go with the flow and that life doesn’t always go your way. He is just like any other 11 year old out there with an exception.

My son was diagnosed with ADHD 5 years ago. We sensed there was a problem, but you know, boys will boys. Well it wasn’t until my son hit a little girl in the head with a tennis ball full force, that it became mandatory to concede that there was a problem. We could no longer say “he’s just being a boy or he’ll eventually grow out of his temper.” He was very physical because that is where he had the control. He could run the fastest and throw the ball harder and that made him feel good about himself. He never had trouble in school because mental concentration wasn’t the problem. His teachers would get so angry with him because during a talk or lecture he would wander about the classroom as if not paying attention. When they would ask him what was just said he could repeat verbatim the talk. His problem was the inability to sit still (physical concentration) and to use that filter in his head that keeps us from saying and doing inappropriate things. He felt frustrated because people all around him were always telling him what to do especially with the little things like sit down, be quiet, stop moving you feet, look here, don’t stand up, be still, don’t say things out loud like she’s fat or his ears are too big, don’t get in peoples personal spaces and don‘t touch people improperly. He had difficulty making friends because of his inability to master social graces, so he was pretty much a loner. Every day life was a series of what not to do and all he wanted to do was have fun. Well, after much prayer and God leading me to a friend who has 3 sons with ADHD, we made the decision to medicate.

I am not a parent looking for the easy way out, I wanted the best for him. My son uses Daytrana patch. This medication is given through the route of a topical patch which gives him constant all day control. We put it on at 5 am and take it off at 4 pm. The medication takes about 2 hours to work and goes away 2 hours after the patch is removed. There are no ups or downs throughout his day. If he has sports practice or an exceptional amount of homework after school we don’t remove the patch until later. Since the medication is administered in this method there is no build up in his system and was very appealing to me. I pray every day that this medication continues to work for him because as we know puberty in itself brings a whole other set of issues, hormones and that will interfer with his medication.

My son is a totally different person with and without his patch on. With the patch, all I can say is that he successfully utilizes the filter for his thoughts and actions and it doesn’t take enormous effort to do so. He is a happy kid because he is in control. Without the patch he inappropriately funny and constant motion. He cannot filter the right and wrong things to say and do, he just lets it all out. He can almost bounce off the walls and literally takes physical attention, hand holding or taking him by the shoulder to redirect him to get him on the right track. Participating in sports without the patch would result in injury to himself or someone else. He is not happy without the patch. He is frustrated, irritated and discouraged and I want a better life for him.

I cannot say that he does not yearn to have that control without the medication, he does. He wants very much to be, in his words “normal”, but what he will understand some day is that his is normal just with a little set back. We all have those, its just some of our setbacks are bigger than others and how we successfully handle these setbacks make us a better person. God is in control All is going according to HIS plan. We must trust that there is a bigger picture and trust that life is unfolding as it should. I know my son will be a very happy well adjusted adult

Carol - posted on 02/21/2010

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Hi Everybody, my son is 11yrs old, now diagnosed with ADHD and AS. I am going the natural route with diet, exercise and therapy, as I am so wary of the side affects of Ritalin, this is the drug that was proposed to me, I am trying to avoid it. Is there a herbal alternative, do things like Kalm or Rescue Remedy or those sort of things from a Health Shop help? I would appreciate any advise, I am so worried about the transition from Primary to Secondary school, which is coming up in a years time.

Sherry - posted on 02/20/2010

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Hello Brandy! I may have a few suggestions for you, I have dealt with ADHD, Autism, OCD, & many other things with my sons. My son's are 23 yrs and 20 yrs now, but I still research things. Gluten-free diets, help a great deal for the above.Also certain herbs and vitamins also make a great deal of difference. I would be glad to share some more information with you. I need to pull some paperwork out & it's almost 1am, so not tonight. You can reach me at imfixin2@comcast.net. I'm happy to help anyone who needs it. I will try to post some websites in the next few days, but feel free to email me. God Bless, Sherry Bruns

Kelli - posted on 02/20/2010

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My son is 11 years old as well, he has ADHD. He is on a medicine called Adderall XR, and has been since he was about 7 years old. He is really doing well on it. His behavior is good and his grades are excellent. However he is pretty quiet, and he does not eat well at all. But I feel if he doesn't have this medication he will not be able to succeed as he is now. I do not give him his meds on the weekend, and believe me my house is a mad house.

Sheryl - posted on 02/20/2010

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Hi Brandy;

I was a "Hyper" kid and my mom was close to putting me on ritalin - but didn't. I have a high energy kid now myself who'd father was officially diagosed ADD. Though I have not taken him to see anyone I suspect there are thoes who would give him the official, though most likley boarderline diagnosis.

So here's my two cents....

Firstly I give him coffee in the morning. Just like Ritalin is an upper for "normal" kids, The coffee mellows him out a bit. And no side effects.

Secondly I am convinced that most of the supposed ADD kids just need a different learning environment. (As opposed to medication) And I DON"T mean special ed. Another post mentioned behavior modification. This is not to say that chemical imbalances are not real conditions, I believe they are. However, I do not believe that there are as many truly drug worthy cases are there are perscriptios written.

In sixth grage I was reading a collegate level and my vocabulary was literally off the charts. But I was lucky enough to attend a Montessori based school. My son is in standard public school which has been a bit of a rocky go. But he's catching on and suprising the teachers who have previously forwarned impending scholastic doom. Unfortunatly this is due to my understanding and involvement, not thier insight. But hey, I have two, they have twenty.

Bottom line, Look into behavior mod and alternative teaching methods. Make sure there is actually a chemical imbalance before looking to drugs, and consider the "natural" path if an imbalance is present.

Jamie - posted on 02/18/2010

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Brandy, I am an RN with a 10 yr old with ADHD. I knew he had it when he was 3 yrs old, and tried to assist him in building his own control skills as much as I could. He is the best kid in the world, with a heart of gold, but school became overwhelming in the second grade and his grades suffered. We have tried three different medications, (all stimulants) and they worked great. But he developed ticks on each one. We are starting him on a new medication called Intuniv this week. It is not a stimulant, or even a narcotic. I have read about it and the most common side effects, and the positive effects it has had on users. I decided to try it. At this age, (pre-teen) their bodies are changing hormonally and neurologically. And their mindset and self image is changing too. His actions and reactions to himself and the world around him will be greatly influenced by his self image and the people he surrounds himself with. His impulse control is very important at this age and is greatly affected by ADHD. What he does or doesn't do because of any lack in this control could become more serious as he gets older. My best suggestion is to keep all lines of communication open with him at all times. Stay involved in his life in all areas - they tend to start to pull away a little at a time starting around this age. (I also have a 15 yr old.) Give him his space as he needs it, but know what's going on by asking. You may also consider meds. My 10 yr old has told me on several occasions that he doesn't like not being able to focus as well and be in control when his meds wear off at the end of the day. It's like a constant stimulus overload for about 3 hours a day. It starts when his meds wear off from the day, and lasts until bedtime. Whatever you decide to do, keep a healthy, loving relationship with him. Just be there for him when he needs you, and teach him to make the decisions that are right for him in his life.

Izzy - posted on 02/16/2010

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hi Brandy,
I have a most wonderful, loving and caring son, age 10, with ADHD. We tried meds and hated them. Meds worked but caused much pain until one actually was ok, we were told that it is used to also stabilize blood preassure. We didn't do this for long, he is now meds free and manages pretty well, "A" and "B" student. We modified our whole life for him. Staying positive and proactive was very important, but what also helped was enrolling him in martial arts, that seemed to do the trick. I also work in this field, so if you have further question, may be I could assist if you have specific situations.
best of wishes,
Izzy

Andrea - posted on 02/15/2010

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Hi Brandy, While I personally don't have children with ADHD, I know a lot of people who do, and many of them have been helped by putting their children on supplements, instead of medicines, and they helped balance their nutrition. If you would like to know more about what vitamins or supplements they took, just let me know. Send me a pm. Hope things are well with you. :)

Bridget - posted on 02/15/2010

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I have an 8 year old with ADHD. I spent a lot of time going back and forth on the topic of medicating him. Finally after trying several options I took him to a doctor who actually listened to may feelings and fears of "snowing" him with pills. She started him on Adderal XR at a very low dose. This helps him while at school to stay focused and the best thing is that he does not have to remain on it during the summer months or during breaks at school. It was enough for the teacher to stop writing him as a "problem child" but not enough that he doesn't act like any normal 8 year old boy would.

Jessica - posted on 02/15/2010

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i read on parenting.com that children with concentration issues..like adhd and autism benefit from listening to calming music and that a tae kwon doe class also helps, they also suggest that a protein enriched breakfast like a scrambled egg with whole wheat toast starts the day off right. they say 6 is a good age to start the class..but its never too late.

Michelle - posted on 02/15/2010

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My just-turned-10 yr old daughter has ADD/borderline ADHD and is on meds. I wish we didn't have to have her on meds, but without them, she's a holy terror.

Elaine - posted on 02/15/2010

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i have a 8 year old daughter who has adhd and possible asd, she not on medicine either but have found that any food coloured orange sends her ape!! like dorritos and wotsits, im keeping note of things that trigger her hyperness and sometimes crazieness!!

Cherron - posted on 02/15/2010

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Hi Brandy, this is definitely a questions that I hear a lot as a Registered Nurse. I am a advocate for diet modification and natural-herbal therapies. If you are interestered in this approach, I will be happy to provide you with information. My email is Simplime@@aol.com. There are lots of "Pearls of Wisdom" is these responses so it depends on how your family would like to proceed.

Heather - posted on 02/14/2010

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I have found that making sure my son has something physical to do in the afternoon is extremely helpful. His therapist suggested having him fill up buckets of water and then move them from one location to another. He also has a scooter and we're getting him a bike for his birthday. The more physical he is, the better his mood is and the better he can sit at dinnertime.

Heather - posted on 02/14/2010

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My son will be five next month and he was diagnosed with ADHD when he was three. After exhausting every other option, I put him on meds and there has been a tremendous change. He is constantly evaluated by his doctor and is doing fantastic. Still have lots of challenges, but he is so much easier to manage. He is no longer absolutely miserable and I am amazed at his progress!

Bradi - posted on 02/14/2010

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On behalf of MyWorkButterfly.com partnership with Circle of Moms, we hope you find the below useful:

(HealthDay News) — Hundreds of gene variations that may be associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been identified by U.S. researchers.

Many of these genes were known to be involved in learning, behavior, brain function and neurodevelopment, but this is the first study to link them to ADHD. The findings appear in the June 23 online edition of Molecular Psychiatry.

“Because the gene alterations we found are involved in the development of the nervous system, they may eventually guide researchers to better targets in designing early intervention for children with ADHD,” study author Dr. Josephine Elia, a psychiatrist and ADHD expert at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, said in a school news release.

For this study, Elia and her colleagues analyzed genomes from 335 ADHD patients and their families, and compared them to more than 2,000 children without ADHD. The hundreds of gene variations were found to occur more often in children with ADHD than in normal children.

“When we began this study in 2003, we expected to find a handful of genes that predispose a child to ADHD,” study co-leader Peter S. White, a molecular geneticist and director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics at The Children’s Hospital, said in the release.

“Instead, there may be hundreds of genes involved, only some of which are changed in each person. But if those genes act on similar pathways, you may end up with a similar result — ADHD. This may also help to explain why children with ADHD often present clinically with slightly different symptoms,” White said.

The cause of ADHD isn’t known, but studies have shown that it’s strongly influenced by genetics.

ADHD, which affects about one in 20 children worldwide, may include symptoms such as hyperactive behavior, impulsivity, inattention, impaired planning and organizing skills, and difficulty maintaining focus.

Aubrey - posted on 02/14/2010

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MY HUSBAND HAS ADULT ADD, TRIED MEDS AND TRIED NOMEDS, MEDS HELP HIM A LOT. MY 6 AND 10 YR OLDS BOTH TAKES MEDS FOR ADHD, IT'S LIKE NIGHT AND DAY. MEDS WORK DIFFERENTLY FOR ALL, FOR MY FAMILY THEY HAVE MADE A HUGE DIFFERENCE. GOOD LUCK, IT'S A NEVER ENDING CHALLENGE!

Laurey - posted on 02/14/2010

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I have 3 kids with ADHD. One of them has severe ADHD. They all are on medication during the week to help them focus in school. The one that has severe ADHD also has an aide with him to help him stay focused. The school has worked with us on accomadations ti help with tests. He gets to go to another room with less kids and that also helps him stay focused. Haven't had much luck with getting him to sit and do homework in the afternoon. Anybody have any suggestions or ideas for the afternoon hours?

[deleted account]

I have an almost 11 year old with moderate - severe ADHD....we didn't explore medicine which was recommended by school until 3rd grade. Thought medicine would cause significant side effects. However - our son is doing so much better and we are more confident that he will succeed and not need to take always.

Jill - posted on 02/14/2010

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I hope all of this support has been helpful. It definitely is encouraging to read. My 12 your old son was diagnosed with ADD and i refused to put him on meds. Let me say this..The doctor took two phone calls while I patiently sat in her office and I felt she didn't give me her full attention. The long and short of it is. Parenting is hard and making decisions for small ones we represent is even harder. Watch the diet it helps. The comments about sugar and carbs (sugar) are accurate. Even 100 juice has high fructose (sugar). Products labeled whole wheat bread have high fructose (sugar). Also pay attention to your cleaning products. We are exposing ourselves and our babies to unknown chemicals we do not understand. Why is ADD, ADHD and Asthma diagnosed at epidemic proportions? Ask yourself these basic questions. Now they have all of us running around going to specialists having our babies probed, tested, labeled and sometimes shamed because we are uninformed consumers. It is not that I don't trust the medical establishment. I just have begun to trust my instincts and ask questions now that I am responsible for someone else. Keep asking for help and asking questions! I can also offer this music can soothe the soul and believe it or not piano lessons have helped. When he gets overwhelemed I ask him to play for me and it seems to work miracles.

Laurel - posted on 02/14/2010

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My 10 year old daughter suffers from mild ADHD as well as seizures. Also not on meds for ADHD, but always wondering if that decision is right.

Belinda - posted on 02/14/2010

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Hi Brandy! What a minefield you are walking! As you can see by the rplies, Children are so different and their reactions vary all the time. My son, 11 is also diagnosed. We have tried various meds, therapies and therapies. And at stages the results were phenomenal! But never consistent! My son is now on no meds, no treatment or therapies...and for the first time in years he feels "good enough". I think the many options I tried on him made him feel like a guinea pig! Never lose sight of the adorable child you have. Accept them for who they are and love them for being them! My son has many talents, some that despite nurturing are hampered by his lack of concentration. My job as his mom is to motivate, encourage, help and LOVE NO MATTER WHAT! It will be hard! But hang in there! They are beauitful, loving children with a heart of GOLD> They work so hard to achieve that when they achieve success it is sweeter than the straight A student that always gets top marks! The life skill they learn is perseverence and determination! Just talk to other and keep a sense of humour nearby!!!

Elizabeth - posted on 02/14/2010

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My eight year old son has ADHD, his is not mild and is on medicine. My problem is that I wish that other people would see what a wonderful boy he is, instead I hear that he's so hyper. It makes me discouraged

Valerie - posted on 02/14/2010

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my son is, I had him on concerta for a couple of years. When they are on that medicine they do not eat much. I have been told that omega 3 6 9 is excellent for children with ADHD. experts told me to ask him to repeat what I say to him and keep him on a schedule.

Penny - posted on 02/13/2010

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Quote:

If you go that route, you need to be strong enough not to let others bully you or make you feel bad. Very few people will make a diabetic feel bad about needing insulin, but some feel giving a child med's for ADHD is nothing more than the excuse of a lazy parent, and that is simply not true in every case. I've had a 15 year-old step-son and a 7 year-old son with ADHD, and there are a few things to keep in mind about med's.

Comment:

Just keep in mind the warning signs of when that psyche medicine is doing more harm than good and realize that consistency is absolutely imperative. For those medicating, watch your child for signs of persistent nightmares and sudden unexplainable fears and intense anger. These are signs of a different kind of illness. I have experience with 3 generations of mental illness and misdiagnosis of ADHD/ADD symptoms. I have dealt with these conditions since I was 16. Appropriately medicated, they can live full wonderful lives but the wrong medication will debilitate and ruin promising young lives.

Not that this has any bearing but if you're child screams hatred at you and you feel you cannot control that child, it is not the child who needs medication but the adult who needs understanding and patience to take the time to genuinely understand and not relate the child's experience to their own experiences. They are not necessarily the same.

Andrea (Nikki) - posted on 02/13/2010

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ADD and ADHD are things that can be troubling to deal with. I was diegnosed with it at a young age. I outgrew it or I thought. I have had it Creep back up in my life. MY son is almost 5 and showing signs of it. ADD and ADHD is thought to be hereditary I was on meds on mine for year in Eelentry School. When I got In 4th or 5th grade i Came off of them. I am tossed abought the med issue. I feel that some times it helps depending on the child. Medication alone will not help the problem. It takes a differant way of dealing with the child, and each child is differant. If you are doing something to help them stay on task and works for a while then all of the sudden it doesen't just try something different? They get bord with things. I watch my son and the things that he does and have to remind my self that I went through that when i was his age. I can be frustrating but they are our children and we have to do what we can to help them any way we can.

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