How does your family afford childcare?

Jessika - posted on 06/29/2011 ( 16 moms have responded )

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We make decent money but have expensive bills. I am wanting to go back to school for nursing because I am not challenged at my current job. I currently work 13 hour days on my husband's off days, if I went back to school it would be 5 days a week and we wouldn't have anyone to watch our 2 children. We can't afford daycare or sitters with me working now and would have less money if I went back to school.....Help I am out of ideas and really want to go back to schoo!!

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Reeda - posted on 07/11/2011

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I don't make enough money to pay for daycare but I make to much to qualify for government assistance. So, what I did was apply for a scholarship at my local YMCA. I was approved for the scholarship and receive 50% off all the services and activities they offer. Including after school care.

Jennifer - posted on 07/01/2011

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Jessika, it sounds like you've got a good plan worked out. Seriously though, call around to your local hospitals (HR departments should have the info) and make sure they are hiring LPNs. Some places are starting to phase them out and as people retire or move to other positions they repost that slot as an RN position not an LPN position. If your hospitals still use LPNs then it is an awesome route to go! Best of luck to you!

Jennifer - posted on 06/29/2011

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After my son was born, I also felt the desire to go back to school. I checked many different schools, looked at tuition and graduation rates and decided to go to the local community college. They offer many classes on line and also have discounted or no cost day care while you are in classes. I also got scholarships for being a working mom!

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Georgiana - posted on 02/28/2013

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My daughter is working on her Masters Degree. She is in the last few weeks until graduates in May 2013. She has to be in the classroom all day and studies in the evening. I work all day and so does my other daughter but doesn't make enough to help pay bills. I pay the bills in the home while they pursue their dreams. She applied for short-term assistance and was denied. Government doesn't provide temporary assistance for single moms who are working on their masters degree. Right now she senIds her son 2hrs away for another family member to babysit. He lost his job and is looking a job. He has a huge family of his own and needs to work. We are all struggling to find ways to help my daughter. I plan to take one week of vacation to stay home. We put money together for her to travel the 2hrs to visit her son on the weekend. She needs assistance until May 4, 2013, when she graduates and finds a job. She is almost there and I want her to finish and graudate. She has about 10 weeks and I think it's about $300 a week for childcare 5 days a week. That's a lot of money. Do you know of a service or program that provides temporary child care. We only need about 8 or 9 weeks of assistance. Thank you.

Nicole - posted on 07/10/2011

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WGU.EDU That is where I got my BA and currently going for my MBA. It's all online at your own pace. You take as many classes as you want per semester for one set cost. Love it

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After thinking more about this if you went back to school full time and you finish you will have a job that pays well. Maybe ask your husband if he can make a sacrifice for you and the family by getting a second job until you finish school and get that job. I know it will suck for him but the second job will pay for daycare and it will only be tmeporary.

Heck i just work ot and most of my check goes to daycare but it is only temporary. I cannot afford to stay home. I have excellent medical benifits, 401k and a pensin when I retire.

Angela - posted on 07/08/2011

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How about swap & share childminding with another working or studying mother who is working or studying the hours you have off? Even babysitting on an evening so another couple can have nights out?

Candi - posted on 07/07/2011

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A common misconception is that hiring a nanny is an expensive proposition and only “the rich” can afford this option. And recent news reports are contributing to this myth, as they spotlight “six-figure” nannies who are earning more than $100,000 per year.

The truth is that most nannies don’t receive such high salaries and are actually an affordable, convenient option for many families. In fact, hiring a nanny is often more affordable than other childcare options, including daycare.

Nannies’ salaries depend on a variety of factors, including:

Their experience
Your geographic location (nannies in big cities often earn more than nannies in smaller towns)
The number of children they’re watching
The ages of the children
Their duties and responsibilities
The number of hours they’re working
Some families pay their nannies benefits, including health care and paid holidays, which add value to their base salaries. Live-in nannies also receive free room and board. But many families do not include these benefits, reducing their overall cost.

While some people still envision nannies as tending only to wealthy families, hiring a nanny is a viable, convenient option for many families - across all tax brackets. In recent years, a significant number of parents have learned - firsthand - about the benefits of hiring a nanny, including the convenience of having someone come to your home vs. bringing your children to daycare, the ability to ask your nanny to start dinner or help with housework, etc.

Hiring a nanny is affordable, yet the benefits are priceless…

VALERIE MARIE - posted on 07/05/2011

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my husband's parent's are minding our children for half the price of creche's any chance somebody like family or friends can help you out !?

Mandy - posted on 07/04/2011

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We live in France, where childminder bills are almost entirely reimboursed by the State.

Jessika - posted on 06/30/2011

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I have looked into programs for day care assistance but unfortunately we don't qualify even with just my husband's income. I get so aggrevated with the government I have worked since I was 16, I am only 24 which I know isn't a lot but I know many people pop out kids that they can't raise and get so much assistence but when I want to better myself I can't get help because they say I make too much. I think the government is flawed single mothers can get more help than married mothers and it teaches the younger generation the wrong message. It is very hard to raise children, I don't know what or how I would get by if I didn't have my husband , but now people are marrying later after they have kids so they get more assistance if they are single. But anyways I have my associate's degree in businees already but when I was 18 I didn't know what I wanted to do so I went with business.....But thanks for the advice I found a college that I could become an LPN in one year and then they have a bridge program to RN that is 1 1/2 years. It costs more than the average community college but it's in a safer location and they are rated better on the quality so I am willing to pay extra for that. So my plan is become an LPN, hopefully I can get on at a hospital before I am finished and get tuition reimbursement to continue for an Rn!

Jennifer - posted on 06/30/2011

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Look into your local community college, lots of them have daycares on site at discounted rates, or free. There are also grants and scholarships for working moms and gov't assistance in many areas as well. It's not always easy but with some juggling it can often be worked out.

On a side note, Beverly mentioned doing an LPN program and then moving on to an RN later. Look into the hospitals in your area before you do this! It works great in some places but there are places that are phasing out LPN's and going to a RN only staff. You just need to know what your hospitals are doing is all. If yours are still hiring LPN's it's a great way to get your foot in the door and start working and then go back to school later. Many hospitals will help with tuition reimbursements for staff going back to attain an RN license.

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When I wanted to go back for my Master's Degree, I took out a home equity line of credit against our mortgage. That helped pay for tuition and other major expenses. My teaching salary helped with child care expenses, and my husband's salary paid for mortgage, household expenses, etc. I was also able to earn extra income by tutoring and teaching professional development courses. My husband could get overtime when he wanted. Perhaps you can barter services with a trusted person in exchange for child care.

Bevely - posted on 06/30/2011

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There are a lot of programs offered by the government that help pay for childcare while you go to school, but you have to qualify and it is income based. I completely understand how you are feeling. I had my babies while I was in college, and ended up having to drop out when the bills got too much for my husband to manage alone to get a job. Then it took a while for us to get back on track. I ended up having to wait for my kiddos to start school before going back to nursing school. Then with the long waiting list for clinicals I did some research and found out that going to LPN school would get me working in 18months, versus the 2 year waiting list for clinicals, then I can always go back for an LPN-RN bridge program. (which I am almost done with thankfully) But that ended up being the best option for me.
You could also look into taking a few online classes or even a night class once a week, that way you can keep your job a little bit longer, save money, and still get started on your goal of becomming a nurse. I don't know how many classes you have under your belt now, but you have a year of pre-requisites and then another 2 years of nursing classes and clinicals. Good Luck!

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