how to reduce my daughter weight? she is 6 yrs and 30 kg weight

Mrudula - posted on 11/10/2012 ( 17 moms have responded )

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how to reduce my daughter weight? she is 6 yrs and 30 kg weight

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Anne - posted on 12/30/2012

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I cut soda and sugar drinks completely out of my daughter's diet. Water, milk and occasional juice only. This made a huge difference in her appetite and weight almost immediately. Another change I made was the type of food I brought into my house... Stop eating processed foods. It does take a little more time but stop feeding her macaroni and cheese in a box, frozen chicken nuggets and canned vegetables. Shop for your groceries outside the inner isles (fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh meats, cheeses, and bread. whole grain cereal is fine too). I learned that most people do not process processed foods. If it is canned, boxed or frozen, it is going to turn into fat. Walks are a great non-stressful form of excerise too. Even 20 minutes 2x /week makes a huge difference. But if you follow just one piece of advice... cut out the sugar drinks! I swear that was the ONE thing that made the most dramatic difference.

Cheri - posted on 12/30/2012

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I would be more concerned with increasing her exercise level. If you watch her food intake like a hawk, then she may become paranoid about it and it may cause more problems than you are ready for. Also consult a physician for additional tips and suggestions.

Jill - posted on 12/26/2012

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What does your child's pediatrician say? Does he recommend she try to lose weight for medical reasons? Some suggestions to lose a small amount of weight would be:
1) Establish healthy eating habits by example. Make sure you plan and provide a healthy breakfast, lunch, and dinner, dessert etc.... If she is destined for a life of constantly having to battle weight, she needs to learn good habits upfront. From You. You are her Mom and her Role Model. Create an actual daily meal plan for her (to include every bite she is going to put in her mouth) and she can know when she gets up in the morning what she'll be eating that day.
2) Some form of exercise daily, whether it be play or (again) you getting out and walking with her.
3. I disagree with the "no dessert" policy. Although they may not provide nutritional value, I feel it is very important to reward a child who is learning new ways of eating. You don't want them to feel deprived as this could totally backfire on you.
4. There are lots of healthy snack options, like microwave popcorn sprinkled with parmesan, string cheese, yogurt with grape nuts and fruit etc...
5. Maybe tie computer or tv time to success with the daily food plan.

I get a free newsletter that I think will be hugely helpful to you. It is called Shrinking On A Budget and it talks about how small changes to your diet can make a big impact on weight loss. She also talks about the importance of Moms (and Dads) being role models for healthy eating. The newsletter comes with recipes that the whole family will like. Again, it is free.

You also might want to look at some of the Hungry Girl recipes. Her newsletter is free to.

Good luck!

[deleted account]

Try to limit carbs to breakfast unless she will be working out soon after eating. Let her make as many choices as possible, and don't focus too much on it or you can cause self esteem issues or eating disorders. Change gradually, and try to eat the same foods she is eating so that she doesn't feel "singled out".



Let her eat 5 small meals per day (if possible) rather than 3 large ones.

Breakfast should be the biggest meal, with the most calories, fats, and carbs.

Small mid-morning snack (if this is allowed at school).

Lunch should focus on fruits and veggies. Add a granola bar or small meat and lettuce wrap for proteins, but keep this meal light.

Small after school snack--raw veggies, raw fruit, or yogurt.

Healthy Dinner/Supper--a meat and 2-3 veggies. The meat serving should be no larger than a deck of playing cards.



Integrate some physical activity. She is only 6, so it has to be fun. Do you work out? If so, take her with you--it can be a great mom and daughter bonding time. Also, plan physical family outings, like swimming, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, mountain climbing, letter boxing, bicycling, roller skating, ice skating, zip lining, etc. Play physical games at home, like tag or hide&seek. Put on some music and dance.

Also, sign her up for a physical sport--dance, gymnastics, a martial arts like karate or taekwondo, soccer, or basket ball.

Also, walk between shoppes when you run errands. If you have an empty afternoon, rather than lounging about the house, take her for a walk, visit shops, galleries, museums, etc. Anything to get her moving as opposed to sitting.

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Kara - posted on 01/01/2013

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Keep in mind though, even if you are keeping a supply of healthy food on hand, if you are not expending more energy than you are taking in you will still gain weight.
A healthy balance of activity and healthy eating is key.

Debbie - posted on 01/01/2013

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Children will eat whenever they are allowed to eat. We have to help them learn to regulate and stay busy. Start by keeping fruit in the fridge, go through the cabinets and cut out chips, crackers, and junk food, and candy. Encourage her perhaps by telling her Barbie has to watch her diet too so she can play and have energy. Start a discussion about what types of things Barbie might eat. Help her see that she can eat food, just less of it and when she picks something Barbie might eat, give her praise and extra play time. Just by watching portions of food, and limiting in-between snacking, and increasing her physical play time, she will start losing weight.
There is a great program I have discovered called: The Happy Face Token System. It uses a reward system for children ages 4-14 to earn tokens with happy faces, for doing good things, learning new things, trying something difficult and helps develop personal attributes like character, honesty and contributing to a happy family. It does much more than this, but these are things I discovered. She will love the program and you could encourage her to choose a fruit snack with some cheese and let her earn tokens. She will want the tokens to earn rewards (other than food). This book is sold in paperback or digital download and it comes with all sorts of charts that really work. It also has things that work with older children and great chore charts to help train children how to work happily and with accountability.
Good luck.

Ann Marie - posted on 01/01/2013

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my daughter is 4 years old but as tall as a 6 year old. Doctors said he weight is fine. In ur case i would see if the dr sees a problem with her weight.

Kara - posted on 12/31/2012

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First of all, what is her height? Her BMI is what needs to be considered and you must know her height in order to determine that. Has her doctor told you that she is overweight? If so, what foods does she eat? What are her routines, does she exercise? How is food prepared, i.e. fried, baked, etc.?

Carolyn - posted on 12/30/2012

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My son is 8 and weighs 64 pounds, and if I'm doing the conversion correctly, your daughter is 6 years old and weighs 66 pounds. What does your doctor say about her weight? I would say the height to weight matters greatly, because my oldest son was always a little heavier than the doctor thought was good, but as he gained weight he would start to get taller and even height/weight out, then put on weight again. My younger son does not do this, he just grows steadily. Talk to your pediatrician about what they think. Our family goes on bike rides together because it is something we all enjoy to do, or take our dog for walks. Exercise is important but also easier to do if more people are involved. Sometimes I have to unplug the TV for a period of time to remind my kids that LIFE DOES GO ON WITH OUT THE TV!!

Amanda - posted on 12/28/2012

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First how tall is she? If she is short for her age I wouldn't worry because her next growth spurt will thin her out too. I am not saying that 20 pounds over weight is a good thing, but she will thin out with her next growth spurt. She is six years old. She should be out in rain, snow or shine. Why is she always watching tv. As her mother you control the tv not her. People blame the kids for how big they are but at her age most of this falls on you as she doesn't understand eating right and staying active. For me I became over weight when my thyroid glad became imbalanced. I didn't understand why I would swim everyday, like 1500 meters and never lose weight, but my mom did so we worked together. Never tell her she is over weight, just tell her that mom is going to start walking everyday, or bike riding and you want to make that mommy daughter time. Or go out side and build a snowman, if you have snow. You getting active is better then telling her she is over weight. Once she is really active she will be fine.

Penny Tan Xin - posted on 11/29/2012

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Maybe ask her to eat more healthy food and fruits(if she is eating junk food[no offence])

Marian - posted on 11/28/2012

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I would encourage everyone to not to get too overly zealous about their kids weight. It is important to keep an eye on it of course for their long term health. But they are kids who are growing and developing. Their bodies are changing all the time, so they may be a little heavy now, but after a growth spurt you may not even think about it.

I do have a few suggestions for establishing healthy habits.

1. I have used the play 60 rule for all the kids I have nannied for and my own son. We have at least 60 minutes of physical playtime each day. The easiest way to accomplish this goal is setting up playtime at a park with friends. Because the kids are with their friends playing tag and swinging on the swings it doesn't seem like working out, but just playtime. My boys love it!

2. The big change I have made in terms of food is moving to all locally sourced organic foods. Check the labels and make sure they foods you buy are certified USDA organic. That way you can be almost certain that the foods you are feeding your child don't contain growth hormones that could be contributing to your child weight gain.

3. No unnecessary sugars or carb loaded foods. I don't give dessert at my house. The things my child would like to have for dessert are high in sugar and carbs and add no nutritional value to his diet whatsoever.

4. Snacks are important, but this is where you can waste a lot of calories. Choose snacks that are high in vitamins. I serve at least on fruit or vegetable at snack times. Then they are accompanied by something high in protein. Plain yogurt with fresh fruit stirred in, hummus and carrot and celery sticks, rice cakes with soy nut butter...There are lots of good healthy snack options out there.

5. Screen time is the number one reason kids stop being active. I limit screen time to one hour a day. And that means one hour total for anything that has a screen. I try and offer combinations so it's not all tv watching. You can add computer time or time on an iPad, and you can make that time about doing enhancing educational opportunities. There are tons of apps and online education programs to keep kids brains working. If their bodies aren't going to be working, then their brains need to be.

6. Good sleeping habits is the only other tip I can provide. Make sure your child is getting the right amount of sleep each night. Tired kids have less energy to move around and get active, so get tough about a good bedtime.



Work with your doctor on setting up healthy fitness goals for your daughter. Your doctor may also be able to refer you to a nutrition specialist that can help you with meal planning and establishing healthy eating for your whole family.

Best of luck.

Pratibha - posted on 11/28/2012

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when you find any tips solution ..please dont forget to inform me bcz my 8 years daughter and her weight is 40 kg

Dr Rosina - posted on 11/27/2012

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Hi Mrudula,



One of the things that has really helped me to keep my son's diet healthy is to talk about two kinds of food:

1. Everyday food

2. Weekend food



1. He is allowed to eat everyday food 7 days a week - which is all the natural unprocessed foods like meat, vegetables, fruits, fish, dairy (yoghurt, cheese, milk) and a few plain crackers for a snack with avocado. I help him understand how good this is for his body, explaining meat is for building muscles and dairy for building bones and fruits and vegetables for energy. He eats lots of raw vegetables like carrots and celery capsicum and cucumber tomatoes as they are colourful and like eating a rainbow! It is important to watch cereals for breakfast as often they are high in sugar and fat. We use puffed cereals from the health section of the supermarket as they have no added sugar or fat! eg puffed rice, corn, wheat, quinoa they are delicious! I only keep everyday food in the house... no weekend food.

2. Weekend food is only for the weekend - this is the fatty, processed, sugary food like chocolate, chips, processed foods, cakes etc. He is allowed to select one item each day on the weekend - he looks forward to it. He knows that weekend food is not good for his body, that's why he only eats it sometimes and in small amounts. We always go out to buy the weekend food so it is not in the house during the week.

This way he has a very well balanced diet but still gets to have some weekend food every weekend!

I am very strict with this except for very special occasions and he is OK with it most of the time

Hope that helps

Rosina

Mrudula - posted on 11/14/2012

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Thanku Kelly, for giving me valuable suggestions of loosing weight for my child

Mrudula - posted on 11/12/2012

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she used to have more carbohydrates in terms of idli, dosa, rice, small choclates, moongdal, kurkure. and to say about her physical activity is less, whatever she does at school that's it. she watches more TV.

Michelle - posted on 11/12/2012

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What sort of foods does she eat? It would help if we had a bit more information on her diet and if she does any exercise/activities.

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