What helps your child develop socially, emotionally, academically or physically?

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[deleted account]

Emotionally, to see a calm well round parents. Someone who can calm themselves when needed and not let people walk all over them and not walk all over others. Also not being around a lot of yelling and no violence. Children need to feel safe to grow emotionally healthy.

Academically, being around other children away from their parents and coming home to a parent who asks about their day. If not daycare, then home with a parent that uses every opportunity to teach their children something new and have a routine.

Physically, a healthy well balanced diet including 3 meals, 2 snacks, vitamins every day, 3 glasses of milk (one with each meal) and 2 glasses of juice (low in sugar with each snack).

Jennifer - posted on 07/07/2010

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I believe that the best way for children to grow in all areas, is to have them be around children their own age, especially for the social aspect of it. To help academics, read to your child, or tell them stories. Emotionally and academically, I would say to speak to them on their level of words, and when u talk to them ask them if they have questions about any of the words that you have said. I know that my daughter will ask me what some words mean, and that gives her a better understanding of how and when to use a certain word. Also giving your child lots of compliments will help their self-esteem a lot.

Bridgette - posted on 07/07/2010

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Having conversation with them on their level, having them around kids the same age or two older, reading to them, age apporiate monies and tv shows...

Sia - posted on 07/07/2010

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Exposure to all things social, emotional, academic and physical.

Jackie - posted on 07/29/2010

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there are SO many things you can do! interaction with same age peers is great, quality time doing creative activities, exposure to different foods, entertainment, activities, etc (age appropriate of course). at an academic level there are statistics that prove a few things will increase brain stimulation and academic level and they're easy! I have done these personally and my four year is is ready for kindergarten. we read together all the time. i allow her to picture read first then i read the words while i point. we also read a variety of books. i pick one and she picks two for each round. I make her use her words. she isn't allowed to point, cry, or make noises to get things. the amount of words and the way she asks or tells me something changes by age of course but at 1 year I would say "use ur word" "drink" or "milk" and she would repeat. at four when she'd like a drink she says "can i have milk please" if she sees something she wants to show me she has to name the object. if she doesn't know it i will say it correctly and have her repeat "look at the cow" and the last i know of to be important is exposure to the world - we go to the zoos, museums, do crafts, investigate nature, go to fairs, carnivals, weddings, etc. I always take her into stores with me and into places like the post office, police station, car garage, etc. that kind of exposure teaches children even at a young age what the world is about.

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Chymerem - posted on 07/28/2010

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i put him in pre nursery cos he was so shy at home and around other kids. And now he associates. Academically i think that develops with time and interaction. Also exposure to good tv programs.

Paula - posted on 07/28/2010

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Play games with them and make them love them even when you invite other kids home. Take time to teach them a few things while with them.

Aisha - posted on 07/26/2010

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I agree with all posts.
Mommy+baby time: read/tell story. sing along. play. conversation. a walk in the park.
daddy+baby time: same as above.
play date with one or more kids there age or younger or older.
educational/fun DVD or TV but not before 2 years (in my opinion)
Grandparents time: story time, walk at the park
family time.

Jennifer - posted on 07/24/2010

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It is great to hear that we don't run our children down but build them up. We have to be careful though that they don't grow up too fast.

Jennifer - posted on 07/24/2010

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I must add being in awareness of all things social, emotional, academic and physical. So that it can embraced and tackled when the time comes around.

Heather - posted on 07/21/2010

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I personally keep my son around other kids at all times, his age and a lil older it keeps him sociall. But I also get him around adults as well, it teaches him how to act around adults. At far as emotionally and physically I'm always hugging and loving on him and telling him what a good job he does when hes doing something and how smart he is. Academically- I personally don't like to "baby" talk him, I talk on his level and actually a little higher than his level. This allows for him to learn new words and poses questions. He loves for me to praise him, so I make fun little flash card games and he gets hugs and high fives and great jobs when he gets it right. It makes him feel so good, and he's learning as well.

Varda - posted on 07/20/2010

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the thing that worked best for my children was being with other children same age and up to 3 years older.
I used to go out every afternoon meeting other moms with children.
Keep them playing and interacting with other children

[deleted account]

What a great question!
Teachers help kids pass tests at school. Parents help kids pass the tests of life! As an advocate for emotional intelligence in children, I'd say these skills built in kids (the earlier the better) give them the best chance of developing emotionally and socially. Having straight A's is great, but if kids don't learn how to manage their feelings in a way that promotes positive outcomes, they will have difficulty with the "real world". Research has proven that kids with higher EI skills grow up to be happier and more successsful (including academically).

[deleted account]

Not pushing! Most parents say they don't push their children (re potty training, reading, etc.) but the truth is, we all do it. Our society breeds that compulsivity in parents.

Having the patience and confidence to give a child the time they need to blossom is the most important thing you can do to help them become everything they're meant to be.

Melissa - posted on 07/18/2010

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My daughter is 7, and for 6.5 years, she was the only child. My husband and I determined from the beginning that we were not going to talk down to her. We do not discuss inappropriate topics, of course, but we do not "dumb" down our conversation for her. We use our normal vocabulary and explain as we go. This has helped develop her vernacular. Also, she attends a school that has a diverse population which assists with her social skills. She attends Boys and Girls Club after school and this has proved invaluable to her social skills. During the summer, she has the benefit of staying home with her father who has developed a routine. During the week, they do science experiments together, complete educational workbook pages, and several times a week, they go to the swimming pool. She is also very comfortable with the computer and the internet as she frequents educational websites. She gets one on one attention from both her father and me. She is a well-rounded, well-behaved little girl, and I am very proud to call her mine!

Tracy - posted on 07/18/2010

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I deal with that matter also...But I find it easier to find kids that your child seems to bond with even for a lil while...Sometimes they do not like change with different people and also people that understand there situation..

Teresa - posted on 07/18/2010

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Hi Ava, each child is a very unique little person and will develop S.E,A,P, very diffrently, the important thing is that you go at their pace and try no to worry if they seem not to be at the same level of other children of the same age.



Having said that there are several options to help your child with development of these skills. 1/ Social... Your child will be used to interacting with adults around him to encourage social skills with other children play dates are fun and also gives your child to feel secure in their own home that mom is around if he needs you.



This is a good step to nursery or toddler groups.. again this should be a gradual process and done at a slow pace to encourage confidence that he feels secure .. social skills are important but sometimes pushing your child to soon can make them feel insecure and shy so watch what he has fun at for instance if enjoys nursery then encourage him to go, but if he enjoys play dates at home more then increase this until he is confident enough not to have you there.



Emotionaly again going at your childs pace is important, he will learn a lot from his main carer which is his parents, and will develop a lot from being around his peers and friends, academically, this can be encouraged in so many ways that he does not even know he is doing it!! visits to exciting places like the Zoo going home and connecting them to books you have at home is the start of teaching him research and reading is very important, books should always be fun and not a chore.. if he does not want to look at books then there are so many alternatives to learning..



letting their imagine run is fun to painting, salt dough, using old boxes to build and make things will encourage his academic skills, using everyday situations to learn is fun to such as counting the steps to bed, cooking and measuring, colours can be learnt this way to, by using what you have at home and everyday he will not even know he is learning!



Physically his development can be encouraged by activties which again are fun but builds on his confidence...swimming clubs is so much fun.. toddler Gym a social and physical activity... walks where you can also learn about the countryside and nature... riding ... I hope this helps and good luck.....

Tracy - posted on 07/17/2010

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daycare - love it or hate it - children learn a lot there - socially: they learn to interact with other children not only their age but above and below them, they learn to share. If you choose a good daycare they also learn academically: I took my 3 yr old in 4 yr old preschool screening and she passed with flying colors they were actually shocked she was only 3, she tested out at a 5 yr old level.
emotionally: showing love and affection - explaining feelings
physically: ensuring a balanced diet and activity -

Shannon - posted on 07/17/2010

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we talk to our daughter with normal conversation...she's been talkin since she was 5months old....she just turned 3 and knows more words then most 3 year olds i know....we are workin our 18month old son....we expose our kids to everythin....our daughter is the social (like her dad)while our son is shy and reserved(like his mom)....get them involved with everyone...

Sarah - posted on 07/17/2010

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I believe in socializing children with kids their own age, older, even younger so they know how to behave. Also, reading, reading, reading! I also think play groups are wonderful & outings to museums, playing games with your children, spending quality time, trying to teach them at a young age & exposing them to new places, people, music, activities etc. Hope that helps!

Jessi - posted on 07/17/2010

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I am a single working mom. I have few friends with children and even less time available to hang out with them. I found that having my son in daycare while i'm working is the best thing. They teach him things I am not able to and it allows him time to interact with other children.

Jill - posted on 07/17/2010

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Day Care..... learning from others. Sometimes good sometimes bad but its still exposure from peers her age that i'd never be able to give her. Reading at night to her.

Vanessa - posted on 07/16/2010

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I would have to say sports, both my girls are in organized sports has help them to become very sociable

Shameeka - posted on 07/15/2010

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What has helped the most with my daughter Abigail has been keeping her in a structured environment since she was 8 mos old. She now reads at a 3rd grade level and is only 5 years old. Pre~School has really enhanced her social, mental and emotional health :) Hope this helps :)

Kate - posted on 07/14/2010

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I have been basically a stay at home mom since the day my daughter was born. With starting college in the fall I have enrolled her into the daycare at my school. They have a great program and its kind of like a school for toddlers. Look into daycares around your area. Im sure there is one that has a great program to help your child! best of luck!

Laquanda - posted on 07/13/2010

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definitely spending time with their peers in all aspects. learning to share, learning to be considerate of others. being read to in group environments and sports are a great group activity to grow in all categories.

Rachael - posted on 07/11/2010

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I find that if you don't baby talk your kids and speak to them as if they are people you talk to every day minus a bit of language they lisp there words less. Lots of interaction socially and physically help quite a bit. When they play, you play. Show them how, do it with them. They will pick it up much quicker. show them by demonstrating and show them physically. You treat them with respect, they give it back. Be very calm. I have learned that if you are loud with children they become loud.
With discipline, it is always good to not spank, yell, or (if a child hits you) hit back. If you approach calmly and rationally they will follow in your foot steps.

Wendy - posted on 07/11/2010

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Teach the child when playing with others to use words in an ugly situation and there will be some even when extremely young. They need to know how to react to a bad situation. I tell my daycare childrren when they come to me and say.. so and so said, or hit, or won't play with me. I say ...YOU go and tell them you do not like that and it is not very nice. Teach the child to defend themselves and we all know that is how they will get respect from others and be able to socially play in big groups. I have a large group in home family daycare with mixed age groups and the older ones definately help with the younger ones. Also teach your child to respect other as well as yourself. Use magic words like please, thank you, may I, and most of all I AM SORRY!!

Shaunette - posted on 07/10/2010

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preschool , playgroups, refer to montessori playgroups, daycare with age appropriate toys and kids the same age and older

Christina - posted on 07/10/2010

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I think that playgroups and other social events help them in all those aspects of life!

TAKELA - posted on 07/09/2010

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taking the kid(s) to the park for starters then maybe it can lead to playdates or vice versa

Michelle - posted on 07/09/2010

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Keeping you child around other children a little older (obviously well behaved, good play mate, etc...); I think is the best way to help your child develop.

Sharon - posted on 07/09/2010

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well i believe talking with your child rather than to him/her is a great start. read stories using intonations and make all events meaningful. when you bath baby talk to them or sing. while creaming baby toes and body do counting games and nursery rhymes with toes and fingers like this little piggy went to market. While feeding talk like you would normally in gentle tones not the goo goo baby talk. also be creative...not all parents can but lots of simulating toys so use what you have...milk tins make excellent drums so too do card board shoe boxes

Isha - posted on 07/09/2010

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Hi!

Socially!

In my experience with my now 10 year old boy what has helped him to develop socially is I have taught him early on how to make friends and maintain and nuture friendships. He can be a little shy so for example: If we are at the beach or pool or even in a foriegn country If I see another child that he would like to make friends with I will go with him to introduce myself and him to the child. Soon they are off playing and become friends. I have encouraged him if he likes the child to arrange a playdate and exchange phone numbers with parents permission of course. Now he meets children everywhere and comes to me and says can I exchange phone numbers with this boy etc. He has alot of friends not just in our local town but all over from our travels which turn into penpals. His father has thanked me because he himself did not have a mother who was so encouraging and he does not have alot of friends himself but is learning by watching me coach our son! Both are grateful!

Blessings,
Isha

Sandria - posted on 07/08/2010

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What I do is I read books to them,they ask questions and I take time to answer them, I spend as a family with as well as individual time with each of them. If you take time and make time within your busy schedule while they are young it won't be so hard to connect with them when they are older.

Crystal - posted on 07/08/2010

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He attend daycare, soccer tots and the little gym, I have read to him since enutero, talked to h im since enutero, spend quality time playing talking with him daily

Claudia - posted on 07/08/2010

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Hola Ava,

i'm claudia and the only answer tht i hav for u to ur question is...

take ur chld/rn to daycare and to attend as many commnity events as possible. tht wy u cn see wht r child has n interest in and u'll b amazed on wht ur chld/rn liks and somday may justwanna b whn he/she may wanna b n th future. good luck.

Shaneatra - posted on 07/08/2010

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Goin to the boys club was very good for my son and especially when he started school

Kris Antonelli - posted on 07/08/2010

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Yes to everything mentioned here..when my son was younger I worked full-time so I found an excellent home day situation, we really loved Miss Bonnie who kept all her kids busy with fun activities --- knowing that he was not only well taken care of while I worked but also entertained and learning social skills, made me feel better about going to work.

Oluwatomilayo - posted on 07/08/2010

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Take the child out regularly, helphim by exposing him to peer groups, go shoping with the child, it could be just grocery shopping, you will find out that he will find out where his food are stocked at the shop. I rememdered when we went on vacation to Dubai, my son was only 18months, while shopping he went around the wears too and picked a shirt for himself extactly his size( he must have see himself fit into it) and guess what it was a lovly top. also talk to the child often.

Cailie - posted on 07/08/2010

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We expose our son to every thing! I'm always finding kids that want to play with him. Parks, playgroups, pools, bookstore! I read all the time and I don't care if he makes a mess (finger paints,coloring, play-doh) as long as he's getting a kick out of it he's leanring and developmenting

Jennifer - posted on 07/07/2010

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Playgroups will definitely help socially, especially if it's introduced early on.

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