when will he sleep all night?

Katie - posted on 08/04/2010 ( 98 moms have responded )

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my son is a lil over 2 months and he is waking up every 2-3 hours. he's over 11 lbs. he eats like a champ. when will he start sleeping thru the night???

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Yvonne - posted on 08/09/2010

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I would like to suggest NOT reading babywise or anything similar to that (The man who wrote that book's daughter won't even talk to him). I would not recommend any sort of scheduled feedings or ignoring a crying baby to get them to "Sleep through the night", feed baby when baby is hungry go by baby's cues. Don't give baby cereal before bed (babies are not supposed to be on solid foods until 6 months old). My daughter is two and does not sleep through the night, but you know what that's okay because I don't either, I don't remember ever sleeping through the night and expecting a baby to do that is unrealistic. A good book is The No Cry Sleep Solution http://www.amazon.com/No-Cry-Sleep-Solut...

Shauneen - posted on 08/11/2010

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Thats what normal 2 month olds do. Make peace with it because if you dont you will go crazy. My daughter is 17 months and still wakes up at least once at night. There was a time that she did sleep through, but then the teething starts. But all kids are different. Good luck!

Cynthia - posted on 08/10/2010

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maybe never. My son is 5 and wakes up to go to the bathroom everynight. i'm 26 and i'm up at 3:00 everynight since i can remember. ppl are different. they start sleeping more at about 9 months to 1 year. hang in there. try napping in the day when your baby sleeps. good luck. also the bed time bath stuff really works.

Yvonne - posted on 08/10/2010

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Look your logic is fallacy honestly, my grandparents gave their children karo syrup with condensed milk which we all know is not a healthy choice, and they were healthy babies. I could make a lot of points here, obviously breastmilk is healthier than formula, but that doesn't mean that all babies are going to have adverse reactions. If you read the article I posted, you will see the new recommendation is not 4-6 months it is between six and nine months and sometimes up to a year old, that is from the World Health Organization. No they don't all develop exactly the same way and it's impossible to know exactly when the gut closes, but choosing to introduce solids based on weight and height is illogical because the reason to wait on introducing them is because of infant gut development with has nothing to do with the baby's size or growth charts (which I also agree with you about not looking at anything but a baby's own personal growth chart). Six months is now the MINIMUM. We waited until seven, some babies are not interested until much later.

Yes all doctors have different view points but not all of them are right, and a lot of the information out there like this is out dated.

Yvonne - posted on 08/10/2010

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Your sons doctor was wrong. Babies guts are not developed efficiently to eat solids before six months. Many doctors will suggest it but that's out dated information and many doctors are wrong. Our doctor said absolutely no solids before six months only breast milk, weight and height is irrelevant to the development of their intestinal tract.



http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids...

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Jannah - posted on 08/11/2010

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Mines almost 10 mos an he's still getting up in the night. He's teething too so tooth pain wakes him up as well. Good luck!

Melissa - posted on 08/11/2010

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I feel your pain. I have 3 children and am still in awe at the difference in when each started sleeping through th night. my 7 yr old was 2 weeks old when she started, my 3 yr old was just under 2 months old, and my 16 month old still is not sleeping all night. With him it depends on who puts him to bed at night, if mommy does, he will get up 2-3 times, but if daddy does, it is only 1 or 2. so i think that you just need to do what feels right for your child, yes there is some good advice here, but in the end it is what you think is best for your son.

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It all depends on the child. My 4 year old still wakes up at least once a night, but he woke up 6 times a night for 3 years!!! My 6 week old only wakes up twice a night though. There is no magic age or weight to indicate when or if he will sleep through the night. The best way to encourage him to sleep at night is to minimize interaction with him. I feed my baby but I dont talk or turn on lights if I dont have to and he goes back to sleep quickly. I used to sing and talk to my older boy and I think this made it more difficult for him to sleep.

Desiree - posted on 08/11/2010

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Yes, all babies are very different! When my son was 4 months he started sleeping thru the night from 7 pm till 7 the next morning! I was so excited to get some sleep. Well, now he is 8 months and wakes up twice a night wanting to play! And gets up for good at 530am! so ya, good luck.

Jocleyn - posted on 08/11/2010

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My daughter (3 1/2 months old) and she is getting to where she finally sleeps through the night. We noticed a change at the 3 month mark - almost to the day. She still wakes up super early, but it isn't that every 2 - 3 hour pattern we were doing nightly. Good luck!

Ashleigh - posted on 08/10/2010

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My baby girl just turned 2 months (12 lbs) on August 5th, and just recently started sleeping in her crib about 2 weeks ago. She now has her last bottle between 12-12:30am and then she sleeps until 8-9:00am.. its so GREAT! I started putting her in the crib during the day to get her used to it.

Adrean - posted on 08/10/2010

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when u make him! make sure he's really hungry or wean him off those night feedings. good luck

Tasha - posted on 08/10/2010

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perhaps if you feed him more oz per bottle and spread out the feedings to every 4 hours during the day it will help him sleep through the night. My baby girl is a week away from 3 months and she eats 5 and a half oz at a time every 4 hours and she sleeps from about midnight to 8 in the morning.

Merry - posted on 08/10/2010

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i would hate sleeping alone, and i would really hate crying alone with no means to get comfort.

Its a shame books are written that dont give babies the same respect that adults and older children have.

A cry is a babies only method of communicating and any book that tels you to ignore, postpone response to a cry is so wrong.

babies need our touch! when they dont get the emotional comfort they need they can fall into deep sleep which is when babies forget to breathe.

when they are unattended at night this can cause death. babies need our help, day and night. we shouldnt be stressing them out by letting them cry for us.

you know you wouldnt let your 7 year old daughter cry herself to slep so why should you be ok leting your infant cry to sleep?

Candace - posted on 08/10/2010

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Yeah, i feel your pain. My son is 9 weeks and weighs about 13lbs and is still up every 2-3 hrs as well. I want to say my first child (hes 5 now) started sleeping through the night sometime between 3 & 5 months old. I'm assuming' that this is your only child, if so just try to sleep when he sleeps and he'll be sleeping through the night before you know it.

Dallas - posted on 08/10/2010

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Yvonne, I did read the article. I would just like to say that to date my son has never been sick and has no food allergies. My son only eats organic homemade baby food, so I'm really not concerned with him getting obese. He doesn't drink juice, for the acids that rot teeth. I feed him iron rich veggies, so as of yet no anemia. So it is sort of a moot point for me, as he is 9 months now. Thank you for your concern, maybe another Mom will read this and get some information to take to her Doctor about this issue. :)



Oh and I read your post, I do agree that a child should choose when they eat. My son ate maybe half a cup of cereal from 4 to 6 months. I never force fed him. Mostly we just played in it, lol.

Theresa - posted on 08/10/2010

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My pediatrician said that at four months babies do not need to eat at night anymore and should learn how to take in their nutrients in the day time. He told me to be on the lookout for when my baby gets up to eat and only eats an ounce or two and then falls asleep. He said this meant that he no longer needed to get up to eat. So once my son did this, I began using the graduated extinction method in the book by Dr. Marc Weisbluth, Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child and when he would cry, I would time it and let him cry to see if he would fall back asleep. If he cried long enough that I felt uncomfortable, I would go in to his room and offer him his pacifier, his thumb or a pat on the back, but would not take him out of his crib. The book is great though it helped me. Best of luck!

Merry - posted on 08/10/2010

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but if we recommend the early solids and some baby wasnt ready for it then its our fault. lets just tell the recommended ages, and if thats not good enough for some specific child, then their dr will direct differently.
aap and who both say that breastmilk is all thats necessary for 6 months or more.

Dallas - posted on 08/10/2010

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No Laura, I don't feel personally attacked. I think you attacked everyone here. It is one thing to disagree with how someone is parenting, it is another to say they are doing things wrong. I used myself as an example, not because I felt threatened but to get my point across. As I am a parent who put her son on a sleep schedule. I have seen what it does to a child when the parent lets them pick the bed time. What it does to that child's school performance. I like to think I am setting my son and I on a path of health that can be carried into the years of school and work. When I am well rested, I am more alert, more patient, and I have the energy to really connect to my child. I am defending those woman who try and have that. Maybe they are making mistakes, or doing things I wouldn't do but their way isn't wrong, just different.
So perhaps you didn't mean to come off insulting but to me you did. You came off like anyone who puts their baby on a sleep schedule is doing something wrong or cruel.

You are now attacking me about drugs and sex? You have no idea how I feel about those things and has nothing to do with sleeping. Society is based around a work DAY. Not a work NIGHT. That was my point on helping my son conform to that one society norm. So he is better prepared when school comes along.

Dallas - posted on 08/10/2010

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Every doctor has a different view. Mine is great, my son is super healthy! He recommended rice cereal, nothing stronger, mixed with his formula. My son is right on target with his development as per the medical "charts". Also, how many adults were fed solids before 6 months and were fine? What I'm saying is when did every baby in the world develop at the same rate? Really, we all hit puberty at different times. So why do all babies develop at the exact same time? They don't. So I'm sorry if you have fallen into the growth chart, medical industries trap, that everything happens at a specific time, with every baby. If you were a Doctor, maybe I would feel differently. As long as you are happy with your doctor and your child is healthy. My sons doctor is awesome, and my son is doing awesome. So I will go with that and how I feel about my sons health over anything anyone else says. So no, my sons doctor isn't wrong, he just doesn't agree with you or your doctor.

Merry - posted on 08/10/2010

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Dallas, I dont even remember reading your post, and nothing in mine was meant for any one woman. I dont argue any ones specific method of parenting I was speaking generally as I read a LOT of comments and dont remember any specific names.



I never mentioned crying hysterically I said "unnecessary crying" meaning letting baby to cry when he/she simply needs human contact, nursing, or rocking etc.

No I dont thing anyone has to play with their baby in the midle of the night, I never said to do that. I said that babies need tending to at night, and if you are feding changing and helping him fall asleep that exactly what I was saying!! But if he is already out of his crib to be fed, I find it much simpler to just hold eric until he falls asleep. might work well for your son too.



But I will never force Eric to conform to society, just as I will never conform to society.

In society theres tons of bad things that I will be teaching him not to do drugs, murder, premarital sex, smoking, drinking, swearing, bullying, lying etc and if one of those things is expecting a 3 month old to not bother you for 8 hours then thats what I think is best.



No 2 moms are the same, but when it comes to health and safety I would think more moms would be diving into the studies and finding the facts.



So thats about it for my 'defence' as you have been quite attacking and rude. I was shocked, and I said so, I was not mad, or attacking, just shocked. So please dont try to turn this into some fight.

Dallas - posted on 08/10/2010

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Wow Laura. You don't know anyone here. Yet you have decided we are all bad moms because we choose to do things differently than you. I never said I let my child cry hysterically!!!!! Who here even said that? But my son will whine to get me to come play, if he is tired or not. If he is upset, I do everything, from feeding to diaper change to standing by his bed and rubbing his back, to help him out. I just won't take him out of his crib and play with him till 1 am. What is wrong with helping your child conform to SOCIETIES schedule? My son knows the difference between day time naps and night time sleep. Which is a skill he will need when I go back to work and he goes to school.



I also don't see anyone saying that they starve their children! If my son wakes up, I feed him, diaper change him. Do I play with him? NO! It's night time, which in my house means quite time. No play!



So as far as I'm concerned you need to check yourself! You took small pieces of someones time with there child and turned it into this grand case of child endangerment! I never assume people are doing harm to their child when they make a comment I may not agree with. I only hope they get correct information from their doctor on the health of their child.



Which I do! So please go be negative and preachy somewhere else!!!!!



Oh and FYI, solid food was recommended for my son at 4 months of age, because of his weight and height, by his DOCTOR! So there is no rule that you can't feed your child solids earlier than 6months. It's based on the individual child and their development.

Merry - posted on 08/10/2010

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i am shocked at all the bad advise given here!!!

oh my goodness its shocking that we are a world addicted to sleep pills and insomnia is rampant. we suffer from apnea and snoring.

you dont think that you are doing harm now, but all of this bad advise will cause your child problems down the road.

NO sugar water

No cereal in bottles

No unneccesary crying

No forcing your baby to adapt to YOUR schedule



we are moms and our babies didnt ask to be born. the least we can do is to be the adult at all hours of the night and do what they NEED



comfort safety security love warmth movement

these are NEEDS

babies arent robots that we can program to fit our wants.

we are the adults we should do them the very least effort and not expect a human wuith the stomach the size of a golf ball to wait 8 hours to eat!!!

and PS medically speaking 'sleeping through the night' means 6HOURS!!! not 8



wow I am so shocked by this, Im glad I know better then to listen to all of this.

Merry - posted on 08/10/2010

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here is an article by Kathy Dettwyler, she is a well known, and trusted source of info on babies and toddlers. This is her article about sleeping

"I am an Adjunct (semi-retired) Associate Professor of Anthropology and Nutrition at Texas A&M University, and I do research on infant/child feeding beliefs/practices both cross-culturally and from an evolutionary perspective, as well as research on children's health and growth. I know from first-hand experience that being a new parent is a difficult time of adjustment, especially when expectations don't match reality, especially when our culture has taught us that children should have certain needs/wants/behaviors and then our children don't seem to fit that mold. This problem of a mismatch between expectations and reality can be very difficult for new parents to accept and adjust to. Sometimes, some children can be encouraged/convinced/forced to fit the mold of cultural expectations, and they do fine. Othertimes, though they do eventually fit the mold, it is at the expense of their sense of who they are, their self-confidence, their view of the world as a safe and trusting place, sometimes, even, at the expense of their health or life. Probably nowhere do cultural expectations and the reality of children's needs conflict more than in the two areas of breastfeeding frequency and sleeping behaviors.

Human children are designed (whether you believe by millions of years of evolution, or by God, it doesn't matter) -- to nurse *very* frequently, based on the composition of the milk of the species, the fact that all higher primates (Primates are the zoological Order to which humans belong, higher primates include monkeys and apes) keep their offspring in the mother's arms or on her back for several years, the size of the young child's stomach, the rapidity with which breast milk is digested, the need for an almost constant source of nutrients to grow that huge brain (in humans, especially), and so on. By very frequently, I mean 3-4 times per hour, for a few minutes each time. The way in which some young infants are fed in our culture -- trying to get them to shift to a 3-4 hour schedule, with feedings of 15-20 minutes at a time, goes against our basic physiology. But humans are very adaptable, and some mothers will be able to make sufficient milk with this very infrequent stimulation and draining of the breasts, and some children will be able to adapt to large meals spaced far apart. Unfortunately, some mothers don't make enough milk with this little nursing, and some babies can't adjust, and so are fussy, cry a lot, seem to want to nurse "before it is time" and fail to grow and thrive. Of course, usually the mother's body is blamed -- "You can't make enough milk" -- rather than the culturally-imposed expectation that feeding every 3-4 hours should be sufficient, and the mother begins supplementing with formula, which leads to a steady spiral downward to complete weaning from the breast. Human children are also designed to have breast milk be a part of their diet for a minimum of 2.5 years, with many indicators pointing to 6-7 years as the true physiological duration of breastfeeding -- regardless of what your cultural beliefs may be. I can provide you with references to my research on this topic if you wish to read more.

The same is true of sleeping. Human children are designed to be sleeping with their parents. The sense of touch is the most important sense to primates, along with sight. Young primates are carried on their mother's body and sleep with her for years after birth, often until well after weaning. The expected pattern is for mother and child to sleep together, and for child to be able to nurse whenever they want during the night. Normal, healthy, breastfed and co-sleeping children do not sleep "through the night" (say 7-9 hours at a stretch) until they are 3-4 years old, and no longer need night nursing. I repeat -- this is NORMAL and HEALTHY. Dr. James McKenna's research on co-sleeping clearly shows the dangers of solitary sleeping in young infants, who slip into abnormal patterns of very deep sleep from which it is very difficult for them to rouse themselves when they experience an episode of apnea (stop breathing). When co-sleeping, the mother is monitoring the baby's sleep and breathing patterns, even though she herself is asleep. When the baby has an episode of apnea, she rouses the baby by her movements and touch. This is thought to be the primary mechanism by which co-sleeping protects children from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In other words, many cases of SIDS in solitary sleeping children are thought to be due to them having learned to sleep for long stretches at a time at a very early age, so they find themselves in these deep troughs of sleep, then they may experience an episode of apnea, and no one is there to notice or rouse them from it, so they just never start breathing again. Co-sleeping also allows a mother to monitor the baby's temperature during the night, to be there if they spit up and start to choke, and just to provide the normal, safe environment that the baby/child has been designed to expect.

Is this convenient for parents? No!

Is this difficult for some new parents to adjust to? Yes!

No doubt about it, the gap between what our culture teaches us to expect of the sleep patterns of a young child (read them a story, tuck them in, turn out the light, and not see them again for 8 hours) and the reality of how children actually sleep if healthy and normal, yawns widely.

But the first steps to dealing with the fact that your young child doesn't sleep through the night, or doesn't want to sleep without you is to realize that:

(1) Not sleeping through the night until they are 3 or 4 years of age is normal and healthy behavior for human infants.
(2) Your children are not being difficult or manipulative, they are being normal and healthy, and behaving in ways that are appropriate for our species.
Once you understand these simple truths, it becomes much easier to deal with parenting your child at night. Once you give up the idea that you must have 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep at night, and view these nighttime interactions with your child as precious and fleeting, you get used to them very quickly.

I highly recommend Dr. Sears' book on Nighttime Parenting [available from the La Leche League International Catalogue]. Our children's early years represent the most important and influential time of their lives. It passes all too quickly. But meeting your child's needs during these first few years will pay off in many ways in the years to come. "

that said, my son Eric is 16 months and he wakes 1-2 times a night. I expect this will continue much longer as that is normal.

Tara - posted on 08/10/2010

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My daughter is now 9 months and she is just starting to sleep through the night. When she was 8 months I would listen to the type of crying/ fussing she was doing then waiting to see if it would get worse or if she was just waiting to see if I would go in the room because she wanted to play. Now she has gotten used to it and starting to sleep through. When she was 2 months old, she was waking up almost every hour so I can understand where you are coming from! It takes time, but when he starts sleeping through the night, you will be the one waking up wondering if he is okay!

Krystle - posted on 08/10/2010

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Sleeping depends on your child's rhythms, not how big they are or how much they are eating, contrary to what a lot of people say.



My son was 17lbs at 3 months and still woke every 3 hours. And then when he was teething he'd wake up all the time, and now he's 1 and has a runny nose and wakes up all the time. What I'm saying is - there is always something! Honestly, before I had him, I'd wake up once or twice a night myself and need to snuggle my husband to get back to sleep! lol So I think it's natural for a baby to want some soothing too! :P



Some babies take a long time until their Circadian Rhythm get's to a more "adult like" state. While it sucks for Mommy, there isn't anything wrong with baby. I'd say, enjoy the quiet time you get at night together. He won't always be a baby - enjoy it while you have it! :D

Dallas - posted on 08/10/2010

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I really worked at a sleep schedule for my son. No fun time at night. It was diaper change, swaddle(up til 6months), bottle and bed. EVERY time he woke up at night, that was the schedule. He was sleeping 5 hours at night by 3months old. It really worked for me. He sleeps 8 to 9 hours know, from about 6 months on. He is 9 months now. The sleep schedule also really worked for the bed time tears. He knows that Mom or Dad will comfort or feed but he doesn't get to play. So he usually doesn't bother anymore, unless he really NEEDS something. Good Luck :)

Maria - posted on 08/10/2010

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You can count on him to sleep through the night when he is about 5. It's just how kids are. It gets better though, when they are older they will often go right back to sleep and not wake as often.

Halee - posted on 08/10/2010

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Every kid is different. Don't push it, he'll figure it out when he's ready. Enjoy it!

Michelle - posted on 08/10/2010

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My daughter is 8 months old, and she slept throuhg the night at about 6 weeks till about 6 months and then that was the end of that, now she is up twice a night.

Myetta - posted on 08/10/2010

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It depends on the little one. 3 of my 4 didnt sleep through the night until they were 18 months and they were bottle fed meanwhile my 3 1/2 month old who is exclusively BF has been sleeping through the night since 3 months. it will happen eventually

Stephanie - posted on 08/09/2010

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My son is like that. He eats really well before bed then wakes up a few times... i think its just being away from mommy too long

Tiffany - posted on 08/09/2010

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It all depends on your child. EVERY baby is different. I've heard of babies who sleep through the night the first night. My daughter is going to be 1 on Saturday and she still wakes up multiple times. My niece was 3 or 4 before she started sleeping through the night. The average is between 8-10 months old. Him waking every 2-3 hours at his age is perfectly normal. He's on a liquid diet, it doesn't take long for him to digest it and be hungry again. He will start sleeping for longer periods once he is to the age that you can give him more filling foods before bed.! Just hang in there hun. It will happen eventually :)

Haley - posted on 08/09/2010

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Good luck my daughter is 16 monthsand still wakes up on occasion. Not usually everynight, didn't start sleeping really good until 14 months.

Elizabeth - posted on 08/09/2010

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I would say there is alot more hope when he starts to eat solids that does make a difference but mine is 8mnths now and wakes up once a night and my oldest slept through the night until he ws a year old then started to wake up till he was 3yrs old so every child is defenitly different

Stephanie - posted on 08/09/2010

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I made my daughter stay awake from 4 pm to 9 pm. Then gave her a warm bottle. after that she would sleep from 9:30 to 5-6am. Started that when she was 2 months.

Sara - posted on 08/09/2010

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my son was the same way he didn't sleep through the night till around 6 monrhs and he wakes up at 6 to have a bottle then goes back to bed and he's 9 months now my daughter slept through the night at 2 months

Valerie - posted on 08/08/2010

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All babies are different but mine started to sleep better when I started rice cereal and baby food which is at about 4 months. Thats not far away for you so hopefully you get some relief soon!!

Angela - posted on 08/08/2010

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My son started sleeping through the night once he started sleeping in his crib in his own room, at about 3 1/2 months. We keep a night light on for him and we play this relaxing music for him quietly all night long. He usually goes to sleep after his last bottle for the night at 9:30pm then he wakes up around 6-7am. I was so surprised once we started noticing this pattern... I just assumed babies didnt sleep through the night til they were over a year old. (Thats what I heard from other moms) But looking on here, it doesnt seem all that uncommon when they are this young to start sleeping through the night! Good luck to you! Dont worry, it will happen before you know it. Enjoy these moments while your little one is this young! Time is flying by sooooo fast! (At least for my husband and I, it is!!)

Rachel - posted on 08/08/2010

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I agree with Amanda Hale and recommend reading "Babywise" and follow the Feed, Play, Sleep routine. At 2 months he is capable of sleeping at least 6-8 hours in one stretch. My son at that age was going down around 10, and would wake up once between 1-4 to nurse and then would sleep till about 6:30-7am. At 12 weeks I cut out his middle of the night nursing and when he woke up I went in and comforted him without getting him up, then went back to bed. He continued to wake up for a week, then was sleeping soundly from about 10-6. All babies are different but you have to help them to figure out that night is for sleeping and that they don't need to eat every couple of hours at night. It also helps to not let him go too long between feedings during the day and to make sure he has a full feeding every time and doesn't fall asleep halfway through. I would tickle my son's toes and talk to him to keep him awake through feedings. The book I mentioned has plenty of great ideas!!

Amanda - posted on 08/08/2010

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Mine started sleeping through the night at 1 1/2 months! Read the book On Becoming Babywise. It saved my sleeping habits!!! Now he'll fall asleep around 9, I'll wake him up and feed around 11 and he'll typically sleep until 7 or 7:30! Good luck!

Yancy - posted on 08/08/2010

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Try to keep him from taking late naps especially close to your bed time. Instead play with him and get him active so that he gets tired and falls into a deep sleep. My son was doing the same but those 8 hr sleep ventures that you once had are basically over. I also use to add rice to his bottle because there were times he would just wake up for a bottle and fall right back to sleep.

Jennifer - posted on 08/08/2010

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My daughter started sleepign in her own room and through the night at 2 1/2 mths. My son is almost 2 and is just starting to sleep through the night. Normally I've always been told "3 months/13 lbs." After 3 months they don't spit up anymore. Also they can eat a little heavier and will stay full longer. Try adding some baby cereal to the formula. It won't hurt baby but help to hold them over for more than 2-3 hrs. Hope it helps.

Robin - posted on 08/08/2010

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Is he going to daycare? My son started sleeping through the night when he was having more stimulation during the day. Try more outings during the day.

Lisa - posted on 08/08/2010

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my daughter didnt start sleeping through the night until she was 11 months. Shes 22 months now and is getting up at 4 in the morning then going to sleep and untill 6. When she first started sleeping through shed sleep 7-7

Robin - posted on 08/08/2010

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My daughter started sleeping from 9-3:30 when she was 2 months and by three months was sleeping from 9 p.m. until 8 a.m. so like everyone said its a total guessing game. It won't seem like long before he makes it all the way through.

Ashley - posted on 08/08/2010

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My 5 month old almost 6 month old daughter still wakes during the night. I normally just give her her binky and she falls right back to sleep but occasionally that doesnt work and i have to feed her.

Rachel - posted on 08/08/2010

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I've learned every child is different when it comes to sleeping through he night. I have friends that their babies came home from the hospital sleeping through the night or were just a few months old and started to. My son is almost 4 and almost never sleeps through the night! Not to scare you or anything! : ) I am expecting baby number 2 and I am praying this time around the baby starts sleeping through the night early! If not though you just gotta deal with it I guess. thats what I have done for almost 4 years! Good luck!

Jeanie - posted on 08/08/2010

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Your guess is as good as mine! lol Every baby is different. My oldest son was sleeping all night by 2 months. My youngest didn't sleep all night on a regular basis until he was 1 and drinking whole milk. Don't know if it was just a coincidence with the milk or not. Good luck!

Amanda - posted on 08/08/2010

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0

Not sure if anyone has suggested this, but if so then I am verifying what they suggest. I started reading 'On Becomming Baby Wise' when my son was 3 months old. The first night I tried it, he slept through the night (this is rare) but I've heard it takes a week or two for them to get into the 'Baby Wise' routine. I wish you the best of luck and will pray for you. It is tough! But you will get through it and it will all be okay (I used to think it would never end)

Shayne - posted on 08/08/2010

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1

my daughter is 3 and 1/2 months she sleeps through on most nights since i gave her solids. i know nurses tell u not to until 6 months but sometimes it is necessary, try a little farex in his bottle before u put him to bed this will put a lining on his stomach and keep him full longer. u just have to buy a larger teat so it doesnt clog up. it sounds like he has the same problem as m daughter and really likes his food lol.

Lisa - posted on 08/07/2010

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my son is 9months and still wont sleep through the night and teething on top of that. all babbies are different my daughter slept through the night at age 3 weeks

Elysia - posted on 08/07/2010

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sorry but it may take years. my son did for a little while then he began teething and it went rite back out the window, he is almost 17months old and has only in the last 3 weeks since having the new baby started sleeping through again (thankfully) but he may still get up at 5am some mornings and then goes back to sleep in our bed.

Tamara - posted on 08/07/2010

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my daughter slept through the night at 8wks old but my son who is almost 8mths still wakes up 2-3 times a night for a bottle and he eats like a champ

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