Hello everyone, i am new to circle of moms

Samantha - posted on 12/13/2011 ( 3 moms have responded )

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well i dont know how to start, so today i finally recieved the visit from our states family interventionalist reffered by our sons doctor. at the end of the visit she shared with me that she could see some deffinate signs of sensory processing disorder. he will be seeing a doctor for his hearing,and in a week an OT and OP including the lady i say today will be comeing back for at least four hours to do some testing. well anyways i did some research online and had notice my son has several of these traits swaying back and fourth all day, body slamming into the floor or myself,dosent like longsleve shirts throughs a fit when wearing them,plugging his ears to certain sound,and the big one he is two and dosent speak one word. there are others but my mind is going a mile a min. the question i had after looking is sensory disorder the same if not simular to autism or asperger? i know there are several different form of each disorder but i am confused? the lady i cant remember her name also metioned that i learn sign language for toddler to help understand him until he can talk, has anyone done that also?

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Samantha - posted on 12/13/2011

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Thank you Katherine, yes it did help...my son has never had eye contact with anybody,dosent respond to his name being called. He lines up his car toys and stacks the couch cushions on top of each other on a daily basses! He has never even said momma, and i am just dying to hear his little voice, and he walks on his tipee toes!:( i have looked up traits and symptoms of all three disorders and they seem almost borderline to me. believe me i am not trying to diagnose my son this is all new to me. i come from a family where my husband is a cna in school for nursing and my motherin-law is a nusre practictioner-board of director...so talking to them is like hey speak in layman terms.... but thank you again and i am somewhat patiently waiting come next wensday to see the out come?!

Katherine - posted on 12/13/2011

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Hi Samantha,

Welcome to Circle of Moms. You can have a sensory processing disorder without autism or aspbergers.
Also it's a great idea to learn ASL to communicate. ABA is also good for behavior modification and so is RDI (Relationship Development Intervention).
Always start early intervention, which it sounds like you're doing. DSM states the following for Autism for a child to be on the spectrum:

(I) A total of six (or more) items from (A), (B), and (C), with at least two from (A), and one each from (B) and (C)

(A) qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
1. marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction
2. failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
3. a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people, (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
4. lack of social or emotional reciprocity ( note: in the description, it gives the following as examples: not actively participating in simple social play or games, preferring solitary activities, or involving others in activities only as tools or "mechanical" aids )
(B) qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:
1. delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
2. in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
3. stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
4. lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level
(C) restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least two of the following:
1. encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
2. apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
3. stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
4. persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

(II) Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

(A) social interaction
(B) language as used in social communication
(C) symbolic or imaginative play

(III) The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett's Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder
For Aspbergers:

(I) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

(A) marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction
(B) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
(C) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interest or achievements with other people, (e.g.. by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
(D) lack of social or emotional reciprocity

(II) Restricted repetitive & stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

(A) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
(B) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
(C) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
(D) persistent preoccupation with parts of objects


(III) The disturbance causes clinically significant impairments in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

(IV) There is no clinically significant general delay in language (E.G. single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)

(V) There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction) and curiosity about the environment in childhood.

(VI) Criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia."

Hope that helps.

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