My son is 3 1/2 and was diagnosed with being on the autism spectrum. The neurologist wants a neuro psych evaluation, but the wait list is 18 months for that. I'm just wondering if anyone out there stressed out at the beginning of the process like I am. He's been evaluated through the school system and will be starting a special needs preschool in a week. I keep reading about all these diets, exams, doctors, etc and I feel overwhelmed. The neurologist told us our son was on the mild side and that the school system would help him adjust and he should be mainstream with a few minor

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Dusti - posted on 01/16/2009

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First, don't forget to stop and process what you have just been told.  Our son was 3 when he was dianosed.  We were shocked, it was not at all what we expected!  We were concerned with his eye movements and we knew he had a speech delay.. but we were blown away when the doctor said PDD-NOS and then devasted when we googled it that night and saw it was autism.  Our son is 8 now and it has been a long 5 years, but we survived!  I went through times of changes in diet, vitamins, doctors, questions, conspiracies, answers, and just plain old dealing with life!  The most important thing that I got out of it was the lesson ...."there is no finish line to this race"  Do not rush your family down every shining path that lights up before you believing that you have found the golden ticket.  Cry, be angry, and then get back to living again.  The scenary along this road is teh most important part!  Be mad and deal with your dissapointment otherwise you will be no good for your child.  I had to sift through piles of information, books, articles, doctors advice, friends advice.... and then finally, I realized that I alone was responsible for the care and treatment of my child.  NO amount of tests, vitamins, or specialized services was going to take Autism away from my home.  There are a lot of people out there that will try to sell you a miracle, be cautious and don't jump in without a life jacket.  Today, my litte boy is doing fantastic, he is in gymnastics with neurotypical peers he is fun loving, affectionate (he always was), he fights with his sister, he catches frogs and puts them in his pockets, tears his pants on the fence, and kisses me goodnight every night!  We have created a program for our home and family that makes sense and is the best for him.  Your life will adjust, you will have  a new normal... find a good friends (this may take awhile... but keep looking).  And don't forget to vent and bitch because life is unfair... but in the end, pull yourself together and put on your happy face because you are the only one who will care enough to make sure that your child gets everything he deserves!

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Christy - posted on 01/18/2009

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That is so true!! You do find a new normal for your life. You learn to weed out (as best you can) the things and people that aren't good for you. You learn as you go what they can and can't handle. I may have mentioned this book before, but 10 things every child with autism wished you knew is a great book. It isn't very techinical, very easy read and very enlightening.

Janet - posted on 01/14/2009

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I have a son who is also on the mild side of the spectrum. He was diagnosed by the school, and is in a regular ed classroom. I also stressed out, but soon learned that it is not productive at all. There is a bible verse that says, "Which one of you by worrying will add a single cubit to his stature." What good does it do when you think about it. Your son will still be your son whether you're in good spirits or not. So take each day as they come. You are right so much information, and you really have the heart to do what is best for your son. Try bits and pieces of things. If you want to try the diets they do work for some. But, if you have a son like mine, part of his autism bit causes him to be very limited on what he eats. He wants the same meal daily. So stress aside, I do my best to nourish the little guy, and thank the Lord he takes a multi vitamin. You will hopefully find that as your child matures some things get better as you learn to work with your child. If you find some useful information that you can use try it. Just remember yourself in the equation. These special little people are often more in tune with you than you think. If they sense you are unhappy, they feed on that. Take care of your needs as well. God bless...

Kerry - posted on 01/14/2009

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LOL i jsut remembered something we did with my son when he was young, we made it a game he called it "something for nothing" or "lets make a deal".



I would have to "make a deal" with him to try something new or keep behaviour under control in public.  "mummy will make a deal with you.  If you can keep your self under control in the McDonalds restaraunt, I will buy you an ice cream on our way home."  Each sentance was short and contained the IF YOU do this I WILL do that, idea. A win win situation all kids can see the benefit of.  LOL my NT used to trick me to play this game so she could have something special too.  she would go :"mummy if you give me fizzy pop, I will tidy my room"



win win, i get her room cleaned and she gets softdrink for a treat.  Yes and maybe bribing usuing food is NOT a good thing. I should have used going fishing or swimming something with no fat content.  It took me a lot fo years to see that thats what i was doing. I now realize its no reward to make them fat or give them bad ideas about food and its use!

Kerry - posted on 01/14/2009

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It is a confusing and hard time to initially learn what Autism means to your family, your social circle, and most of all to your child.  While waiting for a formal diagnosis do everything you can handle to help for future development as others have mentioned already.  If if the diagnosis is then negtive there is nothing that will do any harm!



Most helpful readings are those from sufferers of autism, Temple Grandin, Donna ???if forget her surname, Wendy Lawson.  Then of course the 'big gun' experts such as tony attwood and co.  Keep your diaries of your childs behaviours and things that have worked for each issue (very helpful in later years to look up when there is something that changes or returns), also helpful for when speaking with specialists.  Keep copies of all dignosis and specialist treatments (a lot  just for your own information so you can remember what you have and havnt tried), and also for schools so they can have a starting base to forming an IEP. ps i found that a lot of paperwork "walked" and the stuff i didnt have was important to have kept, so use the ring binder idea!



Most of all jsut hang in there and keep trying, it doesnt hurt to give something a go, dont be afreaid to be a little creative and non-mainstream in your parenting ideas, with interesting children its what works that counts.  Bribery is always a good thing (its basically the same idea as rewards, just more instant) an instant reward ALWAYS works.  eg "Johnny as soon as you put on your Yard clothes, you may wash the dog" short and consice wording without too many commands within one instruction.  K.I.S.S. works for a lot of situations and our guys are no exception (Keep it simple). good luck and remember you are NOT alone.



 

Kara - posted on 01/14/2009

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We just recently went through the same thing. We live in NC. I was reading a book that recommended a neurological work up. I got my pediatrician to send the referral. The neuro office called me and told me it would be 9 months to see the Autism specialist. I asked why do I need to see a specialist when I am needing the initial assessment. She said he specializes in medications for children with autism, I explained he doesn't need any medicates, just a neuroligical workup. I was in the next week. Any pediatric neurologist can perform the workup. Ours consisted of an EEG to check for seizures, MRI of his brain (for any abnormalities that might be causing him to have Autism), and lab work (checking for Fragile X syndrome, thyroid, any thing abnormal that might be causing Autism). Make sure they know you can meet with anyone.

The thing is, his treatment plan won't change at all once you find out the results. You still need to get him started on Occupational and Speech therapy ASAP. The great thing is that once you've been showed how to work with him, you will be able to help him at home.

Where do you live?

Luckily, I am 20 minutes away from TEACCH. TEACCH is a program strictly for Autism and their services are 100% free. People come from all over the US to work with them. My son was diagnosed in March, right when he turned 2. His major problem area is communciation. He doesn't talk yet or intiate conversation, but he has made a lot of progress.

The best advise I have for you is to find a SLP and OT to work with him. You will need to make appointments for an evaluation and then proceed once or twice a week. Early intervention and consistentcy are the key.

it is very overwhelming. i am still overwhelmed. I have read a few very informational books. I'll list them for you.

Most helpful Facing Autism by Lynn M. Hamilton, The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz, and Parent's Guide To Sensory Integration Disorder by Teri Mauro.

The first book tells you what you need to do and in what order, must read for right now. the other 2 books help you understand how his little mind is working and what you need to do to help him succeed in life and how he learns different than children without Autism. I have a daughter who is 6. The way I have to teach him new information is completely different. Your whole world is changing, but it isn't as bad as it seems. You and him will be alright. It takes months to get your mind around the fact that something is wrong with your child, and the urgency to fix it. Love, God, and hard work is the cure.

take Care,

kara

you can call me at home if you need to 919-479-1627

[deleted account]

At this point, don't stress about the eval but do get on the list. More important would be to check your health insurance for rehabilitation benefits so that you can start ST, OT, PT, social groups as appropriate for your son. Also read up on the symptoms that many moms report before starting the GFCF diet. It was extremely helpful for my child, and he's been on it for more than 10 years. He self-restricts his diet too, b/c he knows it makes him ill and dysfunctional to cheat. Finally, hang in there. These early stages with the endless to do lists are exhausting and nerve-wracking. It does get better as you see some of your hard work pay off in your progressing child. Good luck.

User - posted on 01/14/2009

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I am very excited for my little guy to start the special needs pre school.  He has PDD NOS, but without the social "marker" they will not give him an autism diagnosis, so I know he will take off in school.   He loves people and loves to learn, but has very little speech, has many stims, and can't sit still for a split second unless its to focus on his favorite things, shapes, numbers and drums.  He starts the week after his third birthday.  i do worry the GFCF diet will be hard to enforce once hes in that classroom.

Lauren - posted on 01/14/2009

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Yes Melissa, unfortunately the beginning is the hardest to endure. Once you get the ball rolling things will get better. My son Jaylon is also 3 1/2 and he was diagnosed on the lower end of the spectrum as well. The best thing is that you are catching it early. I was very concerned at first (like any mother). I wondered where we would go from here and what was in store for us on the road ahead. Jaylon was diagnosed at 2 and within this past year, he has done a full 180 turn-around. He wasn't talking at first and now he is speaking. Even asking for things. Now we are working on his enunciation. Just keep the faith and remember that he needs as much love and patience as you can give him. These are extrodinary children. They are strong and intelligent. I cried the day my son said " I love you". There will be a day you cry too, and whatever it is, you'll never forget that feeling of accomplishment and believe it or not, neither will your son! :-)



Jaylon sees a speech therapist and behavioralist 3 times a week, He is also enrolled in a special school for autism and the Head Start program. I personally think it is important to cater to his special needs, but also to involve him in mainstream learning simultaneously (even if it's daycare once or more a week). This will help him learn where he is lacking and still expand his already developed skills as well. I wish you the best!

User - posted on 01/14/2009

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Thanks to everyone!  I'm so overwhelmed with all the responses and so GREATFUL!  I didn't know if anyone would reach out to my post.  Everyone had something for me to take from and I appreciate that.  Thank you all so much!  Now I have a place to post all my questions : ).

[deleted account]

Yes, I was completely overwhelmed. For a few years actually. Autism Speaks has a kit for parents of children that have been recently diagnosed with autism. You can go to autismspeaks.org and look for the 100 Day Kit.

My personal advice is to relax and enjoy your child. Help him make the most of his strengths. You will begin to notice them if you haven't already. He will most likely find his niche in the world and be fine. Give him love in ways that he is able to accept it and accept his love in ways that he is able to give it. Remember that no one knows your child like you do. Use your instincts and you'll be fine. Take care.

Jennifer - posted on 01/14/2009

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One more thing that I have found extremely helpful when it comes to school age, is right now you need a notebook or a file where you keep EVERYTHING that pertains to his problems...dr. visits, notes from teachers, report cards (even from preschool) anything that demonstrates his capabilities and his weaknesses as well as any any recommendations by the dr/specialists.  I even went through all of our baby video and made a CD of snippets of his life where I thought he wasn't developing just to have "proof" of what I was saying. Everyone who I share this notebook with is glad because it gives them a better insight into Josh and who he is. Because honestly they may see him for 30 minutes to an hour and without additional information, they can only base their assessment on what they see. 

Wendi - posted on 01/14/2009

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One more suggestion on Doctors appointments.  When making the appointment always ask to be put on the cancelation list.  Most offices have one it doesn't hurt to ask.  This way when someone cancels their appointment they start calling people on the list.  You might get in sooner than expect.

Christy - posted on 01/14/2009

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Another good book I found was "10 things every child with autism wished you knew"  this may not be the exact title, it has been a while but it should be close.



A great support staff in a school will make or break your child. Be as involved in the school as you possibly can. I can promise this makes a huge difference. Don't be shy about. They want the best for your child like you do. The more info you can give them to help with what sets off meltdowns, what you have found to work to help him out, they need info like this.



But just remember our children were given to us for a reason. I believe Rob was given to me to teach me there is more out there than meets the eye. He has so many layers. He is a great actor and comedian, even though he doesn't understand why it is funny and a great story teller, so detailed oriented. I can see him being anything. Yes, it will be harder for him, but I have to believe that we are giving him the tools that will help him succeed in life. Did I mention that he has a heart of gold? When he likes/loves you he comes up with things that will make you happy, not always we are sometimes a bit self-centered, but aren't we all?  At our gym, there was a lady there named Bonnie, she was the gm, he said it was his job to give her hugs. SWEET!



I'm thankful for him. I still get frustrated sometimes though, I think that is common.



 

Jessie - posted on 01/14/2009

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Its been my experience that even if the waiting list is years long, it never hurts to get your child on it. But in the mean time, don't sit around waiting for the Neuro Psych's diagnosis. Go ahead and get things running with services.



And yes, I was totally stressed out as soon as I called my state's early intervention plan. We really eased into therapy and it STILL stressed me out. Now I'm used to it, LOL!



My son is in the special needs preschool here in my town and its been extremely beneficial to him. The school first said the classroom wouldn't be appropriate for him because he is so high functioning, but they couldn't have been more wrong. It was exactly where he's needed to be and he's made wonderful strides socially.



I felt overwhelmed, too, at first at all the various therapies, interventions, supplements, diets, doctors, evaluations, etc. Take a deep breath and know that you don't have to research everything now. Keep a notebook handy and whenever you hear about a new doctor or a new therapy, jot the info down to keep for a later date.



Big hugs, you are doing great!

Sherry - posted on 01/13/2009

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Hi Melissa,



I have a 9 year old son who has been assessed at being a high functioning autistic boy. I have, like I'm sure every other parent raising an autistic child, researched autism and ways we as parents can help our children. I have tried changing my son's diet and had blood tests done and so forth. I didn't stick with the change of diet too long (approx 1 month) because it didn't seem to be working for my child, he started to seem more irritable and it was harder for me to communicate with him. The blood tests had also come back all normal. Every child is different. There have been lots of children that have improved tremendously with just a change of diet which is awesome. However you will never know what is going to work for your child and what won't until you try. I have also done alot of checking around on the internet and have seen programs on TV where some scientists and/or specialists have found that doing brain exercises, when practiced extensively and repetitively, can help re-wire the brain. There are special exercises that work all different areas of the brain to target specific characteristics that our autistic children struggle with. You can check out the website at http://www.braintrain.com/main/about_bra... this website can explain it far better than I can. We have not yet got this for our son, but are in the midst to see if we are able to receive funding coverage. We are planning on trying this for 1 year to see if it makes a positive difference in his life. Wish you the best!

Sarah - posted on 01/13/2009

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Trust me everyone feels overwhelmed at first. My son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS (mild) in May of last year and I still sometimes feel overwhelmed. It is very frustrating because you are going to want to try to do everything at once. You dont have to do everything at once. It is ok if it takes you a week or two to get everything set up. It is good that they diagnosed him early, because honestly the earlier the better. My son was 2.5 when they diagnosed him. A really good book to read, I dont know if anyone has mentioned this yet or not is Engaging Autism by Dr Greenspan. He is like the father of Autism. He knows like everything. It also gives helpful tips on how you can help your son with all kinds of different strategies and you can pick the 1 or 2 that you like best and run with it. I hope this helps.

User - posted on 01/13/2009

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This is a very difficult and overwhelming time. A few things. It should not take 18 months for a neuro psych - that is crazy! Is it the school system that is doing it? Also, in terms of all the different "treatments" out there....do as much reading as you can and do what makes sense and what you can afford. There is so much out there.....take your time getting through it all and join a mom's support group!

Wendi - posted on 01/13/2009

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Everyone goes through the overwhelm stages.  My advice to you is make a list of the things you want to do or try.  Then figure out which ones are the most important and put them at the top of that list.  Then you start at the top and work your way down checking off the things you have done.  I find this less overwhelming.  The other advice to you is keep good records.  Get copies of Doctor records, evaluations, school recomendations and keep them in a 3 rind binder with tabs that divide medical, school etc.  I found this to be my greatests asset because I always have all of his records in one place and  can find what I need quickly.  I also have a spiral note book that I document phone conversations (who I talk with, date, time etc).  I hope this was helpful.

Venetia - posted on 01/13/2009

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One book I recommend is Autism Answer Book by William Stillman. I found it to be a very neutral minded book.  Stillman himself was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Yet he has a BS in education. He also wrote several books on the subject. I ask you would rather read about it from some who is on the spectrum or someon who walks around hollywood claiming her son is cured of autism which is a disability. Also the first step is accepting autism as a disability much like a learning disability or down syndrome.

Linda - posted on 01/13/2009

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Hi my son is autistic but high functioning so provided he gets the right support put in place there is noreason why he should not be able to attend mainstream school. My son is now 11 and in secondary school but he was diagnosed at 51/2 we always new there was something not right. He also has the serve restricted diet because of the textures smells and appearances of food.

I think its good to read up on autisum but it is a very wide spectrum and it depends where your child falls on that spectrum to what his need are.

I am not saying that you will not come across any problems during his schooling you probably will as you are probably aware they are very challenging a times, you learn to deal and cope with the situations that arise.

So don't be alarmed by all that you hear

Good luck hope all goes well

Christy - posted on 01/13/2009

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he is also mainstream, pulled out for resource, which he thinks of as games and fun.



 

Christy - posted on 01/13/2009

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I think that Jennifer nailed it. My son also is mild. You wouldn't know that Rob has asperger's if you didn't know him. You would think that he is just spoiled and acts out when he doesn' t get his way. In this aspect, it is very frustrating. It is hard to watch him in social situations. We just went to his cousin's birthday party (bowling) where he had a meltdown because he didn't win. Not a screaming match, thank God, but still a "don't talk to me, You are making it worse" meltdown.

Jennifer - posted on 01/13/2009

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My son was diagnosed finally at 7.  No one could ever pinpoint the problems because he wasn't "enough of one thing or another".  He has been mainstreamed his whole life.  He has a tutor that he sees everyday for extra help with school work and an OT for working on his fine motor skills.  For the first several years of his life, he never played "with" other kids.  He always parallel played.  He always wanted to be around other kids but never knew what to do with them...anyways, I can honestly say that we just try to work with him the best we can and that there is almost too much information out there.  We went to a conference by Tony Attwood and it was fabulous.  He is an expert on it.  He has a book called "The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome." Also I found "The OASIS GUIDE to Asperger's Syndrome" by Patricia Romanowsku Bashe  helpful.  They both talk about the issues surrounding the disorder and things to watch out for and how to best work with these issues.  I think the most important thing to remember is that what comes naturally to us in the social realm does not come naturally to these children.  You will have to understand that common sense to them doesn't really exist.  They will need to be taught everything like you would teach them to read.  Its going to be very frustrating for everyone at times but that is just a small percentage of your interaction with him.  Get a support group of friends that you can lean on in the times when it seems overwhelming and learn to go with the flow.  The biggest gift you can give yourself and your children is patience and lowered expectations of success.  Its ok not to have as high of standards as you would think you should.  Anyways, I hope that you can sift through all the garbage out there and focus on what is most important...the happiness and well being of your son.

Gabriella - posted on 01/13/2009

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I would join the yahoo group for TACA now. Fantastic resource.Also, go to their website for lots of information www.TACANOW.org.



They just posted a basic checklist for us parents for how to handle things year by year.

http://www.talkaboutcuringautism.org/new...



I don't think it will cut and paste correctly but i am putting it anyway





Sample Child "To-Do Check List"

for Autism Spectrum Disorder

This document is a “sample” checklist to consider in planning intervention for a child affected by autism. Please note, the order and action items will vary by child.



This is only a sample. Please consult with your child’s development and medical team for what is appropriate for their individual needs.



For comments, suggestions and questions – please contact us.



First Year Second Year Third Year

1. Formal assessment and diagnosis: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

14. Omega 3 supplements! Cod Liver Oil, or Flaxseed Meal, etc.

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT



2. Ruling out medical tests: genetic disorders like: Fragile X (boys), Rhetts (girls), Landau Kleffner. Perform MRI & 24 hour EEG. 15. Get support & information!! Attend regular TACA or other meetings. 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel

3. Call ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) providers and get on wait list. Implement intensive 1-on-1 therapy program. 16. It is all in the POOPS: deal with the constipation or diarrhea

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.



4. Start the Gluten Free/Casein Free/Soy Free (GFCFSF) Diet 17. Remove toxins from water, bedding, clothes, etc. 4. Get involved in state & federal legislation efforts.

4. Get involved in state and federal legislation efforts – get family to help.

5. Find a DOCTOR for the long term! Perform baseline medical tests and necessary medical treatments.

18. Evaluate Glutathione! – try oral, topical then IV – with your doctor's help!

5. Continue social skills efforts with preschool activities. Consider social skills videos. 5. Continue social skills for advanced needs with local providers.



6. Remove allergens (from diet and environment) 19. Consider chelation 6. Keep learning your childs legal rights and get educated. 6. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.)

7. Remove additives, preservatives , and dyes from all foods. Go organic and clean diet. 20. Start Social skills development – with structured play dates at home 7. Get an Immune assessment consider oral IG, or IVIG 7. Eval alternative therapies: HBOT, neurofeedback, etc.

8. See an audiologist for a complete hearing evaluation. 21. Hire an special education attorney or advocate.. Learn your legal rights! 8. Consider listening therapies

8. Attend annual medical and traditional therapy conferences.

9. Encourage proper sulphanation with nightly Epsom salt baths

22. Understand health insurance coverage and reimbursements! 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. Or other diets SCD, BED if GFCF is not enough. 8. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others



10. Start basic supplementation and probiotics. 23. Get Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. 9. Continue, review and test other Chelation protocols.

11. Test for and treat YEAST (Go low sugar and low carbohydrates!) 24. Help your child obtain the 8-10 hours a sleep each night. 10. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.) 10. Evaluation if your child a candidate for full inclusion or mainstreaming in school?



12. Investigate & try the “Bs” – B6, B12, TMG or DMG or SuperNuThera. 25. Further refine diet: remove phenols, sacylilates, soy & corn 11. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others 11. Continue to receive respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact.

13. Fathers are important too! 12. Continue rec. Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. LAST RESORT: Consider pharmacology when medical efforts are not progressing.

13. If your child is 6 or older consider CAPD evaluation by an audiologist.



Vaccines



Should you continue to vaccinate your child that is affected by autism? Educate your self on vaccine options for your child and your family’s needs.



For additional information please review the following links:



Vaccine Choices



Greening Vaccines



Vaccination Guidelines



Seizures



Seizures can occur with a child that is diagnosed with autism more often than neurotypical peers. It is important to continue to evaluate if your child has had seizures throughout the treatment process.



For additional information seizures.

The autism journey isn't necessarily linear – some families will take two steps forward, one step back with their child - while still making progress.



This check list can assist in determining the issues and managing the process.





Sample Child "To-Do Check List"

for Autism Spectrum Disorder

This document is a “sample” checklist to consider in planning intervention for a child affected by autism. Please note, the order and action items will vary by child.



This is only a sample. Please consult with your child’s development and medical team for what is appropriate for their individual needs.



For comments, suggestions and questions – please contact us.



First Year Second Year Third Year

1. Formal assessment and diagnosis: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

14. Omega 3 supplements! Cod Liver Oil, or Flaxseed Meal, etc.

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT



2. Ruling out medical tests: genetic disorders like: Fragile X (boys), Rhetts (girls), Landau Kleffner. Perform MRI & 24 hour EEG. 15. Get support & information!! Attend regular TACA or other meetings. 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel

3. Call ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) providers and get on wait list. Implement intensive 1-on-1 therapy program. 16. It is all in the POOPS: deal with the constipation or diarrhea

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.



4. Start the Gluten Free/Casein Free/Soy Free (GFCFSF) Diet 17. Remove toxins from water, bedding, clothes, etc. 4. Get involved in state & federal legislation efforts.

4. Get involved in state and federal legislation efforts – get family to help.

5. Find a DOCTOR for the long term! Perform baseline medical tests and necessary medical treatments.

18. Evaluate Glutathione! – try oral, topical then IV – with your doctor's help!

5. Continue social skills efforts with preschool activities. Consider social skills videos. 5. Continue social skills for advanced needs with local providers.



6. Remove allergens (from diet and environment) 19. Consider chelation 6. Keep learning your childs legal rights and get educated. 6. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.)

7. Remove additives, preservatives , and dyes from all foods. Go organic and clean diet. 20. Start Social skills development – with structured play dates at home 7. Get an Immune assessment consider oral IG, or IVIG 7. Eval alternative therapies: HBOT, neurofeedback, etc.

8. See an audiologist for a complete hearing evaluation. 21. Hire an special education attorney or advocate.. Learn your legal rights! 8. Consider listening therapies

8. Attend annual medical and traditional therapy conferences.

9. Encourage proper sulphanation with nightly Epsom salt baths

22. Understand health insurance coverage and reimbursements! 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. Or other diets SCD, BED if GFCF is not enough. 8. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others



10. Start basic supplementation and probiotics. 23. Get Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. 9. Continue, review and test other Chelation protocols.

11. Test for and treat YEAST (Go low sugar and low carbohydrates!) 24. Help your child obtain the 8-10 hours a sleep each night. 10. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.) 10. Evaluation if your child a candidate for full inclusion or mainstreaming in school?



12. Investigate & try the “Bs” – B6, B12, TMG or DMG or SuperNuThera. 25. Further refine diet: remove phenols, sacylilates, soy & corn 11. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others 11. Continue to receive respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact.

13. Fathers are important too! 12. Continue rec. Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. LAST RESORT: Consider pharmacology when medical efforts are not progressing.

13. If your child is 6 or older consider CAPD evaluation by an audiologist.



Vaccines



Should you continue to vaccinate your child that is affected by autism? Educate your self on vaccine options for your child and your family’s needs.



For additional information please review the following links:



Vaccine Choices



Greening Vaccines



Vaccination Guidelines



Seizures



Seizures can occur with a child that is diagnosed with autism more often than neurotypical peers. It is important to continue to evaluate if your child has had seizures throughout the treatment process.



For additional information seizures.

The autism journey isn't necessarily linear – some families will take two steps forward, one step back with their child - while still making progress.



This check list can assist in determining the issues and managing the process.





Sample Child "To-Do Check List"

for Autism Spectrum Disorder

This document is a “sample” checklist to consider in planning intervention for a child affected by autism. Please note, the order and action items will vary by child.



This is only a sample. Please consult with your child’s development and medical team for what is appropriate for their individual needs.



For comments, suggestions and questions – please contact us.



First Year Second Year Third Year

1. Formal assessment and diagnosis: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

14. Omega 3 supplements! Cod Liver Oil, or Flaxseed Meal, etc.

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT

1. Perform annual assessments: neurologist, behaviorist, speech & OT



2. Ruling out medical tests: genetic disorders like: Fragile X (boys), Rhetts (girls), Landau Kleffner. Perform MRI & 24 hour EEG. 15. Get support & information!! Attend regular TACA or other meetings. 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel 2. Perform annual medical tests: Compreh. Stool test, RBC, Toxic metals and allergy panel

3. Call ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) providers and get on wait list. Implement intensive 1-on-1 therapy program. 16. It is all in the POOPS: deal with the constipation or diarrhea

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.

3. Evaluate all medical and traditional therapy options for their efficacy.



4. Start the Gluten Free/Casein Free/Soy Free (GFCFSF) Diet 17. Remove toxins from water, bedding, clothes, etc. 4. Get involved in state & federal legislation efforts.

4. Get involved in state and federal legislation efforts – get family to help.

5. Find a DOCTOR for the long term! Perform baseline medical tests and necessary medical treatments.

18. Evaluate Glutathione! – try oral, topical then IV – with your doctor's help!

5. Continue social skills efforts with preschool activities. Consider social skills videos. 5. Continue social skills for advanced needs with local providers.



6. Remove allergens (from diet and environment) 19. Consider chelation 6. Keep learning your childs legal rights and get educated. 6. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.)

7. Remove additives, preservatives , and dyes from all foods. Go organic and clean diet. 20. Start Social skills development – with structured play dates at home 7. Get an Immune assessment consider oral IG, or IVIG 7. Eval alternative therapies: HBOT, neurofeedback, etc.

8. See an audiologist for a complete hearing evaluation. 21. Hire an special education attorney or advocate.. Learn your legal rights! 8. Consider listening therapies

8. Attend annual medical and traditional therapy conferences.

9. Encourage proper sulphanation with nightly Epsom salt baths

22. Understand health insurance coverage and reimbursements! 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. Or other diets SCD, BED if GFCF is not enough. 8. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others



10. Start basic supplementation and probiotics. 23. Get Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. 9. Consider a rotation diet to prevent future allergies. 9. Continue, review and test other Chelation protocols.

11. Test for and treat YEAST (Go low sugar and low carbohydrates!) 24. Help your child obtain the 8-10 hours a sleep each night. 10. Refine supplements: take supplement vacations. Change brands of supplements as needed (i.e., rotate probiotics.) 10. Evaluation if your child a candidate for full inclusion or mainstreaming in school?



12. Investigate & try the “Bs” – B6, B12, TMG or DMG or SuperNuThera. 25. Further refine diet: remove phenols, sacylilates, soy & corn 11. Continue education: DAN! Conferences and others 11. Continue to receive respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact.

13. Fathers are important too! 12. Continue rec. Respite and support! Keep your marriage & family intact. LAST RESORT: Consider pharmacology when medical efforts are not progressing.

13. If your child is 6 or older consider CAPD evaluation by an audiologist.



Vaccines



Should you continue to vaccinate your child that is affected by autism? Educate your self on vaccine options for your child and your family’s needs.



For additional information please review the following links:



Vaccine Choices



Greening Vaccines



Vaccination Guidelines



Seizures



Seizures can occur with a child that is diagnosed with autism more often than neurotypical peers. It is important to continue to evaluate if your child has had seizures throughout the treatment process.



For additional information seizures.

The autism journey isn't necessarily linear – some families will take two steps forward, one step back with their child - while still making progress.



This check list can assist in determining the issues and managing the process.

Lindsey - posted on 01/13/2009

1

16

1

You should read the book Louder Than Words by Jenny McCarthy. She has alot of good suggestions on diet and vitamins along with a laundry list of specialist with books to read. It is important to not get overwhelmed but to take one day at a time. Easier said than done. If your son is on the low end of the scale there may be certain foods, diet and vitamins to try and see if that works as well as therapies. Don't give up trying to get him into see neuro psych doctor if you can get in to see another one try that. The more time it takes to get him in to see a specialist the harder it will be for him to adjust sometimes. Well good luck and best wishes!!

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